Anda di halaman 1dari 171

CK-12 PreCalculus Concepts Answer Key

Chapter 1: Functions and Graphs


Concept: Function Families
1.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1

1 2 3 4

-2
-3
-4
2.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4
3.

1 2 3 4

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1

1 2 3 4

-2
-3
-4
4.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1

1 2 3 4

-2
-3
-4
5.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4

1 2 3 4

6.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1

1 2 3 4

-2
-3
-4
7.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4
8.

1 2 3 4

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1

1 2 3 4

-2
-3
-4
9.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1

1 2 3 4

-2
-3
-4
10.

4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4

1 2 3 4

11.

, because is undefined.

12.
13. One difference is

| |
has a minimum value, while

doesnt.

14. The two graphs are reflections of one another across the line
15.
is not defined for all values of
real number.

because the square root of any negative number is not a

Concept: Graphical Transformations


1. Reflection across the x axis and reflection across the y axis.
2. Reflection across the x axis and a horizontal shift left 3 units.
3. Horizontal shift left 1 unit and vertical shift down 2 units.
4. Reflection across the y axis and horizontal shift right 3 units.
5. Reflection across the x axis and horizontal compression by a factor of 2.
6. Vertical stretch by a factor of 4, horizontal stretch by a factor of 2, and horizontal shift left 2 units.
7. A reflection across the x axis, a horizontal shift right 2 units, vertical shift down 2 units, and a vertical
stretch by a factor of 3.
8. Vertical stretch by a factor of 5 and a horizontal shift left 1 unit.
9.

10. (
11.

12. ( (

))

13. ( (

))

14.
15.

( (

))

( )

Concept: Point Notation and Function Notation

1. Vertical reflection across the x axis, vertical compression by a factor of 2, horizontal shift one unit left.
(

0
1
2

5
6
7

-1
0
1

-2.5
-3
-3.5

2. Vertical stretch by a factor of 2, horizontal compression by a factor of 3, and vertical shift up 2 units.
(

0
1
2

5
6
7

0
1/3
2/3

12
14
16

3. Reflection across the x axis, horizontal shift 4units to the right, vertical shift 3 units down.
(

0
1
2

5
6
7

4
5
6

-8
-9
-10

4. Vertical stretch by a factor of 3, horizontal compression by a factor of 2, horizontal shift 2 units to the
right, and vertical shift up 1 unit.
(

0
1
2

5
6
7

2
2.5
3

16
19
22

5. Reflection across the x axis, horizontal shift right 3 units.


(

0
1
2

5
6
7

3
4
5

-5
-6
-7

6.

( )

7.

( )

8.

( )

9.

( )

10.

( )

11. (

12. (

13. (

14. (

15. (

Concept: Domain and Range


1. (

2. ,
3. ,
4. (

)
)

6. (

8. (

5. (

7. (

)
-

9. Domain:
10. Domain:

(
(

) Range:

) Range:

11. Answers vary. Domain should be

) and range should be

12. Answers vary. Domain should be

) and range should be

-.
(

).

13. Domain:

3 Range:

14. Domain:

15. Domain:

16. Domain:

)
)
)

(
(

)
)

Concept: Maximums and Minimums


1. There is a global minimum at (3,0).
2. There are no local extrema.
3. Global minimum at (-/2, -1) and global maximum at (/2, 1).
4. Local maximum at (-, 0) and global minimum at (, 0).
5. There are no global extrema.
6. There are no local extrema.
7. There are no global extrema.
8. Local minimums: (0.4, -1), (2.5, -13). Local maximums: (-1.5, 22), (1, 0). Note: points are
approximate.
9. There are no global extrema.
10. Local minimum: (3, 0). Local maximum: (0.5, 9.5). Note: points are approximate.
11. A global maximum is the overall highest point on the graph, while the local maximum is the highest
point within a certain neighborhood of the graph.
12. Answers vary. Graph should show a global minimum, a local maximum, no global maximum (there
can be a local minimum).
13. Answers vary. Graph should have no global extrema, but both types of local extrema.
14. Local maximum: (-1.16, 36.24). Local minimum: (-4, 0). No global maximum. Global minimum:
(2,16, -18.49).
15. Local maximum: (-1,0). Local minimum: (0.22, -3.23). Global maximum: (2.28, 9.91). No global
minimum.

Concept: Symmetry
1. Even

2. Odd
3. Neither
4. Neither
5. Odd
6. Neither
7. Neither
8. Even
9. (

( )

( )

10. (

( )
( )

11. (

( ) ( )

12. Yes. If h(x) and g(x) are both even and f(x)=h(x)+g(x), then:
(

( )

( )

( )

13. Yes. If h(x) and g(x) are both odd and f(x)=h(x)+g(x), then:
(

( )

( )

, ( )

( )-

( )

14. There are some functions that do not have reflection symmetry across the y axis or rotation
symmetry about the origin.
15. If a function is even then it is symmetrical across the y axis. If a function is odd then it has rotation
symmetry about the origin.

Concept: Increasing and Decreasing


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6. None

.
)

7.

8.

) Note that points are approximate

9.

10.

)
(

) Note that points are approximate

11. Answers vary. Possible answer: A line with a positive slope.


12. Answers vary. Possible answer: A line with a negative slope.
13. Increasing:

) Decreasing:

14. Increasing:

) Decreasing:

15. Increasing:

) Decreasing:

(
(

)
)

Concept: Zeroes and Y-Intercepts of Functions


1. y-intercept: (0, -4); Zeroes: (-1,0) and (0, -4)
2. y-intercept: (0, -12); Roots: (-3,0), (1,0) and (2, 0)
3. y-intercept is approximately (0, 5), x-intercepts are (-2,0) and (1, 0)
4. Both x and y intercepts are (0,0)
5. Both x and y intercepts are (0, 0)
6. No y-intercept; x-intercept is (1, 0)
7. No x or y- intercepts
8. y-intercept is (0, 1); no x-intercept
9. Both x and y-intercepts are (0,0)
10. Yes, because there are functions that are undefined when x=0.
11. Yes, because there are functions with no real solutions when y=0.
12. The x-intercept of f(x) is called a zero because it is the solution to f(x)=0.
13. y-intercept: (0, 10); x-intercepts: (2,0), (-1,0), (5,0)
14. y-intercept: (0, -7); x-intercepts: (-1,0),(7,0)
15. y-intercept: (0, 5); x-intercepts: (5,0), (-1/2, 0), (1,0)

Concept: Asymptotes and End Behavior


1. There are no asymptotes. As x approaches positive infinity, y approaches positive infinity. As x
approaches negative infinity, y approaches negative infinity.
2. There are no asymptotes. As x approaches both positive and negative infinity, y approaches positive
infinity.
3. There are no asymptotes. As x approaches positive infinity, y approaches positive infinity. As x
approaches negative infinity, y approaches negative infinity.
4. There are no asymptotes. As x approaches positive infinity, y approaches positive infinity.
5. There is a horizontal asymptote at y=0 and a vertical asymptote as x=0. As x approaches both
positive and negative infinity, y approaches 0.
6. As x approaches negative infinity there is a horizontal asymptote at y=0. As x approaches positive
infinity, y approaches positive infinity. There is no vertical asymptote.
7. There is a vertical asymptote at x=0. As x approaches positive infinity, y approaches positive infinity.
There is no horizontal asymptote.
8. As x approaches negative infinity there is a horizontal asymptote at y=0. As x approaches positive
infinity there is a horizontal asymptote at y=1. There is no vertical asymptote.
9. There is a vertical asymptote at x=0. As x approaches positive infinity there is a horizontal asymptote
at y=0. As x approaches negative infinity there is a horizontal asymptote at y=2.
10. There is a vertical asymptote at x=1. As x approaches both positive and negative infinity there is a
horizontal asymptote at y=2.
11. There is a vertical asymptote at x=4. As x approaches both positive and negative infinity there is a
horizontal asymptote at y=1.
12. Because when
13. Because when

which is undefined.
which is undefined.

14.
15.

Concept: Continuity and Discontinuity


1. This function is continuous.
2. This function is continuous.

3. This function is continuous.


4. This function is continuous.
5. Infinite discontinuity at
6. This function is continuous.
7. This function is continuous.
8. This function is continuous.
9. Removable discontinuity at

, infinite discontinuity at

, jump discontinuity at

10. Removable discontinuity at


11. Jump discontinuity at
12. Answers vary, but should show ( ) has a jump discontinuity at
, and another jump discontinuity at
.

, a removable discontinuity at

13. Answers vary, but should show ( ) has a jump discontinuity at


, and another jump discontinuity at

, an infinite discontinuity at

14. Answers vary, but should show ( ) has a removable discontinuity at


at
, and another jump discontinuity at

, a jump discontinuity

15. Answers vary, but should show ( ) has an infinite discontinuity at


at
, and a jump discontinuity at

, a removable discontinuity

Concept: Function Composition


1. Here are the three graphs:
( )

( )

( )
y

x
1

-1
x

-2

-1

1
-1

-1
-2

x
-2

-1

-2

-1

-3

-2

-4

2.

( ( ))

|(

3. The negative y values of the original parabola have been reflected across the x-axis:

y
4
3
2
1
x
-1

-1

4.

( ( ))

(| |

5. The portion of the original parabola to the right of the y-axis has been reflected across the y-axis.
y
4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1

x
1

-1

-2
-3
-4

6.

,(

( ( ))

7. The original parabola has been reflected across the x-axis.


y
4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1

-1

x
1

-2
-3
-4

8.

( ( ))

9. The original parabola has been reflected across the y-axis.

y
4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1

x
1

-1

-2
-3
-4

10. Here are the three graphs:


( )

( )

-4 -3 -2 -1

( )

| |

x
1

-1

-4 -3 -2 -1

-2
-3

-1

-4 -3 -2 -1

-1
-2

-2

-3

-3

-4

-4

-4

11. ( ( ))

(| |)

12. The graph looks the same as ( )


y
4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1

-1

x
1

-2
-3
-4

13.

( ( ))

| |

14. The graph looks the same as


15.

( ( ))

( )

| |

16. The original square root graph is there, as well as its reflection across the y-axis.

x
1

y
4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1

x
1

-1

-2
-3
-4

Concept: Inverses of Functions


1. ( ) is shown in blue while

( ) is shown in red.

y
3
2
1
x
-3

-2

-1

-1
-2
-3

( )

2.

. It is a function.

( ))

( ( ))

( )

3.

4.

( ) is shown in blue while

( ) is shown in red.

y
3
2
1
x
-3

-2

-1

1
-1
-2
-3

5.

( )

for

( ))

( ( ))

6.

( )

7.

( ) is shown in blue while

( ) is shown in red.

y
3
2
1
x
-3

-2

-1

-1
-2
-3

| | and is not a function.

8. The inverse is

9. You can see from the graph that they are inverses because they are symmetrical across the line y=x.
10. ( ) is shown in blue while

( ) is shown in red.

y
3
2
1
x
-3

-2

-1

-1
-2
-3

11.
12. (

( )
( ))

13. It is not:

. It is a function.
.

( ( ))

y
3
2
1
x
-3

-2

-1

-1
-2
-3
14. No. The inverse of ( ) is

( )

15. You could switch the x and y coordinates given in the original table to make the table for the
inverse.

Chapter 2: Polynomials and Rational Functions


Concept: Factoring Review
1. (

)(

2. (

)(

3. (

)(

4. (

)
)(

)(

5. (

)(

6.

)(

)(

)(

7.

)(

)(

)(

8. .

/.

9. (

)(

/
)(

)(

) or .

10.

)(

)(

)(

11.

)(

)(

)(

12. .

/.

/(

13. .

/.

/.

)(
/.

/.

/(

)
/

14. The degree is the maximum number of linear factors.


15. Some of the roots are complex.

Concept: Advanced Factoring


1. (

)(

2. (

)(

3. (

)(

4. (

)(

5. (

)(

)(

6. (

)(

7. (

)(

8. (

)(

)
)

9.
10.
11. The binomial will have a subtraction sign. The second factor will have all addition signs.
12. The binomial will have an addition sign. The second factor will have alternating addition and
subtraction signs, ending with an addition sign.
13. (

)(

14. (

)(

15. (

)(

16. (

)(

17. (

)(

18. (

)(

19. (
20. (

)
)

)(
)(

)
)

Concept: Polynomial Expansion and Pascals Triangle


1. (

2. (

3. (

4. (
5. (
6.
7.
8.

)
)

9.

10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Rational Expressions


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(

7. (
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

)
)

15.

Concept: Polynomial Long Division and Synthetic Division


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6. (

)(

)(

)(

7. (

)(

)(

)(

8. (

)(

)(

)(

9. (

)(

)(

)(

10. (

)(

)(

)
)(

11.
12.
13.
14. (

15.

Concept: Solving Rational Equations


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

or
(

6. No solution.

is extraneous.

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

12.
13.

is extraneous.

14.

is extraneous.

15. An extraneous solution is like a fake solution that you get when you solve the equation. It is not
actually a solution because it causes one of the original denominators to be equal to zero.

Concept: Holes in Rational Functions


1.
4. There is a hole at
5. There is a hole at
6. There are holes at

and

7. There is a hole at
8. There is a hole at
9. There is a hole at
10. There is a hole at
11.

or

12.

or

13.

y
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-4

-3

-2

-1

x
1

-1

14.
y
1
-7

-6

-5

-4

-3

-2

-1

x
1

-1

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9

15.
y
2
1
x
-2

-1

-1
-2

Concept: Zeroes of Rational Functions


1.

)(
/ .

(
/

)
(

3.

4.

5.

)(

6.

7.

8.

( )

)
(

)(
(

( )

11. Answers vary. Possible answer:

( )

12. Answers vary. Possible answer:

( )

13. Answers vary. Possible answer:

( )

14. Answers vary. Possible answer:

( )

( )(

15. Answers vary. Possible answer:

( )

( )

( )

( )

4.

( )

5.

( )

6.
7.
8.

)(
)(

)(
)(

(
(

)(
)(

)(
)(

)
)

(
(

)(
)(
)
)( )(
)

(
(

)(
)(

(
(

)( )(
)(

)
)(

)
)

10. Answers vary. Possible answer:

Concept: Vertical Asymptotes

)(

9. Answers vary. Possible answer:

1.

)(

)(
)(

)(

)( )(
(
)(

)(
(

)(

)(
)(

)(

)(
(

)(

)(
)(

)
)

)(

( )(

)(
(

)
)

)
)

)(

)(

)(
)(

)(

)(
(

)(

)(

9.
10.
11. Holes: (

)(

)(

12. Holes: (

)(

) Vertical asymptote at

13. (

14. (

15. (

(
)

). Vertical asymptote at

)
(

Concept: Horizontal Asymptotes


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

as x gets infinitely large and

8. ( )
9.
10.

( )
( )

(
(

)(
)(

)(
)(

)
)

(
(

)(
)(

)(
)(

)
)

as x gets infinitely small.

(
)(
)(
)
( )(
)(
)

11. Possible answer:

( )

12. Possible answer:

( )

13. Vertical asymptotes:


14. Vertical asymptote:
15. Vertical asymptotes:

(
(

)(
)(

(
(

)( )(
)(

)
)(

)
)

. Horizontal asymptote at
. No horizontal asymptote.
. Horizontal asymptote at

Concept: Oblique Asymptotes


1. An oblique asymptote is a slanted line that the graph tends towards as x values get very big and very
small.
2. If the degree of the numerator is exactly one more than the degree of the denominator.
3. No, because if the degree of the numerator is exactly one more than the degree of the denominator
then the function will not a have a horizontal asymptote.
4. Here is a sketch of the graph with the oblique asymptote.

y
15
10
5
x
-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1

10 11 12 13

-5
-10
-15
5. Here is a sketch of the graph with the oblique asymptote.

y
15
10
5
x
-8

-6

-4

-2

2
-5
-10
-15

6. No asymptote. Parabolas dont have asymptotes.


7. Here is a sketch of the graph with the oblique asymptote.

y
50
40
30
20
10
x
-15

-10

-5

10

15

-10
-20
-30
-40
-50

8. No oblique asymptote. Only horizontal and vertical asymptotes.


9.
10. No oblique asymptote because the degree of the numerator is smaller than the degree of the
denominator.
11. No oblique asymptote because the degree of the numerator is the same as the degree of the
denominator.
12. The backbone is the parabola
. There is no oblique asymptote because the degree
of the numerator is two more than the degree of the denominator.
13. While there are an infinite number of functions that match these criteria, one example is:
(

( )

)
)(

14. While there are an infinite number of functions that match these criteria, one example is:
( )

)(

15. Parabolas and cubics do not have oblique asymptotes. Only rational functions can have oblique
asymptotes.

Concept: Sign Test for Rational Function Graphs


1. Vertical asymptotes at

2. It will have an oblique asymptote at


3. Test

4. Here is the graph. Students are only required to sketch the graph near the asymptotes.
y
8
6
4
2
x
-8

-6

-4

-2

-2
-4
-6
-8

5. Vertical asymptotes at
6. Horizontal asymptote at

7. Sign test at
8. Here is the graph. Students are only required to sketch the graph near the asymptotes.

8
6
4
2
-8

-6

9. Vertical asymptotes at

-4

-2

x
2

-2
-4
-6
-8

10. Oblique asymptote at


11. Sign test at

12. Here is the graph. Students are only required to sketch the graph near the asymptotes.

40
30
20
10
-6

-4

-2

x
2

-10
-20
-30
-40

13. Vertical asymptotes at


14. Horizontal asymptote at
15. Sign test at

16. Here is the graph. Students are only required to sketch the graph near the asymptotes.

40
30
20
10
-6

-4

-2

x
2

-10
-20
-30
-40

Concept: Graphs of Rational Functions by Hand


1. No holes. Vertical asymptotes at
2. Sign test at

( )

and
( )

( )

( )

3. Horizontal asymptote at
4. Function approaches positive infinity as x values get large and as x values get small.
5. Zeroes at
6.

-intercept at

7.

y
3
2
1
-6

-4

-2

-1
-2
-3

8. No holes. Vertical asymptote at


9. Sign test at

( )

( )

( )

( )

10. Horizontal asymptote at


11. Approaches positive infinity in both directions.
12. Zeroes at
13. y-intercept at
14.

y
3
2
1
-6

-4

-2

2
-1
-2
-3

15. Here is the complete graph:

x
4

y
30
20
10
-15

-10

-5

x
5

-10
-20
-30

10

15

Chapter 3: Logs and Exponents


Concept: Exponential Functions
1. The independent variable must be in the exponent.
2. Yes
3. If
4. If
5. Exponential functions have one horizontal asymptote and no vertical asymptotes.
6. $14,595.29
7. $390,509.70
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

. /

13.

. /

14.

15. Because the y-intercept occurs where

Concept: Properties of Exponents


1.
2. 16
3. 4
4. -5
5.

and

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14. x=9
15.

Concept: Scientific Notation


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

or

8.
9.
10. 7.132094
11.
12.
13.

in a day;

in a year

14.
15.

Concept: Properties of Logs


1. False
2. False
3. True
(

4.

5.
.

6.

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
. Then (

13. Let
(

and

Simplify to get
and

. Solve for

. /

property and you have


. Then . /

logarithmic form as

. Since both

Use the exponentiation

which simplifies to

You can rewrite this equation as


. Since both

other.

Concept: Change of Base


1. 1.511

and you have

are equal to , they are equal to each other.

14. From the previous problem, you know that

15. Let

Take the log base b of both sides and you have

and

.
. You can then rewrite in

are equal to , they are equal to each

2. 1.131
3. 2
4. 0
5. 4
6. 6
7. 3
8. 0
9. 3
10. 2
11. 5
12. 24
13. 9
14. (

)(

15. Using the previous problem, (

)(

)(

Concept: Solving Exponential Equations with Logs


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1.293

11.

12.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Logistic Functions


1.

( )

2.

( )

3. ( )
4.

( )

5.

( )

6. 32
7. 8
8.

30
25
20
15
10
5
x

-3

-2

-1

9. 25
10. 5
11.

30
25
20
15
10
5
x

-3

-2

-1

12. 4
13.
14.

4
3
2
1
x

-5

15.

( )

where

10

Chapter 4: Basic Triangle Trigonometry


Concept: Angles in Radians and Degrees
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8. 210
9. 225
10. 270
11. 300
12. 180
13. 30
14.
15. There are 360 degrees and 2 radians in a circle. Therefore, each degree is

Concept: Circular Motion and Dimensional Analysis


1.
2. 0.25 feet
3.
4. 1.91 feet
5. 40.212 in/sec

radians.

6. 0.239 rpm
7. 5.14 mi/hr
8. 63.03 feet
9. 672.27 rpm
10. 62.07 rpm
11. 23.8 mph
12. 1008.41 revolutions
13. 377.0 inches/sec
14. 336.14 rpm
15. 188.5 feet

Concept: Special Right Triangles


1. The other sides are 3 and

2. The other sides are 7.2 and


3. The other sides are each

4. The other sides are and 10.


5. The other sides are and .
6. The other sides are

and

7. The other sides are 7.5 and

8. The other sides are and 18.


9. The 67.38 angle.
10. The side labeled 13.
11. The 22.62 angle.
12. 10 and

13. They are each

14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20. Answers vary.

Concept: Right Triangle Trigonometry


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

12.
13.

14.
15.

Concept: Law of Cosines


1. 94.9

2. 48.3
3. 36.8
4. You can use the Law of Cosines or the Triangle Sum Theorem
5. 97.9
6. 29.7
7. 52.4
8. 15.6
9. 86.0
10. 39.0
11. The Law of Cosines is the same as the Pythagorean Theorem for right triangles because
12. SSS and SAS
13. No (triangle inequality theorem)
14. No (triangle inequality theorem)
15. Yes

Concept: Law of Sines


1. Two triangles
2. One triangle
3. Two triangles
4. 47
5. 63.6 or 116.4
6. 58.6 or 121.5
7. 63.5
8. 17.4
9. 3.3
10. 5.6

11. 17.2
12. 14.2
13. 6.3<a<10
14. a<6.3
15. a=6.3 or a10

Concept: Area of a Triangle


1. 91.6 square units
2. 13.6 square units
3. 403.8 square units
4. 10.4 square units
5. 7.2 square units
6. 11.2 square units
7. 13.6 square units
8. 4.3 square units
9. 17.3 square units
10. 18.8 square units
11. 72.3 square units
12. 48.6
13. 41.1
14. 45.3
15. 22.9

Concept: Applications of Basic Triangle Trigonometry


1.

2. Find the angle in the triangle (complementary angles) and then use tangent.
3. 249.8 feet
4.

5. Tangent
6. 57.05 feet
7.

8. This is a right triangle, so you can use the Pythagorean Theorem


9. 6.32 miles
10.

11. Two tangent equations to solve for the distance from B to the building, then substitute to solve for
the height.
12. 9.8 feet
13. 5.32 in
14. 10.48 in
15. 10.35 in

Chapter 5: Trigonometric Functions


Concept: The Unit Circle
1.
2.
3. 140
4. 330
5. 315
6. Negative
7. Positive
8. Positive
9. Positive
10.
11. 2
12. 1
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

and

18. (Image from Wikipedia):

Concept: The Sinusoidal Function Family


1.

2.

3. At multiples of 2.
4. At values of (

) for all integer values of n.

5.
6.
7.

y
2
1
x
-3/2

-/2

/2
-1
-2

8.

3/2

y
2
1
x
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

-1
-2

9.

y
2
1
x
-3/2

-/2

/2
-1
-2

10.

3/2

y
2
1
x
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

-1
-2

Concept: Amplitude of Sinusoidal Functions


1. Amplitude is the value of a (it is always positive), that appears as the coefficient of sin or cos in the
equation.
2. Amplitude is the vertical distance between the sinusoidal axis and the maximum or minimum values
of the graph.
3. 5
4. 3.5
5.
6.
7. 3.12
8. 1
9.

y
4
3
2
1
-3/2

-/2

x
/2

-1

3/2

-2
-3
-4
10.

y
4
3
2
1
-3/2

-/2

-1
-2
-3
-4

11.

x
/2

3/2

y
3/2

/2
x
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

-/2
-
-3/2

12.

y
4
3
2
1
-3/2

-/2

/2
-1
-2
-3
-4

13.

3/2

y
4
3
2
1
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

-1
-2
-3
-4
14.

x
-3/2

-/2

/2

-1

15. The dotted horizontal line represents the sinusoidal axis at

3/2

y
5
4
3
2
1
x
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

-1

Concept: Vertical Shift of Sinusoidal Functions


1.
y
8
6
4
2
x
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

-2
-4

2.
y

x
-3/2

-/2

/2

-1

3/2

3.
y

x
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

/2

3/2

4.
y
2

1
x
-3/2

-/2
-1

5.
y
x
-3/2

-/2

/2
-1
-2
-3
-4

6. Maximum at 4 and minimum at -2.


7. Maximum at -2 and minimum at -6.

3/2

8. Maximum at 1.5 and minimum at 0.5.


9. Maximum at 6 and minimum at 4.
10. Maximum at 0 and minimum at -2.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Frequency and Period of Sinusoidal Functions


1. The frequency is 4 and the period is .
2. The frequency is 2 and the period is
3. The frequency is and the period is

4. The frequency is and the period is

5. The frequency is 3 and the period is

6.

y
4

2
x
-3/2

-/2

/2

3/2

-2
7.

y
x
-3/2

-/2

/2
-2

-4

-6

8.

3/2

y
-3/2

-/2

x
/2

3/2

-2

-4
9.

1.5
1
0.5
-3/2

-/2

x
/2

-0.5
-1
-1.5

3/2

10.

y
1
-3/2

-/2

-1
-2
-3
-4

11.

( )

12. ( )
13. ( )

(
(
.

)
)

x
/2

3/2

14.
y
10
8
6
4
2
x
3

12

-2

15.

( )

Concept: Phase Shift of Sinusoidal Functions


1.

4
3
2
1
-3/2

2.

-/2

-1
-2
-3
-4

x
/2

3/2

4
3
2
1
-3/2

-/2

x
/2

-1
-2
-3
-4

3/2

3.

4
3
2
1
-3/2

-/2

x
/2

-1
-2
-3
-4

3/2

4.

4
3
2
1
-3/2

5.

-/2

-1
-2
-3
-4

x
/2

3/2

4
3
2
1
-3/2

-/2

6. Possible answer: ( )

7. Possible answer: ( )

9. Possible answer: ( )

12.

( )

/2

10. Possible answer: ( )


11. Possible answer: ( )

/
.

8. Possible answer: ( )

-1
-2
-3
-4

.
.

/
/

))

13. 39.69
14. 28.67
15. 565.5 minutes (about 9:26 AM); 1234.5 minutes (about 20:35 or 8:35 PM).

Concept: Graphs of Other Trigonometric Functions


1. You can use

because

2. You can use

because

3.

3/2

y
5
4
3
2
1
-3/2 - -/2

x
/2

-1

3/2

-2
-3
-4
-5

4.

y
5
4
3
2
1
-3/2 - -/2

-1
-2
-3
-4
-5

x
/2

3/2

5.

y
5
4
3
2
1
-3/2 - -/2

-1
-2
-3
-4
-5

6.

x
/2

3/2

y
5
4
3
2
1
-3/2 - -/2

x
/2

-1

3/2

-2
-3
-4
-5

7.

y
5
4
3
2
1
-3/2 - -/2

-1
-2
-3
-4
-5

x
/2

3/2

8.

y
5
4
3
2
1
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5

9.

x
1 2 3 4 5 6

y
5
4
3
2
1
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-1

x
1 2 3 4 5 6

-2
-3
-4
-5

10.

y
5
4
3
2
1
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5

x
1 2 3 4 5 6

11.

3
2
1
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
12.

x
1 2 3 4 5 6

y
3
2
1
x
-3/2 - -/2

/2

3/2

-1
-2
-3

13.

y
3
2
1
x
-3/2 - -/2

/2
-1
-2
-3

3/2

14. Possible answers:

15. Possible answers:

Concept: Graphs of Inverse Trigonometric Functions


1.

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2

2.

1 2 3 4 5 6

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2

3.

( )

4.

( )

5.

( )

6.

( )

7.

( )

8.

1 2 3 4 5 6

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1

1 2 3 4 5 6

-/2
-
-3/2

9.

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2

1 2 3 4 5 6

10.

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2

11.

1 2 3 4 5 6

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1

1 2 3 4 5 6

-/2
-
-3/2

12.

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2

1 2 3 4 5 6

13.

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2

14.

1 2 3 4 5 6

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1

1 2 3 4 5 6

-/2
-
-3/2

15.

y
/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2
-2
-5/2
-3
-7/2

16.

1 2 3 4 5 6

y
5/2
2
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1

1 2 3 4 5 6

-/2

17.

y
3/2

/2
x
-6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-/2
-
-3/2

1 2 3 4 5 6

18.
19.
20.

Chapter 6: Analytic Trigonometry


Concept: Basic Trigonometric Identities
1.

2. Start with the graph of

. This is the same as the graph of

horizontally to the right , creating the graph of

). Then,

( .

/) shifts

3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8. -0.81
9. 0.5
10. 4
11.
12. If a function is even then its graph is symmetric with respect to the y-axis. If a function is odd, then
is has 180 rotation symmetry about the origin.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Pythagorean Identities


1. (
2.

)(
(

)
)

3.

)(

4.
(

5.
6. (

)(

)(
)

)
)(

)(

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Sum and Difference Identities


1.

2.

3.

4.

5. (

6.
7.
(

)
(

(
)

(
( )

))
(

( )(

)(

8.
(

9.

(
(

)
)

)
)

(
(

))

)
)

( )
( )

10.
11.
12.

13.

14.

15.

( )

Concept: Double, Half and Power Reducing Identities


1.

2.

3.

)
(

4.
5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.
15.

Concept: Solving Trigonometric Equations


1.
2.
3.
4. No solution
5.
6. No solution
7. Identity
8.

or

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15. Identity

Chapter 7: Vectors
Concept: Basic Properties of Vectors
1. Answers vary.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

which is point B.

9.
10.
11. NE at 10 knots.
12. Magnitude: 7.62
13. Magnitude: 5
14. Magnitude: 11.18
15. Magnitude: 10

Concept: Operations with Vectors


1.
2.
3.
4.
5. 11.4
6. 14.14
7. 22.36

9. 53.13
10.
11.
12. 17 miles
13. The bird is actually moving in a direction 28 south of east (62 east of south).
14. 50.6 miles per hour
15. 9 east of north

Concept: Resolution of Vectors into Components


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6. (

7. (

8. (

9.
10.

11.
12.
13.
14.

at 263.14

15. 16.9mph north and 36.25mph east

Concept: Dot Product and the Angle between Two Vectors

1. 24
2. 16
3. -14
4. 21
5. 34
6.
7. 56.3
8. 134.4
9. 8.1
10. 26.6
11.
12. The magnitude of a vector is the square root of the dot product of the vector with itself.
13. 0
14. (

Concept: Vector Projection


1. Students should show a sketch of the two vectors.
2.
3. Students should show a sketch of the two vectors.
4.
5. Students should show a sketch of the two vectors.
6.

7. Students should show a sketch of the two vectors.


8.
9. 20 pounds
10. 108.3 pounds
11. 461 pounds
12. 330 pounds
13. 25.4 pounds
14. 21.5 pounds
15. 43.3 pounds

Chapter 8: Systems and Matrices


Concept: Systems of Two Equations and Two Unknowns
1. (-7, 3)
2. (3, 8)
3. (8, -3)
4. (6, 10)
5. (3, 9)
6. (8, 2)
7. (10, -10)
8. (8, -5)
9. (0, 5)
10. (3, -3)
11. A system of equations has no solution if when you are solving you end up with a false statement like
0=2.
12. If a system of equations has no solution it means that the graphs do not intersect.
13. A system where the two equations are equivalents (one is a multiple of the other) will produce an
infinite number of solutions.
14. (2, 9)
15. (7, 1)

Concept: Systems of Three Equations and Three Unknowns


1. Intersect in one point; Pairs of planes each intersect in a line; Two planes are parallel and the third
intersects each in a line; All three planes are parallel; Three planes intersect in a line; Two or more
planes overlap
2. A set of equations is linearly dependent if one equation is a linearly combination of two more or
other equations in the set.
3. When solving, one of the equations will disappear. Or, you will notice that one equation is a linearly
combination of the two other equations.

4. four equations
5. (2, 7, 5)
6. Row 3=Row 2-Row 1
7. (1, 4, 7)
8. (-2, 0, 4)
9. The system is linearly dependent
10. (0, 6, -2)
11. (3, 3, -2, 0)
12.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Matrices to Represent Data


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6. Answers vary.
7. Answers vary.
8. A diagonal matrix.
9. 0

10. The rows represent the days of the week and the columns represent the weeks of working.
11. $124
12. $83

13. Fridays
14. Thursdays
15. No. The entries of matrices must be numbers, not words.

Concept: Matrix Algebra


1. 0

2. Not possible
3. 0

4. [

5. 0

6. 0
7. 0

1
1

8. 0

9. Not possible
10. They both equal 0

11. They both equal 0

12. [

13. [

14. [

15. [

Concept: Row Operations and Row Echelon Forms


1. Answers vary.
2. Answers vary.
3. Add a multiple of one row to another row; Scale a row by multiplying through by a non-zero
constant; Swap two rows.
4. The rows are linearly independent.
5. Answers vary.
6. The rows are linearly independent because reduced row echelon form is the identity matrix.
7. Answers vary.
8. The rows are linearly independent because reduced row echelon form is the identity matrix.
9. Answers vary.
10. Reduced row echelon form is [

]. Because there are no zero-only rows, the rows of the

original matrix were linearly independent.


11. Answers vary.
12. Reduced row echelon form is [

]. The rows of matrix D were not linearly independent.

13. Answers vary.


14. Reduced row echelon form is [

]. The rows of matrix E were not linearly independent.

15. Answers vary.


16. The rows are linearly independent because reduced row echelon form is the identity matrix.

Concept: Augmented Matrices


1. (
2. (

)
)

3. Infinite number of solutions


4. (3, 2)
5. No solution
6. (1, 4, 6)
7. (-3, 1, 5)
8. (2, 5, 3)
9. Infinite number of solutions
10. (3, 2, 8)
11. (5, -1, 2)
12. No solution
13. (-4, 5, 3)
14. (1, 6, 8)
15. (-3, 2, 5)

Concept: Determinant of Matrices


1. 2
2. -27
3. -4
4. 1
5. -22
6. -9
7. -89
8. 294
9. 8
10. -186
11. -56

12. 88
13. 124
14. 176
15. Only square matrices have determinants.
16. If the determinant is zero, then the rows are not linearly independent.

Concept: Cramers Rule


1. (
2. (

)
)

3. There is not one solution because the determinant of the coefficient system is 0. The rows of the
coefficient matrix are not linearly independent.
4. (3, 2)
5. There is not one solution because the determinant of the coefficient system is 0. The rows of the
coefficient matrix are not linearly independent.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12. There is not one solution because the determinant of the coefficient system is 0. The rows of the
coefficient matrix are not linearly independent.
13. (-4, 5, 3)
14. (1, 6, 8)
15. (-3, 2, 5)
16. Look at the other relevant determinants for Cramers rule. If they are also zero then the system has
infinite solutions. If they are non-zero then the system has no solution.

Concept: Inverse Matrices

1. [

2. [

3. [

4. 0

5. [

6. No inverse

7.
[

8.
[

9.
[

10.
[

11.
[

12.
[

13. Students should show that the matrix times itself equals the identity matrix.
14. Students should show that the matrix times itself equals the identity matrix.
15. A non-square matrix couldnt be multiplied on both sides by the same matrix because the order of
the matrices would not work. Therefore, for a non-square matrix there cannot exist just one inverse
matrix.

Concept: Partial Fractions


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

11.
12. Students should verify that the partial fractions sum to the original fraction.
13. Students should verify that the partial fractions sum to the original fraction.

14. Students should verify that the partial fractions sum to the original fraction.
15. Students should verify that the partial fractions sum to the original fraction.

Chapter 9: Conics
Concept: General Form of a Conic
1. ellipse
2. circle
3. ellipse
4. sideways parabola
5. hyperbola
6. parabola
7. (

8. (

9. (

)
.

11. (

12. (

13. (

14. (

10.

15.

Concept: Parabolas
1. (

2. (

3. (

4. (

5. (

6. (

(
(

)
)

7. (

8. (

)
(

7 y
6
5
4
3
2
1
-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
9. (

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

7 y
6
5
4
3
2
1
-14 -12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
10. (

x
2 4 6 8 10 12 14

9 y
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
11. (

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

19 y
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
x
1
-1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
-9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1
-2
-3
-4
12. (

y
15
10
5
x
-15

-10

-5

10

15

-5
-10
-15

13. (

y
15
10
5
x
-15

-10

-5

5
-5
-10
-15

14. (

10

15

y
15
10
5
x
-15

-10

-5

10

15

-5
-10
-15

15. (

( )

y
15
10
5
x
-15

-10

-5

5
-5
-10
-15

Concept: Circles
1.

10

15

y
4
2
x
-6

-4

-2

2.
y
4
2
x
-6

-4

-2

-2
-4

3.
y
4
2
x
-6

-4

-2

2
-2
-4

4.

y
8
6
4
2
-6

-4

-2

-2
-4

5.
y
8
6
4
2
-6

-4

-2

x
2

-2
-4

6. (

7. (

8. (

9. (

10. (

11. (

12. (

13.

14.
15. (

Concept: Ellipses
1. Vertices: (1, -1) and (1, -9). Foci: (

)(

). Eccentricity:

2. Vertices: (2, -2) and (-4, -2). Foci: (

3. Vertices: (2, 3) and (2, -1). Foci: (

)(

)(

) Eccentricity:

4.

8
6
4
2
-6

-4

-2

x
2

-2
-4
-6
-8

5.

8
6
4
2
-6

6.

-4

-2

-2
-4
-6
-8

x
2

). Eccentricity:

8
6
4
2
-6

7.
8.
9.

-4

10.
11.
12.
13.

-2

-2
-4
-6
-8

x
2

)
)

14. Possible answer:


15.

feet

Concept: Hyperbolas
1

. This is a hyperbola because the coefficients of

2. This parabola opens side to side.


3. The vertices are at (
4. The asymptotes are at

) and (
(

)
)

and

have opposite signs.

5.

y
8
6
4
2
x
-8

-6

-4

-2

-2
-4
-6
-8

6.

7. Opens up and down.


8. (
9.
10.

) and (-2, -2)


(

. This is a hyperbola because the coefficients of

and

have opposite signs.

6
5
4
3
2
1
-8 -6 -4 -2
-1
-2
-3

x
2 4 6 8

-4
-5
-6
-7
11.

. This is a hyperbola because the coefficients of

12. Opens side to side.


13. Vertices are at (
14.
15.

) and (

).

and

have opposite signs.

y
4
3
2
1
x
-12-10-8-6 -4-2
-1

2 4 6 8 1012

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
Concept: Degenerate Conics
1. Degenerate hyperbola, point, line
2.
3.
4.
5.

6.

; line
(

7.
8. (
9.

; Degenerate hyperbola

)
)

(
(

)
)

; circle

10.

11.

y
4
3
2
1
-12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
12.

x
2 4 6 8 10 12

y
4
3
2
1

-12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2
-1

2 4 6 8 10 12

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
13.

y
4
3
2
1
-12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
14.

x
2 4 6 8 10 12

y
4
3
2
1

-12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2
-1

2 4 6 8 10 12

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
15.

y
4
3
2
1
-12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7

x
2 4 6 8 10 12

Chapter 10: Polar and Parametric Equations


Concept: Polar Coordinates and Rectangular Coordinates
1.

2.

3.

4.

5. Possible answers: (
6. Possible answers: (
7. Possible answers: (
8.

) (
) (
) (

)
)
)

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7

x
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

9.

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
10.

x
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

9 y
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-9-8 -7-6 -5-4 -3-2 -1
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
11. (
12. .

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101112

13. .
14. (

/
)

15. (
16. (

)
)

17.
18.

Concept: Polar Equations of Conics


1.
2.
3.
4.

; ellipse
; ellipse
; ellipse
; hyperbola

5.

; circle

6.

y
4
3
2
1
x
-4

-3

-2

-1

1
-1
-2
-3
-4

7.

y
4
3
2
1
x
-4

-3

-2

-1

1
-1
-2
-3
-4

8.

y
4
3
2
1
x
-4

-3

-2

-1

1
-1
-2
-3
-4

9.

y
4
3
2
1
x
-4

-3

-2

-1

1
-1
-2
-3
-4

10.

y
4
3
2
1
x
-4

-3

-2

-1

1
-1
-2
-3
-4

11.
12.
13.

Concept: Parameters and Parameter Elimination


1.
2.

3.
4.
5.
6.

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-4

-3

-2

-1

x
1

-1

7.

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-4
8.

-3

-2

-1

-1

x
1

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-4

-3

-2

-1

x
1

-1

9.

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-4
10.

-3

-2

-1

-1

x
1

40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
-5

11.

x
5

-5

y
4
3
2
1
-4 -3 -2 -1

x
1

-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9

12. (

y
4
3
2
1
x
-4

-3

-2

-1

1
-1
-2
-3
-4

13.
14.
15.
16.

Concept: Parametric Inverses


1.
2. Function
3. Neither
4.
5. Inverse
6. Relation

7.
8. Inverse
9. Function
10.
at (

11. When

) and when

at (

).

12.
at (

13. When

).

14.

y
8
6
4
2
x
-8

-6

-4

-2

2
-2
-4
-6
-8

15.

y
8
6
4
2
x
-8

-6

-4

-2

-2
-4
-6
-8

Concept: Applications of Parametric Equations


1.

2. (

3. (

6. (

( (

))

( (

))

)
)
. /

7.
8. (

4.
5. (

. /

9. 172.7 feet in about 3.33 seconds


10.

. /

. /

11. (

12. 338.56 feet in about 5.63 seconds


. /

13.

. /

14.

;
;

. /
. /

15. Even though the two graphs intersect, the balls are not in that place at the same time.
150
140
130
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
-10

x
20

40

60

80

100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240

260 280 300 320 340

Chapter 11: Complex Numbers


Concept: Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
1.

( )

) (

) (

2.

( )

)(

3.

( )

) (

4.

( )

)(

( )

) (

6.

( )

)(

7.

( )

) (

) (

)(

8. ( )

) (

) (

)(

)(

) (

)(

)(

) (
)(

)(

)(

)(

)(

)(

)(

)(

) Roots are

)(

); Roots are
); Roots are (multiplicity 2)

(multiplicity 2)

) Roots are (multiplicity 2), 3 (multiplicity 3), ,

9.

( )

)(

)(
)(

) ; Roots are
)(

)(

10.

( )

)(

)(

11.

( )

)(

) (

)(

); Roots are 6, -1 (multiplicity 3), ,

12.

( )

)(

) (

)(

); Roots are 2, -2 (multiplicity 3),

); Roots are

13. The degree of the polynomial is the number of roots with multiplicity.
14. Multiplicity refers to a root that counts more than once because when the polynomial is in factored
form, the degree of its corresponding binomial is greater than 1.
15.

Concept: Arithmetic with Complex Numbers


1. 1
2. 1
3.
4.

5. |

yi

6. |

yi

7. |

yi

8. |

yi

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Trigonometric Polar Form of Complex Numbers

1.

3.
4.

5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
(

14.

)(

((
,(

15. (

)
(

)(

)-

((

)
(

))

,(

)-

))

Concept: De Moivres Theorem and nth Roots


1.

3.
4.
5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

yi

10.
11. a) 3 roots b)
c)

yi

12. a) 8 roots b)

c)

yi

13. a) 12 roots b)

c)

yi

14. a) 4 roots b)
c)

yi

15. ) 3 roots b)
c)

. /(

. /(

yi

Chapter 12: Discrete Math


Concept: Recursion
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8. 2, 5, 7, 12, 19, 31, 50, 81, 131, 212
9. 550
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
(

15.

Concept: Arithmetic and Geometric Sequences


1.
2.

3. 597
4.
5.
6.

. /

7.
8.

9.
10.
11.

12.
13.
14. Linear functions can be written in the form ( )
while arithmetic sequences can be
(
)
defined as
. The common difference in an arithmetic sequence is like the slope and
the first term of the sequence is like the y-intercept. The reason for the k-1 in the equation for the
sequence has to do with the fact that we start sequences at term 1 instead of term 0. One difference
between linear functions and arithmetic sequences is that arithmetic sequences are discrete (they only
exist at the specific values of the sequence), while linear functions are continuous.
15. Exponential functions can be written in the form ( )
while geometric sequences can be
defined as
. The common ratio in a geometric sequence is like the b value in an
exponential function and the first term in the sequence is like the y-intercept. The reason for the k-1
in the equation for the sequence has to do with the fact that we start sequences at term 1 instead of
term 0. One difference between exponential functions and geometric sequences is that geometric
sequences are discrete (they only exist at the specific values of the sequence), while exponential
functions are continuous.

Concept: Sigma Notation


1.

3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

8.
9.
10.
11.

. /

12.

13.
14.

. /

15.

. /

Concept: Arithmetic Series


1. 1128
2. 11016
3. 6885
4. 1584.3333 or
5. 1502.6666 or
6. 15652
7.
8. 116316
9. 3535
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Concept: Geometric Series


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6. Divergent
7. Divergent
8. Convergent; 10
9. Convergent; 18
10. Divergent
11. Convergent; 9
12. $202,840.40
13.
14.
15. The terms in an arithmetic series can never approach zero as they can do in a geometric series.

Concept: Counting with Permutations and Combinations


1. 840
2. 122391522
3. 22100
4. 84
5. 32760
6. Permutation/decision chart.
7. Combination.
8. Permutation/decision chart.

9. Combination.
10. Permutation/decision chart:

11. Combination.
12. Combination.
13. Permutation/decision chart.

14. This problem is more complicated because you are allowed to repeat. It is like a combination
problem (because order does not matter) where you are allowed to repeat.
15. Student should feel confident using the graphing calculator for permutations and combinations.

Concept: Basic Probability


1.
2.
3. There should be 8 total outcomes.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9. (
10. (
11.
12.
13.
14.

)
)

15. There are 10240 ways to have five cards in a row, but 40 of those ways are straight flushes or royal
flushes. Therefore, there are only 10200 true flushes. There are
total poker hands.
The probability is

Concept: Binomial Theorem


1.
2.
3.

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10. 512
11. 4096
12. 256
13. (
14. (
15. (

)
)
)

Concept: Induction Proofs


1. ) ( )

4.

2.

3.

)
is divisible by 6.
)

b)

( );

c)

; )

5. )
divisible by 3.
6.

b)
( )(

)( ( )

c)
( )(

(both sides equal 1). )


(

)(

)( (

is
)(

7.
Inductive Step:
Add 4 to both sides:
Logical reasoning
Combine previous steps:
Rewrite inequality:

since

therefore,
(

8.
Start with the statement
you are trying to prove is
divisible by 5:
Add and subtract
:
Look for common factors:
Simplify:

( )
(
)
Since both parts of the expression are divisible by 5,
the whole expression is divisible by 5.

9.
Start with the statement
you are trying to prove is
divisible by 6:
Add and subtract :
Look for common factors:
Simplify:

(
) ( )
Since both parts of the expression are divisible by 6,
the whole expression is divisible by 6.

c)

10.
Statements we know:

;
(

Reasoning:

(
(

Therefore:

11.
Start with the statement
you are trying to prove is
divisible by 3:
Add and subtract :
Look for common factors:
Simplify:

(
)
(
)
( )
Since both parts of the expression are divisible by 3,
the whole expression is divisible by 3.

12.

Inductive Step:
Add (

) to both sides:

Manipulate the right side:


Simplify the numerator of
the right side:
Notice that the numerator
of the right side that we
want is
(
)(
)( (
which simplifies to

13. You cannot find a base case to prove is true.

)
(
(

( )(

)(

( )(

)(

( )(

)(

)( (

)
)

)(

14. The base case is necessary for showing that the statement is true at least once. The inductive step
then shows that for every number the statement is true for, the statement is also true for the following
number. Because the base case is true then the statement must be true for all numbers. Without the
base case you havent proven anything!
15. Base Case: For n=3, the sum of the angles in a triangle is
geometry.
Inductive Step: Assume an n-gon has interior angles with a sum of

by the triangle sum theorem from


(

Proof: We want to show that the sum of the interior angles of an n+1 gon is
(
). An n+1gon will have one additional side compared to an n-gon. This means that one additional triangle can be
draw connecting exterior vertices. This logic is shown in the picture below.

The additional triangle adds another 180 degrees to the sum of the interior angles. This means an n+1(
)
(
)
gon has interior angles with a sum of
. This can be rewritten as

Chapter 13: Finance


Concept: Simple Interest
1. $4080
2. $2450
3. $2760
4. $5000
5. $3381
6. 50 years
7. $6666.67
8. 42.67%
9. 37.5 years
10. $7539.68
11. 28.89%
12. 14.44%
13. $2427.18
14. $8960
15. $15100

Concept: Compound Interest per Year


1. $1109.84
2. 7.39%
3. 7 years
4. $7884.93
5. 7.65%
6. 3.48%
7. 12 years

8. $4861.11
9. $97222.19
10. $294570.25
11. Estimate: 18 years. Actual: 17.67 years
12. Estimate: 24 years. Actual: 23.45 years
13. You would have $7000 with simple interest and $7401.22 with compound interest.
14. $13296.02
15. $16486.42

Concept: Compound Interest per Period


1. One month
2. One day
3.
4.
5.
6. $1110.64
7. 7.26%
8. 10 years
9. $7866.33
10. $330376.01
11. 7.44%
12. 3.43%
13. $13941.87
14. $4644.61
15. $93977.10

Concept: Continuous Interest

1. $1110.71
2. 7.13%
3. 6.689 years
4. $7866.28
5. 7.37%
6. 3.42%
7. 11.76 years
8. $4535.90
9. $90717.95
10. $331154.52
11. 17.33 years
12. 23.1 years
13. You would have $8160 with simple interest and $8599.98 with continuously compounding interest.
14. $6911.23
15. $12012.05

Concept: APR and APY (Nominal and Effective Rates)


1. 3.5%
2. 3.444%
3. 3.350%
4. 3.355%
5. 24.35%
6. 18.26%
7. 20.14%
8. 3.004%
9. 1.503%

10. 1.998%
11. APR stands for the annual percentage rate and is a nominal interest rate. APY stands for annual
percentage yield and is the effective interest rate.
12. Anytime interest is compounded more often than annually, the APY will be higher than the APR.
13. Anytime interest is compounded annually, the APY will be the same as the APR.
14. You want a high APY when you are earning money, such as from a bank account.
15. You want a low APY when you are borrowing money, such as when you use a credit card or take out
a loan.

Concept: Annuities
1. $409578.18
2. 9.14%
3. 6.77 years
4. $404.07
5. $861584.02
6. 45.4 years
7. 8.89%
8. $97484.35
9. $816.58
10. 43.13 years
11. $554494.84
12. $505126.50
13. $186703.40
14. 9.493%
15. $2162.63

Concept: Annuities for Loans


1. $26392.86

2. $884.98
3. 1.276 years
4. $10,575.34
5. $664.07
6. $18437.32
7. 26.18 years
8. $68,141.75
9. $60,510.05
10. $170.49
11. $21,682.35
12. About 20 months or 1.67 years
13. $198.77
14. $1108.86
15. $1138.33

Chapter 14: Concepts of Calculus


Concept: Limit Notation
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

. /

10.

11.

12.

does not exist


. /

13. The limit of ( )


14. The limit of

as x approaches 0 is -4.
as x approaches 1 is 3.

15. Yes, its possible as long as

does not equal positive or negative infinity. #6 is an example of this.

Concept: Graphs to Find Limits


1.

( )

2.

( )

3.

( )

( )

4.
5.

( )

6.

( )
( )

7.
8.

( )

9.

( )

10.

( )

11.

( )

12.

( )

13.

( )

14. Answers vary


15. Answers vary

Concept: Tables to Find Limits


1. 10
2. -5
3. DNE
4.

5. DNE
6. 9
7. -6
8.

9.
10. 5
11. -6

12.
13.
14.
15. DNE

Concept: Substitution to Find Limits


1. 10
2. -5
3. -7
4.
5. 3
6. 9
7. -6
8.
9. 7
10. 5
11. -6
12. DNE
13. 6
14.
15. DNE

Concept: Rationalization to Find Limits


1.
2.

3.
4.

5.
6.
7.

8. 8
9.
10.
11.
12. 2
13. 64
14. -144
15. If the function is a rational expression with a square root somewhere, there is a good chance that
rationalizing will help you to evaluate the limit.

Concept: One Sided Limits and Continuity


1. 104
2.

(the limit does not exist)

3.
4. 1
5. -1
6. 2
7. 1
8. 1
9. Yes

(the limit does not exist)

10. 11
11. 11
12. No because (

13. -3
14. -3
15. No because ( )

Concept: Intermediate and Extreme Value Theorems


( )
1. ( )
(
)
such that
because
( )
2. ( )
a such that ( )

and ( )
and ( )

because

( )
( )
( )
3. ( )
there must exist a such that ( )
4. ( )
because

5. ( ) (
such that ( )

( )

( )

and ( )
.

( )

and ( )

; therefore, there must exist a

( )
.

and ( )
because

( )
because

6. ( )
because

( )

therefore, there must exist


( )
.

( )

( )

therefore,

therefore, there must exist a such that ( )


( )

( )

therefore, there must exist a

; therefore, there must exist a such that ( )

7. ( )
because

( )

and ( )

therefore, there must exist a such that ( )

8. ( )
( )
because

( )

and ( )

; therefore, there must exist a such that

9. ( )
that ( )

because

10.

( )

and ( )

11.

12. False

and ( )

and ( )

; therefore, there must exist a such

. Therefore, there must exist a such that ( )


. Therefore, there must exist a such that ( )

because
because

13. True
14. True
15. Functions must be continuous over given intervals in order for the theorems to apply.

Concept: Instantaneous Rate of Change


1. The slope appears to be 2.
2. The limit is 2, which is the same as what the slope appeared to be in #1.
3. The slope appears to be 6.
4. The limit is 6, which is the same as what the slope appeared to be in #3.
5. The slope appears to be 3.
6. The limit is 3, which is the same as what the slope appeared to be in #5.
7. The slope appears to be 6.
8.

9. The slope at 0 is . The slope at is

. The slope at

is . The slope at

0.
10. The derivative of the cosine function is the negative sine function.
11. The slope is 2 at every point. The derivative of the function is
12. Distance vs. Time:

is 1. The slope at

is

280
260
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20

-1

Rate vs. Time:


y
80

60

40

20
x
-1

13. A tangent line is a line that just touches a curve. The slope of the tangent line at a given point is
the derivative of the function at that point.
14. Instantaneous rate of change is the speed at a given point. Speed is shown as slope in functions;
therefore, the slope of the tangent line will be the speed or instantaneous rate of change at that point.
15. We cant calculate a slope with a denominator of 0, but we can use limits to find the limit of the
slope as the denominator approaches 0.

Concept: Area Under a Curve


1. 176
2. 60
3. 8.79

4. 8.86
5. -0.33
6. -0.59
7. -0.72
8. The car is going at a constant speed of 25 mph for 3 hours and then instantly starts going 65 mph for
the next 2 hours.
9. 205 miles
10. The car accelerates steadily from 0 to 75 meters per second in the first 3 seconds and then stays at
75 meters per second for the next 2 seconds.
11. 262.5 feet
12. The runner increases in speed from 0 feet per second to 16 feet per second, then slows back down
to 0 feet per second.
13. The exact answer is
14. The integral of the derivative of a function gives points on the original function. For example, the
area under the curve of a rate vs. time graph gives points on the distance vs. time graph.
15. Integrals are areas under a curve. They can be calculated by finding the sum of the areas of an
infinite number of rectangles.

Chapter 15: Concepts of Statistics


Concept: Mean, Median, and Mode
1. Mean: 1.76, Median: 1, Mode: 1
2. Because there are two large numbers at the end that contribute more heavily to the mean, but
doesnt impact the median.
3. The median or mode would make the most sense in this case because they are not impacted by the
outliers of 10 siblings. Also, you cant have 1.76 siblings, so 1.76 siblings would not make sense as the
typical number of siblings.
4. 885
5. 16
6. 154 miles
7. 5
8. Mean: 19.2, Median: 19, Mode: 15
9. Mean: 7.083 , Median: 6, Mode: 5
10. Mean: 3.889, Median: 4, Mode: None
11. Mean: 69.75, Median: 88.5
12. Mean: 31.67, Median: 19.5
13. #12 because there was one number much larger than the rest in the data.
14. #11 because there was one number much smaller than the rest in the data.
15. In #11, 12 is the outlier. In #12, 98 is the outlier. If you were to remove the outliers, the mean
would be closer to the median in each case.

Concept: Expected Value and Payoffs


1. To calculate expected value, multiply the value of each outcome by the probability of that outcome
and find the sum of all of these products.
2. False, $0.50 is your expected average amount of winnings if you were to play the game many times.
3. True

4.

or 17 cents

5. 36 cents
6. They should charge people more than 65 cents (the expected value) to play.
7. 18.02
8. 81.3%
9. 70.5%
10. 93.0%
11. 79.5%
12. 76.3%
13. Answers vary
14. You should charge more than $1.15 in order to theoretically make a profit by the end of the night.
15. Answers vary
16. Casinos need to design games that people have a chance of winning, but that ultimately the casino
will make money off of. Expected value helps to determine what their profit will be on average for
each game and can help them to determine what should be charged for each game.

Concept: Five Number Summary


1. Minimum: 0.08; Q1: 0.18; Q2: 0.235; Q3: 0.27; Maximum: 0.32
2. Minimum: 77; Q1: 79.5; Q2: 86.5; Q3: 90.5; Maximum: 99
3. Minimum: 53; Q1: 79.5; Q2: 84.5; Q3: 92.5; Maximum: 98
4. Minimum: 51; Q1: 72; Q2: 85; Q3: 91; Maximum: 96
5. Minimum: 185; Q1: 220.5; Q2: 281; Q3: 363.5; Maximum: 518
6. Minimum: 33; Q1: 38; Q2: 40; Q3: 48.5; Maximum: 71
7. Minimum: 3; Q1: 6; Q2: 12; Q3: 16; Maximum: 21
8. Minimum: 6; Q1: 16.5; Q2: 26; Q3: 37; Maximum: 49
9. Minimum: 5; Q1: 9; Q2: 10.5; Q3: 12; Maximum: 17
10. Minimum: 49; Q1: 50; Q2: 53; Q3: 57; Maximum: 67

11. Minimum: 5; Q1: 18.5; Q2: 20.5; Q3: 22.5; Maximum: 24


12. Minimum: 620; Q1: 800; Q2: 850; Q3: 900; Maximum: 1070
13. Minimum: 12; Q1: 13.5; Q2: 17; Q3: 22.5; Maximum: 42
14. Minimum: 15; Q1: 17.5; Q2: 21; Q3: 32.5; Maximum: 55
15. Minimum: 120; Q1: 122; Q2: 124.5; Q3: 129; Maximum: 149

Concept: Graphic Displays of Data


1. pie charts and bar graphs
2. histograms and boxplots
3.
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
A

4.

5. Answers vary
6.

7. {55, 75, 82.5, 91.5, 100}

8.

9. Answers vary. A student might notice that there is a bigger range in the first half of the data than in
the second half of the data.
10. Answers vary. A student might notice that more of the data is in the left side of the graph than the
right side of the graph.
11.

12.

13. Answers vary.


14. Bar graph or pie chart.
15. Histogram or boxplot.

Concept: Variance
1. Standard deviation and variance are both measures of spread, but variance is a larger number.
Standard deviation is the square root of variance.
2. Data Set A has data that is more varied and spread out than the data in Data Set B.

3. 33.2967
4. 16.5432
5. 254.568
6. 33.2967
7. 16.5432
8. 254.568
9. 4
10. c
11. If variance is large, data will be spread out on a histogram. There might be a lot of data at low
values and a lot of data at high values, with not much in between. If variance is small, all data will be
close together near the mean.
12. No, you can only calculate the variance for quantitative data, not categorical data. Bar graphs only
show categorical data.
13. Mean: 81.5; Sample Variance: 149.105; Sample Standard Deviation: 12.2109
14. Mean: 5.15; Population Variance: 12.0275; Population Standard Deviation: 3.46807
15. It is often not realistic or possible to find data from the whole population, and then you have to be
satisfied with only having a sample of the population. For example, it would be impossible to find a
piece of information from every person in the world, but you might be able to get data samples from
every country.

Concept: The Normal Curve


1. 0
2. 1
3. 84.13%
4. 15.87%
5. 2.28%
6. 95.45%
7. 64.69%
8. 0

9. 90.21%
10. 1.15%
11. 1.64 standard deviations below the mean.
12. 49.38%
13. Approximately 68% of adult women are between 63 and 67 inches tall.
14. 69.15%
15. 0.644%

Concept: Linear Correlation


1. Very strong positive correlation. The data is perfectly linear with a positive slope. As the value of one
variable increases, the value of the other variable increases.
2. Mild negative correlation. The data is somewhat linear with a negative slope. As the value of one
variable increases, the value of the other variable tends to decrease.
3. Very strong negative correlation. The data is perfectly linear with a negative slope. As the value of
one variable increases, the value of the other variable decreases.
4. No correlation. There is no relationship between the two variables. As the value of one variable
increases, there is no pattern to what happens to the value of the other variable.
5. Strong positive correlation. The data is strongly linear with a positive slope. As the value of one
variable increases, the value of the other variable increases.
6.
7. 2.87. This seems to fit with the data.
8. The relevant domain is between 200 and 800, which is the range of possible SAT scores. The
regression equation will be most accurate between 400 and 700, where all of the data points are.
9. No, just because the two variables are correlated doesnt mean that a high SAT score would cause a
high GPA.
10.

11. 18.56. This is reasonable, but because the correlation coefficient is only about 0.5, there isnt a
strong correlation and the regression equation isnt a great way to make predictions.

12. Because the data is only mildly positive correlated, you cant use this data to make predictions that
you can be very confident about. Some students scores went up from quiz 1 to quiz 2 and some
students scores went down from quiz 1 to quiz 2.
13. Answers vary. Possible answer: Correlation is a relationship between multiple variables while
causation is when a change in one variable causes a change in another variable.
14. Answers vary . Possible answer: The correlation coefficient measures how strong the correlation is
between two variables and whether the correlation is positive or negative.
15. Answers vary. Possible answer: If you have a larger sample size you will have more data points and
will be closer to have data from the full population.

Concept: Modeling with Regression


1. Two good choices are natural log regression and logistic regression. With natural log regression the
( )
equation is
and with logistic regression the equation is
.
2. The logistic function is a better fit because it levels off when the height as the height of the women
levels off.
3. The natural log regression does not have a y-intercept and the logistic equation has a y-intercept at
26.7. This would be the height of a baby when it was born. The typical length of a baby at birth is 20
inches, so the model is a bit unreasonable.
4. With the logistic equation, the predicted height is 64.88768 inches. This is reasonable because
women arent growing anymore when they are 70. To be perfectly realistic, the model should level off
for awhile in the middle and then start to decrease, as women will tend to actually slowly lose height as
they get older after about age 40.
5. The equation is

6. Exponential regression makes sense because she is losing approximately have her height with each
sip. This is exponential decay with a common ratio of
7. About 5 sips.
8. 1.0866 inches.
9. The equation is

10. The logistic model is appropriate because there is a maximum for how many people can know the
rumor (400 students), so the model needs to level off around 400.

11. The model says 1 person will know the rumor after about 3.4 days. This doesnt fit with the actual
data which found that after 3 days, 29 people knew the rumor. After 5 days, the model tends to fit the
data much better.
12. Sine regression works very well. The equation is

13. The predicted depth is 5.392634697 feet. The actual depth is 5.4 feet. The residual is 0.073653035.
14. The cubic regression equation is
. This model
fits the data points well, but doesnt make as much sense out of the domain of 0 to 10 hours. The cubic
model shows the depth continually increasing after 10 hours, which it of course wouldnt actually do.
The sine model makes more sense because it is periodic, just as the depth of the water will be.
15. Modeling with regression allows you to quickly make predictions and generalizations about
relationships between variables. When there is a lot of data, modeling helps to summarize the data
visually and algebraically.

Chapter 16: Logic and Set Theory


Concept: And and Or Statements
1. P=I go to school; Q=I do my work; R=I stay home; S=I play games
2. (

3. P=I have macaroni and cheese; Q=I have steak; R=I have green beans;
S=I have potatoes
4. (

5. P=I wear flip flops; Q=I wear shorts; R=I wear a t-shirt; S=I wear a dress
6.

,(

7. P=It is dark outside; Q=I light a candle


8.
9. P=We will go to the beach; Q=We will have a picnic; R=We will go to the movies; S=We will eat
popcorn.
10. (

11.
(
T
T
T
F
T
F
F
F

T
T
F
T
F
T
F
F

T
F
T
T
F
F
T
F

T
T
F
F
F
F
F
F

T
T
T
T
F
F
T
F

12.
(
T
T
T

T
T
F

T
F
T

T
T
T

T
T
T

F
T
F
F
F

T
F
T
F
F

T
F
F
T
F

T
F
T
T
F

F
F
F
F
F

13.
(
T
T
T
F
T
F
F
F

T
T
F
T
F
T
F
F

T
F
T
T
F
F
T
F

T
T
T
T
T
T
F
F

T
T
T
T
T
T
T
F

14.
(
T
T
T
F
T
F
F
F

T
T
F
T
F
T
F
F

T
F
T
T
F
F
T
F

T
T
T
T
F
T
T
F

T
T
T
T
T
T
T
F

15. The parentheses appear to make a difference when there are both conjunctions and disjunctions,
but not when there are only disjunctions.

Concept: If-Then Statements

1. hypothesis, antecedent or protasis


2. conclusion, consequent or apodosis
3. If you like Pepsi, then you will like Coke.
4. If you do your homework, then you will get candy.
5. If you go to the mall, then you like to shop.
6. If you dont cook dinner, then you will be hungry.
7. If you join this program, then you will lose weight.
8. If you shovel snow, then your back will be sore.
9. If you do not know how to drive, then you will not get your license
10. If you are not nice to your sister, then you will be punished.
11. The statement is false if you are a kid and you dont like pizza (the hypothesis is true and the
conclusion is false).
12. You can conclude that Sam likes pizza.
13. 18 people
14. 12 people
15. 4 people

Concept: Negative Statements


1. P=Im going skiing next weekend; Q=Im going snowboarding next weekend.
2.

Im neither going skiing nor snowboarding next weekend.

3. P=Mike ate lunch with me; Q=John ate lunch with me.
4.

. Mike and John didnt both have lunch with me.

5. P=my brother wants to play with me; Q=my sister wants to play with me.
6.

Either my brother or my sister wants to play with me.

7. Not all dogs go to heaven. This means there is at least one dog who does not go to heaven.
8. My teacher is often wrong.
9. Not everyone likes pizza. This means there is at least one person who does not like pizza.

10.
(
T
T
F
F

T
F
T
F

F
T
F
T

T
F
F
F

T
T
F
T

11.
(
T
T
F
F

T
F
T
F

F
T
F
T

T
T
T
T

T
T
F
F

12.
(
T
T
T
F
T
F
F
F

T
T
F
T
F
T
F
F

T
F
T
T
F
F
T
F

F
T
F
F
T
T
F
T

T
T
T
T
T
T
F
F

T
T
T
T
T
T
F
T

13.
(
T
T
T
F
T
F
F
F

T
T
F
T
F
T
F
F

T
F
T
T
F
F
T
F

F
F
F
T
F
T
T
T

F
F
T
F
T
F
T
T

F
T
F
F
T
T
F
T

F
F
F
F
F
F
T
T

F
T
F
F
T
T
T
T

14. P
15.
16. (

Concept: Inverse, Converse, and Contrapositive


1. Original: If the fruit is unripe, then the fruit is bad. Contrapositive: If the fruit is not bad, then the
fruit is ripe.
2. Original: If it is a bear, then it likes honey. Contrapositive: If it does not like honey, then it is not a
bear.
3. Original: If it is a dessert, then it is not healthy. Contrapositive: If it is healthy, then it is not a
dessert.
4. Original: If the music is by Taylor Swift, then the music is good. Contrapositive: If the music is not
good, then the music is not by Taylor Swift.

5. Original: If a person is overweight, then the person is unhealthy. Contrapositive: If a person is


healthy, then the person is not overweight.
6. Original: If it is a puppy, then it likes to play. Inverse: If it is not a puppy, then it does not like to
play. Converse: If it likes to play, then it is a puppy. Contrapositive: If it does not like to play, then it is
not a puppy.
7. Original: If I dont like something, then I wont buy it. Inverse: If I like something, then I will buy it.
Converse: If I dont buy something, then I dont like it. Contrapositive: If I buy something, then I like it.
8. Original: If a person is at the party, then the person is popular. Inverse: If a person is not at the
party, then the person is not popular. Converse: If a person is popular, then the person is at the party.
Contrapositive: If a person is not popular, then the person is not at the party.
9. Original: If you go to a concert, then you like music. Inverse: If you dont go to a concert, then you
dont like music. Converse: If you like music, then you go to a concert. Contrapositive: If you dont like
music, then you dont go to a concert.
10. Original: If it is an apple, then it has a core. Inverse: If it is not an apple, then it does not have a
core. Converse: If it has a core, then it is an apple. Contrapositive: If it does not have a core, then it is
not an apple.
11. P=made out of jean material; Q=it is my pants; R=clothes from you; S=clothes are the right size.
Original

Contrapositive

I)
II)
III)
12. The clothes from you were not made out of jean material.
13. P=person is experienced; Q=person is unsuccessful; R=the person is Mike; S=the person is always
confused.
Original
Contrapositive
I)
II)
III)
14. Mike is unsuccessful and inexperienced.
15. P=plates that got shipped; Q=item that is cracked; R=plates from your mother; S=item that can go in
the trash.
Original
Contrapositive
I)
II)
III)
16. The plates from your mother should not go in the trash.