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JOURNAL OF PURE APPLIED AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

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ISSN 2229-7596 (Print)


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Abbr:J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys.
2014, Vol.4(2): Pg.57-68

Analysis of Magneto-acoustic Waves Propagating Through


Transverse Magnetic Field Under the Influence of
Radiative Cooling
R. K. Pensia1, Vishal Kumar2, G.S Kachawa2 and Ashok Patidar2
1

Department of Physics,
Govt. Girls P. G. College, Neemuch, M.P., INDIA.
2
Department of Physics,
Pacific University, Udaipur, INDIA.
(Received on: January 31, 2014)
ABSTRACT
This paper studies the effect of radiative condensation on Jeans
instability of self-gravitating dusty plasma in the presence of
transverse magnetic field. It is assumed that medium is made of
three component plasma having electrons, ions and charged dust
grains. The Ions are assumed to be inertialess and having infinite
large thermal conductivity. The electrons are also assumed to be
inertialess but having finite large thermal conductivity. The
external magnetic field is aligned along the z-direction. With the
help of linearized perturbation equations, a dispersion relation is
obtained. The dispersion relation is solved numerically and effect
of various factors on the growth rate of the instability is obtained.
It is found that the cooling effect of the system has a stabilizing
influence on the growth rate of instability.
Keywords: Magneto-acoustic, waves, transverse magnetic field.

1. INTRODUCTION
One of the most important
phenomena in astrophysical problem is
gravitational collapse of neutral dust grains
and since the first stability analysis given by

Jeans1 and he has derived the expression for


maximum rise of a uniform gravitating mass
which is stable to small fluctuations in
density. The increasing importance of dusty
plasma in relation to understand the
problems of star formation has attracted the

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58

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)

attention of scientists in the recent past. The


interplanetary space is full of dust known as
interplanetary dust. The existence of
interplanetary dust particles was known
from the zodiacal light. The zodiacal light is
due to dust grains distributed throughout the
inner solar system, with the strong
contributions from the asteroid belt2. Dust
grains are massive and their sizes range
nanometers - millimeters. If the dust grains
are charged, the dynamical behavior selfgravitating mass is significantly modified
due to interplay between gravitational and
electrostatic forces.
The present study examines the
effect of radiative condensations on Jeans
instability of self-gravitating dusty plasma in
the presence of magnetic field. It is assumed
that plasma is extremely heated and thermal
loss due to radiative cooling of the electrons.
The phenomenon of thermal instability
arising due to heat-loss mechanism in dilute
plasma has been discussed by several
investigators [Field3, Dwivedi et al.4, Pandey
and Kumar5, Mamum6, Gupta et al.7 and
Bora and Talwar8]. Recently, Prajapati et al.9
have investigated the self gravitational
instability of rotating viscous hall plasma
with arbitrary radiative heat-loss functions
and electron inertia. Pensia et al.10 have
discussed the magneto-thermal instability of
self gravitating viscous hall plasma in the
presence of suspended particles. Kim and
Narayan11 have investigated the thermal
instability in clusters of galaxies with
conduction taking the role of effect of
radiative heat-loss function. Inutsuka et al.12
have studied the propagation of shock waves
in a warm neutral medium taking into
account radiative heating and cooling,
thermal conduction and viscosity terms.

Menou et al.13 have discussed the


importance of radiative effect in the Suns
upper radiative zone. Stiele et al.14 have
investigated the problem of clump formation
due to thermal instability in weakly ionized
plasma. Fukue and Kamaya15 have discussed
the problem of thermal instability
considering the effects of ion-neutrals
friction, radiative cooling functions and
magnetic field. Shadmehri and Dib16 have
investigated the thermal instability in
magnetized partially ionized plasma. To
study the interstellar gas dynamics it has
been established as a fact that the magnetic
field plays an important role in the star
formation and molecular cloud condensation
process. In the interstellar medium (ISM), a
large amount of energy is injected by the
stars, which leads to the formation of shock
waves, they become large amplitudes
hydromagnetic Alfven waves. Magnetic
field can provide pressure support and
inhibit the contraction and fragmentation of
interstellar clouds. The magnetic field
interact directly only with the ions, electrons
and charged grains in the gas. Collisions of
the ions with the predominantly neutral gas
in the clouds are responsible for the indirect
coupling of the magnetic field to the bulk of
the gas [Langer17]. Chhajlani and Parihar 18
have studied the magneto-gravitational
instability of self-gravitating dusty plasma.
Rao19 have studied the magnetoacoustic
modes in magnetized dusty plasma. Dwivedi
and Das20 have investigated the neutral
induced low frequency instability in weakly
ionized magnetized plasma. Mahanta et al.21
have discussed the dynamics of magnetized
gravitating dusty plasma. Recently, Pensia
et al.22 have discussed the role of magnetic
field in contraction and fragmentation of

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R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)
interstellar clouds. Thus the aim of the
present paper is to study the problem of
gravitational collapse of charged dust grains
and the plasma and the excessively heated
and thermal loss due to radiative cooling of
the electrons becomes important in the
presence of magnetic field.
From the above studies, we find that
magnetic field and the radiative cooling of
the electrons on the gravitational collapse of
the dust grains are the important parameters
to discuss the gravitational instability of
plasma. Thus, in the present problem we
investigate the effects of radiative cooling of
the electrons on the gravitational collapse of
the dust grains in the presence of the
magnetic field. It is assumed that radiative
cooling of the ions or dust grains due to this
process is negligible. For our convenience,
we have account the Jeans swindle for
studying the linear stability of infinitely
homogeneous dusty plasma system. Thermal
equilibrium of the electrons is achieved by
the balance of thermal conduction and
radiative cooling through the trace elements.
The analysis caries that the radiative cooling
suppresses the gravitational collapse through
acoustic stabilization terms.
2. BASIC EQUATIONS AND
STABILITY ANALYSIS
We consider a three-component
plasma having electrons, ions and charged
dust gains. In the realistic situation the size,
the mass and the charge of the dust grains
may have different values. The charge to
mass ratio of a dust particle may vary from
one grain to another but for simplicity it is
assumed that dust grains have uniform mass,
behave like point charges and neither break
up nor undergo collisions. For further

59

simplification it is assumed that there is no


charge fluctuation. Our assumptions are
similar to those of the considered earlier by
Dwivedi3 and Tystovich and Havens23.
Consider a three-component fluid
model of dusty plasma consisting of
electrons, ions and charged dust particles
embedded in an external magnetic field. We
assume that the magnetic field is aligned
along the Z direction i.e.
r
(1)
B = B0 z
In general, the dust grains have
distributions in mass, size and charges with
variable changing time scales but we shall
assume here that the grain mass md is
constant. We shall also assume that the
grains confine themselves to fixed spherical
grains of radius a and charge qd. The selfgravitation for dust particles is considered by
taking Poisson equation. The selfgravitational contribution of electrons and
ions is not considered in the present analysis
because it is assumed that both ions and
electrons are inertia-less. It is assumed that
the ions have infinity large thermal
conductivity and, therefore, they are
considered to be in thermal equilibrium but
the
electrons
have
finite
thermal
2
conductivity K 2Vthe
/ e = 1 ,where

Vthe = (Te / me ) 2 , e is the electron collision


frequency and is the growth rate and
radiative cooling through the trace elements.
Consequently, the electrons are not in
thermal equilibrium.
The dynamics of the threecomponent fluid is governed by the
following equations. On the slow time scale
of the dust dynamics, the ions densities are
given by the Boltzmann distributions:

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R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)

ni = ni 0 exp( e / T i )

(2)

The dynamics of the electron is


described by the following set of equations:
0 = ene pe

(3)

(4)
r
3 Te
+ pe.ve = 2Te L ( ne , Te )
ne
2 t
ne
r
+ . ( ne v e ) = 0
t

(5)

where and L are thermal conductivity and


heat-loss due to radiative cooling respectively.
The dynamics of the dust grains is
described by the following set of equations:
r
r
qd
vd B
r
Dv d =


md
C
nd
r
+ . ( nd v d ) = 0
t

We consider the quasineutral equilibrium i.e.


qd nd0 + eni0 ene0 = 0

(12)

In this equilibrium there is no


electric field and the free energy is solely
due to gravitational field of the selfgravitating dust grains. However invoking
Jeans swindle, the zeroth order gravitational
field is assumed to play no role in the
equilibrium. Thus we consider the dusty
magnetized plasma characterized by
r
r
r
(13)
0 = 0, 0 = 0, v d0 = v e0 = vi0 = 0
Thermal equilibrium of the electrons is
described by the following equation
(14)
L ( n , T ) + 2T = 0
0

e0

e0

e0

3. PERTURBATION STATE
(6)

(7)

where
r
D=
+ v d .
(8)
t
denotes the convective derivative and

=
x +
y + z
(9)
x
y
z
Poisson equation for electrostatics and
gravitational fields are respectively given as
2 = 4 e ( ni ne ) + qd nd

(10)

2 = 4 Gmd ( nd nd0 )

(11)

where n j , v j , m j and Tj are respectively the


total number density, velocity, mass and
temperature of the particle species (j- for
electron, i- for ion and d- for dust grain).

Let the equilibrium state be


perturbed then, every variable Q(r,t) may be
expressed as
(15)
Q ( x, y , z , t ) = Q0 ( z ) + Q1 ( x, y , z , t )
Here Q stands for , , ni , ne , nd , e ,
where Q0 is the value of Q at t = 0 and Q1 in
an infinitesimal increment of Q due to
perturbation.
By the use of the expansion (15) for
the fluid model of the dusty plasma system,
the linearized perturbation equations are
given as
e l
ni1 = ni0
(16)
Ti
e T
nei = ne0 l el
Te0
Te

(17)

L
L
3 Tel
= 2Tel 0 nel 0 Tel (18)
ne0
t
ne0
Te0
2

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R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)
61
r
r r
Now substituting values of nil , nel
v dl
qd0
v dl B0
=
1
1
(19)
md
C
t
and ndl from equation (16), (17) and (26)
into the Poisson equation (21), we obtain
nd1
r
+ nd0.v dl = 0
following dispersion relation
(20)
t
1 = 4 e ( nil nel ) + qd ndl

(21)

2 1 = 4 G md ndl

(22)

4. DISPERSION RELATION
Let us assume that all the perturbed
quantities vary as exp (it + iK.r), where
is the frequency of harmonic disturbances
and K is wave number.
Using expression (23) and simplifying
equation (17) and (18) we obtain

(24)
Taking divergence of equation (19) and
using eq. (20) and eq. (22) we obtain
qd nd0 K 2 1
ndl =
(25)
m [ 2 + 2 i ]
d

where
d =

qd B0
md C

(26)

is the dust cyclotron frequency and


j2 = 4 Gmd nd0

is the Jeans frequency.

2
= 4 qd2 nd0 / md , pd is the dust
where pd
1

(23)

1 L0
1 L0
3
= + iK2 iLt , Ln =
, LT =
Te0 ne0
ne0 Te0
2

(28)
where Cs is the dust acoustic speed and is
given by

2 2
depd

(29)
Cs =

ni0Te0
2 2
1 + K de +

ne0Ti

plasma frequency and

n e i L
nel = e0 1 1 n
Te0

where

Ln
1
2 + j2 d2 1 + i
( iLn ) K 2Cs2 = 0

ni0Te0
2 2

1 + K de +

ne0Ti

(27)

de = Te0 / 4 ne0 e 2 is the Debye length

of the electron.
2

Equation (28) represents a general


dispersion relation for a self-gravitating
magnetized dusty plasma incorporated
thermal
conductivity
and
heat-loss
mechanism. The second term in the square
bracket of this dispersion relation arises due
to thermal loss. In the absence of magnetic
field the dispersion relation (28) reduces to
Dwivedi et al.3. Thus, we find that magnetic
field parameter coupled together with dust
acoustic speed. In the present case we have
considered the effect of magnetic field on
the radiative condensation of self-gravitating
dusty plasma but Dwivedi et al.3 have not
considered these parameters. Thus, the
dispersion relation in the present analysis is
modified due to the inclusion of magnetic
field and the condition of Jeans instability of

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62

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)

self-gravitating dusty plasma is affected by


the presence of magnetic field. This is the
new finding, which was not obtained earlier
by Dwivedi et al.3 and Tystovich and
Havens23. It is also clear that on plotting the
growth rate of our present dispersion relation

(28) and the dispersion relation of Dwivedi


et al.3, the growth rate of the instability will
be different in our present case due to the
presence of magnetic field. Thus, magnetic
field has an effect on the growth rate of
instability of the condition (33).

Figure 1. Variation of dust acoustic speed is plotted against the wave number with variying different
parameters.(a) with the variation in debye length of Electrons de.The values of pd, ni0/ne0 and Te0/Ti are
taken to be 1.0, 1.0 and 1.0 , respectively.(b) with the variation in dust plasma frequency pd.The values of
de, ni0/ne0 and Te0/Ti are taken to be 1.0, 1.0 and 1.0 respectively.(c) with the variation in number density
ratio ni0/ne0.The values of de, pd and Te0/Ti are taken to be 1.0, 1.0 and 1.0 , respectively.(d) with the
variation in particle temperature ratio Te0/Ti.The values of de, pd, and ni0/ne0 are taken to be 1.0, 1.0 and
1.0 , respectively.
Journal of Pure Applied and Industrial Physics Vol.4, Issue 2, 30 April, 2014, Pages (57-98)

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)
In the ISM, structure formation is
mainly due to the unstable modes, thus we
study the effects of debye length of
electrons, dust plasma frequency, the
number density and ratio of temperature of
electrons and ions on the dust acoustic speed
by choosing the arbitrary values of these
parameters in the present problem. The
variation of dust acoustic speed with wave
number for different values of various
parameters is shown in figure. 1(a) - (d).
Figure. 1(a) is plotted for the dust
acoustic speed (DAS) against the wave
number with variation of debye length of
electrons. We find that the dust acoustic
speed increases with increase in debye
length of electrons. The rate of increase in
dust acoustic speed with increasing debye
length at low value of wave number is very
high and these rates falls rapidly at high
value of wave number. Hence the debye
length of electron increases the dust acoustic
speed.
Similarly in figure. 1(b), we have
depicted the dust acoustic speed against
wave number for different values of dust
plasma frequency. From the curves we find
that the dust acoustic speed increases with
increase in dust plasma frequency and the
rate of increase in dust acoustic speed with
variation in dust plasma frequency is high
but fall of this rate at high value of wave
number is slow as compared to figure. 1(a).
In figure. 1(c) the effect of number density
on the dust acoustic speed is shown by
depicting the curves between Cs and K for
various values of number density of ions as
compared to number density of electrons.
We find that the dust acoustic speed
increases with increase in ratio of number
density of ions and electrons and the rate of

63

increase in dust acoustic speed with


variation of ratio of two number densities
decreases rapidly as the wave number
increases. Hence the density of ions has
increasing influence on the dust acoustic
speed.
Figure. 1(d) depicts the influence of
ratio of temperature of two species i.e.
(Te0/Ti) on the dust acoustic speed by
showing the curves between Cs and K for
different values of (Te0/Ti). We find that the
dust acoustic speed increase with increase in
(Te0/Ti) and this rate with variations of
(Te0/Ti) decreases rapidly as the wave
number increases.
Hence the ratio of
temperature (Te0/Ti) has also increasing
influence on the dust acoustic speed.
From equation (28), particular cases
may be reduced as given follows, for
thermally non-conducting non-radiating,
self-gravitating and unmagnetized dusty
plasma d = 0, L= 0 and letting
i = , then dispersion relation (28)
becomes
(30)

2 + K 2Cs2 j2 = 0

which leads to Jeans instability


4 G md nd0
K < Kj =

Cs2

(31)

Inequality (31) represents Jeans


criterion of instability for dusty plasma and
Kj is critical jeans wave number. The system
represented by equation (30) is unstable for
all the wave number K<Kj.
For unmagnetized self-gravitating
dusty plasma incorporating heat-loss term
and for our convenience, taking limit <<
Ln , LT , K2 dispersion relation (28) reduces
to

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64

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)

K 2Cs2
+
j2 = 0
1
2

(32)

Ln

here is defined as, =

Ln + LT K 2
Equation (32) leads to monotonic instability
as
4 Gmd nd0 (1 )
K < K jl =

Cs2

(33)

Comparing conditions in eq. (31)


and eq. (33), we find that Jeans instability is
modified due to heat-loss term of the dusty
plasma.
For a self-gravitating unmagnetized
plasma in the absence of dust grains. For our
convenience, taking limit Kde<<1 , we have
from eq. (28) as
2 L

= n + LT K 2
3 2

(34)

This is usual radiative condensation


instability. For self-gravitating magnetized
dusty plasma in the absence of heat-loss
term, we have from eq. (28) as
2
2 + d2 + K 2Cs2 jd
=0

(35)

which gives instability if K<Kj2


where

For self-gravitating magnetized dusty


plasma incorporating heat-loss term and
taking limit << Ln , LT, K2 dispersion
relation (28) becomes
2 + d2 +

K 2Cs2
2
jd
=0
1

(37)

Equation (37) leads to monotonic instability


if K<Kj3
where
(1 ) 4Gm n 2
d d0
d
K j3 =

Cs2

(38)

Thus, it is clear from equation (38)


that critical Jeans wave number is modified
by magnetic field and heat-loss term. The
dispersion relation (37) may be represented
in a non-dimensional from in terms of self
gravitation as
*2 + *2d +

K *2
1 = 0
1

(39)

where
the
various
non-dimensional
parameters are defined as
KCs

* =
, K* =
4Gmd nd0
4Gmd nd0 and
*d =

d
4Gmd nd0

1/ 2

4Gmd nd0 d2
K j2 =

Cs2

(36)

If we compare condition (31) and


(36), it is obvious that the magnetic field
decreases the Jeans wave number. Thus, the
magnetic field stabilizes the dusty plasma
for transverse propagation.

In order to study the influence of


various physical parameters on the growth
rate of unstable mode, we have performed
numerical calculations of the dispersion
relation (38) to locate the root of *
(growth rate) for several values of the
parameters. These calculations are plotted in
figure 2, 3 and 4.

Journal of Pure Applied and Industrial Physics Vol.4, Issue 2, 30 April, 2014, Pages (57-98)

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)
In figure 2, we have depicted the
non-dimension growth rate ( *) versus non
dimensional wave number (K*) for various
arbitrary values of ratio of derivative of
purely density - dependent heat loss function
to sum of derivatives of purely density dependent heat-loss function and purely
temperature - dependent heat-loss function
=Ln/ ( Ln + LT ) for thermally nonconducting medium (* = 0) in the presence
of magnetic field parameter kept constant
i.e. arbitrary value d*= .5. The curve
depicts for = 0, i.e. the density
independent heat-loss function, we find the
non-dimensional growth rate (*) rapidly
decreases with increase in non-dimensional
wave number (K*). Hence for thermally
non-conducting and density-independent
heat-loss function, the system tends towards
a more stable situation with increasing K*.
The curve for = 1 shows the influence of a
purely density - dependent heat - loss
function Ln*= 0.0, L*= 0.5, which increases
with increasing density. It is obvious that
for a purely density - dependent heat loss
and adiabatic medium, the non-dimensional
growth rate (*) rapidly increases with
increasing in non dimensional wave number
(K*). Hence the density dependent heat-loss
function has a destabilizing influence on the
growth rate of instability. The curves for
=1.5(LT*= 1.66, Ln*= 0.5) and =2(LT*=
0.25, Ln*= 0.5), which increases with
increasing density and with increasing
temperature are depicts the combined effect
of derivatives of density-dependent heat-loss
and temperature- dependent heat-loss
function. On the non-dimensional growth
rate against non-dimensional wave number
(K*) for an adiabatic medium. From these

65

curves, it is found that the non-dimensional


growth rate (*) increases with increasing in
non-dimensional wave number (K*) but the
rate of growth is decreases with including
temperature dependent heat-loss and it is
further decreased by the increasing
temperature dependent LT*, which increases
with increasing temperature. From these
curves, we find that the density dependent
heat-loss has a destabilizing influence on the
growth rate of instability where as the
temperature -dependent heat-loss function
has a stabilizing influence on the growth rate
of instability.

Figure 2. The growth rate (Positive real value of


*) is plotted against the non dimensional wave
number K* with variation in normalized radiative
heat-loss function (LT*, L*) i.e. the values of . The
values of constant parameters and d* are taken
to be 0.0 and 0.5, respectively.

The combined effect of density


dependent and temperature dependent heat
loss function, which increases with
increasing in density and decreases with
increasing in temperature are shown by
curves = 1(LT*= 1.0, Ln*= 0.5), =
2(LT*= .75, Ln*= 0.5). It is clear from the

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66

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)

curves that if the system behaves


adiabatically, the non-dimensional growth
rate (*) decreases with increasing in nondimensional wave number (K*). It is
obvious that for an adiabatic medium the
system tends towards a more stable situation
with increasing K* and it is more effective
with the negative arbitrary value of LT*i.e.
(temperature - dependent heat loss function
decreases with increasing temperature).

1, 1.5 and = 2 are similar as obtained in


figure 2 in the presence of magnetic field
parameter but in these curves, the initial
value of non-dimensional growth rate is
more than that of curves in figure 2.Thus
magnetic field parameter stabilizes the
system.

Figure 4. The growth rate (Positive real value of


*) is plotted against the non dimensional wave
number K*with variation in the magnetic field d*.
The values of constant parameters and are
taken to be 0.0 and -1.0, respectively.
Figure 3. The growth rate (Positive real value of
*) is plotted against the non dimensional wave
number K* with variation in normalized radiative
heat-loss function (LT*, L*) i.e. the values of . The
values of constant parameters and d* are taken
to be 0.0 and 0.0, respectively.

In figure 3 we have depicted the


non-dimensional growth rate (*) versus
non-dimensional wave number (K*) for
various arbitrary values of (the ratio of
derivative of purely density dependent heatloss function to sum of derivatives of purely
density-dependent heat-loss function and
purely temperature dependent heat-loss
function for an adiabatic system ( = 0) in
the absence of magnetic field parameter d*
= 0.0.The pattern of curves for = 0, 1, 2,

In figure 4, the effect of magnetic


field parameter on the growth rate is shown
by depicting the curves between * and K*
for various value of d* for an adiabatic
medium ( = 0) with constant value of =
1(LT*= 1.0, Ln*= 0.5). It is clear from
curves that the non-dimensional growth rate
(*) decreases with increasing nondimensional wave number (K*) and this is
further decreases by increasing the value of
magnetic field parameter. Hence the
magnetic field has a stabilizing influence on
the growth rate of instability.
On analysing the critical Jeans
number relation (33), we find that the critical
Jeans wave number have influence of the

Journal of Pure Applied and Industrial Physics Vol.4, Issue 2, 30 April, 2014, Pages (57-98)

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)
ratio of purely density dependent heat loss
function to sum of purely density dependent
and temperature dependent heat-loss
function. The value of critical Jeans wave
number decreases with increasing density
dependent
heat-loss
function
which
increases with increasing in density.
CONCLUSIONS
In the present paper, we have
investigated the effect of radiative
condensation on Jeans instability of selfgravitating dusty plasma in the presence of
an external transverse magnetic field, it is
assumed that the fluid is a three component
plasma having electrons, ions and charged
dust grains. The ions and electrons are
assumed inertia less and the ions have
infinite large thermal conductivity but
electrons have finite thermal conductivity.
We have considered the quasineutral
equilibrium. In this equilibrium there is no
electric field and the free energy is solely
due to gravitational field of the selfgravitating dust grains. With the help of
relevant linearized perturbation equations of
the problem, a general dispersion relation is
obtained, which is modified due to the
presence of thermal conductivity parameter,
the derivative of density-dependent and
temperature dependent heat-loss function
magnetic field parameter and dust acoustic
speed. We find that the Jeans condition
remains valid but the expression of the
critical Jeans wave number is modified. It is
observed that the magnetic field decreases
the critical jeans wave number, thus the
magnetic field have a stabilizing influence
on the Jeans instability of the dusty plasma
for transverse propagation. Owing to the
inclusion of thermal conductivity the

67

isothermal sound velocity is replaced by the


adiabatic velocity of sound. We also find
that the thermal conductivity has a
destabilizing influence on the growth rate of
the system. The value of critical Jeans wave
number decreases with increasing the
parameter of thermal conductivity. It is also
found that critical Jeans wave number is
affected by density- dependent and
temperature dependent heat loss function.
The critical Jeans wave number decreases
with increasing the density-dependent heatloss function. Thus, the density-dependent
heat loss function destabilizes the system.
From the curves it is found that the
dust acoustic speed increases with increase
in Debye length of electrons and increase in
dust plasma frequency. In both the case the
rate of increase in dust acoustic speed at low
value of wave number and this rate falls
rapidly at high value of wave number. We
also find that the dust acoustic speed
increases with decrease in ratio of number
densities of ions and electrons,(ni0/ne0)
decrease in ratio of temperature of two
species (Te0/Ti) and the rate of increase in
dust acoustic speed at low K* and this rate
falls rapidly at high value of K*.
For the adiabatic system curves
shows that the growth rate decreases by
increasing the value of magnetic field
parameter, thus the magnetic field has a
stabilizing influence on the growth rate of
instability of the system in the transverse
direction. The growth rate increases with
increasing wave number for purely density
dependent heat-loss function (1), it is
obvious that purely density-dependent heatloss has a destabilizing influence on the
growth rate of instability of the system.
From the curves it is observed the combined

Journal of Pure Applied and Industrial Physics Vol.4, Issue 2, 30 April, 2014, Pages (57-98)

68

R. K. Pensia, et al., J. Pure Appl. & Ind. Phys. Vol.4 (2), 57-68 (2014)

effect of density dependent and temperaturedependent heat loss function affects the
growth rate of instability. The growth rate
of instability increases with increasing in
derivative of temperature-dependent heat
loss function which increases with
increasing in temperature of the system with
a constant value of density- dependent heatloss function. In the case of temperaturedependent heat loss function, which
decreases with increasing in temperature, the
growth rate decreases with increasing wave
number. Thus cooling effect of the system
has a stabilizing influence on the growth rate
of instability. Thus, radiative condensation
of magnetized dusty plasma plays an
important role in the process of gravitational
collapse.
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Journal of Pure Applied and Industrial Physics Vol.4, Issue 2, 30 April, 2014, Pages (57-98)