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MOD002247 Safe Civil Engineering Works

MOD002258 Safe Civil Engineering


Construction
Introduction to the Module

This Morning
The Book Plus Scheme
Who I am and what have I built?
About this module

Introduction to Civil Engineering


Project planning and control
BIM and BUM
How the civil engineer fits into it all

The Book Plus Scheme


Lilian Irving
John Smiths Bookshop

Who I am
and what have I built?

My Industry Experience
Over 13 years experience
Started as the site secretary
and worked my way up.
Site Planner
Construction Manager

This is Urbis
Now home to the National
Football Museum

My Industry Experience

GMPA PFI Project

16 New Police Stations over


Greater Manchester

My Industry Experience

Manchester University Place

My Industry Experience

Manchester Schools for the Future

Dr Fred Sherratt MCIOB MCABE FHEA

About this module


Safe Civil Engineering Works
Safe Civil Engineering Construction

Overall Aims
To introduce you to civil engineering processes,
technology and management.
To explore various aspects of commercial civil
engineering construction.
To ensure health and safety management is prioritised in
civil engineering.
To give you the skills needed to carry out health and
safety management processes.
To give you a real life example to work on for your
assignment.

Your Module Guide


Can be found on the VLE
http://vle.anglia.ac.uk/modules/2014/MOD002247/Pages/Home3.aspx

The VLE will be updated with:


Lecture Slides from each week
Useful documents and links
Discussions and tips
Assignment information
as the module progresses

Introduction to Civil Engineering

So, what is civil engineering?


What do we think it is?

The ICE says

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4B1
9Mdi6Mg

Civil Engineering
A broad profession

From site to project management to design


From infrastructure to construction to marine
Global opportunities
Big responsibilities!

Case Study: Crossrail


The biggest project in the UK at the moment is
Crossrail.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlo2JUSzHnQ
There is loads more on civil engineering stuff on
YouTube!
I have also put a link to the 3 part TV documentary
about the fifteen billion pound railway on the VLE.

Project Planning and Control


Why we plan
How we control
Project Parameters

Why We Plan
Construction projects are highly complex
Need to ensure resources:
Labour
Plant

Materials
Are used as effectively and efficiently as possible
Planning can be defined as the process of thinking about
future events, and selecting the methods to be adopted
so certain project parameters can be achieved.

Project Parameters

Time

Time
Quality

Cost

Quality

Traditional Parameters
The iron triangle
Theory: can only optimise 2 of 3

Cost

Sustainability

H&S

New Parameters
Two new additions
Theory: can optimise all!

Time
Most construction projects have to be completed within
a certain period of time.
Overruns can attract financial penalties (LADs)
The contract period is therefore critical in planning.
Early completion is not always beneficial - speed often
increases production costs if no financial gain for early
completion, this is wasted spend.
Optimum time management is to complete as quickly as
possible but at optimum cost.
Time is controlled by the programme of work.

Construction Programmes

Cost
The cost of activities (resources) must be considered in
relation to the time available.
Often time constraints will dictate the work method and
therefore cost.
Alternatively, the work method can be driven by cost,
which will therefore influence time.
Cash flow should also be considered, and planning can
determine the rate of spend and associated operations.
Cost is controlled by Quantity Surveyors.

Quality
Planning for quality can mean extra allowances in terms
of time and cost.
Time for correct sequencing of work methods can be
vital for quality production.
Work methods for higher quality can require greater
spend, which will also affect project cost.
Quality is controlled by setting benchmarks, carrying out
on site inspections and checks.

Quality Checks

Health and Safety


Planning for H&S should be an inherent part of any
construction programme.
Legislation requires work methods to be evaluated for
their risk (RAMS).
Risks must subsequently be mitigated where reasonably
practicable, which will influence the work methods
ultimately selected.
This will therefore also influence time and cost.
H&S on site is controlled by inductions, training and on
site inspections and monitoring.

Sustainability
A fairly new project parameter, sustainability can
influence both design and production methods.
Embodied energy of materials can influence their choice
and therefore work method.
Work methods themselves utilise energy and may be
influenced by the wider objectives of the project.
Seeking waste minimisation (both materials and energy)
can influence time and cost, as well as work method.
Sustainability is controlled by inspections and
monitoring, and formal processes like BREEAM.

Is Construction Planning an Oxymoron?

You cant accurately predict time periods


Resources are never available as planned
Materials are often late or wrong
Labour has little loyalty and can fluctuate
Variations change programmes
Reliance on the weather
But this means we need a plan even more!

Summary
You will learn more about planning and control in your
later modules.
Remember the 5 parameters of production and the aim
for optimisation, depending on client requirements.
Contracts how work is managed are very important
in project planning and control.
Civil engineers need to be aware of all the parameters
when they make their management decisions.
They are all connected and a decision on one can make
big (and sometimes unwanted!) changes to another.

BUM and BIM


Seriously?
BUM?
Yup!

Traditional construction thinking


Client Need
(Demolish,
Refurbish or New
Build)

Design

Tender and
Procure

Award
Contract(s)

Construct

Need
(Demolish,
Refurbish or
New Build)

Operate and
Maintain

Design

Project Life Cycle


Tender and
Procure

Construct

Award
Contract(s)

Handover

Buildability

BUM
Design

Construct

Operate &
Maintain

BUM stands for


Buildability
Maintainability & Useability
Useability
Maintainability
We no longer think of projects just in terms of their
construction.
Driven by clients:
Operating costs
Overall Sustainability
Change in the project information flow:

BIM
BIM stands for Building Information Modelling

It is the use of 3D modelling tools to build the project


virtually before it gets on site.
It demands collaborative working and information
sharing between all team members.
Other aspects such as time (4D) and cost (5D) can be
added to the model.
BIM software is developing all the time, most recently
using gaming platforms to enhance useability.

BIM in Action
BIM can be used to plan
and control all production
parameters.
It can model the finished
building operations.
It can also be used by the
Facilities Management
(FM) Team to manage and
maintain the finished
project.

BIM Drivers and Use


The UK Government has set a target of Level 3 BIM on
all its projects by 2016.
It has set up the BIM Task Group to help this transition
check out www.bimtaskgroup.org for documents and
videos.
Clients are keen on BIM the potential gains can be
significant in terms of cost and sustainability.
It brings the project team together to truly collaborate on
a shared model through a shared design process fully
aware of BUM of the project.

Industry Uptake
A fairly recent (2012) survey shows 31% of construction
professionals are now using BIM, compared to just 13%
in 2010.
80% have found BIM improves the co-ordination
process and 65% said it delivered cost efficiencies.
Still concerns of expense and time, particularly for small
businesses (but compare typewriters/computers)

Industry Uptake
Large contractors, like Laing
ORourke and Balfour Beatty, are
already using BIM on all large
projects, and helping their supply
chains keep up.

Laing ORourke have stated that


their use of BIM was key in winning
them the Cheesegrater project:
Multi-disciplinary consultants such
as Arup and Atkins have been
offering BIM services for some time.

How does the Civil Engineer fit


into it all?

The role of the Civil Engineer


Civil Engineers can be:
Site engineers
Project managers
Design consultants
Management consultants
An understanding of the wider project parameters is essential
to their work and decision making.
They need to work to the whole project life cycle operation
is as important as construction (BUM).
They need to develop the skills to use new technologies to help
plan and programme their work to optimum levels (BIM)

For example
Consider a multi-storey building.
The options for the structure are steel frame or in-situ
concrete frame.
Think about the parameters of production:

Time
Cost
Quality
H&S
Sustainability

What effect will the decisions about the frame have on


them?

Summary

In this Session we have


Found out about the Book Plus scheme
Found out about Fred, this module and what it will
cover.
Gained a broader understanding of the industry and how
civil engineering fits in.
Found out about project planning and control, whats
important and how its managed, lots more to read about
and research here (welcome to Uni!)
Found out some new terms BIM and BUM, again more
to read about here.

If you think of anything later, you can email me or launch a


discussion on the VLE if you think the answer will help other
students too.

Next, Tutorials
Civil Engineering Works (BSc and FdSc) tutorial

MAB007
11am-12noon
Civil Engineering Construction (BEng) tutorial
MAR104
12noon-1pm
We will be going through the assignment, and allocating
assignment groups so be sure to be there!