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december 2013

Interviews
Mark Dresser
Lucian Ban

New Section!

William Hooker
Amina Claudine Myers
Andrew Lamb
Giussepe Logan

Expanded CD Review Section!


Comprehensive Directory of
NY Club Concert & Event Listings

Jason Miles

Right On Time Innovator - Groundbreaking, Sound Machine


From Miles Davis to Michael Jackson
The Jazz Music Dashboard Smart Listening Experiences

MichaelPedicin.com

RandyBrecker.com

JasonMilesMusic.com

RobinMcKelle.com

Jazz Piano Duo

Arkadiy Figlin, Valeri Grokhovski


Dec. 21, Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall

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Jazz Inside Magazine


ISSN: 2150-3419 (print) ISSN 2150-3427 (online)
December 2013 Volume 5, Number 5
Cover Design by Shelly Rhodes
Cover photo of Jason Miles by Eleonora Alberto
Publisher: Eric Nemeyer
Associate Publisher: Nora McCarthy
Editor: John R. Barrett, Jr.
Advertising Sales & Marketing: Eric Nemeyer
Circulation: Susan Brodsky
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Layout and Design: Gail Gentry
Contributing Artists: Shelly Rhodes
Contributing Photographers: Eric Nemeyer, Ken Weiss
Contributing Writers: John Alexander, John R. Barrett, Curtis
Davenport; Eric Harabadian; Gary Heimbauer; Alex Henderson; Rick
Helzer; Nora McCarthy; Joe Patitucci; Ken Weiss, Scott Yanow.

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CONTENTS
CLUBS, CONCERTS, EVENTS
15 Calendar of Events, Concerts,
Festivals and Club Performances
28 Clubs & Venue Listings
FEATURES
4 Jason Miles Right On Time Innovator
From Miles Davis To Michael Jackson

30
34
36
40
42
44

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INTERVIEWS
Mark Dresser
Chris Tibaldi, Five Towns College
JAZZ OUTSIDE
William Hooker
Amina Claudine Myers
Andrew Lamb
Giuseppe Logan

49 CD REVIEWHarris Eisenstadt
61 CD REVIEWWilliam Hooker
ARTIST CORNER: Lucian Ban
REVIEWS OF RECORDINGS
51 Gary Bartz; Stefan Bauer; Jamie Baum;
Marc Cary; Tommy Cecil; Kevin Coelho;
Bill Cunliffe; Duduka Da Fonseca;
Matthew Finck Jonathan Ball; Nneena
Freelon; Herbie Hancock; Tom Harrell;

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December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

Greg Hopkins; Keith Jarrett; Jeff Kunkel;


Lage Lund, Will Vinson; Orlando
LeFleming; B.D. Lenz; Bill Mays; Nora
McCarthy & Joshua Wolff; Pete
McGuiness; Jason Miles & Global Noize;
Ken Messer; Ron Oswanski; Aaron
Parks; Art Pepper; Bryn Roberts;
Sketches; Gary Smulyan Dominic
Chianese; Andy Snitzer; Spyro Gyra;
Karolina Strassmayer & Drori Mondlak;
Helen Sung; Verve Jazz Ensemble; Chick
Webb & Ella Fitzgerald; Matt White; Phil

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Monday, December 02, 2013 13:50


Magenta
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Black
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Feature

Jason Miles
Visit Jason Miles online at
www.JasonMilesMusic.com

Interview By Eric Nemeyer


From his groundbreaking synth programming on
Miles Davis 1980s masterpieces Tutu, Music
From Siesta and Amandla to his current partnership with DJ Logic and Falu in the pioneering
global fusion group Global Noize, the Grammy
Award winning New York native dubbed by
one veteran journalist as the Quincy Jones of
Contemporary Music has consistently
brought the highest level of artistry to his multi4

faceted recordings, as both producer and artist,


and live performances. Jason Miles has not only
helped shape the landscape of contemporary
jazz, but also brought his rich sonic textures as a
keyboardist, arranger and producer to artists in
a multitude of genres, from R&B/pop to Latin
Jazz, Brazilian music and even childrens music
and country (producing Suzy Boguss Sweet
Danger).
His many years of collaboration with Marcus Miller include not only the Miles Davis projects, but also classic recordings by David
Sanborn (A Change of Heart, Close Up, Upfront) and Luther Vandross (The Power of Love,
Any Love, Give Me the Reason). Committed to

pushing the envelope of sonic possibilities and


bringing out the best in the artists and musicians
he vibes with, Miles has worked over the years
with a proverbial whos who of contemporary
music: Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan, Michael Brecker,
The Crusaders, Ruben Blades, Freddy Cole,
George Benson, Joe Sample, Herb Alpert.,
Vanessa Williams, Grover Washington Jr.

Jazz Inside: How did your interest in Sly and


The Family Stone evolvewhich eventually
inspired your new recording?

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 6)
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A NEW RELEASE BY MATT CRISCUOLO


featuring
Larry Willis, John Clark, Billy Williams,
Gerald Cannon and Matt Criscuolo

jazzeria.com

matt@jazzeria.com

Jason Miles
(Continued from page 4)

Jason Miles: I got the second row mezzanine to


see Jimi Hendrix with the opening act Sly & The
Family Stone. I had heard some of their stuff, I
had heard some of their songs. But the album
didnt really jump. But then Dance to the Music came out and Sly opened up for Hendrix.
They came out everyone was kind of booing.
They didnt want Sly, they wanted Hendrix.
They started playing. I forgot the song. The
place just went Whoa, wow, these guys are
really good. Everybody was diggin them. They
were dancing across the stageLarry Graham
and Freddy. They got an amazing reception and I
got really hooked into them. The following
month they played at the Electric Circus and we
went there to see themthe midnight show
and I was really into Sly because they were so
funky. I followed them. They had great songs. I
was a Sly fan and everything and then the whole
thing happened all of this stuff. I made the tribute album to Grover. People just dont understand, I dont just grab this stuff out of the hat.
This was stuff that all had an affect on my life.
Ivan [Lins] Miles Davis was going to do that
album and he died and I decided to do it because
Miles wanted me to perform on the album that
he was going to do with Quincy. Weather Reportthe most influential group in my life. Zawinul was my friend for thirty something years,
you know? Marvin Gaye. Herbie Mann. These
days, in order to have any chance, you need
records with a serious hook. You need a really

yeh, and then I put our singer Falu on it doing


like Indie Rock and stuff in between, with Jay
Rodriguez on sax, really funky. I called up my
friend Steve Wolf, great drummer. Hes played
with Grover and Annie Lennox and all these
great people. He said, You gotta get Greg Errico, the cat that played this stuff. So I friended
him on Facebook and the next thing I know, he
gets back to me. So Im at the airport getting
ready to go to a gig. The flight was delayed. So I
called him and spoke with him for an hour and
he said, everybody has tried this Sly stuff. So I
said, I have great respect for you, but if you
have a chance, just Google my name, go to my
website, check out what Im doing. He says,
OK. He gets back to me and sasy, Yeah man.
Nice Jason. Im sorry I dont know you. Well,
keep me posted on this thing. So I have all
these ideas and I started recording two more
tunes after hooking up with Nona Hendrix again.
After a few weeks, I get a phone call from Greg
Errico. So youre really doing this project, this
Sly thing. Id love to hear what youre doing.
So I play it over the phone. He says, This is
genius man. You did it. You nailed it man.
Youre not Sly and the Family Stone, but youre
your group but youre playing our stuff. What
can I do to help? Im in, Im into this. So he
ended up playing on four songs, with the other
cats like Dave Mathews, Ron Holloway, Jay
Rodriguez on sax, Amanda Ruzza on bass,
Adam Dorn on drums. By the way, one night I
was playing with Miles at his house. I know this
sounds crazy but, but I was playing with Miles at
his house and we were trying to do different
stuff. I started playing, and Miles grabbed my
hands and said, Dont play that shit, for me. I

I think America loves


success, but it hates
successful people.
good marketing hook. If you dont have that
nobody is going to be interested in you. So what
happened with the Sly album was that one night,
I was doing my typical thing, watching a ball
gamethe Knicks of course. I put on my headphones that I had on my Ipad and I had it on
shuffle and Family Affair from Sly came up. I
was like, Man, I havent heard this in so long
and I love this, and I started hearing it technically. I forgot how much I loved it and the next
tune that came up was a tune by Roberta Flack,
Feel Like Making Love. I thought I should do
Family Affair, with a Global Noise vibe and
get Roberta Flack to sing it. So I called up
Roberta the next day, Were about doing this
album of Sly tunes, like 21st Century. She said,
Im in. Im in, I dont care, Jason I trust you.
You want to do this. Next thing you know shes
like, bang in the studio with me, shes singing it,
Im going, This could work, this could work, oh
6

said, OK man, and I cut the number of notes


down a third. When I did that, he picked up his
horn and he started riffing with me. I was like, I
get it, I get it. Dont play too much. Anyway,
with the Sly project, I ended up going and talking to people and saying, Ive got little funding,
what do you think? Everybody jumped on board
to help Roberta, Nona, Falu, Maya Azucena,
who has just totally stepped up her game on this
record ... Will Bernard, who is a very underrated
guitar player. I was able to get the recording
licensed through the world and we just came out
in Japan.
JI: What was the first break that enabled you to
get on this pathway and develop all of these
connections and productions youve done for so
many these amazing artists on the Jazz and the
pop side of things?

JM: Well, you know, there is the musical break


and then there is the life break. Which one do
you think is more important?
JI: Both.
JM: Well they are. They both kind of coincide
with each other. The life break was January 24,
1984reconnecting with Michael Brecker. Michael and I hadnt seen each other for a while.
We met by random at a sushi bar on a terrible
night by just accident, and on my wifes birthday. I just had gotten a deal where my lawyer,
just had gotten me a $1,000 advance on a song
of ours, but it cost me $5,000 to do the deal. So I
reconnected with Mike and we started talking
about our music. He was totally trying to get into
Midi synthesizers and everything, and we started
really hanging out. He was saying, Youre the
guy Jay, you are the guy, you are doing stuff. I
was always into the synth-pop thing but I was
into Jazz also. Coming from New York where
we did, you understand, we were hybrid guys
because there was so much music around. You
want rock, you want folk, you want Jazzit was
all in New York. That was kind of my life. So
Mike starting telling all these people about me,
and they started calling me. One night I was at a
club in New York and Lenny White came over
to me and wanted to do something with me.
Mike was just hanging out one night and I came
into New York but it was for only one night. So
the next this I know, like a year later, Lenny told
me, Hey man, you know Marcus [Miller]?
And I said, of course Marcus is on my first album. Were starting a new album tomorrow and
hes going to call you, bring down your keyboard. I said, Cool. Well, from that day, I
worked with Marcus Miller for ten years. I was
his basic right hand guy. I went everywhere with
himand the big break of course, was
Miles [Davis] TuTu. It was a big break because
that was so cutting edge. It was in 1986, nobody
ever heard stuff like that before, nobody.
JI: What kind of discussions did you wind up
having with Miles when that broke for you?
JM: Miles would be talking with Marcus and
Marcus would go, Yeah, yeah. OK Miles, hold
on. [to Jason] He wants to talk with you.
Come over for tea or for coffee. We became
great friends, really great friends. He was a major part of our life for like five years. We saw all
the sides of him. It was really deep. He loved my
wife. He just adored Kathy. It was always,
Bring Kathy. Kathy is a lyricist. Shes a
teacher but shes also a terrific lyricist whose
written wonderful songs for great artists. Soon
after, I met Luther Vandross, who was another
huge influence on me and then Chaka Khan,
Whitney [Houston] and all these people. The
magic I did with the synthesizer was what got
me in it. I was at the right place at the right time
when everything was starting to pop with
keyboards and synthesizers. I was one of the
elite guys that understood about it, and knew
how to do it. So that was a huge break. At times
I thought I could never get it.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 8)
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Jason Miles

that you needed in order to be able to do this


kind of stuff.

(Continued from page 6)

JM: Then another album which totally changed


my life was Everybody Digs Bill Evans. When I
heard that thing and I heard him play Night and
Day and I heard how he approached the modal
stuff and everything, Peace Piece it just
totally took me. Then I got into Duke Ellington
and the stuff from the 30s. I used to listen to
that all the time and its how he put the stuff
together. I understood where Zawinul was coming from. I met Joe and Wayne [Shorter]. I used
to go see them and we used to hang out. But I
wasnt one of the guys in the forefront. So Joe
Zawinul treated me like a kid. Then I got the gig
with Miles and then all of a sudden, he was
really nice to me.

JI: How did you go about getting your stuff


together on synthesizers?
JM: In 1972, Bob Moog came to my school, and
was just on stage with one little keyboard. It was
the Mini-Moog. He said to me that I could play
it during sound checkand I heard the freaking
speakers rattle. I went like, Whoa, I like this
thing. I was always into the Fender Rhodes.
Meeting Joe Zawinul and everything, and watching his set up with the 2600s, and how he had his
Rhodes set up with the Phase Shifter I really
gravitated to that. People would tell me, Youre
not playing the changes man, youre not playing
bebop and all this other stuff. Thats not where
I was going. I love bebop. I studied bebop with
Mike Melillo in New Jersey, who was with Phil
Woods at the time. I studied that. I got into Bud
Powell, and he turned me on to all this amazing
music that I was just not familiar with Poco
Loco and all this great music. I studied that
stuff, and I met the Jersey Jazz guys Harry
Leahy and Phil [Woods]. Wed go out to the
Water Gap all the time with Al Cohn, Zoot Sims
and Bill Goodwin. It wasnt like I didnt want
that. It was just that that wasnt my calling. That
[Bebop] was a formation to help me with composition and music, and where stuff was going
and everything.
JI: That provided the harmonic sophistication

JM: Suddenly you went from janitor to executive vice president.


JM: Exactly. It was like, How did you get that,
man? Well Miles had told Joe about me, but Joe
Zawinul could never give it up to anybody. He
was too cantankerous. So you see this whole
thing in front of you and then you see the kind of
records that were being made, and the kinds of
records that were being made were the kinds of
records that I was needed onwhere you had a
Marcus Miller, who was a great arranger and
bass player. He was hearing this music in his
head but who was going to help him get it out?
You know what I mean? Who was going to help
him get it out, or if he heard this thing as an

orchestra and it only sounded like an accordion,


how could he get it out? How could he make it
happen? Well, I was there and I understood what
he was trying to do. My way of thinking about
the synthesizer and everything was like way
different than anybody elses. If somebody
bought the most popular thing on the market, I
didnt buy it. I bought the thing that was different than everybodythat I had to learn differently to make it. That was how Tutu came about
because it was made with very interesting instruments, like the PPG Wave 2.3 and the Emulator
2 and the Matrix 12. These were instruments that
not everybody was using, and I was able to create a very unique sound with it. Miles picked up
on that. Tommy LaPuma picked up on that.
Marcus [Miller] just kept on calling me and then
Luther [Vandross] started calling me and then
from that, it keeps on going. If your work is
good, you keep on going. The day that Barry
Finnerty got kicked out of Miles band over
something the whole scene was buzzing about it.
At the same time, Im on Miles Davis new album Tutu, Luther Vandross Give Me the Reason, David Sanborns, Straight to the Heart..
People dont want to hear that, But, if I would
have fd something up that day in the studio
when I was doing that, everybody would have
known. Thats the way it goes. Are we rewarded
for our good work? I dont think so. I think
America loves success, but it hates successful
people.
JI: Well, people tend to count other peoples
(Continued on page 10)

(Continued on page 10)


8

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

store.

Jason Miles
(Continued from page 8)

blessings instead of their own.


JM: Thats so true. No matter how I feel about
all of my frustrations about where Im at right
now, Im looking around, and many of my
friends are goneHiram Bullock, Mulgrew
Miller, Whitney Houston, George Duke. Im
lucky, Im pretty healthy, Im in this beautiful
relationship, my wife I love her so much, you
know, weve been together for decades. To find
a woman who will put up with this shit, is pretty
unbelievable. She has hung with this stuff
through everything. You can just be as good as
whats around you. You know, in one week in
1989, I made so much money, it was freaking
crazy. I did, this run for like seven weeks where
I went from album to album, two weeks on this,
two weeks with the Crusaders. It wound up with
me being really tired in the studio working on
Miles Davis album, Amandla and so Miles was
in the studio playing. Kathy would come to pick
me up. I would stay in the city at the Excelsior
Hotel and she would come in on Friday and pick
and what happened was she came to the studio,
was always so happy to see her. Kathys not like
a real hangeryou know. Im with Miles and
Id be like, Kathy whats going on? Shed go,
Im back here, reading my book. Id ask her to
come out into the studio and Id put my head on
her lap as Miles was playing, Id fall asleep. The
next thing, I open up my eyes and Miles is staring at me. He says, I sounded that good, huh?
I go, Im so sorry and I think she stuck up for me
and said, Hes really tired. It never took away
from my work. We could have left but we all
wanted to stick around and hear Miles, and give
him support.

JM: You had the rock section, which when the


doors opened up, a lot of people went there. You
had the Country section, which was packed, and
then you had the Jazz and Folk section. There
were about three people there. So what did I get?
I got Kind of Blue, all the CTI albums and Seven
Steps to Heaven, tons and tons of albums,
Santana, all of the stuff. I would take them
home.
JI: When I first started listening to Jazz I went
into Sam Goodys at the Canarsie Mall. My
mother gave me fifteen dollars and I got, Cannonball and the Boseria Sextet, Herbie Mann
Live at Newport with Dave Pike, and Oscar Peterson and Sounds of the Trio and The Trio Live
in Chicago, 1961all of which I still listen to
this day. I didnt even know what I was getting.
JM: Me too. The first album I bought, with my
own money was, Boss Guitar by Wes Montgomery. I love Wes Montgomery because I used to
watch, Dial M for Jazz on Channel 2 on Sunday
at 4:30 with the Jazz Priest. Coltrane would be
on there and Miles and Wes Montgomery and
Monk. All these cats would be on there all the
time. I just went crazy with the organ trio. I
started studying with this organ cat.
JI: Did you graduate or did you come back to
New York?
JM: No, I came back to New York, in January,
1974 and the third night in New York, I found
myself at Mikells, watching my sisters boyfriend playing with the band at the club, and my
cousins boyfriend was Don Grolnick. The band
was the Joe Beck, David Sandborn, Will Lee,
Don Grolnick and I believe, Chris Parker.

JI: Where did you go to college?

JI: That must have been a great night.

JM: I went to college at Indiana State University. I was trying to go to the Manhattan College
of Music and that year my father had a heart
attack. My family was really falling apart. My
grandmother died. I was staying in New York. It
was a disaster for me so it was really late and
that was a school that I could get into. I just didnt want to get drafted thats all.

JM: Are you kidding me? I walked into the club


and they were playing this tune, Cactus and
that stuck with me forever that tune. It was
unbelievable.

JI: You didnt go out there to study music?

JM: I have that album downstairs. Joe Farrell,


Joe Beck, Herb Bushler and Jimmy Madison. I
remember that band a lot. I used to go see them
all the time as a matter of fact, we were there one
night and Joe Farrell actually came up to me and
Kathy. I said, We drove from New York. We
love this band. Im a keyboard player in New
York. I had Penny Arcade with me and guess
what, he signed it for me. The scene was very,
very vibrant back then. But it was also an incestuous scene too. I had to break out and find my
own voice and not live in New York. People said
I would never get sessions together. I said, You
worry about where youre coming from, Ill
worry about getting in and doing it if it happens. I was always the first person at the gig
and the first person set up with all my gear and
everything. From all that stuff, I graduated col-

JM: Originally yes. But the music program and I


didnt kind of mesh together. I was more progressive and they were more traditional. I couldnt get into Indiana at that point. But as time
went on, my education was me going and taking
my Bar Mitzvah money, and buying a Wurlitzer
piano, and putting it into my little apartment.
Well, my thing was this. We were just a few
miles away from the Columbia Record Club,
where Kathy had a part-time job at the warehouse. Every month they would have the Columbia Record Club sale for the employees and she
would get me in there and it was a dollar an
album.
JI: You must have been like a kid in a candy
10

JI: Around that time, Joe Beck did an album


with Joe Farrell and they did Penny Arcade do
you know that one?

lege. Then I got my Masters of Education - not


formally, but my Masters of Education in the
New York scene after a number of years sloshing my way through trying to get in, trying to do
this, trying to do that. I made my first album
called CoZmopolitan, with Brecker, Marcus
Miller and Ricardo Silveira all these beautiful
cats, Jerry Niewood. That was my Masters Degeree. Then I started really penetrating the studio
scene and those were my PhD years. I was in
with the truly great producers and part of the
production teams and making these amazing
albums. I was flying to L.A. and working with
Luther Vandross for three months and then coming back. Then it was with Roberto or Tommy
LiPuma, and doing Ruben Blades and George
Bensonall these different people. Everybody
really respected me for my work but I didnt
respect myself because it was not where I
wanted to be. I wanted to be making the albums.
But it was also a very intimidating scene. There I
wasJason Miles from Canarsie, Jewish guy,
kind of paranoid, a little neurotic, and standing
over there in the corner is Marcus and Tommy
LaPuma, theres Luther and Miles. I came back
to New York because I wanted to work with
Miles. And, then one night we saw him at the
Bottom Line and I sat there and said to my wife,
I dont know how Im ever going to work with
Miles. How is that ever going to happen? It was
really depressing me because I really wanted to.
I thought that I could add to his music, and I
thought, How do you get to work with Miles?
Somebody has got to tell him about you. When
the moment really happened, and he needed the
music to change, I was there for the change.
And, that was it. I was able to help him make
that change, to something nobody else could do
then. After we did Tutu, after we did Portia,
there was like one night that I had a whole box
of these samples. I was always hearing crazy
sounds and sometimes Id get them off the television, and I had a stereo VHS, cop some stuff
off of a movie or something. Then Id manipulate the sounds and then Id do all this other stuff
and we were doing this tune called, Dont Lose
Your Mind and to Marcus credit he kind of
like really was messing with me. He had me
come to the studio at four oclock, and hed say,
well be with you in a little while. Well I ended
up sitting there for six hours because they were
trying to make me be really tense or nervous,
edgy or feeling weird, and all of a sudden, Marcus comes in and says, OK, come in. The next
thing they did was turn down all the lights in the
studio, really dim, and he goes, Were going to
do, Dont Lose Your Mind and I want to present to you, Jason Miles! Then he goes, Lets
go man, lets start breaking the good shit out.
So I had all of these amazing discs I created
like car crashes, orchestrated and everything and
if you listen to that tune its what you hear. We
played it for Miles and he was freaking out. I
had it panned perfectly so when he was playing
it was like [sings sound effects], and Miles was
reacting off of all of this stuff . and it was
really pretty cool. That was a great night. I went
on and I did music from Siesta and then we
started to do Amandla that took us a year and a
half. But in between, like I said, I did a lot with

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 12)


To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

New Album

The thrilling and striking New Yorkbased Japanese songstress


TAEKO FUKAOs 3rd and best
record to date in electrifying
collaboration with jazz geniuses
such as legendary DOUG CARN
who released excellent series of
albums from Black Jazz Label in
1970s and veteran drummer Victor
Jones whos best-known for his work
with Chaka Khan, Phyllis Hyman,
and Dizzy Gillespie, evincing her
mastery of musical vocabulary with
powerful and creative renditions of
American Jazz and Pop classics
and Japanese folk song.
is available at
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Tracks: 1. Old Devil Moon 2. The Wind Beneath My Wings 3. Softly, As In A Morning Sunrise
4.

If You Could See Me Now 5. Naima 6. Foolin Myself 7. Alice in Wonderland


8. Lullaby of Takeda - I Wanna Go Home 9. I Think About Lovin You
10. Blue In Green 11. What A Wonderful World

Taeko Fukao - vocals | Doug Carn - piano | Lonnie Plaxico - bass | Victor Jones - drums
Guests: Giacomo Gates - vocal | Stacy Dillard - sax | Kevin McNeal - guitar
Produced by Mark Ruffin and Taeko Fukao

Even Ella would call you if she


was still alive. Your Wonderland
creations are truly wonderful!
Lamon Fenner, WHCR-FM,
The Voice of Harlem
Taeko is one of the top performers
in Jazz in the US and the world.
Gino Moratti, Artistic Director,
Jazz at Kitano New York
Taeko can really swing and
although she has her own style,
she reminds me of Betty Carter
on her uptempo tunes
Doug Carn, Pianist/Composer

Luther who really showed me a lot about pop


production and pop vocals, especially vocals. I
learned a freaking world from Luther about recording vocals and making comps and all of that
stuff, very deep.
JI: What were your experiences like with Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson?
JM: They were kind of quick to be very honest
with you. Whitney was very easy. It really was
because Luther was producing Whitney. We
were putting together the song Youre My Baby
Tonight, and Whitney came in. In the beginning,
she really didnt sound so hot and everybody
was really nervous. Luther was really nervous.
Whats going on with her she doesnt sound
like Whitney, Oh my God, what am I going to
do? Then she kept saying, Lets try it again.
Wed go back and then all of sudden, I dont
know why, or how, but out of nowhere, that
freaking voice just appeared and, it was like,
Whoa! Oh my God, you know? Diana Ross was
the same way [at the beginning of the session]. It
was like, Uh this is Diana Ross? Like an hour
later she sounds like freaking Diana Ross,
JI: I guess they needed to warm the pan a little
bit.
JM: Whitney came in and she didnt know me
so I introduced myself. We were talking and
laughing a little bit and then Luther came walking in. Of course, he said, Whitney, is he bothering you? Is he bothering you? Jase are you
bothering Whitney? Im like, I dont think so.
She says, Were having a good time. He says,
One thing out of you man, Im going to exile
you to the lounge. Were cool, she said, and
he said, This is Jason. When youre hearing the
tracks, thats all the stuff he does. Whitney was
like, Fantastic. I told her I was thrilled to be on
her record. She was cool. This was young Whitney, pre-Bobby Brown. The Michael Jackson
thing was very interesting. I was really kind of
done doing studio work. I just had done the US
50th Anniversary album, People an animated
movie, an album with all these big stars on it. It
was my first major, major production that was
put in my hands and I got an Emmy nomination
for the theme song on it, Children of the
World. It was really very cool. I was trying to
build myself up as a producer. One night I was
working with this famous Greek singer and I get
a call from the Hit Factory, Hey Jason, my
name is Brad Buckner, Im Michael Jacksons
musical director. I got a thing that I heard that I
got to call you. We have a part in it too that is
very difficult. Nobody can get it and it really
requires some really specialized man to really
make something great. I said, Ill be happy to
give it a shot. He asked me to come in an hour
and I said I had an artist on their way to my
house that just came in from Switzerland, and I
had to go and do this. So he says, Just tell them
you cant do it because youre working with
Michael Jackson. Im like, thats not the way it
goes, cmon. They are paying me to produce. I
cant have them come up here and tell them on
my drive to New York that I cant make it because Im working with Michael Jackson. I ap12

preciate the opportunity but Im just going to


have to decline tonight, Im really sorry. So he
says, Thats OK because Im going to get, so
and so to do it. And, I said, You dont have to
tell me who youre going to get Brad. Youre
more than welcome to get somebody, of course.
I feel terrible, because who wouldnt want to be
on a Michael Jackson record. But what am I
supposed to do, I have to have some integrity in
life, and I cant do that. He said, OK, well Jason
good luck, nice talking to you. Well the minute
he told me who he was going to call, I thought,
If this is a specialized thing, he aint gonna get
it from this guy. It will be impossible. This is a
jingle guy. Its not going to happen. So anyway,
the next day around noon the phone rings, and
its Brad Buckner asking me when am I going to
be available. So, I said, Im available. I dont
do anything until next Thursday. So he asked me
to come in the next day. The night before must
have been a disaster because this guy just wasnt
there. I brought some gear. I went into the studio, the Hit Factory. Every room was taken by
Michael Jackson. The dressing room was filled
with jars and jars of candy, Haagen-Daz ice
cream. It was crazy. There were fifty synthesizers in all the rooms. I set up my stuff to use it
and they played this tune for me, They Dont
Really Care About Us. They were having trouble with the middle part, with the speed sequencing and all the ambiance they wanted around it.
Michael had said he wanted stuff that nobody
had ever heard before, Ive got to have something that is just going to blow your mind. So I
just started to slowly working in how I wanted to
build it up youve got to start building a
ground work with synthesizers, whats going to
be on the top end, whats going to be on the
bottom end, whats your idea to doing what they
want to do. I worked for about four hours and
the next thing I called upstairs and Brad came
downstairs, and they had these spinal tap stadium speakers up there that they cranked to
eleven. I left the room but it was really loud and
I heard my stuff. I was like, Damn, I did a good
job. The next thing they call me in from the
lounge and said, Jason, I think you got something here, man. I was feeling the same thing.
So, I went into the lounge and I heard them calling up Michael and, they told him it was great.
So then, a number of months later I went into the
Hit Factor and I was working on Luther Vandross Christmas album and somebody said to
me, Jason Miles on Michael Jacksons album,
get down. I asked what they were talking about
and they said, I was at the mix of They Dont
Care About Us They were trying all the different people that they used on the song OK, and all
of a sudden, Michael asked, Whos that? And
they tell him, Its Jason Miles. And he said,
Thats good, I like that. And, they ended up
using my stuff. And then a year later, I opened
up my door downstairs, and there was a thin box,
I opened it up and it was a 10 Million platinum
disc that they sent me. I got it hanging up downstairs. Ive got a lot of them, and Ive got a lot of
them that people owe me. Luther always sent me
stuff. I keep the original ones that were just the
platinum ones that means that I was on the first
wave.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(continued on page 33)


To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Older jazz musicians are living


in poverty while jazz club
owners are getting rich.
NYCs top jazz clubs refuse to contribute to
pensions that would allow jazz artists to retire
with dignity. Hardworking jazz musicians
deserve better! Help us help them.
To sign the petition and learn more, visit:

JusticeforJazzArtists.org

Jazz Tuesdays
at the John Birks Gillespie Auditorium in the NYC Bahai Center

Home base for Legendary


Pianist/Composer

Mike Longo

and his 17 piece big band


The NY State of the Art
Jazz Ensemble
World Class Jazz At Affordable Prices

All Shows on Tuesdays


at 8:00 PM

DECEMBER 3
Richard Boukas Brazilian
Quarteto Moderno
DECEMBER 10
Gary Morgan and
Panamericana
The NYC Bahai Center
53 E. 11th Street
(btw. University Place & Broadway)
Shows: 8:00 and 9:30 PM
General Admission: $15
Students: $10

www.jazzbeat.com
212-222-5159

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
How to Get Your Gigs and Events Listed in Jazz Inside Magazine
Submit your listings via e-mail to info@jazzinsidemagazine.com. Include date, times, location,
phone, tickets/reservations. Deadline: 15th of the month preceding publication (Dec. 15 for Jan.)
(We cannot guarantee the publication of all calendar submissions.

ADVERTISING: Reserve your ads to promote your events and get the marketing
advantage of controlling your own message size, content, image, identity, photos and more. Contact the advertising department:
215-887-8880 | Advertising@JazzInsideMagazine.com

Sunday, December 1
Jeremy Baum, The Falcon, 10AM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Webster Ave. Klezmer, City Winery, 11:00 AM. 155 Varick St.
Dandy Wellington & His Band at The Astor Room, 11:30 AM.
34-12 36th St., Astoria, Queens.
Todd Marcus 4 at Garage, 11:30 AM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Afro-Latin Jazz Cats at Fat Cat, 12:00 PM. 75 Christopher St.
Warren Chiasson 4: Vibes for Duke at Monmouth County
Library, 2:00 PM. 125 Symmes Dr., Manalapan NJ.
Mauricio DeSouza Group at Smalls, 4:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Bill Charlap at Deer Head Inn, 5:00 PM. 5 Main St., Delaware
Water Gap PA.
Jessica Medina 4 at Somethin Jazz, 5:00 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Kane Mathis at Barbes, 5:30 PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Cheyenne Jackson at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Noel Brennan at Caffe Vivaldi, 6PM. 32 Jones St.
Nicolas Letman-Burtinovic/ Kyoko Kitamura at Downtown
Music Gallery, 6PM. 13 Monroe St.
Terry Waldo at Fat Cat, 6PM. 75 Christopher St.
Rosalyn McClore 3 at The National, 6PM. 517 Lexington Ave.
Marlene VerPlanck, Shanghai Jazz, 6PM. 24 Main., Madison NJ.

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Elly Hoyt Band at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.


Carrie Jackson/Nick Verdi 5 at Trumpets, 7PM. 6 Depot Sq.,
Montclair NJ.
Wycliffe Gordon & Friends at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and
9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Maria Schneider Orchestra at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM.
116 E. 27th St.
Kenny Endo/Kaoru Watanabe at Joes Pub, 7:30 PM. 425
Lafayette St.
Carrie Jackson at Trumpets, 7:30 and 9:15 PM. 6 Depot Sq.,
Montclair NJ.
Freddy Cole at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Shrine Big Band at Shrine, 8PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Abraxas (feat. Eyal Maoz) Plays John Zorns Metempsychomagia at The Stone, 8:00, 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Sheila Mark at Van Goghs Ear, 8PM. 1017 Stuyvesant Ave.,
Union NJ.
Kirk Knuffke/Mike Pride 2 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29
Cornelia St.
Fat Cat Big Band at Fat Cat, 8:30 PM. 75 Christopher St.
Sarah Hayes at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Jason Moran, Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
John Lander 3 at Caffe Vivaldi, 9PM. 32 Jones St.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 16)

15

Costas Baltazanis Acoustic 4 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.


La Tematika at Gonzalez y Gonzalez, 9:30 and 11:30 PM. 192 Mercer St.
Joey Arias Experience at Joes Pub, 9:30 PM. 425 Lafayette St.
Livio Almeida at Metropolitan Room, 9:30 PM. 34 W. 22nd St.
Abe Ovadia 3 at Garage, 11PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Ben Paterson 3 at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.
After Hours Session at Fat Cat, 1:00 AM. 75 Christopher St.

Monday, December 2
Nick Finzer 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Howard Williams Jazz Orchestra at Garage, 7PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Vanessa Trouble at Morso, 7PM. 420 E. 59th St.
Meeting: International Women in Jazz at Saint Peters Church, 7PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
George Lesiw Band at Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Drew Williams 3 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Kelley Suttenfield at Zinc Bar, 7PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Gabriel Alegria Afro-Peruvian 6 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30, 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Mingus Orchestra at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Rutgers Jazz Ensemble II at Nicholas Music Center, 7:30 PM. 85 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
Hans Glawischnig 3 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Jermaine Paul at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Bob Parins Pint-Sized Cocktail Orchestra at Radegast Hall, 8PM. 113 N. 3rd St., Brooklyn.
Shu Odamura/Noah McNeil at Tomi Jazz, 8PM. 239 E. 53rd St.
Joe Sanchez Band at Shapeshifter Lab, 8:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Eliane Amherd 3 , Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
David Amram & Company at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Glenn Franke Big Band at Highland Place, 8:30 PM. 5 Highland PL., Maplewood NJ.
Les Paul 3 feat. Joe Louis Walker at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 1650 Broadway.
Tony Scherr 3 w/Anton Fier at Stage 1, Rockwood Music Hall, 9PM. 196 Allen St.
Michael Blanco 5 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Victor Jones/Jay Rodriguez: In the Spirit of Gil Evans at Zinc Bar, 9:00 and 11PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Cheyenne Jackson at Birdland, 9:15 PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Simona DeRosa at Metropolitan Room, 9:30 PM. 34 W. 22nd St.
Jesse Fischer 7 & Vein Melter w/Eddie Henderson: A Tribute to Herbie Hancocks Headhunters at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Jim Campilongo 3 at Stage 1, Rockwood Music Hall, 10PM. 196 Allen St.
Cortex at Shrine, 10PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Alex Menassian 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
The Collective at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.

Tuesday, December 3

Rutgers Youth Jazz Wkshp at Nicholas Music Center, 5PM. 85 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
Yvonnick Prene 4 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Abe Ovadia 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Bob Smith 3 w/Clifford Adams at Amici Milano, 7PM. 6000 Chestnut Ave., Trenton NJ.
Martha Lorin at Metropolitan Room, 7PM. 34 W. 22nd St.
Thana Alexa 5 at Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Kevin Harris Project at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Ted Rosenthal 3 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Joe Locke/Geoff Keezer 4 at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
David Sanborn at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Richard Boukas 4 at NYC Bahai Center, 8:00 and 9:30 PM. 53 E. 11th St.
Joel Beaver 3 at Radegast Hall, 8PM. 113 N. 3rd St., Brooklyn.
Joe Magnarelli/Steve Ash at Sandi Pointe Coastal Bistro, 8PM. 908 Shore Rd., Somers Point NJ.
Lauren Lee 2 at Shrine, 8PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Joe Lovano 3 at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Suzan Veneman Band at Tumultys Pub, 8PM. 361 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
Jack Jeffers & the New York Classics at Zinc Bar, 8:00 and 10PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Brad Jones Avant Lounge at Shapeshifter Lab, 8:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Matt Marantz 3 , Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Stacey Kent at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Nikolaj Hess 3 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Myles Mancuso Band at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 1650 Broadway.
Esperanza Spaulding at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Bill Carneys Jug Addicts at Bar Chord, 9PM. 1008 Cortelyou Rd., Brooklyn.
Cacw w/Landon Knoblock at Korzo, 9PM. 667 5th Ave., Brooklyn.
Dylan Doyle Band at Shrine, 9PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Kathleen Potton at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Ben Allison Band at Joes Pub, 9:30 PM. 425 Lafayette St.
Tyler Gilmore 3 at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Chickentown at The Wayland, 9:30 PM. 700 E. 9th St.
Joe Lovano 5 w/Judi Silvano at The Stone, 10PM. Corner of 2nd St. & Avenue C.
Nobuki Takamen 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.

Wednesday, December 4
Jazz Clinic at Flushing Town Hall, 5:00 PM. Free; for high school students and older. 137-35
Northern Blvd., Flushing, Queens.
Elly Koury 5 at Somethin Jazz, 5:45 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Mauricio DeSouza at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Kevin Wang 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
16

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Lindsay Horner at The Falcon, 7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Jam Session at Flushing Town Hall, 7PM. 137-35 Northern
Blvd., Flushing, Queens.
Michael Mwenso/Brianna Thomas/Charanee Wade Holiday
Show at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Gregoire Maret, Harlem Stage, 7:30 PM. 150 Convent Ave.
Marc Cary 3 at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Monday Blues Jazz Orchestra at Stardust Ballroom, 7:30 PM.
363 W. Browning St., Bellmawr NJ.
Jam Session at Trumpets, 7:30 PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
David Sanborn at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Lainie Cooke 4 at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Vanessa Perea Group at New Brunswick Hyatt, 8PM. 2 Albany
St., New Brunswick NJ.
Swingadelic, Pilsener Haus, 8PM. 1422 Grand St., Hoboken NJ.
Akiko Tsuruga 4 at Riverdale Steak House, 8:00 and 9:30 PM.
5700 Riverdale Ave., Bronx.
Joe Lovano/Kenny Werner at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Valery Ponamarev Big Band at Zinc Bar, 8PM. Concert at 8PM;
Jam Session to follow. 82 W. 3rd St.
Iris Ornig, Shapeshifter Lab, 8:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Stacey Kent at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Jean-Michel Pilc 3 + Rhys Tivey at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM.
29 Cornelia St.
Billy Martin at Iridium, 8:30 and 10PM. 1650 Broadway.
Esperanza Spaulding at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Mitch Marcus 4 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Sylvie Courvoisier 3 at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell
Pl., Brooklyn.
Brian Charette 6 at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Edmar Castaeda at Terraza 7, 9:30 PM. 40-19 Gleane St.,
Elmhurst, Queens.
Richard Bliwas 4 at Silvana, 10PM. 300 W. 116th St.
Joe Lovano/Kenny Werner/Andrew Cyrille at The Stone, 10PM.
2nd St & Ave C.
Martin Zarzar Group w/Dave Eggar & Women of the World at
Shapeshifter Lab, 10:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Adam Moezina 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S..
Jae Young Jeong at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Carlos Abadie 5 at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Colette Michaan 6 at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell


Pl., Brooklyn.
Brian Charette 6 at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Oriente Lopez, Terraza 7, 40-19 Gleane St., Elmhurst, Queens.
Will Mason Ensemble at Douglass Street Music Collective,
10PM. 295 Douglass St., Brooklyn.
Kyoko Oyobe 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Gotham Sophisticats at Cafe Carlyle, 10:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Lluis Capdevila 3 at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.

Friday, December 6
Guy Mintus 3 at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Matt King Plays Holiday Music at Shanghai Jazz, 6:30 and 8:30
PM. 24 Main St., Madison NJ.
Tesar Brothers 3 at Classic Quiche Cafe, 7PM. 330 Queen
Anne Rd., Teaneck NJ.
Masami Ishikawa 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.

Kim Parker & Friends at Deer Head Inn, 7PM. 5 Main St., Delaware Water Gap PA.
Stephen Fuller, The Priory, 7PM. 233 W. Market St., Newark NJ.
InnoVox Green at Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM. 18 Whitwell Pl.,
Brooklyn.
Brown House at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
J.C. Stylles 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Anat Cohen 4 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10
Columbus Cir. #5
Benny Golson, Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Hayes Greenfield/Roger Rosenberg 4 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183
W. 10th St.
Hot Club of Flatbush at Amuse Wine Bar, 8PM. 121 Ludlow St.
David Sanborn at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Lisa Dowling/Shaun Barlow at Firehouse Space, 8PM. 246
Frost St., Brooklyn.
Ayodele Maakheru & Windsong String Ensemble at Flushing
Town Hall, 8PM. 137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, Queens.
CUBINDUS feat. Rez Abbasi at Greenwich House, 8PM. 46
Barrow St.

Thursday, December 5
B. D. Lenz at Hawke Point, 5:30 PM. 294 State Rte. 31 S.,
Washington NJ.
Native Soul at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Nick Finzer 4 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Hajime Yoshida at Shrine, 6PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Dwayne Clemons 5 at Smalls, 6PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Nicholas Brust 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Rio Clemente feat. Bill Crow at Bruschetta Restaurant, 7PM.
Reservations recommended. 292 Passaic Ave., Fairfield NJ.
Marco DiGennaro at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.
Bob DeVos, Vic Juris at Glen Rock Inn, 7PM. 222 Rock Rd.,
Glen Rock NJ.
Karl Bergers Improviers Orchestra at Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM.
Workshop at 7PM; concert at 8PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Gary Fogel 5 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Bria Skonberg 4 + Kate Davis 3 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola,
7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Benny Golson at Jazz Standard, 7:30, 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Carrie Jackson, 16 Prospect, 8PM. 16 Prospect, Westfield NJ.
David Sanborn at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Scott Morgan, Fred Hersch at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Tia Fuller, Makeda, 8PM. 338 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
Greg Bufford, Papillon 25, 8PM. 25 Valley St., South Orange NJ.
Stevie Holland in Love, Linda: The Life of Mrs. Cole Porter at
Saint Peters Church, 8PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Stephanie Rivers at Shrine, 8PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Joe Lovano 9 feat. Tim Hagans & Judi Silvano at The Stone,
8:00 and 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Old Time Musketry at Caffe Vivaldi, 8:15 PM. 32 Jones St.
Clemens Orth 3 at Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Mike Rood 3 , Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Stacey Kent at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Frank Lacy at Ginnys Supper Club, 8:30 PM. 310 Lenox Ave.
NRBQ at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 1650 Broadway.
Esperanza Spaulding at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Nick Sanders, Jazz Gallery, 9 & 11PM. 5th floor, 1160 Broadway.
Bojaira at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Yuko Sings at Tomi Jazz, 9PM. 239 E. 53rd St.
Gregorio Uribe Big Band at Zinc Bar, 82 W. 3rd St.
Bianco Martinis at Caffe Vivaldi, 9:30 PM. 32 Jones St.
Massive Brass at Drom, 9:30 PM. 85 Avenue A.
Sonido Costeno at Gonzalez y Gonzalez, 9:30 and 11:30 PM.
192 Mercer St.
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 18)


17

Nikki Armstrong: Lady Sings the Blues at Lucilles, B.B. King


Blues Club, 8PM. 237 W. 42nd St.
Ted Rosenthal 3 at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
David Benoit: A Charlie Brown Christmas at South Orange
Performing Arts Center, 8PM. 1 SOPAC Way, South Orange NJ.
Joe Lovano/Milford Graves at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Tribute to George Duke at Trumpets, 8:00 and 10PM. Artists
TBA. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Stacey Kent at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Kenny Garrett Band at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 1650 Broadway.
Esperanza Spaulding at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Sara Serpa 5 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 9PM. 29 Cornelia St.
David Virelles 4 at Jazz Gallery, 9:00 and 11PM. 5th floor, 1160
Broadway.
Doug White 5 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Sultans of String at Joes Pub, 9:30 PM. 425 Lafayette St.
Florian Hoefner Group at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Melissa Aldana 3 at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Ron Sunshine Orchestra at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Luis Bonilla 3 at Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University Pl.
Smokeys Secret Family at Barbes, 10PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
New Brunswick Groove Fusion at Destination Dogs, 10PM.
101 Paterson St., New Brunswick NJ.
Joe Lovano 3 at The Stone, 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Andre Matos 4 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 10:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St
Jason Prover & Sneak Thievery Orchestra at Garage, 10:45
PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Nicholas Biellos NB5tet at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Alex Diaz y Son de la Calle at Gonzalez y Gonzalez, 11:30 PM
and 1:30 AM. 192 Mercer St.
Ritmosis at Blue Note, 12:30 AM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Greg Murphy 4 at Smalls, 1:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Visit www.JazzNewswire.com
Saturday, December 7

December 2013
All Shows on Tuesdays at 8PM
December 3:
Richard Boukas Brazilian Quarteto Moderno
December 10:
Gary Morgan and Panamericana

18

Larry Newcomb 4 at Garage, 12:00 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.


12th Night Klezmer at Metropolitan Room, 34 W. 22nd St.
New York Jazz Academy Rehearsal at Somethin Jazz, 12:00
PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Bernard Woma & Saakumu Dance Troupe at Shapeshifter Lab,
2:00 PM. Workshop at 2:00 PM; 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Andrew Grau at Somethin Jazz, 5:00 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Barbara Carroll at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Bill Frisells Big Sur 5 at (Le) Poisson Rouge, 6:00 and 8:30
PM. 158 Bleecker St.
Tierney Ryan at Shrine, 6PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Jesse Simpson at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
A Charlie Brown Christmas: Keith Ingham 3 Plays Vince
Guaraldi at Shanghai Jazz, 24 Main St., Madison NJ.
Abe Ovadia 3 at Dauphin Grille, Berkeley Oceanfront Hotel,
7PM. 1401 Ocean Ave., Asbury Park NJ.
Organik Vibe 3 + 1 at Deer Head Inn, 7PM. 5 Main St., Delaware
Water Gap PA.
Rebecca Martin/Larry Grenadier at Stage 2, Rockwood Music
Hall, 7PM. 196 Allen St.
Julius Rodriguez Group at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Dominick Patrellese at La Tavolta Cucina, 7PM. 700 Old Bridge
Tpke., South River NJ.
Leslie Pintchik 3 , Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, & 11:30 PM. 129
MacDougal St.
Anat Cohen 4 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10
Columbus Cir. #5
Benny Golson, Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Greg Skaff 3 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Radio Jarocho at Barbes, 8PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
David Sanborn at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Richard Benetar 4 at Cleopatras Needle, 8PM. 2485 Broadway.
Ben Monder at Greenwich House, 8PM. 46 Barrow St.
Blue Vipers of Brooklyn at Jewish Community Center, 8PM.
334 Amsterdam Ave.
Bill Mays 3 w/Marvin Stamm at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
New Standard w/Layonne Holmes at The Mill, 8PM. 101 Old Mill
Rd., Spring Lake Heights NJ.
Salsapalooza feat. Andy Montaez, Grupo Niche, & Jerry
Rivera at New Jersey Performing Arts Center, 8PM. 1 Center
St., Newark NJ.
Greg Abate 4 at Puffin Cultural Forum, 8PM. 20 Puffin Way,
Teaneck NJ.
Maddy Ruff at Shrine, 8PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Joe Lovano at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Irini Res & The Jazz Mix at Sugar Bar, 8PM. 254 W. 72nd St.

Bob Baldwin at Trumpets, 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.


Stacey Kent at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Edge of Jazz at Insanitea, 8:30 PM. 570 Bloomfield Ave., Montclair NJ
Kenny Garrett Band at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 1650 Broadway.
Alexander Perry at Shapeshifter Lab, 8:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl.,
Brooklyn.
Esperanza Spaulding at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Rez Abassi, Cornelia St. Cafe, 29 Cornelia St.
David Virelles 4 at Jazz Gallery, 9:00 and 11PM. 5th floor, 1160
Broadway.
Rome Neals Banana Puddin Jazz at Nuyorican Poets Cafe,
9PM. 236 E. 3rd St.
Jimmy Owens: A Tribute to Donald Byrd at Sistas Place, 9:00
and 10:30 PM. 456 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn.
Noshir Mody 5 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Trio Cachimba at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 W. 47th St.
Nick Hempton 4 w/Akiko Tsuruga at Showmans, 9:30 PM,
11:30 PM, & 1:30 AM. 375 W. 125th St.
Melissa Aldana 3 at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Swingadelic at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Marianni at Zinc Bar, 9:30 PM, 11PM, & 12:30 AM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Luis Bonilla 3 at Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University Pl.
Banda Sinaloense at Barbes, 10PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Diego Obregon & Grupo Chonta at Terraza 7, 10:30 PM. 40-19
Gleane St., Elmhurst, Queens.
Peter Valera & the Jump Blues Band at Garage, 10:45 PM. 99
7th Ave. S.
Jack Giannini Group at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Willie Alvarez at Gonzalez y Gonzalez, 11:30 PM and 1:30 AM.
192 Mercer St.
Camille Ganier Jones at Blue Note, 12:30 AM. 131 W. 3rd St.

Sunday, December 8
Lou Caputo 4 at Garage, 11:30 AM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Aaron Copland School of Music Guerilla Ensemble at Flushing
Town Hall, 2:00 PM. 137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, Queens.
Gordon James at Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 2:00 PM. 46 Yard
Rd., Pennington NJ.
Zisl Slepovitch Klezmer 3 at Jewish Heritage Museum of
Monmouth County, 2PM. 310 Mounts Corner Dr., Freehold NJ
Marlene VerPlanck at Tenafly Public Library, 2:00 PM. Free.
100 River Edge Dr., Tenafly NJ.
Juilliard Jazz Ensemble w/Alicia Olatuja at South Orange
Performing Arts Center, 3PM. 1 SOPAC Way, South Orange NJ.
Dr. Dubious & The Agnostics at Teaneck Public Library, 3:00
PM. 840 Teaneck RD., Teaneck NJ.
Ellington at Christmas feat. Savion Glover, Dance Theatre of
Harlem, Keith David, David Berger Orchestra, Lizz Wright, and
Priscilla Baskerville at New Jersey Performing Arts Center,
4:00 PM. 1 Center St., Newark NJ.
Eddie Henderson 4 at Shea Auditorium, William Paterson
University, 4:00 PM. 300 Pompton Rd., Wayne NJ.
Eric Divito 3 at Smalls, 4:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Bob Leive & Wooster St. Trolley Band at Deer Head Inn, 5:00
PM. 5 Main St., Delaware Water Gap PA.
Frank Senior/Valerie Capers at Saint Peters Church, 5:00 PM.
619 Lexington Ave.
Linda Presgrave 5 at Somethin Jazz, 5:00 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Craig Yaremko, Trumpets, 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Natalie Toro at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Noel Brennan at Caffe Vivaldi, 6PM. 32 Jones St.
Francois Grillot String 4 w/Ken Filiano at Downtown Music
Gallery, 6PM. 13 Monroe St.
Nick Finzer at The National, 6PM. 517 Lexington Ave.
John Carlini/Bill Robinson at Shanghai Jazz, 6PM. 24 Main St.,
Madison NJ.
Vanessa Trouble, Pierres, 2468 Main St., Bridgehampton NY.
Jazzmosis + Keith Pray at The Falcon, 7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W,
Marlboro NY.
Sam Shivraj at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Anat Cohen, Dizzys Club, 7:30, 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Benny Golson, Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Chris Flory 3 w/Joe Cohn at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
David Sanborn at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Eric Benet at B.B. King Blues Club, 8PM. 237 W. 42nd St.
Dan Blake: The Dust Moves for Saxophone, String Quartet &
Animation at Roulette, 8PM. 509 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn.
Saxophone Explosion: Joe Lovano 4 w/ guest saxophonists at
The Stone, 8:00 and 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Matt Stevens, Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Kenny Garrett Band at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 1650 Broadway.
Swingadelic at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Esperanza Spaulding at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
John Lander 3 at Caffe Vivaldi, 9PM. 32 Jones St.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Lea Anderson at Shrine, 9PM. 2271 7th Ave.


Joe Benjamin at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Cuban All Stars at Gonzalez y Gonzalez, 9:30 and 11:30 PM.
192 Mercer St.
Aidan Carroll 6 feat. Logan Richardson at Shapeshifter Lab,
9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Bailsmen at The Wayland, 9:30 PM. 700 E. 9th St.
Jelani Bauman at Shrine, 10PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Afron Mantra at Garage, 11PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Grant Stewart 4 at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Monday, December 9
Joe Carter/Ali Ryerson at United Congregational Church,
12:05 PM. Free. 877 Park Ave., Bridgeport CT.
Rutgers Youth Jazz Workshop at Nicholas Music Center, 5:00
PM. 85 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
Aleksi Glick 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Kyle Athayde Dance Party at Garage, 7PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Meeting: International Women in Jazz at Saint Peters Church,
7PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Amanda Ruzza, Shapeshifter, 7PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Michael Eaton 4 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Nancy Harms at Zinc Bar, 7PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Lyrics and Lyricists: Paul Shaffer Hosts an 80th Birthday
Celebration of Mike Stoller with a Tribute to Jerry Leiber at
Kaufmann Concert Hall, 92nd Street Y, 7:30 PM. Artists include
Dee Dee Bridgewater, Ben E. King, Melissa Manchester, The
Coasters, Corky Hale, Chuck Jackson, Sally Kellerman, Betty
LaVette, Tommy Tune, Steve Tyrell, and others. Corner of 92nd
St. and Lexington Ave.
Steve Lyman Group at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Maya Azucena at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Koran Agan at Radegast Hall, 8PM. 113 N. 3rd St., Brooklyn.
Glenn Zaleski at Shapeshifter, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Magos Herrera 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Eddie Gomez/Kenny Barron 4 at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Tangiers Blues Band at Iridium, 1650 Broadway.
Tony Scherr 3 w/Anton Fier at Stage 1, Rockwood Music Hall,
9PM. 196 Allen St.
Michael Sarian 5 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Eddie Allen Big Band w/Wayne Escoffery at Zinc Bar, 9PM. 82
W. 3rd St.
Mr. Wau-Wa Plays the Songs of Bertolt Brecht at Barbes, 9:30
PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
New York Youth Symphony Jazz Classic at Dizzys Club Coca
Cola, 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Andrew McCormack 3 at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Jim Campilongo 3 at Stage 1, Rockwood Music Hall, 10PM.
196 Allen St.
Oz Noy & Supermoon at The Bitter End, 10:30 PM. 147
Bleecker St.
Chris Beck 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.

Tuesday, December 10
Yovsany Terry/New School West African Heritage Ensemble at
Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 1:00, 7:30, & 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir.
Rob Edwards 4 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Duke Bantu X at Shrine, 6PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Adam OFarrill 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Ted Poor 3 at The Falcon, 7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
John LaTona 2 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Alex Sipiagin 5 w/Steve Wilson at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30
PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Tap Dance 6 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Fourplay at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Juilliard Jazz Ensembles at Paul Hall, Juilliard School, 8PM.
60 Lincoln Ctr. Plaza.
Gary Morgan & Panamerica at NYC Bahai Center, 8:00 and
9:30 PM. 53 E. 11th St.
The Bailsmen at Radegast Hall, 8PM. 113 N. 3rd St., Brooklyn.
Frank Strauss/Keith Hollis at Sandi Pointe Coastal Bistro,
8PM. 908 Shore Rd., Somers Point NJ.
Daniel Zamir/Shai Maestro at The Stone, 8:00 and 10PM. 2nd St
& Ave C.
Tucker Flythe Band at Tumultys Pub, 8PM. 361 George St.,
New Brunswick NJ.
Richard Bona at Zinc Bar, 8:00 and 10PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Beat Masters feat. Billy Martin & Cyro Baptista at Shapeshifter
Lab, 8:15 and 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Jeff McLaughlin 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Eddie Gomez/Kenny Barron 4 at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Fellowship Band, Village Vanguard, 8:30/10:30 PM. 178 7 Av S.
Small Elephant Band at Korzo, 9PM. 667 5th Ave., Brooklyn.
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Kenji Herbert 3 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.


SHIFT feat. Logan Richardson at Smalls, 10PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Jason Ennis 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Dave Damiani, Gerry Gibbs. Somethin Jazz, 212 E. 52 St.

Wednesday, December 11

Margi Guanquinto 3 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.


Quentin Angus, Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Bucky Pizzarelli, Shanghai Jazz, 7PM. 24 Main St., Madison NJ.
Kirk Knuffke, Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Pier Luigi Salami 3 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Roger Davidson at Caffe Vivaldi, 7:15 PM. 32 Jones St.
Juilliard Jazz Ensemble at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and
9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
George Coleman 8 at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E.
27th St.
Holli Ross & Montclair State U. Students at Trumpets, 7:30 and
9:15 PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Fourplay at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Ignacio Berroa 4 w/Don Friedman at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Tommy Campbell, New Brunswick Hyatt, 8PM. 2 Albany St.,
New Brunswick NJ.
Daniel Zamir 4 at The Stone, 8:00 and 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Sewer Ratz at Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Eddie Gomez/Kenny Barron 4 at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Paul Jones 6 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
New West Guitar Group at The Falcon, 8:30 PM. 1348 Rt. 9W,
Marlboro NY.
Fellowship Band at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Grand St. Stompers at Radegast Hall, 9PM. 113 N. 3rd St.,
Brooklyn.
Ted Poor 3 at Seeds, 9PM. 617 Vanderbilt Ave., Brooklyn.
Yiannis Kassetas 6 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Richard Bona: Mandekan Cubana at Zinc Bar, 9PM, 10:30 PM,
& 12:00 AM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Joe Alterman 3 at Caffe Vivaldi, 9:30 PM. 32 Jones St.
Brian Landrus, Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Harish Raghavan Group at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Chris Carroll 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Gustavo Cortinas 4 at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Noah Preminger 4 at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Visit www.JazzNewswire.com
Thursday, December 12

Shoshana Bush at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.


Champian Fulton 4 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
New York Bakery Connection at Shrine, 6PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Alex Hoffman Group at Smalls, 6PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Mike Robinson 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Masami Ishikawa 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Bdway.
Dave Samuels at The Falcon, 7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Gabriel Johnson at Metropolitan Room, 7PM. 34 W. 22nd St.
Michael Gregory Jackson, Shapeshifter, 18 Whitwell Pl., Bklyn.
Carol Leven, Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Bobby Watson & Horizon at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and
9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
John OGallaghers Weben Project at Greenwich House, 7:30
PM. 46 Barrow St.
George Coleman 8 at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E.
27th St.
Vision Collaboration Night: Music & Dance by Jason Hwang,
Rachel Bernsen, Taylor Ho Bynum, William Parker, Patricia
Nicolson, and others at Teatro LaTea Theater, 7:30 PM. 107
Suffolk St.
Don Braden & Montclair State U. students at Trumpets, 7:30
and 9:15 PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Carrie Jackson 3 at 16 Prospect Wine Bar, 8PM. 16 Prospect
St., Westfield NJ.
Fourplay at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Rachel Brown at Ginnys Supper Club, 8:00 and 10PM. 310
Lenox Ave.
Maya Nova 4 at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Big Band Holidays: JALC Orchestra/Cecile McLorin Salvant at
Rose Theater, Lincoln Center, 8PM. Broadway & 60th St.
Ralph Bowen 4 at Makeda, 338 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
James Ilgenfritz/ Reiner van Houdt Play Anthony Broaxton,
Pauline Oliveros at Roulette, 8PM. 509 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn.
Daniel Zamir at The Stone, 8:00 and 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Rob Balducci, Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Assaf Kehati 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 20)


19

Eddie Gomez/Kenny Barron 4 at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.


Tom Chang & Water Sign at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29
Cornelia St.
Chad Smiths Bombastic Meatbats at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM.
1650 Broadway.
Fellowship Band at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Richard Bona: Mandekan Cubana at Zinc Bar, 8:30, 10:30 PM.
82 W. 3rd St.
Joshua Breakstone 3 at Signature Theatre, 8:45 PM. 480 W.
42nd St.
Dandy Wellington & His Band at Cafe Tallulah, 9PM. 240
Columbus Ave.
Kyle Poole & the Gang at Jazz Gallery, 9:00 and 11PM. 5th floor,
1160 Broadway.
Howard Fishman & The Biting Fish Brass Band at Radegast
Hall, 9PM. 113 N. 3rd St., Brooklyn.
Ted Poor 3 at Seeds, 9PM. 617 Vanderbilt Ave., Brooklyn.
30th Street Blues Band at Shrine, 9PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Verve Jazz Ensemble at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Mimi Jones 3 at Bar Thalia, Symphony Space, 9PM. 2537
Broadway.
Grand St. Stompers at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 W.
47th St.
Grupo Arcano at Gonzalez y Gonzalez, 9:30 and 11:30 PM. 192
Mercer St.
Jocelyn Shannon Group at Metropolitan Room, 34 W. 22nd St.
Maritri Garrett, Shapeshifter, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Harish Raghavan Group at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Mauricio Zottarelli 4 at Terraza 7, 9:30 PM. 40-19 Gleane St.,
Elmhurst, Queens.
Benjamin Sutton 4 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Caroline Jones at Cafe Carlyle, 10:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Joshua Trinidad 4 at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.

Friday, December 13
Big Band Holidays: JALC Orchestra/Cecile McLorin Salvant at
Rose Theater, Lincoln Center, 2:00 and 8PM. Corner of Broadway & 60th St.
Alma Mii 3 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 6PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Joel Beaver 3 at Radegast Hall, 6PM. 113 N. 3rd St., Brooklyn.
John David Simon 3 at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Javon Jackson, Shanghai Jazz, 24 Main St., Madison NJ.
Reggie Pittman/Loren Daniels 4 at Classic Quiche Cafe, 7PM.
330 Queen Anne Rd., Teaneck NJ.
Rudi Mwongozi 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.
Vinny Bianchis La Cuchina at Deer Head Inn, 7PM. 5 Main St.,
Delaware Water Gap PA.
Marco Benevento Band at The Falcon, 7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W,
Marlboro NY.
Felix Cabrera/Robert Ross Band at Lucilles, B.B. King Blues
Club, 7PM. 237 W. 42nd St.
One feat. Ivo Perelman & Joe Morris at Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM.
18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Phil Palombi 3 w/Don Friedman & Eliot Zigmund at Smalls,
7PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Les Grant at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Bulgaria Meets New York w/Paul Bollenback & special guests
at Zinc Bar, 7PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Jon Irbagon 3 , Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, & 11:30 PM. 129
MacDougal St.
Bobby Watson & Horizon at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and
9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
George Coleman 8 at Jazz Standard, 7:30, 9:30, & 11:30 PM.
116 E. 27th St.
Vision Collaboration Night: Music & Dance by Jason Hwang,
William Parker, Patricia Nicolson, and others at Teatro LaTea
Theater, 7:30 PM. 107 Suffolk St.
Amanda Monaco 4: Carols & Car Races at Flushing Town Hall,
8PM. 137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, Queens.
Alan & Marilyn Bergman w/Christine Ebersole, Tyne Daly &
Lari White at New Jersey Performing Arts Center, 8PM. 1
Center St., Newark NJ.
Fourplay at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Michael Carvin Experience at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Ron Aprea, Trumpets, 8:00, 10PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Plymouth feat. Joe Morris & Gerald Cleaver at Shapeshifter
Lab, 8:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Eddie Gomez/Kenny Barron 4 at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Fellowship Band at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Ingrod Laubrock 5 w/Tim Berne at Cornelia St. Cafe, 9:00 and
10:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Joanne Weaver at Flatiron Room, 9PM. 37 W. 26th St.
Ted Poor 3 at Seeds, 9PM. 617 Vanderbilt Ave., Brooklyn.
Somethin Vopcal w/Matt Baker 3 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212
E. 52 St.
Smith & 9th at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 W. 47th St.
20

Slobber Pup feat. Jamie Saft & Joe Morris at Shapeshifter Lab,
9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
John DiMartino 2 at Knickerbocker Bar, 33 University Pl.
Biting Fish Brass Band at Barbes, 10PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Freddie Redd at Smalls, 10:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Manuel Valera & New Cuban Express at Terraza 7, 10:30 PM.
40-19 Gleane St., Elmhurst, Queens.
Kevin Dorn & the Big 72 at Garage, 10:45 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Halley Hiatt & Sibling at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Willie Villegas y Entre Amigos at Gonzalez y Gonzalez, 11:30
PM and 1:30 AM. 192 Mercer St.
Suoni Italiani: Simona Molinari & La Mosca Jazz Band at Blue
Note, 12:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Lawrence Leathers at Smalls, 1:15 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Saturday, December 14
Alex Layne 3 at Garage, 12:00 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Billy Lawlor 3: Holiday Concert at Howell Library, 2:00 PM. 318
Old Tavern Rd., Howell NJ.
Aida Brandes 6 at Somethin Jazz, 5:00 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Sandy Sasso 4 at 55 Bar, 6PM. 55 Christopher St.
Outer Bodies 4 at Shrine, 6PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Dre Barnes Project at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Javon Jackson 4 at Shanghai Jazz, 6:30 and 8:45 PM. 24 Main
St., Madison NJ.
Bob Dorough 3 at Deer Head Inn, 7PM. 5 Main St., Delaware
Water Gap PA.
Chris Bergson Band + The Flaming Meatballs at The Falcon,
7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Russ Wilcox 7 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Rick Stone 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Bobby Watson & Horizon at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and
9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Volora Howell: A Tribute to Phyllis Hyman at Ginnys Supper
Club, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 310 Lenox Ave.
George Coleman 8 at Jazz Standard, 7:30, 9:30, & 11:30 PM.
116 E. 27th St.
Dave Glasser 5 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Fourplay at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Larry Newcomb 4 at Cleopatras Needle, 8PM. 2485 Broadway.
Michael Lytle 6 w/Steve Swell & Weasel Walter at Firehouse
Space, 8:00 and 9:30 PM. 246 Frost St., Brooklyn.
Les Paul 3 w/Johnny Farina at Lucilles, B.B. King Blues Club,
8PM. 237 W. 42nd St.
Michael Carvin Experience at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Kevin Hildebrandt 3 at The Mill, 8PM. 101 Old Mill Rd., Spring
Lake Heights NJ.
Anima Claudine Myers at Roulette, 8PM. 509 Atlantic Ave.,
Brooklyn.
Willie McBlind Blues Band at Shrine, 8PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Spanish Harlem Orchestra at South Orange Performing Arts
Center, 8PM. 1 SOPAC Way, South Orange NJ.
Daniel Zamir and SATLAH at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Rob Silverman at Sugar Bar, 8PM. 254 W. 72nd St.
Houston Person at Trumpets, 8:00 and 10PM. 6 Depot Sq.,
Montclair NJ.
Eddie Gomez/Kenny Barron 4 at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Chad Smiths Bombastic Meatbats at Iridium, 8:30, 10:30 PM.
1650 Broadway.
Fellowship Band at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Sheila Jordan 3 w/Alan Broadbent at Cornelia St. Cafe, 9:00
and 10:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Patrick Cornelius, Jazz Gallery, 9PM. 5th floor, 1160 Broadway.
Ted Poor 3 at Seeds, 9PM. 617 Vanderbilt Ave., Brooklyn.
Ed Stoute, Sistas Place, 9PM. 456 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn.
Swingadelic at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Marianni at Zinc Bar, 9:30 PM, 11PM, & 12:30 AM. 82 W. 3rd St.
John DiMartino at Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University Pl.
Baby Soda Jazz Band at Barbes, 10PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Freddie Redd at Smalls, 10:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Daylight Blues Band at Garage, 10:45 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
John Petrucelli 5 at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Scot Albertson/Ron Jackson at Tomi Jazz, 11PM. 239 E. 53rd
Giulia Valle 5 at Blue Note, 12:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.

Sunday, December 15
Saints of Swing, Falcon, 10:00 AM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Isle of Klezbos at City Winery, 11:00 AM. 155 Varick St.
Dorthaans Place: Cecil Brooks III & Band at New Jersey
Performing Arts Center, 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM. 1 Center St.,
Newark NJ.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 22)


To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

sunday, December 8 @ 7:30 pm

thursday, December 12 @ 8 pm

Linda Eders
Holiday Show

A Rockapella
Holiday!

Back by popular demand!


Eder will delight audiences
with an unforgettable concert
of popular standards and
holiday favorites!

The hippest and hottest a c


appella group on the airways!
Texturing their rich harmonic
vocals with elements of rock,
jazz, R&B and doo-wop.

Sat & Sun, December 14 & 15

Thur & Fri, December 19 & 20

The Nutcracker

Holiday
Spectacular

Guest artist Brent Whitney


A holiday tradition that
dazzles all ages, the beloved
Nutracker, makes a perfect
annual family event to see
live theater and bring in the
festive season!

The most wonderful time of


the year gets even brighter
with music presented by Tony
Award Winning Broadway
Star Debbie Gravitte.

SATURDAY, December 21

John Tesh

Consummate entertainer John Tesh and his Big Band Christmas will be swinging into
town for a Merry Little Christmas!. John along with fourteen performers will play
favorite holiday tunes in the big band style and treat the audience of all ages to piano
solos and charm. With three gold albums, two Grammy nominations, and the nationally
syndicated John Tesh Radio Show, John is known worldwide as a leading figure in the
entertainment industry as a pianist, composer, radio host, television presenter and
sportscaster.

80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, CT

203.438.5795 www.ridgefieldplayhouse.org

Monday, December 16
The welfare of the people
in particular has always been
the alibi of tyrants, and it provides
the further advantage of giving
the servants of tyranny a
good conscience

- Albert Camus

(Continued from page 20)

Iris Ornig 4 at Garage, 11:30 AM. 99 7th Ave. S.


B. D. Lenz, Gladstone Tavern, 12PM. 273 Main, Gladstone NJ.
Ryu-Kaji w/Saki Taguchi at Somethin Jazz, 4:00 PM. 212 E. 52
Samuel St. Thomas/Bovine Social Club at Deer Head Inn, 5:00
PM. 5 Main St., Delaware Water Gap PA.
J. P. Jofre, Saint Peters Church, 5:00 PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Anna Maria Mannarino at Trumpets, 11:30 AM. 6 Depot Sq.,
Montclair NJ.
Lami Istrefi Jr., Dave Liebman, Smalls, 4:00 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Shoshana Bush at The National, 6PM. 517 Lexington Ave.
Club dElf feat. John Medeski at The Falcon, 7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W,
Marlboro NY.
Chris DeVito at Trumpets, 7PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Chico Hamilton & Euphoria at Drom, 7:15 PM. 85 Avenue A.
Bobby Watson & Horizon at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and
9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
George Coleman, Jazz Standard, 7:30, 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Nico Dann, Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Fourplay at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Billy Newman 5 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Ben Wood: Gypsy Jazz Night at Shapeshifter Lab, 8:30 PM. 18
Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Fellowship Band at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Nobuko Miyazaki 3 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Justin Lees 3 at Garage, 11PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Dmitry Baevsky 4 at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Paul Jones 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Howard Williams Jazz Orchestra at Garage, 7PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Eileen Howard & Friends at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Brandon Bain at Zinc Bar, 7PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Marika Hughes & Bottom Heavy + Pyeng Threadgill at
Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Jazz at Lincoln Center Youth Orchestra at Dizzys Club Coca
Cola, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Mingus Orchestra at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E.
27th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Pedrito Martinez, Brooklyn Bowl, 8PM. 61 Wythe Ave., Bklyn.
Warren Vache 4 w/Tardo Hammer at Bickford Theater, Morris
Museum, 8PM. 6 Normandy Hts., Morristown NJ.
Paolo Tomasellis Bridges at Shapeshifter Lab, 8:15 PM. 18
Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Deborah Latz, Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Tony Scherr 3 w/Anton Fier at Stage 1, Rockwood Music Hall,
9PM. 196 Allen St.
Jidam Kang Group at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Kassetas/Spanos Group at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18
Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Mike Moreno Group at Smalls, 10PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Oz Noy, Bitter End, 10:30 PM. 147 Bleecker St.
Adam Larson 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.

Tuesday, December 17

Miki Hirose 4 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.


Nick Lancaster 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St..
Bob Smith, Amici Milano, 7PM. 600 Chestnut Ave., Trenton NJ.
Swallow by Sound at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Eli Yamin 3 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10
Columbus Cir. #5
Matt Wilsons Christmas Tree-O + Jason Moran at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Leni Stern at Shrine, 8PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Ikue Mori/Zeena Parkins at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.

Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks w/The Hot Sardines, Anat


Cohen, and others at Town Hall, 8PM. 123 W. 43rd St.
Gusten Randolph Band Plays Art Blakey at Tumultys Pub,
8PM. 361 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
Antonio Madruga 3 at Zinc Bar, 8PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Akiko Pavolka, Shapeshifter, 8:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Justin Lees , Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 8:30 PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Geri Allen 4 at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Darius Jones 4 at Korzo, 9PM. 667 5th Ave., Brooklyn.
Loren Stillman, Shapeshifter, 9:30 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Bklyn.
Phantom Orchard 5 w/Ikue Mori & Cyro Baptista at The Stone,
10PM. Corner of 2nd St. & Avenue C.
Paul Francis at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Peter Apfelbaum at Korzo, 10:30 PM. 667 5th Ave., Brooklyn.
Karrin Allysons Yuletide at Birdland, 11PM. 315 W. 44th St.

Wednesday, December 18

Nick Moran at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.


Ricardo Grilli 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Yuka Mito 4 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Roger Davidson at Caffe Vivaldi, 7:15 PM. 32 Jones St.
Eli Yamin 3 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10
Columbus Cir. #5
Matt Wilsons Christmas Tree-O + Jason Moran at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Diane Moser: The Music of George Russell at Trumpets, 7:30
and 9:15 PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Ronny Whyte 3 at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Carrie Jackson, New Brunswick Hyatt, 2 Albany St., New
Brunswick NJ.
Briggan Krauss, Shapeshifter, 8:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Bklyn.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 8:30 PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Jane Ira Bloom 4 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Mike Stern Band w/Randy Brecker at Iridium, 1650 Broadway.
Geri Allen 4 at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Shuhei & Haruka Duo at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Manuel Valera 4 at Zinc Bar, 9PM, 82 W. 3rd St.
Michael Dessen, Seeds, 9:30 PM. 617 Vanderbilt Ave., Brooklyn.
Joe Sanders Infinity at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Sam Taylor 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Karrin Allysons Yuletide at Birdland, 11PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Jure Pukl Group at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Thursday, December 19
Duduka DaFonseca/Helio Alves at Dizzys Club Coca Cola,
1:00, 7:30, & 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Rick Stone at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Dwayne Clemons 5 at Smalls, 6PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Olli Hirvonen 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Joel Forrester 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.
Shari Pine at Metropolitan Room, 7PM. 34 W. 22nd St.
Olli Soikelli 3 at Shanghai Jazz, 7PM. 24 Main St., Madison NJ.
John Allen Watts 3 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Bobby Avey 3 & 4 at Greenwich House, 7:30 PM. 46 Barrow St.
Lenny White 3, Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Daryl Sherman w/Houston Person at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Shamie Royston, Makeda, 338 George St., New Brunswick NJ.
Stevie Holland in Love, Linda: The Life of Mrs. Cole Porter at
Saint Peters Church, 8PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Mephista at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Three Holiday Belles: Leslie Uggams/Christine Andreas/
Marilyn Maye at Town Hall, 8PM. 123 W. 43rd St.
Jerry Bergonzi 4 w/Vic Juris & Billy Hart at Trumpets, 8:00 and
10PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Jonathan Greenstein 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 8:30 PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Ellery Eskelin at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Mike Stern Band w/Randy Brecker, Iridium, 1650 Broadway.
Mauricio DeSouza & Bossa Brasil at Papillon 25, 8PM. 25
Valley St., South Orange NJ.
Geri Allen 4 at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Mike McGinniss, Jazz Gallery, 9:00 PM. 1160 Broadway.
Ethan Lipton at Joes Pub, 9PM. 425 Lafayette St.
Ark Orvutski 4 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Emily Ashers Garden Party at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM.
228 W. 47th St.
Joe Sanders Infinity at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Victor Prieto 3 at Terraza 7, 9:30 PM. 40-19 Gleane St., Elm-

(Continued on page 24)


22

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Bobby Watson
Dizzys Club Coca Cola
December 12-15
Photo by Eric Nemeyer

The strongest
and most effective force in
guaranteeing the long-term
maintenance of power is not violence
in all the forms deployed by the
dominant to control the dominated,
but consent in all the forms in which
the dominated acquiesce in
their own domination.
-- Robert Frost

(Continued from page 22)

hurst, Queens.
Mephista w/Lotte Anker at The Stone, 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Emiko Ohara at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Karrin Allysons Yuletide at Birdland, 11PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Ruby Choi 5 at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.

Friday, December 20

Joshua Breakstone 2 at Signature Theatre, 6PM. 480 W. 42nd


Masami Ishikawa 3 at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Champian Fulton, Shanghai Jazz, 24 Main St., Madison NJ.
Kuni Mikami 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.
Bill Mays 3 w/Marvin Stamm at Deer Head Inn, 7PM. 5 Main St.,
Delaware Water Gap PA.
Mark Soskin, Steve Smith, Falcon, 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Nanny Assis at Lucilles, B.B. King Blues Club, 7:00, 9:30, &
11:30 PM. 237 W. 42nd St.
Fred Frith 3 at Shapeshifter Lab, 7PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Bob Arthurs 4 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Jocelyn Medina 4 at Zinc Bar, 7PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Tom Dempsey 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Duduka DaFonseca/Helio Alves at Dizzys Club Coca Cola,
7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Lenny White at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.

Fay Victor Sings Herbie Nichols at Greenwich House, 7:30 PM.


46 Barrow St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Bobby Womack at City Winery, 8PM. 155 Varick St.
David Leonhart 3: Winter Holiday Concert at Flushing Town
Hall, 8PM. 137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, Queens.
Spirit Voices: a Cuban/Jazz Fusion feat. Janis Siegel at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Mike Bono at Trumpets, 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Sean Clapis, Shapeshifter, 8:15 PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Mike Stern w/Randy Brecker at Iridium, 1650 Broadway.
Geri Allen 4 at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Tony Malaby, Cornelia St. Cafe, 29 Cornelia St.
Ben Wendel/Dan Tepfer at Jazz Gallery, 9:00 and 11PM. 5th
floor, 1160 Broadway.
Aimee Allen 4 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Jerry Bergonzis Fleetwing at Shapeshifter Lab, 9:30 PM. 18
Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Ron Sunshine Orchestra at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Jon Davis 2 at Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University Pl.
Ada Dyer at Dinosaur Bar-B-Q Harlem, 10PM. 700 W. 125th St.
Dezron Douglas 5 at Smalls, 10:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Hot House at Garage, 10:45 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Vickie Natale at Blue Note, 12:30 AM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Jeremy Manasia 3 at Smalls, 1:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Visit www.JazzNewswire.com
Saturday, December 21
Marsha Heydt at Garage, 12:00 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Vince Ector: Organatomy at Candlelight Lounge, 3:30 PM. 24
Passaic St., Trenton NJ.
Naomi Okai 4 at Somethin Jazz, 5:00 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Klea Blackhurst/Jim Caruso/Billy Stritch: A Swinging Birdland
Christmas at Birdland, 5:30 PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Mark Marino 3 at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Walt Bibinger/Howard Alden at Deer Head Inn, 7PM. 5 Main St.,
Delaware Water Gap PA.
Ed Palmero Big Band w/Napoleon Murphy Brock at The Falcon, 7PM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Emanuele Tozzi 4 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Kevin Hildebrandt at La Tavolta Cucina, 7PM. 700 Old Bridge
Tpke., South River NJ.
Mike Baggetta 3 , Bar Next Door, 7:30, 9:30, & 11:30 PM. 129
MacDougal St.
Duduka DaFonseca/Helio Alves at Dizzys Club Coca Cola,
7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Craig Harris & Harlem Night Sounds Big Band at Ginnys
Supper Club, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 310 Lenox Ave.
Lenny White 5 w/Bennie Maupin at Jazz Standard, 7:30, 9:30, &
11:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Ted Rosenthal 3 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Ray Blue 4 at Cleopatras Needle, 8PM. 2485 Broadway.
Jay Clayton 4: Harry Who? The Music of Harry Warren feat.
Houston Person at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Christmas Pookestra at Shapeshifter, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Ikue Mori/Fred Frith/Lotte Anker at The Stone, 8PM. Corner of
2nd St. & Avenue C.
Marsh Brothers 3 at Sugar Bar, 8PM. 254 W. 72nd St.
Ty Stephens at Trumpets, 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Edge of Jazz at Insanitea, 570 Bloomfield Ave., Montclair NJ
Mike Stern w/Randy Brecker at Iridium, 1650 Broadway.
Geri Allen 4 at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Mark Dresser 5 w/Rudresh Mahanthappa at Cornelia St. Cafe,
9:00 and 10:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Hamiet Bluiett at Sistas Place, 9:00 and 10:30 PM. 456
Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn.
Geo Progulakis 5 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Banda Magda at Drom, 9:30 PM. 85 Avenue A.
Trio Cachimbo at Edison Rum House, 9:30 PM. 228 W. 47th St.
Crescent City Maulers at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Monika Oliveira at Zinc Bar, 82 W. 3rd St.
Jon Davis 2 at Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University Pl.
Ikue Mori 4 at The Stone, 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Dezron Douglas 5 at Smalls, 10:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Brent Sandler 3 at Somethin Jazz, 11PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Rachel Brotman at Blue Note, 12:30 AM. 131 W. 3rd St.

Sunday, December 22

Mala Waldron, Falcon, 10:00 AM. 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Seth Kibel Klezmer 3 at City Winery, 11:00 AM. 155 Varick St.
Mayu Saeki 3 at Garage, 11:30 AM. 99 7th Ave. S.
WO Town Krew at Trumpets, 11:30 AM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair
Jerry Bergonzi & Fleetwing at Deer Head Inn, 5:00 PM. 5 Main
St., Delaware Water Gap PA.
Luis Perdomo at Saint Peters Church, 5PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
J. P. Jofre 5 at Somethin Jazz, 5:00 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Klea Blackhurst/Jim Caruso/Billy Stritch: A Swinging Birdland
Christmas at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Brynn Stanley 3 at Shanghai Jazz, 24 Main St., Madison NJ.
Matt Wilsons Christmas, Falcon, 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Emilie Weibel at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Barbara Rose at Hotel Tides, 9PM. 408 7th Ave., Asbury Park NJ.
Golden Ratio Project at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Duduka DaFonseca/Helio Alves at Dizzys Club Coca Cola,
7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Glenn Miller Orchestra at South Orange Performing Arts
Center, 7:30 PM. 1 SOPAC Way, South Orange NJ.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Bobby Womack at City Winery, 8PM. 155 Varick St.
Ikue Mori/John Zorn at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Mike Stern Band w/Randy Brecker at Iridium, 1650 Broadway.
Swingadelic at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Geri Allen 4 at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Terry Vakirtzoglu 3 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Camilla Meza at Cornelia St. Cafe, 10PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Ikue Mori/Fred Frith at The Stone, 10PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Chris Beck 3 at Garage, 11PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Alex Norris 5 at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Monday, December 23
Klea Blackhurst/Jim Caruso/Billy Stritch: A Swinging Birdland
Christmas at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Joe Pino 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Lou Caputo Not So Big Band at Garage, 7PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Bibb/Fadini 2 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Sweet Diane at Zinc Bar, 7PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Duduka DaFonseca/Helio Alves at Dizzys Club Coca Cola,
7:30 and 9:30 PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Jon Davis 2 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Marvin Parks , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Les Paul 3 feat. Mike Stern at Iridium, 1650 Broadway.
Yuhan Su Group at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Kate Cosco 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.

Tuesday, December 24
Kyoko Oyobe, David Coss at Garage, 5:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Klea Blackhurst/Jim Caruso/Billy Stritch: A Swinging Birdland
Christmas at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Ruby Choi at Shrine, 6PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Dan Ori 3 , Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Dr. Michael White at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Ben Holmes Coincidental Night of Klezmer at Barbes, 9PM.
376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 9PM. 315 W. 44th St.

Wednesday, December 25
Champian Fulton 4 at Garage, 1:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Klea Blackhurst/Jim Caruso/Billy Stritch: A Swinging Birdland
Christmas at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Alex Hoffman 4 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
John Zorn 10 feat. Uri Caine, Mark Feldman & Ikue Mori at The
Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Dr. Michael White at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 9PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Peter Bernstein, Steve Nelson at Smalls, 183 W. 10th St.
Craig Wuepper & Earsight at Smalls, 1:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Thursday, December 26
George Weldon 3 at Garage, 6PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Benno Marmur 3 , Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Kayo Hiraki 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.

(Continued on page 26)


24

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Henry Butler
Appearing with Steven Bernstein
Jazz Standard, December 31
Photo by Eric Nemeyer

Half the harm


that is done in this world is
due to people who want to feel
important. They dont mean to do
harm but the harm does not
interest them. Or they do not see it,
or they justify it because they are
absorbed in the endless
struggle to think well
of themselves.
T. S. Eliot

(Continued from page 24)


Wynton Marsalis 7 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:00 and 9:30
PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Kerryn Preito at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Carmen Lundy, Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
James Weidman at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
John Zorn 8 feat. Ned Rothenberg & Marty Ehrlich at The
Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Dave Stryker at Trumpets, Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Larry Corban 3 w/Harvie S , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Dr. Michael White at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 9PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Ian OBeirne at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Peter Bernstein 4 feat. Steve Nelson at Smalls, 9:30 PM. 183
W. 10th St.
Rotem Sivan 3 at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Emmet Cohen 3 at Smalls, 1:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Friday, December 27
New Aires Tango at Cornelia St. Cafe, 6PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Joel Perry & Friends at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.

William Spaulding, Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.


Michael Collins 4 at Deer Head Inn, 7PM. 5 Main St., Delaware
Water Gap PA.
Wynton Marsalis 7 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:00 and 9:30
PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Jerome Sabbagh 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Carmen Lundy at Jazz Standard, 7:30, 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Ralph Lalama & Bop Juice at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Nancy Harms, Anthony Wonsey at Kitano, 8 & 10PM, 66 Park
Gashford Guillaume & Creole Fusion Ensemble at
Shapeshifter Lab, 8PM. 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Grupo Arcano at SOBs, 8:00 and 10PM. 204 Varick St.
John Zorn 10 feat. Eyal Maoz, The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Bob DeVos, Trumpets, 8:00, 10PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Pravin Thompson Ensemble at Insanitea, 8:30 PM. 570 Bloomfield Ave., Montclair NJ
Dr. Michael White at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
P. Klampanis, Jean-Michel Pilc, Cornelia St. Cafe, 29 Cornelia
Kevin Hildebrandt 3 at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Reggie Parker at Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Valerie Capers 2, Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University Pl.
Kevin Dorn & The Big 72 at Garage, 10:45 PM. 99 7th Ave. S
Aaron Comess at Blue Note, 12:30 AM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Lawrence Leathers at Smalls, 1:15 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Saturday, December 28

Jerry Costanzo 4 at Garage, 12:00 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.


Nabuko w/Kanji Ohta 3 at Somethin Jazz, 5:00 PM. 212 E. 52
Jay Leonhart 2 at Birdland, 6PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Deborah Latz 3 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 6PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Champian Fulton 4 at Garage, 6:15 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Dave Liebman, Deer Head Inn, 5 Main, Delaware Water Gap PA.
Wynton Marsalis 7 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:00 and 9:30
PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Hiroko Kanna at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Dmitiry Baevski 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Carmen Lundy 4 at Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E.
27th St.

Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Satchmo Mannan 4 at Cleopatras Needle, 8PM. 2485 Bdway.
Scot Albertson 4 w/Billy Test at Kitano, 8PM. 66 Park Ave.
Kaoru Watanabe at Shapeshifter, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
John Zorn 10 feat. Frank London & Adam Rudolph at The
Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Wallace Roney at Trumpets, 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Michael Feinstein at Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.
Dr. Michael White at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Mark Helias, Cornelia St. Cafe, 9PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Charles Sibirsky at Somethin Jazz, 9PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Red Light District w/Broadway Brassy at Edison Rum House,
9:30 PM. 228 W. 47th St.
Ron Sunshine Orchestra at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Valerie Capers 2 at Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University
Scot Albertson at Kitano, 10PM. 66 Park Ave.
Akiko Tsuruga 3 at Garage, 10:45 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Baba Israel & Duv at Blue Note, 12:30 AM. 131 W. 3rd St.

Sunday, December 29
Erik Lawrence 4 w/Pete Levin at The Falcon, 10:00 AM. 1348
Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
Michika Fukumori 3 at Garage, 11:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Rio Clemente 3 + Sandy Sasso at Rutherfurd Hall, 3:00 PM.
1686 Rte. 517, Allamuchy NJ.
John Merrill 3 at Smalls, 4:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Bill Carter at Saint Peters Church, 5:00 PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Lauren Henderson at The National, 6PM. 517 Lexington Ave.
Wynton Marsalis 7 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:00 and 9:30
PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Marta Bagratuni at Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Shoko Amano 4 at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Carmen Lundy, Jazz Standard, 7:30 and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
John Harbison at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
John Zorn 11 feat. Thurston Moore, Joe Morris & Craig Taborn
at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Dalton Gang at Trumpets, 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Joe Taino at Van Goghs Ear, 1017 Stuyvesant Ave., Union NJ.
DYAD Plays Puccini at Stage 3, Rockwood Music Hall, 8PM.
196 Allen St.
Matt Davis, Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Eri Yamamoto 3 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Vanessa Trouble, Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Dr. Michael White, Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave. S.
Josh Lawrence, Shapeshifter, 18 Whitwell Pl., Brooklyn.
Nobuki Takamen 3 at Garage, 11PM. 99 7th Ave. S.

Monday, December 30
Shu & Tomo at Shrine, 6PM. 2271 7th Ave.
Andrew Van Tassel, Bar Next Door, 6:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Wynton Marsalis 7 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:00 and 9:30
PM. 10 Columbus Cir. #5
Cecilia Coleman Big Band at Garage, 7PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Melissa Hamilton at Zinc Bar, 7PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Deer Head Jazz Orch. 5 Main St., Delaware Water Gap PA.
Joel Press 4 at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
B. D. Lenz at Balloons, 8PM. 20 Monroe St., Ellicottville NY.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Avalon Jazz Band at Le Cirque Cafe, 8PM. 151 E. 58th St.
Dida Pelled, Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Tom Rainey 3 at Cornelia St. Cafe, 8:30 PM. 29 Cornelia St.
Swingadelic at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Dandy Wellington & His Band at Bathtub Gin, 9PM. 132 9th Ave.
Antibalas at SOBs, 9PM. 204 Varick St.
Anderson Brothers at Garage, 10:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.

Tuesday, December 31
Joey Morant: Louis Armstrong Tribute Show at Lucilles, B.B.
King Blues Club, 1:30 PM. 237 W. 42nd St.
Bill Goodwin & The Resolutions w/Roseanna Vitro at Deer
Head Inn, 7PM. Dinner served at 7PM; music starts at 9PM. 5
Main St., Delaware Water Gap PA.
Alexis P. Suter Band + Aubrey Haddard at The Falcon, 7PM.
1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro NY.
New Years Jam at Somethin Jazz, 7PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Wynton Marsalis 7 at Dizzys Club Coca Cola, 7:30 and 11PM.
10 Columbus Cir. #5
David Coss 4 at Garage, 7:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Henry Butler w/Steven Bernsteins Hot 9 at Jazz Standard,
7:30 and 10:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
26

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Birdland Big Band w/Darmon Meader at Birdland, 8:00 and


11PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Chris Botti at Blue Note, 8:00 and 10:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
New Years Eve Party feat. Nanny Assis Bossa 2, Williamsburg
Salsa Orchestra, & Antibalas at SOBs, 8PM, 10PM, & 12:30
AM. 204 Varick St.
Thurston Moore/John Zorn at The Stone, 8PM. 2nd St & Ave C.
Mel Davis at Trumpets, 8PM. 6 Depot Sq., Montclair NJ.
Ed Cherry 3 , Bar Next Door, 8:30, 10:30 PM. 129 MacDougal St.
Ring in the Swing: NewYears Eve Dance Party at Allen Room,
Lincoln Center, 8:30 PM. Artists include Pedrito Martinez Group,
Dominick Farinacci 8, Charanee Wade, Broadway & 60th St.
The Bad Plus, Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Roni Ben-Hur at Kitano, 9PM. 66 Park Ave.
Craig Harris, Sistas Place, 456 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn.
Sandy Sasso at Hotel Tides, 9PM. 408 7th Ave., Asbury Park NJ.
Crescent City Maulers at Swing 46, 9:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Valerie Capers at Knickerbocker Bar, 9:45 PM. 33 University Pl.

REGULAR GIGS
Mondays (12/2, 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30)

Earl Rose at Bemelmans, Hotel Carlyle, 5:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.


Kat Gang/Joe Young at Arcane Bistro, 7PM. 111 Avenue C.
Grove St. Stompers at Arthurs Tavern, 7PM. 57 Grove St.
Brain Cloud at Barbes, 7PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Mingus Big Band (except 12/9 and 12/16) at Jazz Standard, 7:30
and 9:30 PM. 116 E. 27th St.
Takuya Nakamura at Manhattan Inn, 7:30 PM. 632 Manhattan
Ave., Brooklyn.
Blue Vipers of Brooklyn at Chez Oskar, 8PM 211 DeKalb Ave.,
Brooklyn.
Jon Weiss 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 8PM. 2485 Broadway.
Cotton Club All Stars, Cotton Club, 8PM. 656 W. 125th St.
Vince Giordano Nighthawks at Iguana, 8PM. 240 W. 54th St.
Iris Ornig Jam Session at Kitano, 8PM. 66 Park Ave.
Ken Fowser 5 (except 12/2) at Sandi Pointe Coastal Bistro,
8PM. 908 Shore Rd., Somers Point NJ.
Gelber & Manning at Circa Tabac, 8:30 PM. 32 Watts St.
Ray Abrams Big Band at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Vanguard Jazz Orchestra at Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S.
Woody Allen & The Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band
(except 12/23 and 12/30) at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Earl Rose Trio at Bemelmans, Hotel Carlyle, 9PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Jam Session at Cleopatras Needle, 9PM. 2485 Broadway.
Chicha Libre at Barbes, 9PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Milkman & Sons atThe Wayland, 9:30 PM. 700 E. 9th St.
Cole Ramstad, at Apotheke, 10PM. 9 Doyers St.
Terry Waldo at Edison Rum House, 10PM. 228 W. 47th St.
Ari Hoenig 3 (except 12/16) at Smalls, 10PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Ron Affif 3 (except 12/2) at Zinc Bar, 11PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Richie Cannata Jam, The Bitter End, 11:59 PM. 147 Bleecker St.
Spencer Murphy at Smalls, 12:00 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

Tuesdays
(12/3, 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31)

Wednesdays (12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25)


Louis Armstrong Eternity Band, Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.

Visit www.JazzNewswire.com

Chris Gillespie, Hotel Carlyle, 5:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.


Bill Crow, Red Hat Bistro, 1 Bridge St., Irvington-on-Hudson NY.
Mark Sganga at Solaris, 6PM. 61 River St., Hackensack NJ.
Eve Silber at Arthurs Tavern, 7PM. 57 Grove St.
Sarah King, Chez Oskar, 7PM 211 DeKalb Ave., Brooklyn.
Jerry Costanzo, Don Lorenzos, 242 Glen Cove Ave., Glen Cove
Les Kurtz 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 7PM. 2485 Broadway.
Joel Forrester at Manhattan Inn, 632 Manhattan Ave., Brooklyn.
Courtney Graf at Millesime, 7PM. 92 Madison Ave.
Jason Marshall, American Legion Post #398, 248 W. 132nd St.
Avalon Jazz Band at Apotheke, 8PM. 9 Doyers St.
Mike Lee Jam, Hat City Kitchen, 8PM. 459 Valley, Orange NJ.
Stevie Holland in Love, Linda: The Life of Mrs. Cole Porter
(except 12/25) at Saint Peters Church, 8PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Jonathan Kreisberg, Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Michael Aranella & His Dreamland Orchestra at The Clover
Club, 8:30 PM. 210 Smith St., Brooklyn.
Pedrito Martinez Band at Guantanamera, 8:30 PM. 939 8th Ave.
Stan Rubin Orchestra at Swing 46, 8:30 PM. 349 W. 46th St.
Steve Tyrell at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Kat Gang at The Rose Club, Plaza Hotel, 9PM. 768 5th Ave.
Loston Harris 3 at Hotel Carlyle, 9:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Smokin Billy Slater, Edison Rum House, 228 W. 47th St.
Alyson Williams, Arthurs Tavern, 10PM. 57 Grove St.
Mandingo Ambassadors at Barbes, 10PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Grandpa Musselman & the Syncopators (except 12/25) at The
Wayland, 10PM. 700 E. 9th St.
Joonsam Lee at Cleopatras Needle, 11:30 PM. 2485 Broadway.

Thursdays (12/5, 12/12, 12/19, 12/26)


Chris Gillespie at Bemelmans, Hotel Carlyle, 5:30 PM. 35 E.
76th St.
Eri Yamamoto 3 at Arthurs Tavern, 7PM. 57 Grove St.
Curtis Lundy Jam Session at Phoebes Place, 7:30 PM. 445
Cedar Ln., Teaneck NJ.
Bill Goodwin, Deer Head Inn, 5 Main, Delaware Water Gap PA.
Lauren Henderson 3 at Millesime, 8PM. 92 Madison Ave.
Pedrito Martinez Band at Guantanamera, 8:30 PM. 939 8th Ave.
Adam Tully 3 at Pane e Vino, 8:30 PM. 174 Smith St., Brooklyn.
Lapis Luna, Rose Club, Plaza Hotel, 8:30 PM. 768 5th Ave.
Steve Tyrell at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Grace Garland at Anyway Cafe, 9PM. 34 E. 2nd St.
Jam Session, Deer Head Inn, 5 Main, Delaware Water Gap PA.
Greezy Greens at Cafe Moto, 9:30 PM. 394 Broadway, Brooklyn.
Loston Harris, Hotel Carlyle, 9:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Jam w/Kazu 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 11:30 PM. 2485 Broadway

Fridays (12/6, 12/13, 12/20, 12/27)

Chris Gillespie, Hotel Carlyle, 5:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.


Markham Group (except 12/24) at Bar Catalonia, 6PM. 206 W.
41st St.
Yuichi Hirakawa at Arthurs Tavern, 7PM. 57 Grove St.
Mark Sganga at Bayou, 7PM. 1072 Bay St., Staten Island.
Spike Wilner 3 (except 12/10 and 12/17) at Smalls, 7:30 PM. 183
W. 10th St.
Jon Devine 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 8PM. 2485 Broadway.
Grupo Irek at Hayaty, 8PM. 103 Avenue A.
Vince Giordano Nighthawks at Iguana, 8PM. 240 W. 54th St.
Pedrito Martinez Band at Guantanamera, 8:30 PM. 939 8th Ave.
Dandy Wellington, Hotel Chantelle, 8:30 PM. 92 Ludow St.
Steve Tyrell at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Jam Session at Cleopatras Needle, 9PM. 2485 Broadway.
Jam Session at Crossroads, 7PM. 78 North Ave., Garwood NJ.
Loston Harris, Hotel Carlyle, 9:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
NY Gypsy All Stars at Drom, 10PM. 85 Avenue A.
Smalls Legacy Band at Smalls, 10PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Orrin Evans Jam Session at Zinc Bar, 11PM. 82 W. 3rd St.
Kyle Poole & Friends at Smalls, 12:30 AM. 183 W. 10th St.

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Jam Session at Smalls, 4:00 PM. 183 W. 10th St.


Birdland Big Band at Birdland, 5:00 PM. 315 W. 44th St.
Chris Gillespie, Hotel Carlyle, 5:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Stevie Holland in Love, Linda: The Life of Mrs. Cole Porter at
Saint Peters Church, 8PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Steve Tyrell at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 and 10:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Loston Harris, Hotel Carlyle, 9:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Jam w/Gerry Eastman 4 at Williamsburg Music Center, 10PM.
367 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn.
Jam w/Joanna Sternberg at Cleopatras Needle, 12:30 AM.
2485 Broadway.

It is difficult for men


in high office to avoid the
malady of self-delusion. They
are always surrounded by
worshipers. They are constantly,
and for the most part sincerely,
assured of their greatness. They
live in an artificial atmosphere
of adulation and exaltation
which sooner or later impairs
their judgment. They are in
grave danger of becoming
careless and arrogant.

Calvin Coolidge,
30th President of The United States
Alyson Williams at Arthurs Tavern, 10PM. 57 Grove St.
Jesse Simpson, Cleopatras Needle, 12AM, 2485 Broadway.

Sundays (12/1, 12/8, 12/15, 12/22, 12/29)

Tony Middleton at Kitano, 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM. 66 Park Ave.


Avalon Jazz Band at The Lambs Club, 11:00 AM. 132 W. 44th St.
Ian Sarver at Manhattan Inn, 632 Manhattan Ave., Brooklyn.
Tina daVaron at Measure, Langham Place, 11AM. 400 5th Ave.
Claudio Roditi: Tribute to Dizzy Gillespie at Blue Note, 11:30
AM and 1:30 PM. 131 W. 3rd St.
Emily Wolf 3 at Millesime, 12:00 PM. 92 Madison Ave.
Nanny Assis at SOBs, 204 Varick St.
Bob Kindred 3 at Cafe Loup, 12:30 PM. 105 W. 13th St.
Stevie Holland in Love, Linda: The Life of Mrs. Cole Porter
(except 12/1) at Saint Peters Church, 2:30 PM. 619 Lexington
Keith Ingham 3 at Cleopatras Needle, 4:00 PM. 2485 Broadway.
Earl Rose at Bemelmans, Hotel Carlyle, 5:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Rodney Siau 3 at Bees Hive Galleria, 424 Classon Ave., Bklyn.
Junior Mance 3 at Cafe Loup, 6:30 PM. 105 W. 13th St.
David Coss 4 at Garage, 6:30 PM. 99 7th Ave. S.
Creole Cooking Jazz Band at Arthurs Tavern, 7PM. 57 Grove
Kelley Suttenfield at Pierre Loti Wine Bar, 7PM. 258 W. 15th St.
Peter Mazza 3 , Bar Next Door, 129 MacDougal St.
Forroteria at Millesime, 8PM. 92 Madison Ave.
Stephane Wremble at Barbes, 9PM. 376 9th St., Brooklyn.
Arturo OFarrill at Birdland, 9:00 and 11PM. 315 W. 44th St.
David Budway 3, Hotel Carlyle, 9PM. 35 E. 76th St.
John Benitez Jam Session at Terraza 7, 9:30 PM. 40-19 Gleane
St., Elmhurst, Queens.
Johnny ONeal at Smalls, 10PM. 183 W. 10th St.

THROUGHOUT THE MONTH


Thru Dec. 31: Art Exhibit The Collage Aesthetic of Louis
Armstrong at Flushing Town Hall. 137-35 Northern Blvd.,
Flushing, Queens.

Saturdays (12/7, 12/14, 12/21, 12/28)


NY Jazz Academy Big Band Workshop & Vocal Jazz Workshop at Saint Peters Church, 12:00 PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Hammerheaded 4 at Dauphin Grille, Berkeley Oceanfront
Hotel, 1:00 PM. 1401 Ocean Ave., Asbury Park NJ.
Milkman & Sons at Skylark Bar, 1:00 PM. 477 5th Ave., Brooklyn.
Blue Vipers of Brooklyn (except 12/28) at Bergdorf Goodman
Mens Store, 2:00 PM. 745 5th Ave.
New York Jazz Academy Big Band (except 12/28) at Somethin
Jazz, 2:00 PM. 212 E. 52 St.
Pasquale Grasso Jam at Smalls, 4:00 PM. 183 W. 10th St.
Chris Gillespie, Hotel Carlyle, 5:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Eri Yamamoto 3 at Arthurs Tavern, 7PM. 57 Grove St.
Avalon Jazz Band at Matisse, 8PM. 924 2nd Ave.
Doug Jennings (except 12/14) at Roberts Steakhouse, Trump
Taj Mahal, 8PM. 1000 Boardwalk, Atlantic City NJ.
Stevie Holland in Love, Linda: The Life of Mrs. Cole Porter at
Saint Peters Church, 8PM. 619 Lexington Ave.
Steve Tyrell at Cafe Carlyle, 8:45 and 10:45 PM. 35 E. 76th St.
Grupo Irek at Pane e Vino, 9PM. 174 Smith St., Brooklyn.
Baby Soda Jazz Band at Cafe Moto, 394 Broadway, Brooklyn.
Loston Harris 3 at Hotel Carlyle, 9:30 PM. 35 E. 76th St.

Half the harm


that is done in this world is
due to people who want to feel
important. They dont mean to do
harm but the harm does not
interest them. Or they do not
see it, or they justify it because
they are absorbed in the
endless struggle to think
well of themselves.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

T.S. Eliot
27

Clubs, Venues & Jazz Resources


55 Bar, 55 Christopher St. 212-929-9883, www.55bar.com
92nd St Y, 1395 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128,
212.415.5500, www.92ndsty.org
Aaron Davis Hall, City College of NY, Convent Ave., 212-6506900, www.aarondavishall.org
Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, Broadway & 65th St., 212875-5050, www.lincolncenter.org/default.asp
Allen Room, Lincoln Center, Time Warner Center, Broadway
and 60th, 5th floor, 212-258-9800, www.lincolncenter.org/
default.asp
American Museum of Natural History, 81st St. & Central
Park W., 212-769-5100, www.amnh.org
Arthurs Tavern, 57 Grove St., 212-675-6879 or 917-3018759, www.arthurstavernnyc.com
Arts Maplewood, P.O. Box 383, Maplewood, NJ 07040; 973378-2133, www.artsmaplewood.org
Avery Fischer Hall, Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave. & 65th St.,
212-875-5030, www.lincolncenter.org
BAM Caf, 30 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, NY, 718-636-4100,
www.bam.org
Barbes, 376 9th St. (corner of 6th Ave.), Park Slope, Brooklyn,
718-965-9177, www.barbesbrooklyn.com
Barge Music, Fulton Ferry Landing, Brooklyn, 718-624-2083,
www.bargemusic.org
B.B. Kings Blues Bar, 237 W. 42nd St., 212-997-4144,
www.bbkingblues.com
Beacon Theatre, 74th St. & Broadway, 212-496-7070
Bickford Theatre, on Columbia Turnpike @ Normandy Heights
Road, east of downtown Morristown. 973-744-2600
Birdland, 315 W. 44th St., 212-581-3080
Blue Note, 131 W. 3rd St., 212-475-8592, bluenotejazz.com
Bourbon St Bar and Grille, 346 W. 46th St, NY, 10036,
212-245-2030, contact@bourbonny.com
Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery (at Bleecker), 212-614-0505,
www.bowerypoetry.com
BRIC House, 647 Fulton St. Brooklyn, NY 11217, 718-6835600, http://bricartsmedia.org
Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2nd Fl, Brooklyn, NY, 718-230-2100, www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org
Buttonwood Tree Performing Arts & Cultural Center, 605
Main St., Middletown, CT. 860-347-4957, buttonwood.org.
Caf Carlyle, 35 E. 76th St., 212-570-7189,
www.thecarlyle.com
Caf Loup, 105 W. 13th St. (West Village) , between Sixth and
Seventh Aves., 212-255-4746
Caf St. Barts, 109 E. 50th St. (at Park Ave.), 212-888-2664,
www.cafestbarts.com
Caffe Vivaldi, 32 Jones St, NYC; www.caffevivaldi.com
Candlelight Lounge, 24 Passaic St, Trenton. 609-695-9612.
Carnegie Hall, 7th Av & 57th, 212-247-7800,
www.carnegiehall.org
Casa Dante, 737 Newark Avenue, Jersey City, NJ,
www.casadante.com
Chicos House Of Jazz, In Shoppes at the Arcade, 631 Lake
Ave., Asbury Park, 732-774-5299
City Winery, 155 Varick St. Bet. Vandam & Spring St., 212608-0555. www.citywinery.com
Cleopatras Needle, 2485 Broadway (betw 92nd & 93rd), 212769-6969, www.cleopatrasneedleny.com
Copelands, 547 W. 145th St. (at Bdwy), 212-234-2356
Cornelia St Caf, 29 Cornelia St., 212-989-9319,
www.corneliaStcafe.com
Count Basie Theatre, 99 Monmouth St., Red Bank, New Jersey
07701, 732-842-9000, www.countbasietheatre.org
Crossroads at Garwood, 78 North Ave., Garwood, NJ 07027,
908-232-5666
Cutting Room, 19 W. 24th St, www.thecuttingroomnyc.com,
212-691-1900
Destino, 891 First Ave. & 50th St., 212-751-0700
Division St Grill, 26 North Division St, Peekskill, NY, 914-7396380, www.divisionStgrill.com
Dizzys Club Coca Cola, Broadway at 60th St., 5th Floor, 212258-9595, www.jalc.com
DROM, 85 Avenue A, New York, 212-777-1157, dromnyc.com
The Ear Inn, 326 Spring St., NY, 212-226-9060,
www.earinn.com
El Museo Del Barrio, 1230 Fifth Ave (at 104th St.), Tel: 212831-7272, Fax: 212-831-7927, www.elmuseo.org
The Falcon, 1348 Rt. 9W, Marlboro, NY., 845) 236-7970,
Fat Cat, 75 Christopher St., 212-675-7369, fatcatjazz.com
Five Spot, 459 Myrtle Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 718-852-0202,
www.fivespotsoulfood.com
Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, NY,
718-463-7700 x222, www.flushingtownhall.org
For My Sweet, 1103 Fulton St., Brooklyn, NY 718-857-1427
Franks Cocktail Lounge, 660 Fulton St. (at Lafayette), Brooklyn, NY, 718-625-9339, www.frankscocktaillounge.com
Galapagos, 70 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, NY, 718-782-5188,
www.galapagosartspace.com

28

Garage Restaurant and Caf, 99 Seventh Ave. (betw 4th and


Bleecker), 212-645-0600, www.garagerest.com
Garden Caf, 4961 Broadway, by 207th St., New York, 10034,
212-544-9480
Ginnys Supper Club, 310 Malcolm X Boulevard Manhattan,
NY 10027, 212-792-9001, http://redroosterharlem.com/ginnys/
Glen Rock Inn, 222 Rock Road, Glen Rock, NJ, (201) 4452362, www.glenrockinn.com
Greenwich Village Bistro, 13 Carmine St., 212-206-9777,
www.greenwichvillagebistro.com
Harlem Tea Room, 1793A Madison Ave., 212-348-3471,
www.harlemtearoom.com
Hat City Kitchen, 459 Valley St, Orange. 862-252-9147.
www.hatcitykitchen.com
Havana Central West End, 2911 Broadway/114th St), NYC,
212-662-8830, www.havanacentral.com
Hibiscus Restaurant, 270 S. St, Morristown, NJ, 973-359-0200,
www.hibiscusrestaurantnj.com
Highline Ballroom, 431 West 16th St (between 9th & 10th Ave.
www.highlineballroom.com, 212-414-4314.
Hopewell Valley Bistro, 15 East Broad St, Hopewell, NJ 08525,
609-466-9889, www.hopewellvalleybistro.com
Hyatt New Brunswick, 2 Albany St., New Brunswick, NJ
IBeam Music Studio, 168 7th St., Brooklyn, ibeambrooklyn.com
Iridium, 1650 Broadway, 212-582-2121, iridiumjazzclub.com
Jazz 966, 966 Fulton St., Brooklyn, NY, 718-638-6910
Jazz at Lincoln Center, 33 W. 60th St., 212-258-9800,
www.jalc.org
Frederick P. Rose Hall, Broadway at 60th St., 5th Floor
Dizzys Club Coca-Cola, Reservations: 212-258-9595
Rose Theater, Tickets: 212-721-6500, The Allen Room,
Tickets: 212-721-6500
Jazz Gallery, 1160 Broadway, New York, NY 10001, (212)
242-1063, www.jazzgallery.org
The Jazz Spot, 375 Kosciuszko St. (enter at 179 Marcus Garvey
Blvd.), Brooklyn, NY, 718-453-7825, www.thejazz.8m.com
Jazz Standard, 116 E. 27th St., 212-576-2232,
www.jazzstandard.net
Joes Pub at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St & Astor Pl.,
212-539-8778, www.joespub.com
John Birks Gillespie Auditorium (see Bahai Center)
Jules Bistro, 65 St. Marks Place, Tel: 212-477-5560, Fax: 212420-0998, www.julesbistro.com
Kasser Theater, 1 Normal Avenue, Montclair State College,
Montclair, 973-655-4000, www.montclair.edu/arts/
performancefacilities/alexanderkasser.html
Key Club, 58 Park Place, Newark, NJ, (973) 799-0306,
www.keyclubnj.com
Kitano Hotel, 66 Park Ave., 212-885-7119. www.kitano.com
Knickerbocker Bar & Grill, 33 University Pl., 212-228-8490,
www.knickerbockerbarandgrill.com
The Knitting Factory, 74 Leonard St., Tel: 212-219-3132,
www.knittingfactory.com
La Famiglia Sorrento, 631 Central Ave, Westfield, NJ, 07090,
908-232-2642, www.lafamigliasorrento.com
Langham Place Measure, Fifth Avenue, 400 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10018, 212-613-8738, langhamplacehotels.com
La Lanterna (Bar Next Door at La Lanterna), 129 MacDougal
St, New York, 212-529-5945, www.lalanternarcaffe.com
Le Madeleine, 403 W. 43rd St. (betw 9th & 10th Ave.), New
York, New York, 212-246-2993, www.lemadeleine.com
Les Gallery Clemente Soto Velez, 107 Suffolk St. (at Rivington St.), 212-260-4080
Live @ The Falcon, 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY 12542,
Living Room, 154 Ludlow St. (betw Rivington & Stanton), 212533-7235, www.livingroomny.com
The Local 269, 269 E. Houston St. (corner of Suffolk St.), NYC
Makor, 35 W. 67th St. (at Columbus Ave.), 212-601-1000,
makor.org
Lounge Zen, 254 DeGraw Ave, Teaneck, NJ, (201) 692-8585,
www.lounge-zen.com
Makeda, George St., New Brunswick. NJ, www.nbjp.org
Maxwells, 1039 Washington St, Hoboken, NJ, 201-653-1703,
www.maxwellsnj.com
McCarter Theater, 91 University Pl., Princeton, 609-258-2787,
www.mccarter.org
Merkin Concert Hall, Kaufman Center, 129 W. 67th St. (betw
Broadway & Amsterdam), 212-501-3330, www.ekcc.org/
merkin.htm
Metropolitan Room, 34 West 22nd St NY, NY 10012, 212206-0440
Mirelles, 170 Post Ave., Westbury, NY, 516-338-4933
Mixed Notes Caf, 333 Elmont Rd., Elmont, NY (Queens area),
516-328-2233, www.mixednotescafe.com
Montauk Club, 25 Eighth Ave., Brooklyn, NY, 718-638-0800,
www.montaukclub.com
Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Ave. (between
103rd & 104th St.), 212-534-1672, www.mcny.org

Musicians Local 802, 332 W. 48th St., 718-468-7376 or


860-231-0663
Newark Museum, 49 Washington St, Newark, New Jersey
07102-3176, 973-596-6550, www.newarkmuseum.org
New Jersey Performing Arts Center, 1 Center St., Newark,
NJ, 07102, 973-642-8989, www.njpac.org
New School Performance Space, 55 W. 13th St., 5th Floor
(betw 5th & 6th Ave.), 212-229-5896, www.newschool.edu.
New School University-Tishman Auditorium, 66 W. 12th St.,
1st Floor, Room 106, 212-229-5488, www.newschool.edu
New York City Bahai Center, 53 E. 11th St. (betw Broadway
& University), 212-222-5159, www.bahainyc.org
Night of the Cookers, 767 Fulton St., Brooklyn, NY, Tel: 718797-1197, Fax: 718-797-0975
North Square Lounge, 103 Waverly Pl. (at MacDougal St.),
212-254-1200, www.northsquarejazz.com
Novita Bistro & Lounge, 25 New St, Metuchen.
Nublu, 62 Ave. C (betw 4th & 5th St.), 212-979-9925
Nuyorican Poets Caf, 236 E. 3rd St. (betw Ave. B & C), 212505-8183, www.nuyorican.org
Oak Room at The Algonquin Hotel, 59 W. 44th St. (betw 5th
and 6th Ave.), 212-840-6800, www.thealgonquin.net
Oceana Restaurant, 120 West 49th St, New York, NY 10020
212-759-5941, www.oceanarestaurant.com
Opia, 130 East 57th St, New York, NY 10022, 212-688-3939
www.opiarestaurant.com
Orchid, 765 Sixth Ave. (betw 25th & 26th St.), 212-206-9928
Palazzo Restaurant, 11 South Fullerton Avenue, Montclair.
973-746-6778. www.palazzonj.com
Pigalle, 790 8th Ave. 212-489-2233. www.pigallenyc.com
Priory Restaurant & Jazz Club: 223 W Market St., Newark,
NJ 07103, 973-639-7885
Private Place, 29 S. Center St, South Orange, NJ, 973-675-6620
www.privateplacelounge.com
Proper Caf, 217-01 Linden Blvd., Queens, 718-341-2233
Prospect Park Bandshell, 9th St. & Prospect Park W., Brooklyn, NY, 718-768-0855
Prospect Wine Bar & Bistro, 16 Prospect St. Westfield, NJ,
908-232-7320, www.16prospect.com, www.cjayrecords.com
Red Eye Grill, 890 Seventh Ave. (at 56th St.), 212-541-9000,
www.redeyegrill.com
Ridgefield Playhouse, 80 East Ridge, parallel to Main St.,
Ridgefield, CT; ridgefieldplayhouse.org, 203-438-5795
Rockwood Music Hall, 196 Allen St, New York, NY 10002
212-477-4155
Rose Center (American Museum of Natural History), 81st St.
(Central Park W. & Columbus), 212-769-5100, amnh.org/rose
Rose Hall, 33 W. 60th St., 212-258-9800, www.jalc.org
Rosendale Caf, 434 Main St., PO Box 436, Rosendale, NY
12472, 845-658-9048, www.rosendalecafe.com
Rubin Museum of Art - Harlem in the Himalayas, 150 W.
17th St. 212-620-5000. www.rmanyc.org
Rustik, 471 DeKalb Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 347-406-9700, www.
rustikrestaurant.com
Shapeshifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl, Brooklyn, 646-820-9452.
www.shapeshifterlab.com
St. Marks Church, 131 10th St. (at 2nd Ave.), 212-674-6377
St. Nicks Pub, 773 St. Nicholas Av (at 149th), 212-283-9728
St. Peters Church, 619 Lexington (at 54th), 212-935-2200,
www.saintpeters.org
Salon at Rue 57, 60 W. 57th St, 212-307-5656, www.rue57.com
Sasas Lounge, 924 Columbus Ave, Between 105th & 106th St.
NY, NY 10025, 212-865-5159, sasasloungenyc.yolasite.com
Savoy Grill, 60 Park Place, Newark, NJ 07102, 973-286-1700
Schomburg Center, 515 Malcolm X Blvd., 212-491-2200,
www.nypl.org/research/sc/sc.html
Session Bistro. 245 Maywood Avenue, Maywood. 201-8807810.
Shanghai Jazz, 24 Main St., Madison, NJ, 973-822-2899,
www.shanghaijazz.com
ShapeShifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11215
www.shapeshifterlab.com
Showmans, 375 W. 125th St., 212-864-8941
Sidewalk Caf, 94 Ave. A, 212-473-7373
Silver Spoon, 124 Main St., Cold Spring, NY 10516, 845-2652525, www.silverspooncoldpspring.com
Sistas Place, 456 Nostrand Ave. (at Jefferson Ave.), Brooklyn,
NY, 718-398-1766, www.sistasplace.org
Skippers Plane St Pub, 304 University Ave. Newark NJ, 973733-9300, www.skippersplaneStpub.com
Smalls Jazz Club, 183 W. 10th St. (at 7th Ave.), 212-929-7565,
www.SmallsJazzClub.com
Smiths Bar, 701 8th Ave, New York, 212-246-3268
Sofias Restaurant - Club Cache [downstairs], Edison Hotel,
221 W. 46th St. (between Broadway & 8th Ave), 212-719-5799
Somethin Jazz Club, 212 E. 52nd St., NY 10022, 212-3717657
Sophies Bistro, 700 Hamilton St., Somerset. www.nbjp.org
South Gate Restaurant & Bar, 154 Central Park South, 212-

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

484-5120, www.154southgate.com
South Orange Performing Arts Center, One SOPAC
Way, South Orange, NJ 07079, sopacnow.org, 973-313-2787
South St Seaport, 207 Front St., 212-748-8600,
www.southstseaport.org.
Spoken Words Caf, 266 4th Av, Brooklyn, 718-596-3923
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse, 165 W. 65th St., 10th Floor,
212-721-6500, www.lincolncenter.org
The Stone, Ave. C & 2nd St., www.thestonenyc.com
Sugar Bar, 254 W. 72nd St, 212-579-0222, sugarbarnyc.com
Swing 46, 349 W. 46th St.(betw 8th & 9th Ave.),
212-262-9554, www.swing46.com
Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, Tel: 212-864-1414, Fax:
212- 932-3228, www.symphonyspace.org
Tea Lounge, 837 Union St. (betw 6th & 7th Ave), Park Slope,
Broooklyn, 718-789-2762, www.tealoungeNY.com
Terra Blues, 149 Bleecker St. (betw Thompson & LaGuardia),
212-777-7776, www.terrablues.com
Thea tre Row , 4 10 W. 42 nd , 212 -71 4-2 442,
www.theatrerow.org
Tito Puentes Restaurant and Cabaret, 64 City Island Avenue,
City Island, Bronx, 718-885-3200, titopuentesrestaurant.com
Tomi Jazz, 239 E. 53rd St., lower level. 646-497-1254,
www.tomijazz.com
Tonic, 107 Norfolk St. (betw Delancey & Rivington), Tel: 212358-7501, Fax: 212-358-1237, tonicnyc.com
Town Hall, 123 W. 43rd St., 212-997-1003
Trash Bar, 256 Grand St. 718-599-1000. www.thetrashbar.com
Triad Theater, 158 W. 72nd St. (betw Broadway & Columbus
Ave.), 212-362-2590, www.triadnyc.com
Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St, 10007,
info@tribecapac.org, www.tribecapac.org
Trumpets, 6 Depot Square, Montclair, NJ, 973-744-2600, www.
trumpetsjazz.com
Tumultys Pub, 361 George St., New Brunswick
Turning Point Cafe, 468 Piermont Ave. Piermont, N.Y. 10968
(845) 359-1089, http://www.turningpointcafe.com/
Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave S., 212-255-4037,
www.villagevanguard.net
Vision Festival, 212-696-6681, info@visionfestival.org,
www.visionfestival.org
Watchung Arts Center, 18 Stirling Rd, Watchung, NJ 07069,
908-753-0190, www.watchungarts.org
Watercolor Caf, 2094 Boston Post Road, Larchmont, NY
10538, 914-834-2213, www.watercolorcafe.net
Weill Receital Hall at Carnegie Hall, 57th & 7th Ave,
212-247-7800
Williamsburg Music Center, 367 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn,
NY 11211, (718) 384-1654 www.wmcjazz.org
Zankel Hall, 881 7th Ave, New York, 212-247-7800
Zebulon, 258 Wythe St., Brooklyn, NY, 11211, 718-218-6934,
www.zebuloncafeconcert.com
Zinc Bar, 82 West 3rd St.
RECORD STORES
Academy Records, 12 W. 18th St., New York, NY 10011, 212242-3000, http://www.academy-records.com
Barnes & Noble, 1960 Broadway, at 67th St, 212-595-6859
Colony Music Center, 1619 Broadway. 212-265-2050,
www.colonymusic.com
Downtown Music Gallery, 13 Monroe St, New York, NY
10002, (212) 473-0043, www.downtownmusicgallery.com
J&R Music World, 13 Monroe St, 212-238-9000, www,jr.com
Jazz Record Center, 236 W. 26th St., Room 804,
212-675-4480, www.jazzrecordcenter.com
Normans Sound & Vision, 555 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn,
New York 11211
Princeton Record Exchange, 20 South Tulane St, Princeton,
NJ 08542, 609-921-0881, www.prex.com
Rainbow Music 2002 Ltd., 130 1st Ave (between 7th & St.
Marks Pl.), 212-505-1774
Scottis Records, 351 Springfield Ave, Summit, NJ, 07901,
908-277-3893, www.scotticd.com
MUSIC STORES
Drummers World, Inc., 151 W. 46th St., NY, NY 10036, 212840-3057, 212-391-1185, www.drummersworld.com
Robertos Woodwind & Brass, 149 West 46th St. NY, NY
10036, 646-366-0240, Repair Shop: 212-391-1315; 212-8407224, www.robertoswoodwind.com
Rod Baltimore Intl Woodwind & Brass, 168 W. 48 St. New
York, NY 10036, 212-302-5893
Sam Ash, 333 W 34th St, New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 719-2299 www.samash.com
Sadowsky Guitars Ltd, 2107 41st Avenue 4th Floor, Long
Island City, NY 11101, 718-433-1990. www.sadowsky.com
Steve Maxwell Vintage Drums, 723 7th Ave, 3rd Floor, New
York, NY 10019, 212-730-8138, www.maxwelldrums.com
SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, CONSERVATORIES
92nd St Y, 1395 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128
212.415.5500; www.92ndsty.org
Brooklyn-Queens Conservatory of Music, 42-76 Main St.,
Flushing, NY, Tel: 718-461-8910, Fax: 718-886-2450

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Brooklyn Conservatory of Music, 58 Seventh Ave., Brooklyn,


NY, 718-622-3300, www.brooklynconservatory.com
City College of NY-Jazz Program, 212-650-5411,
Columbia University, 2960 Broadway, 10027
Drummers Collective, 541 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011,
212-741-0091, www.thecoll.com
Five Towns College, 305 N. Service Rd., 516-424-7000,
ext.163, Dix Hills, NY
Greenwich House Music School, 46 Barrow St., Tel: 212-2424770, Fax: 212-366-9621, www.greenwichhouse.org
Juilliard School of Music, 60 Lincoln Ctr, 212-799-5000
LaGuardia Community College/CUNI, 31-10 Thomson Ave.,
Long Island City, 718-482-5151
Lincoln Center Jazz At Lincoln Center, 140 W. 65th St.,
10023, 212-258-9816, 212-258-9900
Long Island University Brooklyn Campus, Dept. of Music,
University Plaza, Brooklyn, 718-488-1051, 718-488-1372
Manhattan School of Music, 120 Claremont Ave., 10027,
212-749-2805, 2802, 212-749-3025
New Jersey City University, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City,
NJ 07305, 888-441-6528
New School, 55 W. 13th St., 212-229-5896, 212-229-8936
New York University-Jazz/Contemporary Music Studies, 35
West 4th St. Room#777, 212-998-5446, 212-995-4043
New York Jazz Academy, (718) 426-0633
www.NYJazzAcademy.com
Princeton University-Dept. of Music, Woolworth Center Musical Studies, Princeton, NJ, 609-258-4241, 609-258-6793
Queens College Copland School of Music, City University
of NY, Flushing, 718-997-3800
Rutgers Univ. at New Brunswick, Jazz Studies, Douglass
Campus, PO Box 270, New Brunswick, NJ, 908-932-9302
Rutgers University Institute of Jazz Studies, 185 University
Avenue, Newark NJ 07102, 973-353-5595
newarkwww.rutgers.edu/IJS/index1.html
SUNY Purchase, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY
914-251-6300, 914-251-6314
Swing University (see Jazz At Lincoln Center, under Venues)
William Paterson University Jazz Studies Program, 300 Pompton Rd, Wayne, NJ, 973-720-2320

RADIO
WBGO 88.3 FM, 54 Park Pl, Newark, NJ 07102, Tel: 973-6248880, Fax: 973-824-8888, www.wbgo.org
WCWP, LIU/C.W. Post Campus
WFDU, http://alpha.fdu.edu/wfdu/wfdufm/index2.html

I am thankful for all of those


who said no me. Its because of them
Im doing it myself .
Albert Einstein

WKCR 89.9, Columbia University, 2920 Broadway


Mailcode 2612, New York, NY 10027, Listener Line: (212) 8549920, www.columbia.edu/cu/wkcr, jazz@wkcr.org
One Great Song, Hosted by Jay Harris, www.wmnr.org (at 6 on
Saturdays, and at www.tribecaradio.net at 11AM Sundays and
again on Monday and Thursday nights at 11PM.)
Lenore Raphaels JazzSpot, www.purejazzradio.com.
PERFORMING GROUPS
Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, 490 Riverside Drive, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10027, 212-896-1700, www.orpheusnyc.com
Westchester Jazz Orchestra, Emily Tabin, Director, PO Box
506, Chappaqua, NY 10514, 914-861-9100,
www.westjazzorch.org
ADDITIONAL JAZZ RESOURCES
Big Apple Jazz, www.bigapplejazz.com, 718-606-8442,
gordon@bigapplejazz.com
Louis Armstrong House, 34-56 107th St, Corona, NY 11368,
718-997-3670, www.satchmo.net
Institute of Jazz Studies, John Cotton Dana Library, RutgersUniv, 185 University Av, Newark, NJ, 07102, 973-353-5595
Jazzmobile, Inc., 154 West 127th St, 10027, 212-866-4900,
www.jazzmobile.org
Jazz Museum in Harlem, 104 E. 126th St., 212-348-8300,
www.jazzmuseuminharlem.org
Jazz Foundation of America, 322 W. 48th St. 10036,
212-245-3999, www.jazzfoundation.org
New Jersey Jazz Society, 1-800-303-NJJS, www.njjs.org
New York Blues & Jazz Society, www.NYBluesandJazz.org
Rubin Museum, 150 W. 17th St, New York, NY,
212-620-5000 ex 344, www.rmanyc.org.

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December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

29

Interview

Mark Dresser
Interview by Eric Nemeyer

Photo (opposite page) by Jim Carmody

Visit Mark Dresser online at


www.MarkDresser.com
JI: Could you discuss your current CD Nourishments featuring Rudresh Mahanthappa, Michael Dessen, Denman Maroney, om Rainey and
Michael Sarin and the development from
your inspiration and concept to finished project?
Mark Dresser: The initial idea for Nourishments started around 2008. I was approached by
the director of a festival in France who had heard
and enjoyed my CD, Banquet (Tzadik label)
and had written to me that the theme for that
year was literally, Nourishments. The festival
had a history of interdisciplinary works and encouraged me to make an ambitious proposal. I
also dug the plurality of metaphor, nourishment
(s) and on all the levels that we are nourished. I
dreamed up a team of my favorite artists that I
wanted to get into the same room, including chef
Paul Canales, digital artists, Ligorano/Reese,
animator/cinematographer Sarah Jane Lapp and
a cast of musicians including hyperpianist, Denman Maroney. I imagined everyone on stage
with individual cameras and microphones capturing their actions: performance chef, animator,
video/artist/mixer, an ensemble of musicians
directed by me as Soundpainting conductor and

scribed after a great meal that he had hosted us


to after a recording session at Oliveto, a wonderful restaurant which Paul had been the executive
chef before starting his new venue, Duende. In
response to the music I had sent him, he sent me
a photo of a new dish with a title, which in turn
inspired more compositions. Canales Rose,
from the CD began in this way. Together with
Myra Melford, Paul Canales and many others we
created two events in which Paul cooked for live
audiences with performed music in between
courses, conceived for event including video
feeds from the kitchen. The next step was with
animator/cinematographer Sarah Jane Lapp who
has been a long time collaborator since 2000. In
summer 2010 Sarah Jane and I spent a couple of
weeks in residency at the Maybeck House in
Berkeley, California Wed spend time in Paul
Canales kitchen, video taping his improvisatory
process of developing the daily menu and in
response we generated music and drawings.
Sarah Jane and I continued to work together for
three months over a year resulting in film and
live music for the premier of Nourishments, as
part of an Internet concert with musicians in
New York and San Diego, Inspiraling 2011:
Telematic Jazz Explorations. including conductor/composer Sarah Weaver, soprano saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom, Oliver Lake on alto, Tomas
Ulrich on cello, Amir El Saffar on trumpet and
Ikue Mori on laptop at New York University

Balancing a professional presence with a


teaching career and family life is challenging
and its not for everyone. It's hard to generalize
about the different routes to successful
careers, beyond complete dedication.
composer orchestrating the totality. The proposal
ultimately got rejected but the idea of working
collaboratively with these folks seemed to be
irresistible. I wanted to find a way to realize this
project even if it was step by step as we all lived
in different cities between two coasts. The first
step was collaboration with Paul Canales and
Trio M with Myra Melford and Matt Wilson, in
which we exchanged recorded and notated musical themes. Paul is an improvised music fan, a
hyper-creative thinker who not only follows the
scene, but also gets direct inspiration from music
for his cooking creativity. He is also a guitar
player and reads music. It started out as a tone
row which I improvised, recorded and tran30

and from University of California San Diegotrombonist/composer Michael Dessen, pianist


Joshua White, flutist Nicole Mitchell, and myself. Telepresence has been very important in the
development of much of the music on the
CD. Both Michael Dessen and I teach at different campuses in the UC system and we have
access to this high speed high bandwidth network. This allowed us to rehearse together regularly from our offices and was very useful for
woodshedding the more tricky tunes like,
Rasaman, which is dedicated to my UCSD colleague and friend, sitarist Kartik Seshadri. In
2010 I formed a west coast quintet which included pianist Joshua White, saxophonist Tripp

Sprague, trombonist Michael Dessen, and drummer Duncan Moore. I had always intended to
perform this music with my long time colleagues
on the east coast whose especially Denman Maroney with whom Ive been playing with for 25
years, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Michael Dessen,
who plays in both quintets, and drummers Michael Sarin and Tom Rainey. I proposed the
project as a CD to Pedro Costa from the Portuguese label, Clean Feed, with whom Ive been
working together with for two decades. He
agreed to document and release the CD.
JI: Your composition Time Axiom is being
performed together by musicians in New York,
Belfast and Zurich via the Internet. The presentation involves acoustic and electronic musicians
and the use of static and processed video, and the
temporal and spatial properties of the telematic
medium What are some of the key advantages
and challenges for the musicians in performing
in such a setting?
MD: Time Axiom is actually the name of the
concert, Time Axiom: A Telematic Music Concert - New York, Belfast, Zurich. My piece is
called Trifecta Tele Phases. The key advantage
to network music performance that we refer to as
telematic music is that we can rehearse and perform with a community of musicians and for
audiences in different geographical locations.
This means that we dont have to get on a plane,
travel thousands of miles to perform together.
Also the telematic medium requires a new kind
of artistic collaboration involving not only musical issues, but also video, set design, documentation, as well as technical and
administrative coordination. We tend to use not
only email, and Skype, but also Google sites to
storehouse a lot of information from multiple
sites. Telematic music performance is a complex
hybrid medium which has similarities to live TV
except it includes both live and remote performers, live and remote audiences, video, lighting,
stage design, and sound design considerations. A
surprising outcome for me is that the most meaningful aspect of the telematic music experience
has been on the human level. It has brought together a group of collaborators from parts of the
world with whom Im quite sure I would have
not encountered otherwise. It has made my musical community broader. The will to connect and
the effort to do meaningful collective activity is
a powerful motivating force. It requires so much
time and testing to manifest a concert that those
who choose to participate generally really care
and fully engage with all the tech, administrative, and artistic levels. It creates a special kind
of intimacy. Ive collaborated meaningfully with
wonderful musicians in Korea, China, Israel,
Australia, Europe as well as the US.
JI:. The telematic medium involves geographical separation of the musicians from the live
audience in each of the three performance locations, and the gap is bridged in a technological
way. What are your observations based on what
you have experienced in terms of how this enables the audience to be connected or disconnected to the music and performers and by
comparison to having all performers and audi-

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

ence members live in the same venue?

pact. Scale matters.

MD: When we perform telematically, we typically have live audiences at each location, so the
experience for the audiences and the performers
is the same as a traditional live performance. In
addition we have video monitors so the musicians as well as the audiences can see the remote
ensembles as well. We also typically turn the
camera towards the audience at some point in the
concert each audience, the local and remote can
see other. This makes a difference to verify that
there are other folks experiencing the music
together. Though one might guess that this kind
of performance would feel distanced but to the
contrary Ive had the exact opposite reactions
from audiences that some of our telematic
events have been the some of most emotionally
powerful experiences. That may seem counterintuitive but compare the qualities of film compared to theater. Film can make small things like
a mere expression have impact, the telematic
medium has similar properties and potentials.
The way we amplify audio with close miking,
and the use of video capture and projection can
change the scale of what we hear and see compared to live performance. It can create a different kind of intimacy Add stunning visual and
audio content and the experience can have a
cumulative impact. In 2008 we gave a concert,
Multiplicities: An Inter-arts Telematic Performance that included Myra Melford, drummer Billy
Mintz, Michael Dessen, painter Nancy Ostrovsky and the Butoh dancer, Oguri. We composed specifically for this event. Oguris expression is very intense to begin with and when
watching his image on a bigger than life projection added an extra dimension of emotional im-

JI:. Could you discuss some of your mentors


and how you became inspired to pursue a career
in music, and especially as a jazz player on bass?
MD: I grew up in Los Angeles and as a teenager
had the access and good fortune to study with a
wonderful bassist, Bill Plummer. I played in a
rock band with the step son of jazz master, Red
Mitchell. Red was an extraordinarily kind, generous, and of course an amazing musician. He
would give free lessons to group of us young
bass players in Los Angeles at Grants Music
Center. It was here I met the then young bassists
Roberto Miranda, and the prodigy J.J. Wiggins.
At age sixteen, I was able to enroll in a master
class at UCLA with the iconic bassist, Ray
Brown. He instilled the fear of God in all of
no-nonsense work ethic and clearly explained
and most impressively demonstrated what was
expected of a jazz bass player. Also I was studying the classical music tradition with Nat Gangursky a very fine pedagogue and man in the
Herman Rheinshagen/Simandl tradition. Without
a doubt the most influential bassist in my development was Bert Turetzky, whom I met during
my last year of high school. I spent a brief year
at Indiana University studying with Murray
Grodner and then after three weeks gave Bert a
call and enrolled at UC San Diego the following
fall. He was the first person to really affirm that I
had what it takes to be a musician, he told me
that I was a lifer, meaning, that I had the potential to do this as a livelihood. His holistic
teaching method and personal confidence gave
me the green light to commit to music as a profession something that I had no previous con-

cept of what that meant. He encouraged me as


well as all of his students to become total musicians, not to think of ourselves as instrumentalists but as artists. Bert more than anyone else
really appealed to my sense of possibility. Bert
introduced me to Stanley Crouch who was teaching at Pomona College. After a three week
chamber music festival taught by Bert, the great
Charles Libove from the Beau Arts Trio and the
amazing cellist Joel Krosnick, I stayed in
Pomona for a month afterwards playing daily
with Stanley and often Bobby Bradford. Stanley
was someone who like Bert affirmed my talent.
He would often talk about responsibility of talent. Working with his band was an empowering
and a complex environment to grow, to experiment, and often fail. This was one of the most
intense and inspiring periods of my early development. In 1983 I had the opportunity to go to
Italy on a Fulbright to study with the great maestro, Franco Petracchi. This was invaluable experience and brought by technical understanding
to the next level. At 30 I was an older student.
Petracchi understood I wasnt trying to become a
classical virtuoso like him. At our first masterclass in Sienna I got up to play the Koussevitzy
Concerto in solo tuning with a pianist. Not having ever played in solo tuning before I tuned my
normal orchestra strings up a whole step which
increases the tension of the strings significantly.
It went terribly, but Petracchi who had previously heard my own music from a recording,
asked me to play some of my own music in order
to save face in front of the younger students. It
was very kind.
JI: Could you discuss your associations with one
(Continued on page 32)

(Continued on page 32)


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31

tivity of so many artists.

Mark Dresser
(Continued from page 31)

or more of these artists with whom you played,


and their unique approaches to creating music
and or improvisation? Bobby Bradford, Arthur
Blythe, James Newton, David Murray, John
Zorn?
MD: I met Bobby Bradford, Arthur Blythe,
James Newton and David Murray in the context
of Stanleys band in Pomona, California. Between 1972-1974 we got together at Stanleys
home nearly weekly to rehearse. We probably
gave no more than two concerts a year. Through
that experience I was simultaneously learning
my instrument, new ways of improvising before

JI: What are some key understandings you


gleaned about integrity, creativity, focus, and or
leadership from Anthony Braxton during your
ten years of working with him?
MD: Anthony Braxton is a genius one of the
most courageous, stubbornly tenacious and
deeply forward thinking and persons Ive ever
met. His example of always sticking by his guns,
never denying the music, musicians and his musical influences, regardless of how unpopular
and un-hip that may be. His unconditional and
tenacious commitment to his artistic vision
of music continues to inspire me. No other music that Ive played balances responsibility and
freedom the way his music does. He can be one
of the most generous and positive people, mak-

Creating music is literally vibrational and energetic work, a process of transformation of mind,
body, and spirit into sound. Being a musician is
both a calling and an act of will. The discipline of
music embraces so many skill sets This takes
years to develop and it is easy to become absorbed
and even lost in the craft of making music.
having mastered the traditional ones, playing in
an idiosyncratic rhythm section, and simultaneously learning about a performance attitude; the
needed confidence to project ones point of
view. Much of the music was coming out of the
Ornette Coleman tradition of melodies without
chord changes nor harmonic cycles. What I took
from this experience was to study and absorb the
tradition as best I could with the intent of finding
my own way. Also involved in this music scene
was Diamanda Galas, as a pianist, before she
became the singularly amazing and visionary
singer. I met John Zorn in 1987 through Tim
Berne, first in the contexts playing in his small
group projects, Oscar Pettiford, Misha Mengleberg, Ornette Coleman, and various recording
projects including film scores, Spy Vs Spy, Cobra, and Bar Kokhba. He invited me to write an
article for his first volume of Arcana on my bass
techniques, as well as invited me to make two
different composer CDs on Tzadik. Ive never
worked with him when he wasnt absolutely
clear and frank about what he wanted, conceptually, sonically, and visually, and has always
insisted on getting those results. Hes completely
uncompromising about his vision. His gift for
creating structure and efficiently implementing
his ideas is amazing. Besides his remarkable and
diverse compositional output his role as a curator
and producer of other peoples work is perhaps as
significant. He has had an immense contribution
to the scene and several generations of artists.
Through his label Tzadik, the venue the Stone,
and his Arcana book series he has generously
invested in and facilitated so much diverse crea32

ing young musicians believe in their own vision and possibilities. As a bandleader he empowers his musicians to bring their musicality
and creative decision making to the performance
at the same time give them the interpretive responsibility of playing his music which has tremendous rhythmic, intervallic and conceptual
challenges. In addition he has a deeply ironic
and hilarious sense of humor.
JI: In 2004 you took a position as professor of
music at the University of California, San Diego.
How has your role as an educator enhanced or
challenged your time and creativity as a performing artist and composer?
MD: It certainly has challenged the amount of
time I have to compose and practice. But this
opportunity has given me the chance to grow in
previously unimagined ways. Coming to UCSD
has performatively, compositionally, and conceptually opened up several new doors, including telematic music and has required that I learn
new skill sets. Its interesting how new responsibilities affect ones growth. I recall that after our
daughter was born I had to become more productive than in previous years. I had to use my time
more effectively as I had less free time I sort of
feel similarly with my position at UCSD. Ive
had to learn several skill sets, to learn to teach
and how to be effective in this environment
meanwhile still having the need to create performance opportunities, music to compose, and
conceive of new projects. None of this would
have been possible had it not been for my wife,

Carol Del Signore, whose strength of character,


intelligence and love has facilitated my focus on
music both in New York and in San Diego.
JI: What are your opinions about the benefits or
shortcomings of the academic route versus performance and apprenticeship in the real world
that had been the pathway to a performance career in the past?
MD: The benefits of the economic stability provide by a full time teaching position is obvious.
Balancing a professional presence with a teaching career and family life is challenging and its
not for everyone. It's hard to generalize about the
different routes to successful careers, beyond
complete dedication. Young musicians need to
be in stimulating environments to grow whether
in or out of school. The greatest education can
often come with working with ones peers and
developing ones own music and figuring out
how to get the word out about ones music. Apprenticeship doesnt function in the same way as
it did in earlier generations. There just isnt the
work there once was to tour, in the way that Art
Blakey or Miles did. Yet there are people still
able to carry on the apprenticeship tradition in
their own ways. Braxton has been doing it for
over two decades through his teaching positions
at Mills and Wesleyan, training his students in
his unique music. Not surprisingly several of his
former students have gone on to significant careers. Tim Berne continues to be one who constantly invents new bands, finding new great
talent to mutually enliven one another and to
move his music forward. I think it is undeniable
however that the jazz business has contracted in
the past couple of decades. The impact of the
internet and social media has changed the dimensions of the career equation, reducing economic outlets, yet enhancing potential global
exposure.
JI: How do music critics impact your creative
efforts and or state of mind?
MD: Ive been fortunate with critics but I
learned early on that you cant let them impact
the way you perceive yourself in any significant
way.
JI: If there is one for you, what's the connection
between music and spirituality?
MD: Creating music is literally vibrational and
energetic work, a process of transformation of
mind, body, and spirit into sound. Being a musician is both a calling and an act of will. The
discipline of music embraces so many skill sets,
traditions, and stylistic dialects. This takes years
to develop and it is easy to become absorbed and
even lost in the craft of making music. That being said I so value the discipline of music, the
daily ritual of practicing, of honing ones perception and execution of sound in time. Yet this is
second to the goal of the performance and those
special moments when we successfully channel
something greater than ourselves to commune
with an audience while projecting outwards.

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Jason Miles
(continued from page 12)
JI: I guess platinum today is ten thousand sales.
JM: If that. Now were back to the original
thinglike a Jazz album is a success if it sells
5,000 copies. Now were back to the 50s version of what a Jazz album is. But the whole thing
is you know, and I always say this, we had Jazz
albums that truly did innovate a lotlike Head
Hunters. Cmon man, I dont care who you are,
if you heard Head Hunters or Bitches Brew,
which maybe was a little bit harder to understand. But those were very, very successful albums. There was some edgy stuff on Headhuntersand it was so funky, and Herbies playing
was so freaking good. That was the groove man,
and Paul Jackson. The Miwandishi stuff all fell
apart. There was never going to be a future for
them. It was too heady. I liked the ostinato but
then it started getting very heady and all of a
sudden, Herbie started realizing if Im going to
make some money The flip he did was great.
But were seeing that Jazz at that point, did have
some albums that were very, very successful,
But they were successful on the merit that it was
very cutting edge music and the audience that
was us, the baby boomers, really just said,
Whoa, this is where were going with Return to
Forever and Weather Reportyou know those
bands that sparked new ideas. Then Pqat
Metheny came in. Kenny G who made an album
that went off the freaking charts as far as selling
and it was put under the guise of a Jazz album.
But it wasnt a Jazz album. It was an instrumental pop albumlike Montovani that your parents
used to listen to. But because they didnt know
what to say about itbecause it wasnt like Paul
Mauriat, Love in Blue or Cast Your Fate To
the Wind, that they used to play on the radio,
that I loved ...
JI: Or, Theme From a Summer Place
JM: That was awesome, those were great songs.
They were pop instrumentals. Thats what
Kenny G was, but they threw him under this Jazz
thing. Kenny was kind of a Jazz player, because
he played with Jeff Lorber. He actually was very
good with Jeff Lorber, but mostly on tenor. I
really liked how he played. I was not a fan of his
soprano playing. When that happened and that
record sold all of the copies, Jazz and contemporary Jazz was definitely on its way to not the
most creative place. Because the labels started
saying, We need a guy like Kenny G - then all
of a sudden they were trying to get five Kenny
Gs. Then all of a sudden the most copied player
in the world was no longer David Sanborn, who
had set the bar very, very high with those albums
in the 80slike Voyeur and Back Street. Those
are some funky, well played albums. So all of a
sudden, Kenny G just sold 14 million albums.
Then we ended making Close Up with David
Sanbornbecause Sanborn wanted a big hit
album. Thats when he figured out he didnt
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want to make that kind of an album, even though


the album was very cutting edge. It really was a
very good album. That was the craziest album I
ever worked on in my life. So the whole scene
started changing after that. And it was starting to
separate people. All of a sudden these West
Coast guys started infiltrating the freaking thing
and their sound wasnt West Coast Jazz anymore. It was West Coast Pop Instrumental that
they were like turning into Jazzthat was very
soft and very urban influenced. So Contemporary Jazz hasnt really been able to regain its
footing since then. Then the radio came with CD
101 and a play list. Ive been one of a few people
that have really tried to keep the fire burning and
keep it really Contemporary. But in keeping with
my formula, which I call Creative Commerciality, which is like, be creative but understand
what the audience wants to hear. Miles could
play Someday My Prince Will Come and get
over. I could do something also and get over and
keep it creative. Thats what I try to do but the
audience is kind of in a place right now where
they are on Xanax. Where are the musicians that
are really going to be the next generation of cats
in both genres? Who can fill up a concert hall?
Who can go and do this? You go and you see
some of these places where the Smooth Jazz
guys play are R&B festivals. They are not even
Smooth Jazz places because theyve only got
twenty people out there making a living. Youre
having genres of music being defined by cruises.
So, where are we at with this whole thing?
Where are we at with all of this? I look at myself and to lead back to this Sly album. What Im
trying to do with Global Noize is an air of consciousness and message, along with some severely funky music that was made at a time of
very big upheaval in our world and our country.
I introduce this in a way that I feel that I could
bring it together with men and women of all
different nationalities and colors and countries
and all of this stuff, makes me at a space where I
know where its at, I just need the opportunity to
go and really make it happen. Wherever I play
and whenever I do a show, its always a knockout. All the time. I know what Im doing. Ive
learned from the best. I used to sit at Madison
Square Garden, watching, Third World, watching Luthers show. OK, well, Id be studying
Luther. Id be studying the show and Id be seeing whats happening and the pacing of the
show. I understand how to pace a show and how
to make it work. It took all of these different
angles in order for me to reinvent myself, three
freaking times.
JI: Thats a good thing because youre assimilating everything thats going on and youre always
in process as opposed to somebody whos locked
into the past.
JM: Thats true. But theres also the thing that
innovators are not really rewarded. Right now
Im finding a real struggle out there. I do a show,
The Music of Grover Washington, Jr. We did
it at the Blue Note in Tokyo for like fourteen
shows with Ralph McDonald and Buddy Williams. We brought Mikells to freaking Tokyo,
OK? Ive played at all of these great festivals,

but politics has kept me out of certain places. We


just got a major booking for the Sly Project. But
I had to make a few compromises. Its OK, Ill
make the compromises because I know that I can
still make it, and make it work and make everybody happy and do it. We got a major booking at
the Berks Jazz Festival for a headline spot, in an
800 seat place. So were going to go there and
kill it. We went to Joes Pub and killed it. Ive
made one sheets, weve got videos, we have the
Grover show video in four-camera High Def. We
cant even get a freaking promoter in New York
to want to honor Grover or the showand the
show is wonderful. Its all politics and there is so
much going on there these days man. Yet I feel
that some of the music thats out there is so not
focused. I sat down with people in Japan and I
said to them, Look, I could bring some great
stuff here because Michaels not around anymore. Zawinul is not here. Oscar Peterson is
gone. Hank Jones is gone. Life moves on and
youve got to keep on developing people to keep
the audiences interested. Bob James is 74. Chick
[Corea] is 74, Herbie [Hancock] is 73, Jimmy
Cobb is 80 something. Were all going at some
point. So wheres the music left? Whos left of
the music? Who out there can fill a concert hall?
JI: Part of the problem is the marketplace. The
marketplace is not demanding the productthe
music, jazzin bang down the doors numbers. It
is an overwhelmingly aging and contracting
market. Its not a reflection on the quality of the
music. In part, there are far more options to
which people can be attracted to occupy their
spare time. People can surf the internet, access
500 TV stations on cable, and so on. There are
fewer venues offering bookings for one or two
nightss rather than what used to be a week at a
time. People may have been going out more
during the week in decades gone by. There are
also fewer jazz stationsand most of those are
not-for-profit or public radio based.
JM: I said that too. I did do some airplay for
Sly, because I felt that I needed to legitimize the
album. I wanted people to see, Im number one
on a Smooth Jazz station. OK? In Canada. Its a
big station called Smooth Jazz Now. It got to be
number one on his station for two weeks in a
row. The guy is saying to me, Jason I didnt do
anything, I just played it. The people responded
and want to keep on hearing this thing. They
loved it. So you know what it made me say? It
made me say, Hey, if put it out there the right
way, it will get the response from the people. So
all the cats that are dissing me in that freakin
format, because I dont play the game with them
and everything like thatthe truth is that on a
big station, Im number one.
JI: The truth has a certain ring to itsomething
with which people will resonateif you can get
it in front of them.
JM: I totally agree with you.

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33

Interview

CT: I came up in a time when


guys like Peter Erskine, Vinnie
Colaiuta, Dave Weckl, Steve
Smith, Dennis Chambers, Steve
Gadd, Alex Acuna and Terry
Bozzio were making these
amazing Jazz Fusion records.
During my time at Berklee I
lived and breathed this stuff. I
always wanted to sound like
me. I believe that each of us has
a unique style and sound that is
just waiting to be nurtured. That
being said, I would be lying if I said some of
these gentlemens stuff didnt creep into my
playing here and there. Chick Corea, John
Scofield, Mike Stern, Alan Holdsworth among
others are jazz performers who influenced me as
well.

Chris Tibaldi

Percussion at Five Towns College


Interview by Joe Patitucci
Visit Five Towns College online
At www.FTC.edu
JI: Could you discuss the percussion curriculum
and the activities for which your are responsible
at Five Towns College?
CT: At Five Towns College every student majoring in music performance, music education,
audio recording technology or music business is
required to take a private lesson in their primary
instrument. My job it to prepare my students,
musically, for life after collegethe real world!
My area of expertise is drum set. We have some
set material that we work from at the school but
there is also room to mold the lessons to each
individual students needs. I need to have my
students prepared for jazz gigs, rock gigs, Latin
gigs, hip hop gigs, theatre work, studio sessions
etc. I have even tutored my students on the art of
teaching, should they get the opportunity to do
so down the road. Its tough out there. Very few
people coming out of college are in any position
to turn down gigs.
JI: What are some of the key understandings
you picked up from one of more of your mentors?
CT: I have been have been able to study with
some amazing teachers. Dom Famularo had the
biggest influence on me. We worked on so many
great things including the Moeller Method and
the free stroke. We mostly discussed how to play
the drums meaning, how the body moves
when you play, and using the natural rebound of
the stick to do the work for you. It changed everything for me. Dom was the first teacher I had
that truly treated the feet as equals to the hands.
He had me go through the classic book Stick
Control by Ted Reed with my feet! Crazy stuff.
Beyond the kit, we would discuss the business
end of drumming learning how to teach and
present clinics, being organized, how to handle
yourself when dealing with endorsements, etc.
Another mentor I learned so much from was
Bobby Sanabria. Bobby is more than just an
amazingly talented player he has this beautiful, joyful vibe that is infectious. He helped me
understand so much about Afro-Cuban drumming and where it came from. The man is a historian on Latin drumming.
JI: Could you discuss one or more of the instrumentalists - drummers or other performers whose artistry has influenced you to assimilate
their ideas into your playing?
34

JI: What are some of the essentials involved in


developing solid rhythmic foundation to bolster
development in the pursuit of musical mastery
and in
the development of the skill of improvisation.
CT: You have to be able to play everything you
know to a click. That is essential for being a
modern drum set player. These days everything
in the studio is played to a click or a loop. Not
only that but many live gigs are too. You have to
be able to read well, know your rudiments, and
be well verse in a wide variety of styles and do it
all to a click. Besides that, I would suggest getting yourself a good teacher, work out of some
great books, listen to as much music as you can
and play with as many musicians as possible.
JI: Could you compare the benefits or shortcomings of taking the academic route versus the
apprenticeship route - the latter having been the
pathway to a performance career in the past?
CT: That is a great question and one many
young musicians wrestle with everyday. Going
to college for music can expose you to so many
aspects of music that, as a percussionist, you
may not have access too. Classes in ear training,
sight singing, harmony etc are invaluable in
becoming a well rounded musician. The rough
part is the monetary costs involved. Its not an
easy field to enter in 2013/2014. The employment opportunities may not be what they once
were. It takes a lot of determination and belief in
ones self to persevere. There have been plenty of
amazing musicians that never went to school for
music. You have to decide what is right for you.
JI: What are some of the essential understandings about business that you have learned in your
professional activities as a performer, recording
artist, educator and so forth?
CT: The business end it so important. It is the
music business, after all. One must know how to
present themselves like a professional. We all
know the clichs but very few abide by them.
Be on time, be prepared, know how to take direction and be friendly. Return calls, texts and
emails right away. Be organized. I have my own
drum school, The East Coast Drum School, that

prepares young drummers to go to music school


through private lessons, if they so desire. I have
to know how to conduct myself to run a company. It sounds so simple but most musicians
screw up one or more of these basic tasks every
day.
JI: How has your work as an educator challenged, supported or influenced your artistry and
creative pursuits?
CT: I am constantly searching for new material
to present to my students. I want to always be
current with firm roots in the past. This often
leads me to some great new books or YouTube
videos to use in my teaching. I have always been
into electronic percussion. Programming and
triggering loops and samples is standard these
days. My students need to know about these
things. To stay current I also ask my students
what they are listening to. Their influences are
important to me. Every student is unique and
should be treated as such. I have been turned
onto a lot of great music and musicians through
my students. That's one of the great things about
teaching.
JI: What are some the ideas you share with your
students that youve found serve to motivate and
or inspire them?
CT: I find that students really respond to being
motivated to be themselves. Don't worry about
what your friend is practicing or how fast he or
she can play it. Do your own thing, find your
own voice. There are enough clones out there.
You can actually see when they really start to
believe that they are unique. You can hear it too.
JI: Are there some words of wisdom or advice
about life and human nature that you've picked
up from one or more of your peers, mentors or
artists with whom you have worked - that you
might share?
CT: Enjoy that you play music. Enjoy every gig,
good or bad that you play. Enjoy the private time
you have to practice your craft. Enjoy learning.
Enjoy teaching. It is all so precious. Life can
turn in an instant. Enjoy the journey.

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DECEMBER 2013
WWW.JAZZOUTSIDE.COM

Giussepe Logan
Andrew Lamb
Amina Claudine Myers
Lucian Ban

William
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35

Interview

and its really heavy. So, that was the basis for
the whole piece that wound up to be Channels of
Conscousness.

William Hooker
A Creative Force, Drummer, Composer, Poet
Interview by Nora McCarthy

Photo By Ken Weiss

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

Visit William Hooker online at


www.WilliamHooker.com
Hear William Hooker solo
December 3, 2013, Intar Theater,
502 W. 52nd Street, 4th Floor, NYC at 8PM
Tuesday Night Performance Series sponsored by
The Conjure Music Collective. Admission, $10
Jazz Outside: I am very delighted you agreed to
join us for the second issue of Jazz Outside
Magazine and give us this candid interview with
you. Please talk about your 2012 release, Channels of Consciousness the CD I had the pleasure
of reviewing for this issue.
William Hooker: Thank you so very much.
Channels of Consciousness, is one of my best
recordings I think and one of the CDs Im most
proud of.
Jazz Outside: Its a masterpiece I think. The
story that youre telling is pretty intense.
WH: Lets investigate the story. I read a book
by Richard Wright and it is called, A Fathers
Law. That book had an effect on me. Of all of
the many things that Richard Wright has written,
this one hit me in particular because its a novel
that not that many people know that he wrote.
Also, its a hard-to-find book. I read this book
and I said, Whoa. Heres the premise. Theres
been a series of murders that have happened in
this quaint village, and the father becomes the
head of the police because the other fellow
passed away and hes going into this situation as
the first Black head of police and his family is
overwhelmed with the job that he has to do. Hes
really happy about it because hes up on his
game and hes knows what to do, he knows
whats happening, but hes presented with this

case that involves a person who commits these


horrendous deeds in this small village and now
its his job to find out who this person is in order
to capture this person. So, in the meanwhile, he
has his family to deal with, his wife who is really
happy that he got this new job and his son that is
a very astute young man, going to college, doing
very well and he knows that his son, in terms of
his class, not only his race but his class, who he
hangs out with, he knows that his son knows all
of these people that are in this circle in the village and he starts to ask his son, about these
people, what they are like, who they are, asking
him if he remembers this and that person. His
son responds saying Yes, that he plays tennis
with them. Then, it gets deeper and deeper, and
he realizes that his son knows a little bit more
about these people than hes telling him, because
hes intuitive, throughout all these years of having dealt with criminality, not only criminality
but social unrest. So he keeps using his intuition
and what kicks in are his feelings about being a
father and his feelings about his own guilt as to
what is this boy like that he raised and not wanting his mother to know that he suspects his own
son and he thinks that he has something weird
going on in his brain and he didnt want to jeopardize the trust that his son has in him. But he
comes to find out that his son is the one who has
been doing all these things and he has to deal
with it overall. He sees his son doing some really
strange things, his relationships with women and
the people he has grown up with and his take on
life, and thats the basis of it, its like a morality
play. When you think of Richard Wrights work
and his contribution to not only Black literature
but literature on the whole, and this book, which
is really a crime story, but again, not really,
thats why a lot of people are not acquainted
with itits hard to find, but I found it, read it

ABOUT JAZZ OUTSIDE


When we title, name or call a given style of music,
we do so in order that we can communicate something about the music, and or to establish a point of
agreement or departure. Jazz Outside is our title for
this section of the magazine where readers will find
coverage of the music that listeners alternately identify as open form, avant-garde, free, new music, improvised music, among other descriptors - and the
artists who perform the music that is created and
36

Jazz Outside: Throughout the CD, you say


things sporadically that are related to the piece
when youre in in the moment that indicate
where its leadingtheres so much emotion. I
did get the idea of something that involved murder or something being taken away, and the sorrow behind that discoveryI was picking up
those kinds of things without knowing the story
that it was based on. I was also wondering if it
might have come from a poem or something that
you had writtenbut I knew it was a story.
WH: Im a very happy guy. [Laughter] No, it
was just the impact of Wrights work, and his
impact on me in terms of all the things that Ive
read about him and his relationship as an expatriot. I have a book, Richard Wright: the Demonic Genius. There are a lot of things to be said
about him with regard to what he has to deliver
to literature as an artist, separate from the Black
Presidents. He really packs his work with things
that make people think, not just about moral
questions, about class vs. cast questions, questions about what we are doing as artists and people to people question, separate from race or any
of those kinds of things. Hes an excellent writer.
Jazz Outside: You did his work proud. Im not
changing one word of my review after finding
out where the story came out of because you
touched on all the things that are important from
what youre telling me that he demonstrated in
his work. You certainly translated all of those
things in this CDthe emotion, the anger, the
sorrow, all of it, its all there. Lets talk about
other projects you have and any recent or upcoming recordings, performances, etc.
WH: Stepping back a little, Channels of Consciousness is the third recording Ive done for
the NoBusiness label.
Jazz Outside: Please tell me about that label.
WH: NoBusiness is an excellent labelI cant
stress it enough. I have a really good relationship
with them and this is the third piece that Ive
done with them. The first one was, Earths Orbit
which is Bliss (east) and Bliss (west). Its a

expressed on this broad landscape. As a publication


that is created by musicians, we are especially sensitive to the concerns of our fellow creators and music makers. By sharing their perspectives about the
creative process, and insights into their everevolving lives, events, ideas and contributions, we
hope that readers will gain greater understanding
about and appreciation for the music.
  

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

(Continued on page 37)


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Skau Mes along with a visual called


Approaching the Garden. I was there for seven
days, and I played at that festival with the trio
and then I took a bus to Vilnius and we recorded
the Vilnius thing for NoBusiness. It was a very,
very eye-opening experience for me.
Jazz Outside: In what way?
WH: These people love culture. I had seven
hundred people that were at the performance.
And as you know, when you play here, youre
lucky if you get fifty.

A person just wants to communicate with another


person. So many things happen in this world that
you cant really anticipate the results of what you
do. You just kind of want to put the energy into the
universe, put the energy out there and see what
happens, because half of the time you really dont
have any control over it. If youre going to stress
out from the conception of it all the way up to what
it becomes, its kind of ridiculous actually.
Jazz Outside: Oh tell me about it. We performed in Austria to the same kind of thing. To
perform in a filled-to-capacity beautiful concert
hall, for people who utterly loved and appreciated our music, who gave us their rapt attention
and a standing ovation, brought us to our knees
and was an incredible feeling.
WH: We played in a place called the Splendid
Palace. Just to know that when I went into this
place I was given everything that I needed to
make the performance just the way I wanted it
like an IMAX screenI didnt even have to talk
to the engineer, he was reading my mind. The
drums sounded like thunder. I was just so impressed and Im still realizing that they just appreciate this in terms of culture and in terms of
their lives. This is important to them, and theyre
proud of it.

Jazz Outside: Just you and him?


WH: Yes. That was the first piece we did; the
second piece that I did I was invited to the Riga
Splendid Palace cinema in Riga on October 10
with a Baltic trio assembled specifically for

In a time of universal
deceit - telling the truth is
a revolutionary act.
- George Orwell
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people, they didnt look at me as if I was some


sort of star or something, we just sat and we
talked and then after that I did a seminar at the
conservatory, which was also eye opening, because I saw the younger people thereearly
twenties and they were into this music. They
were into wanting to know about it, they were
into wanting to know about who I am listening
to, what they can do to further their education
and understanding of our music, because one
thing I noticed, the way we play here in America
is on a different level in terms of the artistic
excellence of the people that Ive worked with so

Jazz Outside: Thats it. The value that they


place on art is incredible as opposed to this
countryits gone, its washed away. Did it
every really exist here? I really wonder because
its not ingrained in the hearts and minds of the
masses.
WH: There are so many commercial concerns
here. Just to see all of these resources that I had
to actually implement the idea that Id been
thinking of. Just to see that when I came down
from this room, (it was in an old palace) and
when I walked downstairs and looked and saw
there were seven hundred people in this place,
Im saying, This is really beautiful. And, these

far. These people are giants and when you go to


Europe and you have the opportunity to present
this to them, they appreciate it and they show it.
And, theyre very down to earth about this being
an important part of their lives, not something
that I have to buy, that I have to sell, that I have
to package in a certain way, that I have to play
all the angles; I have to do this, its just a part of
their lives. And, then I went to Vilnius where the
NoBusiness people were located and I hooked
up with them and that was the opportunity for
me to spend time with the people that put the
records out. We spent time, went out to eat, and
there were nine hundred people in that place. So,
you come back and then youre doing your work
and youre just happy about the fact that you
know that there are places on this earth that can
really foster the love of art and culture and thats
important for civilization to me.
Jazz Outside: Absolutely, thats the end result,
civilization life on this planet, in peace, love
and harmony.
WH: Thats where Im coming from with this.
My eyes were opened and as a matter of fact,
Im in contact with these people right now,
were thinking about how to put out the Riga
concert and a person from Germany sent me the
whole video of it and wants me to review it, etc.
My mind took a turn within the last three weeks
or so. And, here we are meeting and talking and
Im feeling really good about the things that
have happened.

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

(Continued on page 38)


37

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

double vinyl. Its a collectors item because


every copy has a certain number on it. Its both
CD and vinyl. I used the groups that I had, Bliss
(east) which is Adam Lane and Darius Jones and
myself. Thats on the first vinylon the second
vinyl is Bliss (west) which is me, Damon Smith,
Weasel Walter and Aaron Bennett. Those are the
people I work with when I go to California and I
go to California pretty frequently. That came
about because I was working very hard with
those two groups, so they put out the first one.
Then the second one came, which was the opportunity for me to put out, Crossing Points and
it was the work I did with Thomas Chapin. That
was a concert that happened on the Lower East
Side and was recorded and we went through
quite a wait for it and they chose this one because I presented two pieces to them. One was
from Live at Yoshis in San Francisco, which is a
beautiful place to play and it was a great performance I thought. The other one was the Thomas Chapin piece. They said they liked it. I liked
it too. Its intense and I must say I never heard
Thomas play like this, ever. What happened was
he died from leukemia, he was a person that was
more or less in the mainstream, playing at Newport Jazz Festival and places like that, doing
those kinds of things, worldwide traveled and
everything. It just so happened that through
Bruce Gallanter at the Downtown Music Gallery, we both met. We found out we came from
towns that were very close to each other and
then we bonded and I got this gig and I said,
Lets play. And we played for like an hour and
a half. He played as he never played before.
Thats another duo double vinyl and then Channels of Consciousness which was done at Roulette and that was the third one. The fourth one
were working on which should be in the spring
of next year. I just came back from Lithuania
where I performed at the Vilnius Jazz Festival
2013. Im playing with a European reed player
by the name of Liudas Mocknashes one of
the better players over there, absolutely. Hes
also one of the people who runs NoBusiness but
I never knew that. I developed a relationship
with one of the head people there also because
he came over to visit and we walked all through
Brooklyn, he was selling the records at the Vision Festival and he spent the day. Then when I
went over to Lithuanian about three weeks ago
to perform at Vilnius, we recorded it and its to
come out in the spring. It was a really excellent
performance, really captivating.

William Hooker

roots and the blood of what is inherent in the


tune itself and inherent in the concept of just
what its called, Channels of Consciousness.

Jazz Outside: Im personally glad Im getting


the chance to get this from you noweverything
is happening right now. There are no consequences. Your whole body of work brought you
to this place. However you started, you went on
this journey and went through it all and now
your mission has been divulged. Just what you
said, for our civilization, maybe when you had
your first gig you werent thinking that that was
the heavy task that was being asked of you.

Jazz Outside: And you did it, you freaking did


it.

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

WH: Never. Some of those things that were


happening in the sixties and the early seventies
never! Forget it! Are you kidding? I couldnt
get arrested.
Jazz Outside: But you were being groomed.
Everything that happened to you in your life,
brought you to this place and groomed you for
this, serious, serious, very important mission that
you are accomplishing with this music.
WH: My history in music has been this that I
understand, beautiful songs like Youve
Changed, I understand changes. Im not out
here to just blow. Im not just out here to play till
I get exhausted and pass out and thats it. No, I
came from knowing changes; I came from the
Black book. Thats where I came from. When I
was thirteen, fourteen, fifteen years old, I had to
memorize that thing. And, they thought I could
play and they wanted to take me with them and
my mother consented as long as they didnt have
me coming home drunk because I was only in
the eleventh grade, you know that kind of thing?
But I had to learn that, and all those tunes, those
things, that stuck with me; thats in my soul, so I
can appreciate that. In my work now, I try to
even foster the people that I play with to play in
kind of an elevated transcendental change in
their improvisation. Instead of just one full-on
blast, its not about that at all. I think if you listen to some pieces like Alice Coltranes, Lord
of Lords the way she plays you realize its not
just about power, and its not just about chops
its about some sort of beautyyou looking into
one flower and trying to see the beauty of that as
opposed to even looking at a whole big garden
full of flowers, all different types, youre looking
at one flower and then when you play those
changes, to people who even understand it more
deeply, you see part of what were doing in
terms of this avant-garde, Im talking about
the people that I feel have really mastered it and
understand itwe know its not just about blowing, its not just about that, not at all. Because,
how could it be about that if I came from something that is a part and parcel of the tradition.
You are your music. You play oft times your
accumulation of experiences and since I have
experienced those things, I can say, Youve
Changed made me almost cry, because its so
beautiful, its beautifulyou know that tune,
obviously. So what Im saying is that even in
those times like in Channels of Consciousness,
when the guitarist deals with slide guitar and we
go into blues, Im trying to really bring back the
38

WH: Yes, and Im trying to do it every time I sit


down. So because of that, rehearsal is important
and all these things are important. Its almost as
if, Ive come to this music with a lot of playing
of a lot of different kinds of music Nora. And,
this is where I am at now. Im continuing on the
same path, using all these toolsnot forgetting
these tools, not just discarding them, not just all
of a sudden saying, No, thats not intense
enough for me. Its not about that for me, its
about transcendent beauty rather so that I can
inspire something in myself and in others and
Im inspiring something, not out of fear, not out
of just blasting, not out of, Let me stuff this
down your throat. I want to inspire by taking
people up with me as I go there and see where
we go, thats my purpose.
Jazz Outside: Would you say that when you
hear a lot of the free stuff thats being played
now, it is precisely the stuff youre talking about,
just the blasting, the blaring, the one decibel, the
screaming all at once kind of thing. I dont know
how that happened to seem to take the place of
the individual voice and the conversation and the
overall design of something when youre collaborating in a group ensemble, Ive worked
with several great conductors who truly understood what Im about to say as well and some of
the cats that are on the fringe or underneath it or
wherever they want to categorize themselves but
there seems to be that concept that playing free
means to be blaring and screaming at top intensity with not giving thought to the underlying
universal harmonics of some kind of changes,
rhythm, dynamics, or spaceyou know, a little
space please, I love space. You cant have a vase
without a space, you know?
WH: Yes, [Laughter] Space is the Place! My
philosophical and musical thought on that is this:
for every person that you go to see, every person
has a different voice. Thats kind of the beauty
of it too and it just so happened that, I think
there was book that came out about Coltrane and
the avant-garde of Coltrane and the Black Revolution of the sixties and something like that, and
it was trying to really deal with the latter part of
the avant-garde where we got into like more
freedom, freedom as it is interpreted in terms of
Black Music. The freedom as interpreted as a
scream again the status quo. The status quo at
that time was changes. We could not get past
Ornette, Cecil and Trane and we can throw
Jackie McLean in as wellwe couldnt get past
that and then to get past that, sometimes you
have to destroy something to build something
new. Like the element of firefire serves a purpose. The purpose to me is that if everything is
all of a sudden ash out of that comes somethingthe phoenix. So, to my thinking you have
people that adhere to that particular way of doing
it and you have other people that adhere to other
ways of doing it and I myself, I love all these

people. I can understand where they are coming


from and I can appreciate where they are coming
and all I can say is if your motive is the correct
onefine, come from wherever you want to
come from; if your motive is the correct one. But
Im speaking for me because some people like to
be assaulted, that gets them offthey like that
Im kind of not like that.
Jazz Outside: To me its like if youre decorating a house, would you stuff a living room with
every piece of furniture you could think of,
where nobody could go in?
WH: But you wouldnt want to go into that
house.
Jazz Outside: You couldnt go in, you wouldnt
fit, there would be no room.
WH: But thats their house. The house that Im
trying to build, Im trying to build it on a different premise, Ill just put it that way, so Ill be
comfortable in it; I can work in it. I can do what
I have to do in it.
Jazz Outside: Do you think that there needs to
be some formal training or education in terms of
theory = musicianship before you can break out
and play free, or do you think that just being
very fluent and familiar with your instrument
with the ability to just blow is enough?
WH: As opposed to trying to find the criteria for
what I think makes a great statement, I think that
different people approach life differently. They
approach their own awakening differently and so
because of that I look at what I think Im listening to or what is being presented to me musically, if its really something that I can find a
beauty in, but thats me, I can roll with it. Just
like Thelonius Monk made that piece, Ugly
Beauty. If you were to say that to any person
they would say, Jeeze its beautiful, how could
it be ugly, blah, blah, blah. You could go off on
a very, heavy esoteric study about beauty and
ugliness.
Jazz Outside: But you know you cant have one
without the other because they define each other.
WH: Like Yin and Yang. What Im saying is
that if people want to approach things that way
its fine, but that doesnt necessarily mean that
those are the kinds of people that Im going to
work with within the context of what Im trying
to present and what Im trying to do. There are
many branches on the tree and as long as they
arent hurting anybody and saying things that are
derogatory and racially getting crazy and acting
all stupid and thinking that they are all that and
theyre notI can handle it. It gets to the point
where sometimes we start to believe our own
press. If we get into believing our own press,
then we kind of eliminate constructive criticism,
we eliminate other peoples viewpoints. I dont
want to be dogmatic, is what Im trying to say.
And, Im not saying that out of being a chicken
to approach other people but in terms of the way
I approach humanness I can basically accept

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

(Continued on page 39)


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William Hooker
good people. I dont know about how they want
to do things artistically or if theyve mastered
their instrument or if they know Solar or if
they know Spring Can Really Hang You Up the
Most or if they know China by Frank Wright,
its cool with me, Im good and Im happy. I can
relate to the goodness in them. Thats what Im
seeking to find that goodness in people that
gives them the impulse to even want to do this.
This is not something that if you want people to
like you, you do this.
Jazz Outside: And if you want to be popular or
reviewed in the New York Times, or have anybody breaking down your doors with record
deals.

Jazz Outside: Thats very good advice.


WH: I wouldnt want to impose my path on
someone else. If they ask how they could approach something differently, I may answer that
one, but I wouldnt say, This is what you have
to do. I was told certain things that I had to do,
and I just decided that Im not doing it. A lot of
times I would say, I already did that. You
cant tell by the way Im playing but I already
did that. That was my inner pretense for not
doing it, not just to be arrogant.
Jazz Outside: Im very interested in learning
about your poetry writing the poem in your
liner notes is very abstract there are many
methods to writing poetry what are the sources
of your inspiration and please describe the way
you use the words. When did you begin writing,
how many books do you have published?
WH: I dont have books published because the
vehicle basically has been magazines like Parabola as well as a lot of esoteric magazines. Because as you know, it is very difficult to have
someone give you money to publish a book. I
can spend time doing that and Im learning now
how to deal with foundation grants and things
like that to actually be able to materialize this
stuff. But throughout the course of my life Ive
had to take, in terms of the writing, had to take
second place to the music.

Jazz Outside: You paint as well.


WH: Yes, go to my website, williamhooker.com
and youll see all my paintings, all my poetry,
because thats completely differenta different
medium. But the main thing with that it could
enhance the gift that was being created, that was
it, really and thats how Ive used it.
Jazz Outside: You are clearly a storyteller. The
poetry on Channels of Consciousness sounds
spontaneous, improvised in the moment, and is
an integral element of the overall composition
Im interested in how and when you began composing and your personal approach to composition. The thing thats good is that for me, word is
more singular that group music. Because then
Im dealing with more than just myself then just
the written word. Im dealing with usually at
least, four or five other musicians making interpretations of the music and in this case, I can just
interpret it myself through writing. Thats a major difference, you know what I mean. Its a
major difference because you are including more
people in terms of the creation of this thing with
music than you are with poetry. Are they stream
of consciousness or do you sit down and think
about something; do you pick a subject or a
topicdo you ever do a work for hire?
WH: No.
Jazz Outside: Dont you think when youre
sitting down to write poetry youre kind of dealing with people you cant see?
WH: Oh, do you mean all the influences?
Jazz Outside: All the influence all the spirits
and the channeling of the whole creative process.
WH: Thats true, but theres a difference when
theres actual human beings and youre all in the
same room, working on my interpretation of a
melody for example. Im also adding all of those
things you just mentioned even in that situation.
But it gets more singular in terms of the word for
me.

Jazz Outside: When did you start writing.

Jazz Outside: The Channeling Consciousness


CD is absolutely incredible. The levels of energy
and emotion are intense, the performance flawless, how long have you been working with this
particular group of musicians, what is the preparation for a performance such as this, and how
does it differ from your other performancesin
other words do you usually play without interruption? Is the music notated? Do you conduct
while playing?

WH: In the seventies, when I was in California.


It became just a part of what I was doing and
when I got back, I realized I had all of these
papers and all this poetry all written down. I had
to write articles for people and for magazines
and then I started putting the poetry inside of my

WH: Lets go through the whole process. First


of all the idea happens and the idea happening,
Im thinking about the conceptual part of how
long this performance is going to last, how its
going to fulfill itself, whats it going to do. Then
I find the people I need to do certain things be-

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cause I know what kind of sounds I want. Maybe


sometimes I want a bass player, maybe sometimes I dont want a bass player. Maybe I want
an expansive piano player, maybe I dont.
Maybe I want somebody who plays multi-reads
as opposed to somebody who is basically sticking to one reed or that kind of thing. Then with
the stuff thats written down usually, those are
the springboards that I use. I can place it in front
of them and say, This is the seed of this portion
of the improvisation.
Jazz Outside: Do you write specifically for the
instruments youre using?
WH: No. Also, there is no rhythmic sign on it
either. Theres none because I want to be totally
free to do anything that I want to do. Its really
like a person listening and hearing the melody
and almost being able to sing it back to me.
Jazz Outside: When I was listening to the very
first piece on the CD, I noticed how the time was
building and everyones participation as they
entered onto the stage and made their presence
known, this stuff built up like a beehive, within
moments up to the point of such high intensity
with no one bumping into each other at all and
then it began and took off changing shapes and
going in different directions and now youre
telling me you dont write with any time?
WH: Yes, theres no time. I write that way so I
can be free. If the person approaches it with their
tapping their foot, if they think its 3/4 or 6/8,
that can be an impediment because theyre really
being too stiff. Like if you were singing something to someone, you wouldnt do it that way,
because thats making everything more inflexible. Then when I add the rhythm on top of it, it
really makes it inflexible, thats not even workable for me. Then, that person would be imposing
that particular strict time signature on what Im
playing and it wouldnt make sense to the person
thats tapping their foot. I could handle it but
still, I want them to feel free enough so that they
could sing it back to me if they to or they could
hum it back to me. There are some people that
dont have to deal with that at all for some reason. I put it in front of them and they sing it right
back to me on their instrument automatically,
thats happened many times.
Jazz Outside: I think what you just said, is what
makes this music at a supremely higher level
than all the other forms, Im putting it out here
because I think thats it in a nutshell because so
many people are anchored to these things that
were talking about, reading the time and the this
and the that and it has to be here or thereor the
question, Why are you phrasing like that, Im
over here, the downbeat is here.
WH: Thats it, phrasing; the human voice thing.
Thats important, even if the person doesnt want
to use it I know that they have it. Im trying to
bring it out in them, to make it comfortable so
that they understand whats going on separate
from the way I interpret the rhythm and separate
from usually the wild card that is thrown in

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

(Continued on page 48)


39

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

WH: You dont do it and you sure dont do it


this way. Thats why I get happy when I see
certain things being successful and certain things
still carrying on. So, I would want to reserve
judgment in that case. So for me to tell somebody else, how to do this and how to do that, I
dont know where they are, I just know what I
did and it seems to work for me.

recordings and then I would do performances


where the poetry was very essential and thats
the way I did. But it was always secondary, just
like painting, its secondary.

Interview

Amina Claudine Myers

JI: But you stayed in New York?

Interview By Ken Weiss


Visit Amina Claudine Myers online at
facebook.com/aminaclaudine.myers

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

JI: What did you learn from the AACM and


how did it change you as an artist?
ACM: The AACM opened me up musically to
the point where there were no barriers. We had
our disagreements and discussions but we came
together as one whole unit, there was a lot of
love, and I learned how to let the music grow
and flow. Nobody ever tried to tell me how to
play or what to play, but they were supportive.
Muhal is very supportive.

others were coming. When I first came to New


York in 1967, I was scared of New York. I said I
had to have a whole lot of money, it was a culture shock. Well, I didnt like Chicago either
because it was dark and gloomy and the buildings were close to each other but then I liked
it after I started living there. But after a while,
the music scene in Chicago started fading, it
started dying out. I had to go back into the
church and play. I said, Ive been there, I dont
want to do that. So I knew I had to leave. It was
New York or California and I went to California
first but then I ended up in New York and when
I ended up in New York, I knew I was ready. It
really freed me up when I went to New York.

JI: You mentioned Muhal Richard Abrams, he


received an NEA Jazz Master award in 2010. He
led the AACM and somehow organized a wide
array of musicians into a unit that demanded to
be treated respectfully. Others such as Bill Dixon
in New York failed to maintain group solidarity.
What was behind Muhals success?

JI: There was also a group of St. Louis musicians from the Black Artist Group (BAG) who
moved to New York at the same time. Was there
a competition between the two groups or did
they embrace each other?

ACM: I cant speak for Muhal, but Chicago had


the Southside community where we were all
together. Once you get to New York, you have

JI: You basically were all competing for the


same jobs though.

ACM: Oh, no, no, no.

From Jug, I learned about programming


Sonny was altogether different. I learned about
music from him Sometimes you dont see
things when they happen but that was a learning
experience be prepared, play it differently.
to have your program together because its
harder there, you have to hustle to survive.
Whereas in Chicago, we had a community, there
was a togetherness that would be hard to have in
New York because people are too spread-out.
Theres too much going on with people trying to
make a living. Now that Im getting older, I
realize how special it was what we had in Chicago. It was a beehive of activity with Muhal
writing plays and so much going on. Thats
where I learned that I could paint and write poetry, the AACM brought all that out. It showed a
person what they could do, how to be creative
and how to take that and grow with it. You cant
do that in New York. If youre not together,
youll find yourself going back home.
JI: You moved to New York City in 1976,
along with other AACM members. Was that a
group decision? What was behind the move?
ACM: No, I didnt know that Muhal and the
40

with them right away. Im not giving any names


but I know some instances where it was Oh,
who are you? Oh, yeah? You a musician, huh?
OK. You know, that kind of thing, but they
came around after a while. You didnt have that
love feeling like we had in Chicago, its just not
there.

ACM: We were all playing in those lofts and


some of those musicians were better known. I
didnt know that all those people from St. Louis
were moving to New York either. You see, we
used to go down there [St. Louis] to play with
BAG, there was some unity there, just different
states. There was no competition with Julius
Hemphill, Oliver Lake, Hamiet Bluiett, they
were wonderful musicians, we embraced each
other.
JI: Did the existing New York musicians welcome the incoming musicians or did they see
them as threats?
ACM: I cant speak for them, I supposed some
were a little standoffish. In some instances, you
had to prove yourself, you know, that old-school
thing where you got to go through changes first
before youd be accepted. Thats the feeling I
felt from some of the musicians. Actually, they
were beautiful but you cant just come up and be

ACM: The New York musicians were fine individually. There were people who were good to
me like Eddie Moore and Marion Brown. When
I first got to New York, I stayed with Eddie
Moore because he was friends with Ajaramu, my
boyfriend. Eddie was Sonny Rollins drummer
and he knew Sonny was looking for a pianist so
Eddie took me to a rehearsal. Sonny took a break
and I played the piano. He was on the telephone
the whole time I played and he hired somebody else. [Laughs] Eddie would try to get me
work. You know, I worked with Art Blakey, I
was a Jazz Messenger. Joanne Brackeen and I
were the only two women with Art. That was an
experience, but all that was good.
JI: Do you have any Art Blakey stories?
ACM: Art would tell me, Dont be scared. I
would tell him, Im not scared, Art. John
Stubblefield told me to let Art know that I wrote
and that I sang so Art had me singing. Walter
Davis, the pianist, would come to the rehearsals
because we were playing some of Walters
tunes. One day Art said to me, Get your passport, were going to Brazil. So I ran over and
got my passport, although I had no money. We
were supposed to have a rehearsal but all of a
sudden, I didnt hear from nobody, couldnt talk
to nobody, nobody was contacting me. Well,
what happened was that when Walter Davis
would come to the rehearsals, he used to tease
me and then one day, he wouldnt look me in the
eye. He went to Brazil with the band in my
place. It was okay but I kept that music a long
time before I let Art get that music back. It was a
wonderful experience playing with Blakey because every night was hitting, every night was
good, it was up. Thats when I met Bobby Watson and David Schnitter, two wonderful musicians. So I was a Messenger for a few weeks, it
was an honor.
JI: Before that, you toured with Gene Ammons
and also spent time with Sonny Stitt. What can
you say about that experience?
ACM: Yeah, we had some good nights. Sometimes I went on tour with Sonny, Dexter Gordon
and Jug together. From Jug, I learned about programming the music. Jug was a very beautiful,
very warm man. I learned a whole lot from Jug.
Sonny was altogether different. I learned about
music from him. One night he called four blues
tunes in a row and I was on the organ for all of
them. Sometimes you dont see things when they
happen but that was a learning experience be
prepared, play it differently. Sonny would call a
song in March that wed rehearse, and then in
June, wed completely forgotten all about the
song. I learned valuable lessons from both of
them.
  

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Amina Claudine Myers


Photo by Ken Weiss

Interview

Andrew Lamb

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

Interview By Gary Heimbauer


Jazz Outside: What are your sources of experience as an independent artist?
inspiration?
AL: The challenges as an independent are
Andrew Lamb: The focus and stamina that artist are just as large as ever, opportunities
allow me to be creative for extended peri- to work, the increase of financial stability,
ods of time are as a result of hard work, in order to pursue the art form in a more
practicing and studying for countless hours, comfortable fashion than previously entrial and tribulation, a personal commitment dured, having your work presented corto aware of one health, and above all else, rectly, and having ones self represented
the bless-ings of the creator. What keeps me correctly, while maintaining patience and
inspired? The unpretentious love that dwells balance. My advice for overcoming many
in my heart to be a vehicle that creates of these obstacles is to never allow yourself
beauty, joy, and a healing presence in the to become a myopic thinker, surround your
universe. My family, art and culture, the self with kindred spirits, and those that you
work well with, and seek the counsel of
birds, I am inspired by many things.
those who actually know, and not those
Jazz Outside: Can you talk about the op- who present themselves as knowing.

AL: Nature, the sanctified church, love, and


understanding the blues as a person.
Jazz Outside: Who are your influences?
AL: All of the greats in the lineage of the
saxophone from Lester Young to Kidd Jordan and Fred Anderson
Jazz Outside: What have you discovered
about human nature in your career?
AL: Everybody needs something to feel
good about and something to share.
Jazz Outside: Do you have advice youve
received that has made an impact on your
artistry and person?
AL: Be true to yourself Tell your own
story,
Jazz Outside: What do you do to relax?
AL: Family, being alone, prayer.
Jazz Outside: If there is one for you, what

never allow yourself to become a myopic thinker,


surround your self with kindred spirits, and those
that you work well with, and seek the counsel of
those who actually know, and not those who
present themselves as knowing.
is the connection between music and spiriJazz Outside: What discoveries have you tuality?
AL: The audience for the music has made about business through your artistic
AL: Music and Spiritually are both within
changed so drastically from the first time I experience?
the same, for me.
ever walked into a loft at the height of the
loft jazz scene that it just amazes me. The AL: Learn AS much as possible about the
  
lack of venues for the music to be pre- business of music, constantly update your
sented, the need for much more of a pres- research and data bases. I have a good perence on the air waves that also play the mu- son managing me Glen Leslie who has
sic of artist that are currently accessible, if really gone to bat for me on several occaIn the beginning
these things would be addressed and put sions, being an artist on C.I.M.P. is a most
of a change, the patriot
into place then, the audience for the music wonderful thing for and I feel very fortunate
is a brave and scarce man,
would once again flourish and so would the to have been embraced by that situation, my
hated and scorned. When the
opportunities to perform just as much and Long-lasting relationship with the French
cause succeeds, however, the
more in the country, and in the inner cities American Reed Company, and knowledge
timid join him...for then it
so that musicians who play this music could that my recordings and concert appearances
costs nothing to be
be equally heralded at home as well as are appreciated on a global level
a patriot.
abroad.
Jazz Outside: What sounds and sights have
- Mark Twain
Jazz Outside: What are the challenges you influenced you?
portunities for performance?

42

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Andrew Lamb
Photo by Ken Weiss

Interview

Giuseppe Logan

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

Interview By Ken Weiss


Logan, born in 1935, is an avant-garde multiinstrumentalist who made influential recordings
in the mid-60s on the ESP Disc label. He
played with game-changing artists such as
Archie Shepp, Pharoah Sanders, Milford
Graves and Roswell Rudd before suddenly vanishing off the scene in the early 70s. His reappearance in 2008 was a shock to many who
assumed he had died. Logan is back performing
and has released a new recording on Tompkins
Square Records. This interview [an excerpt
from the complete text] took place on April 1,
2010 at the Philadelphia Art Alliance in Philadelphia prior to his first performance outside
New York since his comeback.
Jazz Outside: Your story rivals that of bassist
Henry Grimes, who suddenly disappeared from
the jazz world for 30 years and reappeared in
2002 after being tracked down by a persistent
fan. You were presumed to have died years ago.
Giuseppi Logan: Well, I wasnt dead but I was
almost dead. I was confined in mental institutions for using abusive substances. My wife had
me incarcerated four times but then she got a
divorce and left me homeless. I had nowhere to
live, I was outdoors and she avoided me. She
took everything from me, I lost everything. She
didnt understand me, she didnt understand the
musicians life.
Jazz Outside: How has it been for you coming
back to the stage after 45 years?
GL: It hasnt been easy but Im starting to get a
few jobs now, but its really been hard.
Jazz Outside: How does it feel to be playing
again?

Jazz Outside: You made 2 important albums


for ESP Records in the mid-60s and then you
vanished. We touched on this subject earlier but
could you talk about the drug scene back then
and what happened to you?
GL: Most of the people I know used drugs. I
hope they dont get caught and I hope their
wives dont turn them in. My wife turned me in.
Jazz Outside: Was that for mental illness or for
using drugs?

GL: I never thought about it, I was just so disturbed mentally about my situation. I used to
play peoples pianos sometimes.
Jazz Outside: Any comments on changes in the
business of making music since youve been
gone?
GL: Its still hard getting work. If I could get
work I would appreciate being a musician more.
[Laughs]

44

GL: I heard about the festival so I went to listen to the musicians. I went to hear them because I couldnt play, I didnt have a good instrument.
Jazz Outside: The way that you played in the
60s relied on raw emotion and feeling. Your
recordings were not based on technical playing.
GL: Its highly technical because I use everything, I use chords, I use modes, I use everything. I have a good understanding of music
because I went to the New England Conservatory.

GL: No, that was for using abusive substances.


Jazz Outside: Were you in New York all this
time?

Jazz Outside: You are playing in Philadelphia


tonight, have you had many performances outside of New York?

GL: No, I was in Virginia. I bought a home in


Virginia and I had my family down there although they are all grown now. My wife got my
home even though it was in my name, I dont
know how.

GL: No, this is the first. I used to live in Philly


way back but I dont know my peoples addresses so I cant find them. Most of them are
dead anyway so I dont know how to get in
touch with them.

Jazz Outside: Was it ever an option for you to


return to working as a musician or was it that
there was nobody to help you get back to that
stage?

Jazz Outside: Who is helping you with performance bookings?

GL: They dont understand, they thought it


[drugs] was the most horrible thing you could
do. If I was hurting anything, I was hurting myself.
Jazz Outside: So what instruments are you
playing now?
GL: Im trying to play the bass clarinet, but its
half broke and I have a flute, but it needs a cap
so I cant play that. So Im playing alto right
now and some piano and I sing a little bit.

GL: I dont know, people just give me jobs.


They hear me in the park and they give me jobs.
I dont have a specific person who is handling
that.
Jazz Outside: You have a new recording out,
your first one in 45 years. What were your goals
in putting this together? Were there any special
concepts that you wanted to stress?
GL: I was trying to do something different,
something different from everybody else. I was
just doing my thing

Jazz Outside: How were you found in 2008?

Jazz Outside: The new recording contains 5


new original tunes. Are these spontaneous compositions or are they written out?

GL: People told me they saw my name in


magazines so I thought maybe I would continue
playing music.

GL: I wrote them out.

Jazz Outside: I know you were playing on the


streets around Tompkins Square Park.

Jazz Outside: The music you play is not easily


appreciated by the general public. How would
you explain your playing to someone who doesnt understand your music?

GL: It feels wonderful. Yeah, its wonderful.


Jazz Outside: Did you ever think that you
would ever be back playing again?

broken alto sax next to you. It looked like you


were waiting for someone but you were just
sitting there. I asked you for your name and
when you said it was Giuseppi Logan I was
floored. You met up with old friends Dave
Burrell and [ESP Records producer] Bernard
Stollman that night which helped your comeback. It seems that this was your first attempt to
reconnect with the jazz community, how did
you end up at the Vision Festival that night?

GL: Yeah, I play there when the weathers


good, I get tips from people. That gets me in
shape for playing again.
Jazz Outside: I first met you at the 2008 NYC
Vision Festival. You were sitting on a couch
near the bar very peacefully by yourself with a

GL: They have to understand modes and basic


theory. I havent thought of how to explain it to
anyone. I can play more standard compositions
which would help them, I guess.

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

  
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Giuseppe Logan
Photo by Ken Weiss

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR IMPROVISED MUSIC


SEVENTH FESTIVAL/CONFERENCE

CROSSCULTURAL IMPROVISATION III


JUNE 5-8, 2014
NEW SCHOOL UNIVERSITY
NEW YORK CITY
Hosted jointly by the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music
and Mannes College The New School for Music.
FEATURED ARTISTS and SPEAKERS TBA

CALL FOR PROPOSALS


The International Society for Improvised
Music is happy to announce its seventh
festival/conference and welcome proposals
for performances and presentations.
Continuing its theme of Crosscultural
Improvisation that guided recent events
at the University of Michigan and York
College/Roulette, the upcoming event will
bring together musicians from disparate
cultures to perform together and share
ideas about the challenges and exciting
opportunities inherent in improvising
across traditions. Both improvisationdriven confluence in the professional

musical world and strides toward making


improvisation central in 21st century
musical training will be showcased,
including sessions devoted to
improvisation for classical musicians.
Please visit ISIM website
www.improvisedmusic.org
for proposal submission information.
For questions or more information,
contact: info@improvisedmusic.org
Proposal deadline: Feb 1, 2014
Notification of decision: Feb 15, 2014

ISIM Board of Directors


Ed Sarath, Founder and President | Karlton Hester, Vice President
India Cooke, Secretary | Stephen Nachmanovitch, Treasurer
William Johnson | Jin Hi Kim | Douglas Ewart

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DEPT OF JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY IMPROVISATION


Groundbreaking degree program

BFA IN JAZZ AND CONTEMPLATIVE STUDIES


Improvisation, meditation, consciousness studies, life . . .

Oliver Lake with the U-M Creative Arts Orchestra


Following in the footsteps of the great jazz innovators
whose creativity cut across stylistic boundaries and
opened up to transcendent dimensions of consciousness.
The Department of Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation
offers a full slate of course offerings including large and
small ensembles, rigorous jazz improvisation training,
arranging, and composition.

Other degrees offered:


BFA in Jazz Studies
BFA in Jazz Studies with Teacher Certification
BFA in Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation
MM in Improvisation
DMA in Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation
currently under design

For more information, contact: www.music.umich.edu


See us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/uofmjazz

William Hooker
(Continued from page 39)

there. In this case (Channeling Consciousness),


the wild card is Sanga of the Valley. Hes the
wild card. You probably listened to that.
Jazz Outside: Oh yes, I listened to that intensely
and I thought that what he was doing with you
was like he were an extension of who you are.
WH: Exactly.

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

Jazz Outside: First of all I loved how he complimented what you were playing,
WH: Practice and strength in himself. A lot of
times you cant throw these things at people and
expect them to catch them. But he was the wild
card because obviously they didnt know where I
was going to be coming from and then when you
have him backing up where Im coming from,
and Im like feeding off of him too, and vice
versa, then youve got this other thing happening
in terms of rhythm and the turbulence thats
underneath it. That keeps that whole foundation
in the center of the cauldron working.
Jazz Outside: Are you in total control of whats
going on there? So when you want to change it
up, youre like the conductor, you are changing
the mood and shape, they all are with you 100%
of the way.
WH: Yes, Exactly.
Jazz Outside: You made it a suite, is this how
you played it?
WH: Yes, thats the way it was conceived, thats
the way it was meant to be, it was like that.
Thats why Im really happy with that one.
Jazz Outside Magazine: Talk about the other
ways that you compose with your other projects,
is this kind of indicative of how you work, or are
things that are maybe completely the opposite of
thisdo you have any abstract polar opposite
approaches to what you do?
WH: Yes, and one of them is going to be done at
Lincoln Center on February 20, 2014. Its at the
Atrium. Its a different approach because Im
going to be doing a live music silent film project.
There are nine players and Im doing the film,
Body and Soul, a Black silent film by Oscar
Micheaux that featured Paul Robeson in his
motion picture debut. So thats going to happen.
The way Im approaching the rehearsal is first
off, everyone has to look at the film, because its
not people just getting up there and blowing. I
want them to actually have a conception of how
Im approaching the film and actually having a
conception of not making it corny to the point,
where they are automatically reacting in an obvious way to what is happening on the screen.
They have to be free enough in their own minds
to know what it is that I really want which is to
not create a sound track, because it is not a
48

sound track. It is an open conversation based on


the film and based on the entire story of it and
how it s used so that it is a different approach
separate from the way Consciousness was done
because there is no film there at all and its really
me sitting at the drums and directing from there.
And, in this case, I will be doing the same but
there should be a relationship, as far as Im concerned with myself, the players and the film.
Jazz Outside: I do know because I have done
that kind of work with silent filmspecifically
Battleship Potemkin by the Russian Director
Sergei Eisenstein and The Cabinet of Doctor
Caligari, a silent horror film by German director
Robert Wiene with the Dissident Arts Orchestra
led by innovative vibraphonist/leader/composer,
John Pietaro. We performed these at The Frost
Theater in Williamsburg, Brooklyn October of
2012 and Battleship in February, 2013. It was
totally improvised but conducted by Pietaro with
various directives that involved interludes, key
changes, and concepts and of course the word
that I utilized in my improvisation. It was the
first time I had done something like that and I
loved it.
WH: Yes, you can hope that the people you are
working with can respect the fact that you are
directing something not based on just musical
motifs but you are also directing something
based the progression of the work and how long
it takes to tell a story that lasts for an hour and
twenty minutes, so you just dont keep repeating
the same thing over and over again. Thats like
another approach and then theres going to be a
tour happening with some people from Canada. I
just did something at the Vancouver Jazz Festival recently. Were going to be doing a tour and
its going to be assisted by the Canadian Arts
Counsel and were going to go to Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, Toronto, London, Halifax, Ottawa and come back down into New York and
thats going to be a pianist, alto player, another
drummer and an electronics person and myself.
Its called Approaching the Garden, thats the
piece, thats what its called. In terms of your
question about the approaches; I have many
different approaches. I have to take into consideration my respect for the players that Im working with and how well we work together and
how well they fit, because if they dont fit then I
have ego problems going on which is something
I dont feel like dealing with it.
Jazz Outside: So its not necessarily a collective, it is your thing, and you put the guys in the
positions and then you all make the work. Its
not like youre taking instructions from the various members.
WH: Its like any group. You can call it the John
Coltrane Quartet. You knew whose quartet it
was, you know where the ideas were coming
from, where the impulses were coming from and
its not like Im playing just solo stuff and these
people are like filling in. I dont approach it like
that. So those are the two things coming and just
to answer how the approaches are different,
those two approaches are going to be very different than what youre listening to right now.

Jazz Outside: Well William, this is all great and


Id love to talk to you forever, because you are a
fountain of information. I would like to wrap it
up with one final question. I understand from
reading some of your other interviews that you
practice/warm-up several times a week. With
your schedule, and being a family man, how do
you maintain the kind of stamina that is required
to play the way you do, at such a high level and
at such a relentless burning pace? Mind, body,
spiritdo you workoutwhat are your spiritual
practiceshow do you maintain your health and
your center. You cant create on the level that
you create and be dealing with a bunch of nonsense.
WH: [Laughter] The best way I would explain
that one is that I dont think my life is helter
skelter, I really dont. There is a certain order to
it. Even though sometimes it may feel like I
dont have a handle on certain things, I do and
basically that is just the way my mind works. I
get more and more inspired by it; inspired so
much by it that I have to actually turn it off because I get hyped. In getting hyped you become
this thunder ball. Lately, what has happened is
that Ive realized, by speaking to other people,
the necessity to go to the gym as often as I
should, and the necessity to be a lot more regular
about things that it takes to be able to keep energy at a certain level. I think for the most part, I
just live a wholesome lifeI like it. In terms of
all those things, all of it makes sense to me and
all of it is just working. There were times when
it didnt work, where there was a little bit more
chaos than now, but for the most part just having
parallel careers in terms of the economics of it, I
wasnt always just playing music like now. Just
making sure the rent and the bills were paid.
Those things didnt impose their will on the
music Im trying to do. A lot of times thats what
happens. We find ourselves in the situation not
because the person didnt do anything in a
healthy way but because of all the stress of this
is all I do..Ive got to go to Paris to make
$300 to pay my rent in Brooklyn. You know
what Im saying? Thats like stressful.
Jazz Outside: Yes I do, [laughter,] I spend most
of my time keeping the wolf away from my
door, and I do understand the concept of parallel
careers.
WH: Separate from what you do, all of those
things bring added grief and a lot of times, I just
dont have that kind of grief.
Jazz Outside: What do you do for recreation?
Do you read, take long walks, do you go to the
movies?
WH: All those things you just said, it just makes
life a lot more enjoyable, it makes you happy
when you wake up, its a good thing.
Jazz Outside: Well you are indeed a selffulfilled human being and it has been a real joy
talking with you.

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

  
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

CD REVIEWS
Harris Eisenstadt
GOLDEN STATE Songlines SGL 1602
www.Songlines.com. What Is A Straw Horse,
Anyways; It Is Never Safe To Be; Dogmatic In
Any Case; Unless All The Evidence Is In; Sandy;
Especially Preposterous Assertions; Flabbergasted By The Unconventional
PERSONNEL: Nicole Mitchell, flute; Sara
Schoenbeck, bassoon; Mark Dresser, bass; Harris Eisenstadt, drums

ous musical conversation. While there are sections where Mark Dresser walks his bass and
Harris Eisenstadt swings on drums behind the
two horns, most of the time they are part of a
musical democracy in which the instruments
take turns leading (during solos) or interacting as
equals. Golden State needs to be listened to several times in order to fully digest the fascinating
and continually surprising music.
  

ARTIST CORNER

By Scott Yanow

Lucian Ban
On Improvisation
Improvisation is one of the means by
which we create music but theres many
levels, layers and approaches to it. It is also
something that at the same time is very personal and very communal. Highly developed it becomes a language an amazing
one if we think for example of the master
be-bop players. The thing that interests me
with regard to improvisation in jazz is how
personal it can be. The great players in jazz
are all without exception master improvisers
from Louis Armstrong to Lester Young,
from Miles to Don Cherry, from Coltrane to
Ornette, from Monk to Keith Jarrett, and so
on; these are all very individual players and
amazing improvisers. They are also very
different from one another. Which demonstrates the jazz musicians ability to create
their own unique language when they improvise.
I dont know if one is born with this
ability or not but I do know that you can
develop ityou can build the language
individually but one of the great wonders of

JAZZ OUTSIDE The ART and SOUL of the Advanced New York Music Scene

An inventive drummer who sounds unlike


anyone else, Harris Eisenstadt is probably most
significant as a composer who has been involved
with some of the most stimulating music of the
past decade. Born in Toronto, he began playing
drums when he was ten, inspired by modern
jazz, avant-garde and rock drummers. After
moving to New York, he studied with Barry
Alstchul and worked regularly at the Knitting
Factory. A period in Los Angeles studying at Cal
Arts included collaborations with Sam Rivers
and Adam Rudolph. He has since worked with
Yusef Lateef, Vinny Golia, James Newton,
Wayne Horvitz, Nels Cline, Marty Ehrlich, Wadada Leo Smith, Francoise Houle, Jessica
Pavone, the AMH Trio, the Ahisma Orchestra,
Nate Wooley, and the Convergence Quartet
among many others. In addition, Eisenstadts
wide-ranging career has included work with
West African dance troupes, poets, opera companies, theater groups, contemporary classical
musicians and on soundtracks. Musically he is
open to nearly any type of creative music.
Eisenstadt has won many commissions
through the years and appeared on more than 50
recordings since 2000 including 15 CDs of his
own. The music on Golden State is particularly
intriguing. While being quite original, his seven
compositions and arrangements sometimes recall
the music of Henry Threadgill a little in that they
utilize unusual harmonies and tone colors, with
the songs not including any definite beginnings
and purposely having inconclusive endings. The
compositions become arrangements and the
arrangements logically become improvisations.
Since there is no obvious line between the sections, and the soloing is such a logical part of the
arrangements and vice versa, there are many
times when it is difficult to know where the writing ends and the improvising begins.
The group Golden State was born in 2012 at
Cal Arts when Eisenstadt and his wife bassoonist
Sara Schoenbeck played with flutist Nicole
Mitchell. Schoenbeck and Mitchell had previously worked together on Anthony Braxtons
2006 recording Nine Compositions while bassist
Mark Dresser and Eisenstadt have had a longtime musical association. This CD is the first
recording by the quartet.
Due to the attractive group sound, with
flute and bassoon often being in the forefront,
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

the music on Golden State is more accessible


than one might expect from such titles as
Dogmatic In Any Case, Especially Preposterous Assertions and Flabbergasted By The
Unconventional. Actually the titles mean little,
and an exact play-by-play of the music would be
both tedious and fairly impossible. One learns
much more by simply listening and experiencing
the ensembles and the writing.
The performances are essentially a continu-

jazz is its communal aspect of creating music in a group. You can definitely learn a lot
by playing with great musicians who are
also great improvisers and if youre aware
you get from each one something very
unique. I certainly got a lot from playing
with master improvisers like Abraham Burton, Bob Stewart, Matt Maneri, Nasheet
Waits, Jorge Sylvester or Tony Malabyto
name just a fewor someone like Evan
Parker whose work is so much about pure
improvisation. You have all the basic elements of music, the whole spectrum, from
jazz tradition to contemporary chamber
music to completely free music. You have
melody and harmony, rhythm and structure,
feel and coherence.
One can view improvisation with regard to composition, its opposite in many
respects. My take is basically this I think
theres no essential difference between improvisation and composition. Improvisation
is composition in real time. The great players completely erase the line and their improvisations sound like compositions and
vice versa. Structure can be learned but
freedom is more of an instinctbalancing
the two is the story of improvisation.
  

December 2013  Jazz Inside Magazine  www.JazzInsideMagazine.com  Jazz Outside

49

NEW BOOK BY ED SARATH


PROBES CONNECTIONS
BETWEEN JAZZ, CONSCIOUSNESS,
AND EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIETAL CHANGE
Improvisation,
Creativity, and
Consciousness:
Jazz As Integral
Template for
Music, Education,
and Society
SUNY/Albany Series
in Integral Theory
Written By

Edward W. Sarath

combines several streams of musical and spiritual


thought towards realizing a new way to look at music...
will be a classic in the field of educational philosophy.
David Liebman, National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master

CD REVIEWS

Gary Bartz
COLTRANE RULES (Tao of a Music Warrior) OYO Recordings www.GaryBartz.com.
After the Rain; I Concentrate on You; Dear
Lord; To Your Lady; Nita; Dahomey Dance/
Tunji; Birdtrane; Vilia/Ole; Pristine; The Song
of Loving/Kindness; After the Rain
PERSONNEL: Gary Bartz, soprano saxophone,
alto saxophone, bass clarinet, vocals; Barney
McAll, piano; James King, bass; Greg Bandy,
drums; Andy Bey, vocals; Rene McLean, flute;
Makea Keith, vocals; Eric Rose, vocals; Ommas
Keith, vocals
By Curtis Davenport
Many times recordings are made, mastered
and then shelved. Why? Sometimes its because
all involved realize how bad the music is and for
anyone to hear it would damage an artists reputation. Other times the music is good but there
are financial squabbles between the artists and
the producers/management/record company.
And other times the record company goes under
and the recording is orphaned. Those are just a
few of the many reasons that tapes can stay on
the shelf for years. Sometimes this will deprive
the listening public of the chance to hear some
good music and sometimes keeping an album on
the shelf is a great public service. Veteran saxophonist Gary Bartzs most recent release Coltrane Rules (Tao of a Music Warrior) consists
mostly of tracks that were recorded in 2000.
Having now heard them, I can now say what
took you so long.
Though he has never achieved wide acclaim, Gary Bartz has been on the jazz scene
since the mid 60s when he joined the Max
Roach / Abbey Lincoln group. His career has
been a series of up and downs and he has dabbled in just about every jazz related musical style
from bop to modal to free jazz to jazz-rock fusion to funk/disco and then back to his roots. He
made his recorded debut as a member of Art
Blakeys Jazz Messengers on Soul Finger and he
joined Miles Davis in 1970, right in the middle
of Miles electric/fusion phase. So when I heard
that Mr. Bartz had recorded a Coltrane tribute, I
thought that it had possibilities since he unlike
many others making similar projects, was an
actual contemporary of Tranes. It could also,
given Bartzs eclectic history, go in a number of
different directions. What would Bartz do?
Would he concentrate on the boppish Prestige/

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Atlantic years, would the use the avant-garde


projects of the mid 60s as a base or would it be
a combination of both?
It turns out that Bartz and his quartet at that
time chose to concentrate mostly on the mainstream side of Trane, which may disappoint fans
of the latter years but it will please many others
and probably garner this project a good share of
airplay in the jazz radio world. Mr. Bartz was at
the top of his game on these 13 year old recordings, his vinegary tone on alto was strong
and his sidemen were swinging like mad, which
inspired the leader. He often plays here in the
low end of the altos register, which gives him a
sound that at times is eerily Coltrane-like. To his
credit, Bartz avoided the over familiar Coltrane
works for the most part and he even composed a
couple of his own works that fit in so easily that
I at first thought that they may have been lost
Trane pieces.
Things start off with a bit of the unexpected; an up-tempo, almost 15 minute take of I
Concentrate on You. Bartz on starting out on
alto, sounds great as he throws out inventive solo
lines stretching at times to the boundaries of
convention, while pianist Barney McAll is deep
into a McCoy Tyner bag, comping behind Bartz
with Tyners patented block chord figures. After
McAll solos, Bartz returns on soprano swinging
hard right down to the last minute of the piece,
where they create a natural fade out. Its good
stuff. This is followed with a pleasant surprise,
Dear Lord featuring vocals from the great
Andy Bey, one of Bartz longtime musical partners. Mr. Beys rough-edged but still velvety
baritone fits around the lyric perfectly. Nita a
Coltrane rarity that he originally recorded on
Paul Chambers Whims of Chambers sessions, is
a hard swinging 4/4 flag-waver; as is Birdtrane
a Bartz composition, with an arrangement reminiscent of But Not for Me on the My Favorite
Things album. Also quite compelling are two

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& Products For Review in
Jazz Inside Magazine
Record labels or individual artists who
are seeking reviews of their CD or
DVD recordings or books may submit
CDs for review consideration by following these guidelines.
Send TWO COPIES of each CD or
product to: Editorial Dept., Jazz Inside, P.O. Box 30284, Elkins Park, PA
19027. All materials sent become the
property of Jazz Inside, and may or
may not be reviewed, at any time.
medleys, where Bartz weaves together two similar compositions; one blends Dahomey Dance
and Tunji, the other very effectively combines
Ole with Vilia from the operetta The Merry
Widow.
The name of Mr. Bartzs new record company is OYO, which stands for Own Your
Own (as well as being the name of a Nigerian
tribe). It is through this type of self empowerment that we finally get to hear these first rate
recordings. Lets hope that Gary Bartz has more
like Coltrane Rules in the vaults.

Stefan Bauer
VOYAGE GEOGRAPHIA - Jazz Haus Musik
JHN 216. Luna Park; Coney Island; From Afar;
Askale Tulem; Seymours Kitchen; Im Licht der

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Eric Nemeyer, 215-887-8880, Eric@JazzInsideMagazine.com
(Continued on page 52)
Nora McCarthy, 215-887-8880, Nora@JazzInsideMgazine.com

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

51

Sterne; New Shores; Pangea; Aluva; Siren Call;


Kartik; Zeitlinsein; Old Maps, New Routes.
PERSONNEL: Stefan Bauer, vibraphone, marimba, glockenspiel & ambient sounds; Michal
Cohen, voice; Chris Bacas, soprano saxophone;
Pepe Berns, bass; Roland Schneider, drums &
percussion; Karolina Strassmayer, soprano &
alto saxophones & arrangements; Christoph
Haberer, hand drums.

of drums and other band contributions. Tasteful


dynamics really come into play quite effectively
here. This extensive musical odyssey comes to a
close with Old Maps, New Routes. This is,
perhaps, one of the albums most focused and
energetic pieces. It is very intriguing how Bauer
mixes ambient noise and background sounds of
crowds, random conversations, airports and various bastions of travel and combines them with
the up tempo feel that the music suggests. The
bands performance is also very lyrical and colorfulboth harmonically and rhythmically.
In these modern times of
iTunes,
downloads and digital one-offs, its really nice to
listen to a recording that is truly an album. It is
designed and arranged to be experienced in its
entirety and Bauers global music approach is
well worth the effort.

By Eric Harabadian
From the title and track listing the listener
gets a taste of this album being a travelogue of
sorts. Its a festive galleria of global sounds that
truly define the term world beat. Upon cracking the inner sleeve open one can read thoroughly engrossing liner notes of life on the road
while the band was on tour through various parts
of Africa. It is leader Stefan Bauers very personal account of the rigors of being a traveling
musician and a very selfless acknowledgement
of the kindness of strangers.
This album is quite interesting in the way
field recordings, found sounds and audio effects
are effectively utilized to push the music forward
and link each individual piece together as a conceptual whole. Luna Park opens the album as a
duet between soprano saxophonist Chris Bacas
and vibist Bauer. The ambient use of space and
progressive aesthetic suggests some of Karl Berger or Gary Burtons best work. The sounds of
an amusement park and people milling about
sets the scene for the follow up track Coney
Island. Dense percussion by Roland Schneider
blends nicely with Michal Cohens wordless
vocalizing. She gives the piece an overall uplifting and ethereal quality. The vibraphone and sax
work well in concert with each other too.
Askale Tulem is a moody and ominous piece.
Here Cohen uses her voice in a horn-like manner. Her sense of improvisation is sharp as well
as the tonal character of her delivery. The piece
takes on an almost otherworldly essence. Im
Licht der Sterne features an ostinato vibes pattern that is mimicked by Pepe Berns acoustic
bass. It is almost hypnotic in a way. This very
ably sets up the vibrant piece New Shores.
Cohens vocal scats and gregarious filigree sets
the music ablaze from darkness to jubilant light.
Pangea is experimental and somewhat ambient
in structure. Bauer adds marimba which offers a
shimmering and weighty contrast to the snippets
of sputtering saxophone that bubble through.
Aluva is a major town and cultural hub in
India. Vocalist Cohen seems to adopt a rich and
authentic dialect and accent to compliment the
words and exotic feel of the piece. The overall
takeaway here is one that merges poetry with a
spiritual and somewhat seductive quality.
Zeitlinsein is another interesting piece in the
way it is arranged; essentially a vehicle for vocals and bass but with well-placed integrations
52

Jamie Baum
IN THIS LIFESunnyside Records 1363.
Nusrat; The Meeting; Ants and Other Faithful
Beings; In Another Life; Monkeys of Gokarna
Forest; While We Are Here; Richies Lament;
The Game; In a Nutshell; Inner Voice; Sweet
Pain/Nusrat
PERSONNEL: Jamie Baum, flute, alto flute,
tenor flute, producer, arrangements; Amir Elsaffar, trumpet; Taylor Haskins, trumpet; Douglas
Yates, alto saxophone, bass clarinet; Chris Komer, French horn; Brad Shepik, electric guitar;
John Escreet, acoustic piano, electric keyboards;
Zachary Lober, bass; Jeff Hirshfield, drums;
Samuel Torres, congas; Dan Weiss, tabla.
By Alex Henderson
Jazz has had some exceptional flute players
over the years, ranging from Herbie Mann to
Hubert Laws to Bud Shank (although he played
it as a second instrument and eventually gave it
up to concentrate on his name instrument: the
alto sax). But it isnt one of jazz more prominent wind instrumentscertainly not the way
that the tenor sax, alto sax and trumpet are
prominentand in a sense, that is a positive
thing for jazz flutists because it is easier to stand
out in jazz if you are playing one of jazz less
crowded instruments. Jamie Baum, a New York
City-based flutist who grew up in Connecticut,
makes a solid contribution to post-bop on In This
Life. Sometimes, Baum favors an inside/outside
approach and detours a bit into avant-garde territory, which is what happens on Monkeys of
Gokarna Forest and Ants and Other Playful
Things. And Brad Shepik, her electric guitarist,
gives parts of the album a touch of fusion appeal
with his rock-influenced moves. But In This Life
is, for all intents and purposes, a post-bop albumand Baum composed most of songs for
this release, ranging from the reflective While

We Are Here to the mysterious In a Nutshell


to the probing Richies Lament (which Baum
dedicates to veteran pianist Richie Beirach).
In fact, Baum composed everything on this
CD except for Nasrat Fateh Ali Khans The
Game and Sweet Pain (which Khan wrote
with Michael Brook). Khan, for those who are
unfamiliar with his work, was a Pakistani singer
who specialized in Qawwali music (which is the
devotional music of Sufi Muslims). Sadly, Khan
was only 48 when he died of liver failure in London in 1997, but 16 years after his death, Khans
music still has plenty of admirers all over the
worldand one of them is obviously Baum. In
addition to playing two songs Khan wrote or cowrote, Baum offers a Khan-influenced original
titled Nusrat (which combines post-bop with a
strong Qawwali influence and includes some
tabla playing from Dan Weiss).
It should be noted that Baum plays three
different flutes on In This Life: a standard flute,
the alto flute and the tenor flute, which is also
called the flute damour or flauto damore (flute
damour means flute of love in French, flauto
damore means the same thing in Italian). And
the fact that Baum plays a lesser-known member
of the flute family on parts of this disc is a plus.
Hearing instruments that arent prominent jazz
instruments being successfully played in a jazz
setting helps to keep this interesting.
In This Life is a memorable outing that
underscores Baums talents as both a soloist and
a composer.

Marc Cary
FOUR DIRECTIONS Motema MTM-130
www.Motema.com Todi Blues; Waltz Betty
Waltz; He Who Hops Around; Open Baby; Tanktified; Boom; Ready Or Not; Spectrum; Indigenous; Outside My Window
PERSONNEL: Marc Cary, piano, keyboards;
Burniss Earl Travis II and/or Rashaan Carter,
bass; Sameer Gupta, drums, tabla
By Scott Yanow
To say that Marc Cary has a diverse and
wide open style is a bit of an understatement. At
the Monterey Jazz Festival a few months ago, he
performed with his trio and each song seemed to
bring out a different aspect of his personality. He
went from acoustic hard bop to electric Herbie
Hancock, from McCoy Tyner to fairly free improvising, and yet managed to sound like himself
in each idiom.
Cary is not afraid to display his influences in
his playing and there are many that combine
together to help make up his own voice. He
spent most of his childhood growing in Washington D.C. Early on he played go-go dance
music with the High Integrity Band. He learned

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to play jazz as a teenager, was part of the Dizzy


Gillespie Youth Orchestra, and had opportunities
to sit in with Gillespies own band. After moving
to New York in 1988, Cary worked with Art
Taylor, Mickey Bass and Betty Carter (with
whom he performed for over two years) while
also played hip hop with Q-Tip. Other important
associations included Roy Hargrove, Abraham
Burton, Abbey Lincoln and Stefon Harris. Cary
started leading his own recordings in 1995 and
displaying his increasing originality. Reaching
beyond acoustic jazz, he explored electronics,
West African and Caribbean grooves, ambient
and dance music, and Native American music
while also being interested in Indian classical
and Malian songs.
Marc Cary formed the Focus Trio around
2005. It has always featured Sameer Gupta on
drums and tabla, while a few different bassists
have been in the third spot. For the new project,
Burniss Earl Travis II. plays acoustic bass on six
songs and electric bass on three. Rashaan Carter
adds his acoustic bass to four selections, three of
which also include Travis.
For Four Directions, Cary does the opposite of the usual practice of recording an album
and then playing the music live. Since this trio
had not recorded in several years, they have
developed a lot of new music in clubds and concerts that was overdue to be recorded. The result
is that this outing sounds like a polished live
session. The musicians, while being very familiar with the complex grooves, push and stretch
themselves throughout the performances.
Cary contributed seven of the ten selections, there is a group improv and a song apiece
from Terreon Gully and John McLaughlin
(Spectrum). Most of the songs are based on an
eccentric rhythm on which Cary and his sidemen
build and layer ideas. The piano solos are frequently explosive but never obvious, and it is not
unusual for the trio/quartet to gradually increase
or decrease the tempo a la Charles Mingus. Cary
alternates between acoustic and electric pieces,
finding something fresh and unusual to say in
each performance.
Todi Blues (which is not a blues) starts out
by staying in one place for a bit before it becomes a heated jam, reminiscent of Weather
Report in the 1970s. Waltz Betty Waltz, an
acoustic jazz waltz dedicated to Betty Carter, is
an aggressively-played medium-tempo strut. He
Who Hops Around uses a repeated two note
octave jump as the basis for the song while
Open Baby has a moody two-chord electronic
vamp worthy of Lonnie Liston Smith.
On Tanktified, Cary and Gupta on tabla
play off of each other, echoing each others ideas
and rhythms. Boom is a little Monkish and
boppish in its sound but its rhythm with its odd
accents seems to be in several different unexpected places at once. Listeners will find it difficult to find the one!
The other songs include Ready Or
Not (featuring a continually changing tempo),
Spectrum which has Cary getting a metallic
sound on electric piano, Indigenous (built off a
bass riff) and the rumbling one-chord piece
Outside My Window.
Every selection on Four Directions deserves
a close listen.
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Of course, anyone who has heard Petersons 51-year-old interpretation of West Side
Story knows darn well that instrumental bop and
Sondheim can be an appealing combination, but
there is no reason why Cecil and Mays should
not offer some additional proof. They do exactly
that on Our Time: Sondheim Duos, Vol. 2.

Tommy Cecil, Bill Mays


OUR TIME, SONDHEIM DUOS, VOL. 2
Web: TommyCecil.com. Everybody Says Dont;
Johanna; Our Time; Moments in the Woods;
Finishing the Hat; The Millers Son; Losing My
Mind; The Best Thing That Ever Has Happened;
Agony; Being Alive; Rich and Happy
PERSONNELTommy Cecil, acoustic bass,
producer, liner notes; Bill Mays, acoustic piano
By Alex Henderson
Many jazz musicians feel intimidated by the
music of Broadway great Stephen Sondheim.
Instrumentalists and singers who wouldnt think
twice about recording something by Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Cole Porter, Harry Warren or Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart shy away
from Sondheims work, which they consider
difficult to perform. Regardless, there are some
fine examples of jazz musicians soaring with
Sondheim material: The Oscar Peterson Trios
West Side Story session of 1962, for example, is
a straight-ahead acoustic bop classic. So where
there is a will, there is a way when it comes to
Sondheim. And one duo that has been devoting
itself to Sondheims work is the acoustic team of
bassist Tommy Cecil and pianist Bill Mays, who
played Sondheim exclusively on their 2012 release Side By Side: Sondheim Duos and continue
to do so on 2013s Our Time: Sondheim Duos,
Vol. 2.
The question, Can Sondheims material
work in a straight-ahead jazz setting? has been
asked many times over the years. Peterson demonstrated that the answer was a definite yes 51
years ago, but there are those in the jazz world
who remain unconvincedor, at the very least,
they would rather leave the Sondheim challenge
to others and remain in their comfort zones. But
Cecil and Mays demonstrate that they are unafraid of that challenge, tackling material that
ranges from Losing My Mind (from 1971s
Follies) to Agony (from 1986s Into the
Woods) to Johanna (from 1979s Sweeney
Todd). Cecil and Mays touch on A Little Night
Music with The Millers Son, and they acknowledge Merrily Along We Roll with their
interpretations of Rich and Happy and Our
Time. The cohesive duo performs 11 songs
altogether, and through it all, Cecil and Mays are
very much in sync and demonstrate that Sondheim can, in fact, work well in a straight-ahead
acoustic bop setting. Their performances never
sound forced or uneasy; they make Sondheims
songs sound perfectly natural as improvisatory
jazz.

Visit www.JazzNewswire.com

Kevin Coelho
TURN IT UP - Chicken Coup Records CCP
7018. Root Down; Soft and Wet; Come Together; The World is a Ghetto; Zig Zag; When
Johnny Comes Marching Home; Shadows;
Georgia On My Mind; Bonus Tracks: The World
is a Ghetto (radio edit); When Johnny Comes
Marching Home (radio edit).
PERSONNEL: Kevin Coelho, Hammond B3
organ; Derek DiCenzo, guitar; Reggie Jackson,
drums.
By Eric Harabadian
Kevin Coelho is a young organ talent that is
steeped in the tradition of predecessors like
Jimmy Smith and Big John Patton and applies
that knowledge in a contemporary manner. His
program here reflects a musical palette sprinkled
with variety and color; from tasty originals to
classic rock, pop and standards. Most importantly, whatever the tune, he infuses it with his
own style and vision; no mean feat for an artist
still in his teens.
Coelho establishes where his loyalties lie
from the outset by kicking the disc off with a
Jimmy Smith nugget Root Down. The playing
all around is decidedly funky and smooth. The
band is tight and effortless in their execution. Its
a nice feel good burner that grabs your attention
right away. The ever diverse and unpredictable
pop artist Prince is represented here with a selection called Soft and Wet. It continues that mild
funk vibe, essentially built around a vamp. Guitarist Derek DiCenzo utilizes tasteful wah-wah
and chordal support and Reggie Jackson steps
out prominently on the skins as well. The trio
dips into their Beatles grab bag for Come Together. In the fine tradition of jazz artists interpreting pop perennials, the band retains the cool
bluesy feel of the original by keeping the dynamics on simmer. But, then they up the ante, with
rubato drums and tasty key modulations. Coelho
reaches back to the 70s for another subtle and
moody piece by War called The World is a
Ghetto. Again, they are faithful to the essence
and spirit of the original but expand on it with
brilliant solos. Coelho balances supple chords
and keyboard runs with ease and deftly weaves
in and out with DiCenzos well crafted ideas.
They uniformly bring things to a fever pitch,
thus making this track a highlight. After a series

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 54)


53

of cover tunes its time for the leader to show his


own hand at composition. He lays his cards on
the table with the very swinging Zig Zag. The
format is syncopated and blues-based taken at a
brisk pace. There is some nice left-hand comping
and walking bass by Coelho that really opens
things up for Jacksons smooth ride work and
spot on solos from DiCenzo. Again, Coelho
demonstrates flawless technique, with playful
runs, great substitutions, and subtle dynamics at
his beckon call. Perhaps, this tribute to the military is evident here, with the traditional When
Johnny Comes Marching Home. The trio begins with an appropriate snare-driven beat by
Jackson. They quickly open it up to reveal a
swinging bluesy core that provides some nice
solo time for Coelho and DiCenzo. Coelho contributes another original here with Shadows.
This one swings easy in waltz time. It features an
intricate melody imbued with spiraling and cascading intervals and harmonies. To their credit,
Coelho and DiCenzo never get too busy or convoluted and their solos are challenging and engaging. The main body of their track list here is
concluded with Hoagy Carmichaels Georgia
On My Mind. Coelho really shows his love for
the old tunes and a respect for tradition. The
tempo is slow and contemplative as he caresses
each note with distinction and care.
Also included are bonus radio edits of The
World is a Ghetto and When Johnny Comes
Marching Home. Both are a minute or two
shorter, with soul and guts intact. Actually, not a
bad idea; Kevin Coelho and company have a
sound that is certainly the real deal, but has
crossover appeal as well.

Bill Cunliffe
RIVER EDGE, NEW JERSEY - Azica Records AJD-72250. Sweet Andy; The Girl From
Ipanema; Blue Notes; For Wanda; You and The
Night and The Music; What Might Have Been;
One ( Is the Loneliest Number); Choro ( from
Nostalgia in Corcovado); All is Full of Love;
Eriks Song.
PERSONNEL: Bill Cunliffe, piano; Martin
Wind, bass; Tim Horner, drums.
By Eric Harabadian
The trio format is probably one of the most
intimate and demanding in all of jazz. There you
are, without a net or wall of horns and accoutrements to fall back on. Its all about the interplay
and relationship between the three and the give
and take that ensues within that relationship. One
can say that about any artistic combination, no
matter the number involved. But the trio, in par-

Visit www.JazzNewswire.com
54

ticular, really tests the mettle of a musician. Bill


Cunliffe, Martin Wind and Tim Horner are certainly up to the challenge. And, as the liner notes
state, there is a richness and level of familiarity
and experience to their relationship that is truly
something inventive and special.
The mix of material here spans the gamut
from Great American Songbook fare to classic
rock and pop from Cunliffes youth. Throw in
some of the leaders distinct originals and you
are in for a diverse and unique listening session.
Sweet Andy is a Cunliffe composition dedicated to Sarah Vaughans legendary bassist
Andy Simpkins. The group quickly establishes
their deeply felt rapport from the outset. Cunliffe
lays down an intrepid and provocative theme
that serves as a festive romp for Wind and
Horner to jump in. Antonio Carlos Jobims The
Girl from Ipanema is probably one of the most
famous Brazilian jazz-pop tunes ever recorded.
It has been interpreted by countless musicians
and Cunliffe throws his hat in the ring with his
unique take. The samba rhythms and romantic
atmosphere are certainly on point and what one
might expect. But the leader kicks it up a notch
and pulls out all the stops, with clever reharmonization and layering variations upon
variations. He also employs well-placed key
modulations that keep the group and the listener
on their toes. Another Cunliffe original Blue
Notes seems to recall cool jazz from an earlier
time. This sounds like a hip 60s TV theme
loaded with intrigue, romance and a touch of
sophistication. The tunes mid section features
some tasty interplay between Horners bass soloing and Cunliffes supportive comps. Thats
followed by a dedication to the leaders girlfriend entitled For Wanda. Its a beautiful
modal-like piece that unfolds in a dreamy fashion where winding melodic patterns twist and
turn in a fascinating manner. This is reminiscent
of Herbie Hancock or Richie Bierachs more
ethereal work. The standard You and the Night
and the Music picks up the tempo and is a nice
light hearted departure; pure drive and improvisation from start to finish. The end of a relationship is instrumentally depicted in the reflective
What Might Have Been. This swings with an
airiness and flow that truly takes flight via Wind
and Horners effervescent interplay. The piece is
a fine example of the group really tuned in on
the same wavelength. Harry Nilssons One (Is
the Loneliest Number) is a youthful favorite of
Cunliffe and he plays with the time and alters it
in a manner that recalls some of Vince Guaraldi
or George Winstons work. It is a blend of new
age stylings and modern bop. Choro (from Nostalgia in Corcovado) is all over the map, with
an engaging semi-classical theme that evolves
into individual improvisational vignettes for the
bass and drums. It drifts modally and even somewhat free-form. But it comes back to melodic
territory for a gorgeous and eloquent finale. I bet
you wouldnt expect to see a Bjork composition
on a jazz album. But that is exactly what
Cunliffe and company did by including her ballad All is Full of Love. Simply put, this is
given a sweet treatment and adapts very well to
the ensembles rich body of work. They close
with another tender ballad called Eriks Tune.
The group is certainly at its most sensitive and

empathic, utilizing tasteful dynamics and a copious reservoir of space.

Duduka Da Fonseca
NEW SAMBA JAZZ DIRECTIONS
DudukaDaFonseca.net. Dudukas Mood; Sonho
de Maria; Solito; Alana; Isabella; Zelo; Tet;
Cu e Mar; Bad Relation; Samblues
PERSONNEL: Duduka Da Fonseca, drums,
David Feldman, piano; Guto Wirtti, bass.
By Alex Henderson
It would be difficult to overstate the importance that drums play in Afro-Latin music.
Drums, of course, are a rhythm instrument, and
Afro-Latin music is known for its wealth of great
rhythmsfor example, son, mambo and cha-cha
from Cuba, plena and bomba from Puerto Rico,
merengue and bachata from the Dominican Republic, cumbia from Colombia, and samba and
choro from Brazil. And Brazilian rhythms, like
Afro-Cuban rhythms, have a long history of
working well in a jazz context. No one knows
that better than Brazilian drummer Duduka Da
Fonseca, whose self-produced New Samba Jazz
Directions underscores his ability to unite the
richness of hard bop and post-bop with the richness of samba.
Recorded in Rio de Janeiro in August 2012,
New Samba Jazz Directions finds the veteran
improviser forming an intimate acoustic trio with
pianist David Feldman and bassist Guto Wirtti.
The term samba jazz, for many people, means
bossa novawhich was a fusion of samba and
cool jazz. The Lester Young-influenced tenor
saxophonist Stan Getz was a crucial figure in
1960s bossa nova as well as a crucial figure in
subtle, understated cool jazz. But samba can also
be combined with more aggressive jazz, and Da
Fonseca often does that on New Samba Jazz
Directions. A forceful, hard-swinging yet melodic approach prevails on Dudukas Mood,
Cu e Mar and Zelo as well as the driving
Samblues. There are moments of quiet introspection on this 58-minute CD, including
Isabella, Tet and the melancholy Solito.
But when Da Fonseca, Feldman and Wirtti play
something uptempo, this albums rule is swing
hard and swing passionately.
Brazilian jazz albums often bring in a Brazilian vocalist to sing in Portuguese and emphasize the fact that the album has a Brazilian connection, but the Rio de Janeiro-born Da Fonseca
doesnt employ any vocalists at all on New
Samba Jazz Directions. The album is instrumental from start to finish, but Da Fonsecas strong
command of the samba rhythm leaves no doubt
that this is acoustic jazz of the Brazilian variety.
Da Fonseca turned 62 on March 31, 2013,
and New Samba Jazz Directions demonstrates

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

that he is still very much on top of his game after


many years of performing.

Matthew Finck
Jonathan Ball
ITS
NOT
THAT
FAR
JonathanBallMusic.com; MatthewFinck.com.
Its Not That Far; Gentle Soul; Levins Impression; I Thought You Had Gone; Conundrum;
East 86th; Geppetto; The Way You Look Tonight;
Get Up!.
PERSONNEL: Jonathan Ball, saxophone; Matthew Finck, guitar; Randy Brecker, trumpet &
flugelhorn; Jay Anderson, bass; Adam Nussbaum, drums.

then picks up the pace to a brisk swing for the


solos. East 86th is a decidedly urban sounding
tune where a lazy and languid swing meets a
pleasant melody for a midnight stroll. It is a
Finck original and features one of his strongest
performances. Balls Geppetto turns the tables
and picks up the energy. Anderson fires out of
the gate, with something to prove, fueling a
strong rhythmic core. It becomes an open free
for all pitting the saxophonist to musically spar
with Brecker. The albums sole standard The
Way You Look Tonight is a good choice in the
hands of these master players. They add a tasty
Brazilian feel where the songs original romantic
intent is further explored. The exclamatory Get
Up! wraps things on a high note; the mood is up
tempo, the structure is swing and the bands
passion is relentless. This is a truly special and
remarkably talented group.

By Eric Harabadian
The woodwind and guitar team of Jonathan
Ball and Matthew Finck has been an industrious
and well respected presence on the New York
jazz scene for a number of years. On this, their
debut CD, they collaborate with a strong rhythm
core in drummer Adam Nussbaum and bassist
Jay Anderson. The addition of Randy Brecker on
three tracks certainly sweetens the proceedings
considerably. This is an album that recalls a lot
of those great 60s Blue Note sides; well structured playing, a nice mix of stylistic approaches,
cool and relaxed changes and a pervasive
warmth to the production that is lively and magnetic. Save for Jerome Kerns The Way You
Look Tonight all material was written by Ball
and Finck.
From the manner in which the tracks are
sequenced--providing equal time for each leader
as composersto the empathy and dialogue they
share between them; this is an impressive release. The title track is a Ball composition and
features him front and center on full-bodied
tenor sax. He locks in perfectly with Finck on
elastic and snaky lines that frame an angular
melody. Nussbaum and Andersons samba-esque
rhythms provide a strong foundation. Fincks
Gentle Soul is just as one might expect;
smooth as silk. Breckers entrance on trumpet
adds a laid back Jazz Messengers vibe. The
horns are sharp and on point, and Fincks solos
are very lyrical and effective. Balls robust tenor
is clear and incisive on his own Levins Impression. Its especially noteworthy the way the
group navigates dynamics and provides Fincks
guitar space to really develop and flourish. I
Thought You Had Gone is another joint venture
where the guitar and sax are tightly bound at the
melody. It gives a lot of weight to the piece.
Subtle Metheny-styled rock chording by Finck
meshes nicely with the tunes rootsy gospel-like
approach. Balls Conundrum is, yet, another
inventive composed structure. The piece alternates between a kind of mid-tempo funk and
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Nneena Freelon
CHRISTMASNneena.com, JBJazz.com.
Swingle Jingle Bells; Spiritual Medley; Let It
Snow; I Like the Sunrise; Christmas Time Is

Here; Silent Night; Little Drummer Boy; O Little


Town of Bethlehem; Baby, Its Cold Outside;
Itll Be Home for Christmas
PERSONNEL: Nneena Freelon, vocals, producer, executive producer; John Brown, acoustic
bass, producer, vocals; LeRoy Barley, trumpet;
Art Barnes, trumpet; Derrick Gardner, trumpet;
Jay Meachum, trumpet, Benjy Springs, trumpet;
Mitch Butler, trombone; Andy Kleindienst,
trombone; Ronald Westray, trombone; Joshua
Vincent, trombone; Brandon McCune, acoustic
piano, electric keyboards, organ; Miki Hayama,
acoustic piano; Scott Sawyer, electric guitar;
Adonis Rose, drums, percussion; Jon Metzger,
conductor.
By Alex Henderson
Its always fun to look at the recording
dates of Christmas albums. Ironically, many of
them have been recorded during the summer
months. A singer might be singing about the
need to Let It Snow or describing a Winter
Wonderland, but he or she could be doing so in
July or August when it was hot, sunny and
90F/32C. Backed by the big band of acoustic
bassist John Brown, Nneena Freelon recorded
Christmas in July 2012 at a studio in North
Carolina (where Browns band is based). The
southern states, of course, are not exactly known
for being frigid that time of year, but Freelon has
no problem singing about Christmas convincingly regardless of how hot it might have been
outside the studioand she does so in a consistently bop-oriented fashion. The fact that this is a

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(Continued on page 56)


55

Christmas album doesnt mean that the bigvoiced Freelon sacrifices jazz considerations at
all: she maintains a gritty, hard-swinging approach whether she is performing Christmas pop
songs of the 20th Century (including Let It
Snow, Baby, Its Cold Outside and Jingle
Bell) or embracing a traditional European
Christmas carol such as Silent Night. Brown
(who performs a male/female vocal duet with
Freelon on Baby, Its Cold Outside) certainly
helps her achieve that hard-swinging ambiance:
his big band has both a Count Basie influence
and a hard bop influence, which is a recipe for
passionate, aggressive swinging.
There is a major difference between 20th
Century Christmas pop songs and the European
carols of the 18th and 19th Centuries; the former
arefor all intents and purposessecular songs,
whereas the European carols are specifically
Christian-inspired. Regardless, the two often
work well together on Christmas albums, and
they work well together on Freelons Christmas.
Freelon offers a fair amount of variety of on this
release, performing everything from O Little
Town of Bethlehem to a medley of AfricanAmerican spirituals to Vince Guaraldis
Christmas Time Is Here. And she also turns
her attention to Duke Ellingtons I Like the
Sunrise, which isnt one of the Dukes better
known songs. Many vocalists and instrumentalists wont touch an Ellington song unless it is a
really well known standard such as Take the ATrain, In a Sentimental Mood or Satin
Doll. So its nice to see Freelon doing some
homework and unearthing a worthy Ellington
song that hasnt been beaten to death over the
years.
Jazz enthusiasts need not worry about Freelon skimping on the jazz factor; the fact that this
is a Christmas album doesnt detract from its
jazz appeal at all, and Freelon and Brown sounds
like they had a lot of fun celebrating Christmas
in the heat of July.

Herbie Hancock
THE COMPLETE COLUMBIA ALBUM
COLLECTION, 1972-1988 Legacy
B003M3UJIK: Sextant; Head Hunters; Dedication; Thurst; Death Wish; Flood; Man-Child;
Secrets; V.S.O.P; The Herbie Hancock Trio;
V.S.O.P.: The Quintet; V.S.O.P.: Tempest In The
Colosseum; An Evening With Herbie Hancock &
Chick Corea In Concert; Sunlight; Feets Dont
Fail Me Now; Directstep; The Piano; V.S.O.P.
The Quintet: Live Under The Sky; V.S.O.P. The
Quintet: Five Stars; Kimiko Kasai with Herbie
Hancock: Butterfly; Monster; Mr. Hands; Magic
Windows; Herbie Hancock Trio with Ron Carter
+ Tony Williams; Quartet; Lite Me Up; Future
Shock; Sound-System; Herbie Hancock and
Foday Musa Suso: Village Life; Round Mid56

night; Perfect Machine


By Scott Yanow
Herbie Hancock was 32 when he began
recording for the Columbia label in 1972. He
had been famous in jazz at least since joining the
Miles Davis Quintet in 1963 for a very significant five year period. Three years earlier he had
debuted with the Donald Byrd-Pepper Adams
Quintet. Hancock led seven noteworthy albums
for Blue Note (introducing Watermelon Man
and Maiden Voyage), wrote the soundtrack to
the Blow Up movie, developed original styles on
both piano and electric keyboards, and formed
what was arguably his finest band, the Mwandishi sextet. The latter group consisted with
trumpeter Eddie Henderson, trombonist Julian
Priester, saxophonist Bennie Maupin, bassist
Buster Williams and drummer Billy Hart recorded two stimulating albums for Warner
Brothers.
With the exception of a World Music album
made for Verve in 1987, all of Herbie Hancocks
recordings during 1972-88 were recorded for the
Columbia label, and all of them are in this remarkable 34-CD set. Even the most ardent of
Hancocks fans will probably be unfamiliar with
some of these sessions because eight of the projects were only previously available as expensive
imports from Japan.
Hancocks Columbia period began with
Sextant, the last album by his sextet. While the
group utilized electronics and some funk
rhythms, their avant-garde explorations failed to
catch on with the public and Hancock broke up
the band, switching directions and forming the
Headhunters. The funky jazz band soon had a
major hit with Chameleon (from the Headhunters album) and that gave Hancock the commercial success he had desired. He followed that
best-selling record with other Headhunters albums (Thrust, Man-Child and Secrets) before
temporarily giving up the electronics and switching to acoustic piano for his 1976 hard bop
group V.S.O.P.
Or did he? As became apparent in the
United States in the 1980s, Hancock never
stayed satisfied with playing in one format, one
style or even one instrument for long. Listening
to the music on this box in chronological order
with the Japanese releases in their proper place
shows just how restless Hancock was even from
the beginning of his Columbia years. After his
giant success with the Headhunters album, Hancock next recorded a solo record in which he
performed two acoustic piano pieces and two
numbers (Maiden Voyage and Dolphin
Dance) with a barrage of electronic keyboards.
Thrust was actually followed by his soundtrack
for Death Wish before the Headhunters recorded
Flood, Man-Child and Secrets.
The 1976 Newport Jazz Festival double
album was a type of retrospective for Hancock
Sometimes we stare so long at a
door that is closing that we see too
late the one that is open.

with him featured with the Headhunters, a reunion of Mwandishi, and a regrouping of the 1965
Miles Davis Quintet (including Wayne Shorter,
Ron Carter and Tony Williams) but with Freddie
Hubbard in Davis place. Because V.S.O.P. was
the hit of the night and the Headhunters had run
its course, there would be four more extensive
recordings (two only released in Japan) with the
all-star group along with tours. Hancock also
recorded with Carter and Williams in a trio and
made a surprising double album of acoustic piano duets with Chick Corea; listen to them stride
a bit on Liza. Hancock returned to electronics
and funk, even exploring disco and dance music
during 1978-79 with Sunlight, Feets Dont Mail
Me Now and Directstep. But during that period
he also recorded the solo acoustic piano album
The Piano and two of the V.S.O.P. projects.
Clearly it is impossible to draw a straight
line in Hancocks career that would explain his
evolution and development. If a new style or
approach gained his attention and his interest,
Hancock was never shy to suddenly change directions while still managing to sound like himself in the new setting. Butterfly from 1979 features some of Hancocks better-known songs
sung by Japanese vocalist Kimiko Kasai. Monster, Mr. Hands and Magic Windows are funky
dance music sets but also include some departures and plenty of variety. Herbie Hancock Trio
with Ron Carter + Tony Williams from 1981
shows that Hancock had not lost his taste for
acoustic jazz and Quartet adds the 19-year old
trumpeter Wynton Marsalis in one of his best
early efforts.
A relatively short time later, Hancock was
recording the electronic R&B of Lite Me Up, the
avant-garde funk of Future Shock (which included his surprise hit Rockit), the unclassifiable World Music of Sound System, and a duet
album with the kora and talking drum of Foday
Musa Suso called Village Life. This box set
concludes with the nostalgic acoustic soundtrack
to Round Midnight and the funk of Perfect Machine.
While Hancock has remained quite active
up to the present time, his output has slowed
down (ten albums as a leader during 1989-2013)
and he has not toured as relentlessly as he did
during his earlier years. His massive Columbia
box set features Herbie Hancock during his
prime years. Because of its very wide diversity,
few listeners will enjoy every single performance, but virtually every jazz, funk and R&B fan
will find a great deal to savor.

Tom Harrell
COLORS OF A DREAM TomHarrell.com.
Tango; Velejar (Sail Away);Phantasy In Latin;
State; Seventy; Blues 2013; Nite Life; Even If;
Walkway; Family; Goin Out
PERSONNEL: Tom Harrell, trumpet, flugelhorn; Jaleel Shaw, alto; Wayne Escoffrey, tenor;
Esperanza Spalding, bass, voice; Ugonna
Okegwo, bass; Johnathan Blake, drums
By Scott Yanow

Alexander Graham Bell

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

Tom Harrell at 67 can look back on a very


To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

productive and significant career. The trumpeterflugelhornist has been on over 250 albums with
Colors Of A Dream being his 30th as a leader.
Harrells soft tone and advanced hard bop style
have uplifted a countless number of sessions and
he has also been a skilled songwriter and a hardworking bandleader.
After five albums with his quintet, it was
time for a few changes. On this CD, Harrell and
his longtime sidemen tenor-saxophonist Wayne
Escoffrey, bassist Ugonna Okegwo and drummer
Johnathan Blake are joined by altoist Jaleel
Shaw and Esperanza Spalding. Those who worried that Ms. Spalding would be leaving jazz
altogether after her very successful R&Boriented Radio Music Society recording and tour
will be particularly happy to hear this CD. Her
voice is often used by Harrell as a wordless addition to the ensembles and Spalding also plays
powerful bass, interacting closely with Okegwo.
Her contributions help to give Harrells sextet its
own distinctive musical personality.
Harrell wrote all 11 of the songs on Colors
Of A Dream. The opening Tango has a dark
melody and a staccato tango rhythm. There are
brief statements by tenor, trumpet and the two
basses with Spaldings wordless voice being a
major asset.
Sail Away is probably Harrells best
known composition. This new version,
Velejar, has Spalding singing in Portuguese
and is her most conventional vocal of the set,
displaying her very attractive voice. Harrell
takes a lyrical trumpet solo that leads logically to
the second vocal which includes some fine scatting.
Phantasy In Latin has a calypso feel and
some jubilant ensembles that one could imagine
Dizzy Gillespie or Paquito DRivera performing.
The alto and trumpet solos are quite boppish and
there is a spot for Johnathan Blakes drums.
State is a passionate piece with an African feel to the rhythms and dense harmonies
performed by the three horns and Spaldings
voice. Next is Seventy, a moody jazz waltz
that has voicings that sound a little like they
could have been written by Gil Evans.
Blues 2013 is a medium-tempo blues
with a tricky melody. The interplay by the two
bassists during their spot is a bit reminiscent of
Charlie Haden and Scott La Faro on Ornette
Colemans Free Jazz. Altoist Shaw, Harrell
and Escoffrey on tenor all stretch out for spirited
and boppish solos.
Nite Life is avant-funk with Shaw and
Harrell soloing over horn riffs. Even If has
some wild scat singing by Spalding, showing
that even at this early stage she is a superior jazz
singer. Walkaway features adventurous interplay by the two saxophonists over pretty free
accompaniment from the rhythm section. After
Harrell makes a statement, the two bassists are
outstanding during their section. Family feaTo Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

tures a trio comprised of the trumpeter and the


bassists. It has one of Harrells more charming
melody and features an attractive group sound
that has one of the bassists sounding a bit like a
rhythm guitar.
Colors Of A Dream concludes with Goin
Out, happily funky jazz by the full group.
One can understand Tom Harrells enthusiasm for this band. Hopefully there will be further
recordings by this colorful and unique group.

Greg Hopkins
REALITY CHECK - Un-Gyve Records
www,un-gyverecords.com. 6 on 6; The Lost
Bagatelles pt1; The Lost Bagatelles pt2; First
Impressions; Spring is Here; Rioja; Affogato;
You Too!!; Olives Branch; Tigress; Reality
Check.
PERSONNEL: Greg Hopkins, trumpet, flugelhorn & cornet; Bill Pierce, tenor saxophone;
Mick Goodrick, guitar; Tim Ray, piano; Dave
Zinno, contrabass; Gary Chaffee, drums; Mark
Phaneuf, flute, alto saxophone & bass clarinet.
By Eric Harabadian
Masters of musical dialogue; thats how
leader Greg Hopkins describes his creative cohorts on this album. And who could dispute
him? Its evident from the first note that there is
a rich connection thats taken place throughout
these recording sessions and between the participants involved. This record, essentially, is about
seasoned vets that have nurtured their sound for
a significant amount of time. And here are the
results of their diligent road work and artistic
commitment.
There are many elements of this recording
that are post bop straight ahead jazz. But there is
also an influx of fusion and the avant garde as
well. This makes for an exciting and eventful
break from the norm that establishes the Hopkins
ensemble as the band with something extra. 6
on 6 was one of the first compositions that
Hopkins wrote for the group and it is a nice introductory showcase for their collective talents.
It is the epitome of cool; relaxed and warm flugelhorn passages emerge from Hopkins ala
Woody Shaw. Mick Goodrick also makes a brilliant entrance here on electric guitar. The Lost
Bagatelles I and II are lengthy conceptual
pieces that highlight lively drumming by Gary
Chaffee and spirited syncopation via Tim Rays
piano. Hopkins trumpet and Bill Pierces sax
converge and mesh. And then Goodricks fuzz
guitar matches wits with Rays intrepid pianistic
statements. The soloists mimic and inspire each
other. Another piece that gets a startling redux is
the Rodgers and Hart classic Spring is Here.
Hopkins arrangement restructures the theme
while still staying loyal to its joyful and buoyant

subject matter. Outstanding solos abound from


Goodrick, Pierce and Ray that create an atmosphere rife with elegance and sophistication. Another piece that seems to come from left field is
named for a Spanish red wine. Rioja is rather
dark and strange, with interesting electronic
effects by Goodrick. The players seem to make
cameo appearances in the way the instruments
weave to and fro. Musical fragments are pieced
together like a puzzle; it is a kind of organized
chaos that takes the album to an alternate dimension. Affogato continues Hopkins fascination
with Mediterranean cuisine, with a tune dedicated to the Italian espresso/ice cream dessert.
The tune is weighty and drowned in heavy
rhythms and an insistent groove just as the ice
cream is drowned and melts into the coffee.
Shades of Freddie Hubbard can be heard here.
Perhaps, a pivotal piece for Hopkins is an auto
biographical one called Olives Branch. It is
inspired by the leaders Detroit upbringing and
named for his mother Olive. The ensemble is not
so much about burning solos as to offering support for the lovely melody and each other. In
particular, Rays evocative piano is delicate and
sincere. Hopkins concludes the album with the
title track Reality Check. It is rather apropos
as it returns to the essence of the leader and his
groups musical experience. Everyone seems to
recognize and relate to the blues and this romping jam gets back to the basics of why this stellar
unit began to perform in the first place. The
blues is at the root of jazz and is universal. And
its a fitting way to wrap up a momentous recording date.

Keith Jarrett
NO
END

ECM
2361/62

www.ECMRecords.com. Parts I-X; Parts XI-XX


PERSONNEL: Keith Jarrett, guitars, piano,
electric bass, drums, tablas, percussion, voice,
recorder, soprano sax
By Scott Yanow
During the past decade, nearly every Keith
Jarrett recording featured him as an unaccompanied solo pianist or in his longtime trio with
bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack De-

5% of the people think,


10% of the people think they
think, and 85% of the people
would rather die than think.

Thomas Edison

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

57

Johnette. Jarrett has been a major voice on the


piano since the 1970s and is instantly recognizable to most of the jazz world.
But put on the two-CD set No End for a
fellow jazz fan and ask him or her who it is.
Chances are that nearly 100% will never guess it
was Jarrett. For instead of featuring him on piano (which he plays mostly in the background on
these performances), he is heard on guitars, electric bass, drums, tablas, percussion and recorder.
How did this happen and who would have
thought that he had this unusual music in him
waiting to come out?
It should be mentioned that these previously
unreleased performances are from 1986. Way
back in 1968 when he was a 23-year old member
of the very popular Charles Lloyd Quartet,
Jarrett recorded an obscure but quite intriguing
album, Restoration Ruin. Through overdubbing,
he was heard on guitar, harmonica, soprano,
electric bass, drums, percussion, recorder, his
voice and just a bit of piano and organ. For that
obscurity, he performed music that overlapped
into folk and rock.
Jarrett occasionally doubled on soprano sax
during the next decade and he recorded on organ, clavichord, flute and percussion now and
then. Spirits 1 & 2 from 1985 can be seen a direct predecessor to No End. Jarrett overdubbed
himself on flute, soprano sax, violin, guitar,
synthesizer, tabla, and percussion on 26 improvisations.
A year later, Jarrett did it again for No End
but with a difference. After completing the project, he put the tapes in a drawer and largely
forgot about them until recent times. He did all
of the recording himself on two cassette recorders, recording on one instrument and then overdubbing on another instrument, again and again.
Although he initially ran a few tests to make sure
that the balance would be right, otherwise the
sessions were very spontaneous. No music was
written out and no beginnings or endings were
planned in advance. In that way it is a little reminiscent of his solo piano concerts, except of
course that in this situation he had the opportunity to build and build off of the ideas that he
expressed on the other instruments.
Throughout these 20 improvisations, nearly
all of the time the lead voice is the guitar. Jarrett
recalls in the liner notes that, although he is
mostly associated with acoustic music, he always loved the sound of the electric guitar. He
enjoyed playing it early on and at one point was
even offered a job with Stan Getz. Jarrett turned
it down, feeling that as a guitarist he was not
ready and that it was not going to be his main

A human group
transforms itself into a crowd
when it suddenly responds to a
suggestion rather than to reasoning,
to an image rather than an idea, to
an affirmation rather than to proof,
to the repetition of a phrase rather
than to arguments, to prestige
rather than to
competence.
Jean-Franois Revel
58

voice anyway. However listening to these jams,


one can understand why Getz was impressed.
Since there are no specific melodies and the
instrumental colors do not change much from
track to track, there is no point in giving excessive play-by-play of these 20 pieces. But to
name a few highlights, I is quite bluish while
also including bits of influence from World Music. Jarretts drums and percussion are fairly
prominent on II, III and XIII feature bluesy
grooves that one might expect from Miles Davis
Bitches Brew, or Jarretts own Solo Concerts. IV
has a particularly infectious vamp, VII is rockish
and ecstatic, VIII has the tablas high in the mix
and XI features Jarrett playing lyrical soprano
sax (which is not listed on the album) and guitar
solos over a static rhythm pattern. The bluesy
XV is the closest of the 20 selections to being a
song while XVIII shows how much he could get
out of a one-chord vamp.
Suffice it to say that No End is a very different Keith Jarrett set, one that his fans will find
quite intriguing.

Jeff Kunkel
MEU CORAO BRASILEIRODelira
Musica 575. DeliraMusic.com. Bossa Para Me
e Pai; Rodizio de Pizza; Meu Corao Brasileiro; No One Can Hurt Me Now; Samba Triboz; Praia do Leblon de Manh; What a View;
Saudade de Voce; Follow Your Heart; Encanto
de Itapo; Bebop Brasileiro
PERSONNEL: Jeff Kunkel, acoustic piano,
producer, liner notes; Haroldo Mauro, drums,
producer; Mauro Senise, alto flute, alto saxophone, flute; Vika Barcellos, vocals; Mariana
Bernandes, vocals; Fernando Corona, vocals;
Jos Arimata, trumpet; Alex Rocha, bass.
By Alex Henderson
In the liner notes that he wrote for Meu
Corao Brasileiro, acoustic pianist Jeff Kunkel
mentions that when he was a kid growing up in
Pittsburgh back in the day, his earliest exposure
to Latin rhythms included Herb Alpert & the
Tijuana Brass and Sergio Mendes Brazil 66.
That isnt surprising to hear: in their day, the
Tijuana Brass and Brazil 66 had considerable
crossover appeal and reached plenty of nonLatino listeners (which was something the two
had in common even though they didnt sound
anything alike). Kunkel points out that Brazil 66
are still influencing him many years later, and
one can hear it on Meu Corao Brasileiro
(which Kunkel recorded during a visit to Rio de
Janeiro).
Meu Corao Brasileiro is Portuguese for
My Brazilian Heart (in Spanish, it would be Mi
Corazn Brasileo). Kunkel isnt Brazilian, but
most of the musicians on Meu Corao Bra-

sileiro areincluding drummer Haroldo Mauro,


who he produced the album with. And those
Brazilian musicians help Kunkel achieve a sound
that owes a lot to the 1960s heyday of bossa
nova. The Brazil 66 influence is obvious, as is
the influence of Astrud and Joo Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Stan Getz. But unlike so
many of the Brazilian jazz albums that have a
strong 1960s influence, Meu Corao Brasileiro
is not dominated by overdone warhorses. Kunkel
doesnt play Jorge Bens Mas Que Nada followed by Luis Bonfs Manh de Carnaval,
a.k.a. A Day in the Life of a Fool, followed by
Corcovado, The Girl from Ipanema, One
Note Samba and a bunch of other Jobim standards that have been recorded countless times
over the years. Instead, Kunkel expresses his
appreciation of that era with original material:
everything on Meu Corao Brasileiro was written or co-written by the Pittsburgh native. And a
warm, sweetly melodic ambiance prevails
whether Kunkel is providing instrumentals
(which include Rodrizio de Pizza, Follow
Your Heart and Praia do Leblon de Manh) or
employing female vocalists (who include
Mariana Bernandes and, more often, Vika Barcellos). Some of the vocal offerings are in Portuguese (Saudade de Voc and the title track),
while others are in English (No One Can Hurt
Me Now and What a View). And wordless,
Brazilian-style scat vocals are employed on
Encanto de Itapo and Bossa Para Me e
Pai.
Bebop Brasileiro is closer to hard bop
than the albums other songs, which owe more to
cool jazz (a laid-back style that greatly influenced the bossa nova). That track isnt unlike
something Brazilian trumpeter Claudio Roditi (a
master of bringing together samba and hard bop)
would do. But even on Bebop Brasileiro,
which is the last track, the solos are melodic and
lyrical. And Bebop Brasileiro is as Braziliansounding as everything else on Meu Corao
Brasileiro. Kunkel obviously wanted to record
an album that was consistently faithful to the
spirit of Brazilian jazz, and he succeeded. This is
a consistently enjoyable effort that underscores
the long-lasting influence of the Brazilian jazz of
the 1960s.

Lage Lund, Will Vinson,


Orlando LeFleming
OWL TRIOLosen Records 123. Web: LosenRecords.no, OWLTrio.com. Morning Glory; All
Across the City; I Should Care; Hallow; Dear
Lord: Yesterdays; Churchgoing; Sweet and
Lovely; From This Moment On; Blues for
Jimmy; Moonstone
PERSONNEL: Lage Lund, electric guitar; Will
Vinson, alto sax; Orlando LeFleming, bass.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

By Alex Henderson
Ask most jazz fans where jazz albums are
usually recorded, and they are likely to respond,
In recording studios and jazz clubs, or sometimes in smaller theaters or concert halls. But
churches arent exactly the first places that come
to mind when one thinks of jazz albums. Some
jazz artists might attend churches (or a temple or
mosque) if they are spiritually inclined, but they
dont record in them. However, an abandoned
church in Brooklyn is where guitarist Lage
Lund, alto saxophonist Will Vinson and bassist
Orlando LeFleming recorded OWL Trio in 2011
(OWL stands for Orlando, Will and Lage). Recording in that church was photographer Jimmy
Katz idea, and while the musicians were understandably skeptical at first, they checked out the
acoustics and decided to follow his suggestion.
Recording equipment was set up, and Katz produced this memorable CD.
A relaxed, laid-back mood dominates this
release, which is greatly influenced by cool jazz
and favors a very sparse, airy sound. Lund and
Vinsons interaction, in fact, recalls guitarist Jim
Halls encounters with alto saxophonist Paul
Desmond, and the three improvisers make extensive use of space whether they are playing Tin
Pan Alley songs (including Cole Porters From
This Moment On and Jerome Kerns
Yesterdays), Halls All Across the City,
Duke Ellingtons Morning Glory or Brazilian
artist Toninho Hortas Blues for Jimmy.
In the 1950s, cool jazz was essentially bebop played in a relaxed, understated fashion
and most of the time, that is exactly what OWL
Trio sounds like. Yet at times, the disc becomes
a cool-toned approach to post-bop rather than a
cool-toned approach to bebop. John Coltranes
Dear Lord is a perfect example. That gem
came from Coltranes modal period; its a song
he recorded after his transition from hard bop to
post-bop. But Lund, Vinson and LeFleming
approach Dear Lord in a totally calm way.
They are as relaxed on Dear Lord as they are
on Paul Weston/Sammy Cahns I Should Care
or Gun Arnheims Sweet and Lovely, offering
quite a contrast to the intensity that Coltrane
often brought to modal jazz in the early to mid1960s. And that spirit of interpretation is a plus.
Jazz, after all, is meant to be the sound of surprise (to borrow a phrase from the late Whitney
Balliett), not the sound of note-for-note emulation. So it makes perfect sense for the OWL Trio
to play a Coltrane gem in a way that is not Coltrane-ish.
Katz obviously knew what he was talking
about when he suggested recording an album in
an abandoned church. On this contemplative CD,
the Owl Trio really thrives in that environment.

B.D. Lenz

juez; Spain; Monk Tribute: Trinkle Tinkle/


Pannonica; Straight No Chaser
PERSONNEL: Bill Mays, piano; Marvin
Stamm, trumpet, flugelhorn; Alisa Horn, cello

By Alex Henderson
By Scott Yanow
Guitarist B.D. Lenz is not a major name in
the jazz world, but the North Jersey resident has
been building his catalogue since the 1990s and
has at least eight CDs available as a leader (some
on Jade Buddah Records, some on Apria Records). Lenz most recent album is Ready or Not,
a solid effort that touches on post-bop, hard bop,
fusion and even crossover jazz on occasion.
Drawing on direct or indirect influences that
range from George Benson to John Scofield,
Lenz demonstrates that he isnt lacking in the
chops department and has a strong command of
his instrument.
Ready or Not is a largely a trio album, uniting Lenz guitar with Ken Pendergast on acoustic bass and Abe Fogle or Matt Scarano on
drums. The guitar trio format serves Lenz well
on Miles Davis Solar as well as funky, hardswinging originals such as Blues for Red and
the title track. But the trio becomes a quintet
with the addition of acoustic pianist/electric
keyboardist Jeremy Grenhart and saxman Benjamin Drazen on Sunny Tuesday and The Sea,
The Sky. Ready or Not has its share of aggressive, hard-edged performances, yet Lenz takes a
quiet, airy, contemplative approach on Say You
Will, Source of Reason and a delicate, somewhat Pat Metheny-ish interpretation of the Bee
Gees How Deep Is Your Love. The latter is
the closest this album comes to smooth jazz, but
it should be stressed that even at his most gentle
and caressing, Lenz does not play elevator
muzak. There is a difference between sweet and
saccharine, and while a lot of smooth jazz is
saccharine, Lenz version of the Bee Gees is
never saccharinesweet, yes, but never saccharine. It still has a brain.
The fact that Lenz is capable of being forceful one minute and gently introspective the next
demonstrates that he is far from a one-trick
pony. Lenz keeps things unpredictable: he can be
edgy and assertive, or he can be vulnerable. It all
depends on what strikes his fancy at a given
moment. And during the course of 47 minutes,
Ready or Not paints a favorable picture of the
North Jersey guitarist.

Bill Mays

READY OR NOTJade Buddah 113.


BDLenz.com. Honus; Blues for Red; Ready or
Not; How Deep Is Your Love?; Sunny Tuesday;
Walts Waltz; The Sea, The Sky; Source of Reason; Solar; Say You Will
PERSONNEL: B.D. Lenz, electric guitar, producer; Ken Pendergast, acoustic bass; Able
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Fogle, drums; Matt Scarano, drums; Benjamin


Drazen, saxophone; Jeremy Grenhart, acoustic
piano, electric keyboards

LIFES A MOVIE Chiaroscuro CD (D) 400


www.chiaroschurojazz.com. Homage To Bill
Evans: My Bells/Interplay/Turn Out The Stars/
Waltz For Debby; Lifes A Movie 4 Cues In
Search Of A Film: Main Title/Love Theme Bittersweet/Chase/End Credits; Concierto de Aran-

The Bill Mays Inventions Trio first came


together in 2004. The veteran pianist and his
long-time associate trumpeter Marvin Stamm
were visiting Dr. Howard Horn in Memphis.
Mays played a couple of classical pieces with
Horns daughter cellist Alisa Horn and encouraged her to improvise on Rachmaninoffs
Vocalise. She did very well and Mays and
Stamm soon decided to form a trio with her even
though she had not played jazz before.
The trio recorded in 2005 and has performed together on an occasional basis ever
since. On Lifes A Movie, the setting proves to be
a particularly ideal one for Mays. A virtuoso
based in bop who is a wide-ranging improviser,
Mays does not need a bassist or a drummer in
order to sound at his best. In fact, the lack of
those instruments allows one to fully appreciate
the active and creative playing of his left hand
which might otherwise have been partly covered
up. Marvin Stamm, who first came to fame with
the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra in the late
1960s, is still very much in his musical prime,
playing crisp solos in which every note counts,
even on up-tempo tunes. As for the much
younger Alisa Horn, she certainly does not
sound as if jazz is her second language. On some
numbers she mostly plays her cello like a string
bass but she is also masterful when using the
bow, displaying a beautiful tone. In addition she
occasionally emulates a rhythm guitar.
The music on Lifes A Movie is programmed into four sections. The first four selections are all Bill Evans compositions. My
Bells is taken by Mays as a quietly emotional
and sophisticated piano solo. Interplay is a
minor-toned blues with a memorable melody. In
addition to their fine solos, Stamm and Mays
play off each other, justifying the pieces title.
While Alisa Horn keeps the music swinging on
Interplay by walking her instrument like a
bass, she bows the passionate melody of Turn
Out The Stars with accompaniment by Mays.
The three musicians share the lead and take concise solos on Evans most famous original,
Waltz For Debby.
The next four Mays pieces could fit the title
of Soundtrack In Search Of A Movie. Main
Theme does sound like the title cut of a film
although it is probably a bit more complex than
most; it develops quite a bit during its seven
minutes. Theme Bittersweet is about a love
affair that is far from smooth sailing while
Chase is hyper. End Credits is a bit reminiscent in spots of the Main Theme although

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

59

different, more like a relative.


Chick Corea based part of his famous
Spain on the slower part of Concierto de
Aranjuez. The latter is given one of its briefer
versions at 2:42, acting as a prelude to a spirited
rendition of Spain.
The Inventions Trio concludes this CD with
straight-forward versions of three Thelonious
Monk songs: the tongue-twisting Trinkle Tinkle, his ballad Pannonica and an explorative
rendition of the medium-tempo blues Straight
No Chaser.
The music overall is both melodic and challenging, with Mays, Stamm and Horn all in top
form. Highly recommended.

Nora McCarthy
Joshua Wolff
A TIME FOR LOVE RedZen 0003
www.RedZenRecords.com. A Time For Love;
Better Than Anything; Small Day Tomorrow; I
Like You Youre Nice; Love Came On Stealthy
Fingers; It Isnt So Good It Couldnt Get Better;
Blue Gardenia; I Guess Ill Hang My Tears Out
To Dry; Spring Can Really Hang You Up The
Most; You Are There; Lucky To Be Me
PERSONNEL: Nora McCarthy, vocals; Joshua
Wolff, piano
By Scott Yanow
A Time For Love serves as a double tribute.
On this live performance from May 28, 2010 at
the Metropolitan Room in New York, singer
Nora McCarthy and pianist Joshua Wolff pay
homage to the late great singer Irene Kral. And,
due to Wolffs recent and untimely passing, this
duet set has ended up becoming an unintentional
tribute to him too.
Nora McCarthy has had a very productive
career, in fact several. As a singer, she has a
warm voice and a dramatic chance taking style.
She can sing veteran standards fairly straight or
swing and scat when it fits the song. She can
also really stretch herself and take free form
flights, or sing in a lowdown bluesy style. In
1996 she recorded her first CD and a few years
later she began regularly collaborating with altoist Jorge Sylvester. McCarthy has performed
with such artists as Kuumba Frank Lacy, Gunter
Hampel, Butch Morris (his A Chorus Of Poets
during 2005-10), Hayes Greenfield, Tim Armacost, Bill Ware, James Weidman, John diMartino, Eric Lewis, Barry Wedgle, Dom Minasi,
Dominic Duval, Santi Debriano, Ken Filiano,
Essiet Essiet, Dafnis Prieto and even Wilson
Pickett.

Visit www.JazzNewswire.com
60

McCarthy is also a poet and a songwriter


who has recorded some of her own original material. She has written over 20 compositions and
penned lyrics to over a dozen jazz standards. In
addition, she is also an educator who conducts
workshops, teaches, authored The Zen Of Singing; The Spiritual Path To Finding Your Voice
and founded The Modern Voice Studio.
Joshua Wolff was only 39 when he passed
away from pancreatic cancer, and was only
stricken six weeks before his passing last May.
Born in Lake Stevens, Washington, he moved to
New York in 1998. Although far from a household name, he was kept busy accompanying
singers including Mark Murphy, Sheila Jordan,
Jay Clayton, Judi Silvano, Tessa Souter, Maria
Muldaur, Michelle Walker and Greta Matassa.
He was also a member of Nora McCarthys
OuARTet.
Fortunately this duet concert was recorded
and the sound quality is excellent. Nora
McCarthy chose to perform 11 songs associated
with Irene Kral including five from her classic
duet album with pianist Alan Broadbent, Where
Is Love. McCarthys sound and style are not that
similar to the quieter and inwardly passionate
Irene Kral who was a particularly superb ballad
singer. McCarthy has a more extroverted style
and pushes the boundaries much more. While
some of the songs are given straight forward
treatments, other tunes inspire some scatting and
much more extended interpretations.
Joshua Wolff proves not to only be a superior accompanist to the singer but a competing
voice, pushing her with some stimulating ideas
of his own and acting as an equal partner while
also giving her the support she deserves.
Highlights of this fine set include Better
Than Anything, Small Day Tomorrow, It
Isnt So Good It Couldnt Get Better and
Guess Ill Hang My Tears Up To Dry. Beyond
its importance as a double tribute album, A Time
For Love is well worth checking out.

Pete McGuiness
VOICE LIKE A HORN - Summit Records
DCD 609. Yesterdays; Oh, You Crazy Moon;
Never Let Me Go; 49th Street; Birks Works; Tea
for Two; Ive Grown Accustomed to Her Face;
Who Cares?.
PERSONNEL: Pete McGuiness, vocals &
trombone; Jon Gordon, alto sax & flute; Bill
Mobley, trumpet; Ted Kooshian, piano; Andy
Eulau, bass; Scott Neumann, drums.
By Eric Harabadian
This is the leaders third CD release under
his own name and McGuiness most vocally
centric to date. The award winning musician
proves to be equally adept at expressing himself

via the voice or his trusty trombone. And, upon


hearing the mellifluous timbre and quality of his
singing, it is really hard to tell where his vocals
stop and his horn skills begin. One complements
the other. McGuiness draws from the Great
American Songbook and seems very much influenced by such jazz vocal luminaries as Mel
Torme, Ben Sidran, Jon Hendricks, Tony Bennett, etc. And you can put Pete McGuiness in
that category as well. He has a style that is light
and airy, with a range that is unfettered by convention. Oh, sure, he is reverent to jazz tradition
and holds these tunes in esteem, but is not afraid
to step out and make his own presence known as
well. Hence this release here. Now is the time
for McGuiness to make his mark and, with this
disc, he truly has arrived!
Evidence of his arrival can be found at various points throughout this stellar release.
McGuiness has a great band, with drummer
Scott Neumann exploding on the scene at the
onset of Jerome Kerns Yesterdays. The
leaders voice emerges bright and buoyant and
the arrangement is challenging and jauntily syncopated. Oh, You Crazy Moon follows and
swings in a modest and mid tempo manner.
There is a nice bluesy feel to the Van Heusen/
Burke composition overall. Great performances
abound from Jon Gordon on alto and pianist Ted
Kooshian. Again, the arrangement is strong and
offers nice accents to the pieces dense mix.
Never Let Me Go is a beautiful and hauntingly
arresting ballad. This is a pinnacle of a romantic
torch song. McGuiness sings with a sincerity and
plaintive quality only matched by his superb
trombone acumen. Kooshian stands out as well,
with sweet comps and empathic support. 49th
Street is the only original composition here
from trumpeter Bill Mobley and it is a good one.
This cool bebopper swings at blazing speed and
proves graceful and melodic. The leader really
demonstrates his vocal chops as he scats along
with the horn lines and matches them cleanly
note for note. Dizzy Gillespies Birks Works
continues that scatting ability as McGuiness
flawlessly mimics the trumpet solos, with his
unique and inimitable approach. Tea for Two
is often taken at a moderate and relaxed pace.
The Youmans/Caesar nugget is reworked here
where it begins, essentially, as a vocal and drum
duet. The intro is sparse and allows for the lyrics
to really shine through. When the entire band
falls in it takes on a rousing and joyous persona
that just feels right. The Lerner/Loewe mainstay
Ive Grown Accustomed to Her Face is tenderly rendered here by McGuiness. He is a master craftsman of interpretation and gives rich and
considerable weight to the lyrics. It is moody,
pensive and features great support from the piano and bass. George and Ira Gershwins Who
Cares? is a clever and amusing tongue twister
of a tune. In the hands of the leader it is navigated with perfection. He also offers great trombone work and seamless interaction with
Kooshian on the keys. It is a nice blend of chops
and stylistic aplomb all around.
This album works on so many levels as an
improvisational showcase, vocal charmer and
modern jazz classic. Make this an essential addition to your jazz listening library very soon!

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

CD REVIEWS

William Hooker
Quintet
CHANNELS OF CONSCIOUSNESS
Record Label: NoBusiness Records
www.nobusinessrecords.com
The Unfolding; Compelling Influences;
Thought and Intention; Lower Interlude;
Character; Connected; three Hexagons;
Mothers History (untold).
PERSONNEL: Adam Lane: bass; Dave
Ross: guitar; Chris DiMeglio: trumpet;
Sanga: percussion; William Hooker: drums
By: Nora McCarthy
A wondrously multi-talented artist,
William Hooker has sustained a lifelong
career since the mid 70s as a highly innovative, experimental, free jazz drumming
icon, composer and poet. Hooker draws on
cognitive memory, a perpetual fountain
akin to an arsenal of powerfully executed
movements, distinctly expressive voices
with his company of highly skilled musicians and his inherent gift of storytelling
through poetry and shouts to weave together, command, direct and construct a
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

remarkable musical work of art on his latest


release, Channels of Consciousness, a live
performance recorded on March 27, 2010,
at Roulette, NYC.
The suite consisting of nine compositions begins with the burning intensity of
The Unfolding, with drum, bass, and percussion establishing the foundational
groove that progressively builds upon itself
with Hookers intricate fills until DiMeglio
emerges as an awakened thought in the web
of a time lapsed construction wove by Ross
that rapidly changes and rearranges in real
time. The first of many sporadic interjections of Hookers vocalized pronouncements conjure a theater of the mind that is
controlling and commanding the flood of
images that are opening up and bursting
forth.
The intensity increases with Compelling Influences and here DiMeglio alternates largo with streaking phrases against a
blazing confluence of rapturous improvisation. Thought and Intention seamlessly follows with Dave Ross superhuman picking
and sound design. There is so much going
on everywhere on this piece creating a ferocious emotional energy like a battle within.

Amazing interaction between Hooker and


Sanga opens Lower Interlude developing
into a fusion of tribal African rhythms.
Spontaneous shouting from Hooker segues
into Character with Hookers recitation of a
poem beautifully introduced by Ross
bluesy roots guitar bending sliding tones.
The excellent bow work of Adam Lane and
DiMeglios moody foreboding trumpet
combined with Ross superb playing brings
an intense darkness of spirit, depth of suffering and painful lament to Connected as
the focus shifts to what is at the heart of the
untold story; the realization from which all
else was spawned. Three Hexagons investigates every aspect of the aftermath of
choices made and begins the process of
lifting out of and from the despair. It is an
understanding, a clearing away, a resolve,
an internal strength, a wisdom. Again we
hear the incredible bow work of Lane
whose solo is gripping and wrought with
shredding tenderness. The second longest
piece on the CD, Three Hexagons itself has
several movements within. DiMeglios
voice is introspective and brooding giving
way to the moving momentum of Mothers
Story (untold).
One is totally engulfed in the experience of Channels of Consciousness. This
flawlessly executed performance and ultimately the CD that was created from it can
only be described as a work of art. It is a
testament to why this music with its many
descriptors, must be heard, honored and
preserved. William Hooker is a gifted and
extraordinary musician, composer and poet.
His artistic vision and driving relentless
propulsion throughout this performance
meticulously encircled the myriad and masterfully employed components of it like a
cocoon bearing witness to the metamorphosis of the creation within.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

When you choose


your friends, dont be
short-changed by
choosing personality
over character.

- W. Somerset Maugham

61

Jason Miles - Global Noize


SLY REIMAGINED JasonMilesMusic.com.
In Time; Its a Family Affair; Fun; The same
Thing; You Can Make It If You Try; Stand!;
Thank You Talking to Me, Africa; Its a Family
Affair; The same Thing; Dreams
PERSONNEL: Jason Miles, producer, arranger,
electric keyboards, organ, synthesizers, engineer;
Nona Hendryx, vocals; DJ Logic, turntables;
Roberta Flack, vocals; James D-Train Williams, vocals; Falu, vocals; Maya Azucena, vocals; Amy Hanaialii, vocals; Mudbone Cooper,
vocals; Nick Moroch, electric guitar; Will Bernard, electric guitar; Dean Brown, electric guitar;
Ingrid Jensen, trumpet; Ron Holloway, tenor
saxophone; Jay Rodriguez, tenor saxophone,
baritone saxophone; Jeff Coffin, saxophone;
Amana Russa, electric bass; Adrian Harpham,
drums; Brian Dunne, drums; Greg Errico, drums;
Bashiri Johnson, percussion.
By Alex Henderson
Sly Stone did not invent funk. The first
funk recordings came with the seminal James
Brown, The Godfather of Soul, in the mid1960s. But Sly & the Family Stone were not
behind, and their impact was enormous. Stones
hits of the late 1960s and early 1970s not only
had a major influence on R&B and rock: they
also affected jazz. Many soul-jazz organ combos
recorded instrumental versions of Stones songs,
and his bassist, Larry Graham, was an influence
on Stanley Clarke, Charnett Moffett, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, the late Jaco Pastorius and
many others who have played jazz on the electric
bass. So bearing those things in mind, it is quite
appropriate that a jazz musician like Jason Miles
would pay tribute to Stones legacy on Global
Noizes Sly Reimagined.
Miles is generally an instrumentalist, but
Sly Reimagined is a vocal-oriented album. The
CD is best described as funk/soul with jazz overtones and elements of hip-hop and world music.
So it would be unfair to unfair to judge Sly Reimagined by hardcore jazz standards because
that isnt what Miles (who produced and arranged the selections and plays keyboards, organ
and synthesizers) is going for. But while Miles
arrangements of gems like Its a Family Affair (which is performed twice), You Can
Make It If You Try, Stand! and Fun arent
jazz in the strict sense, they are jazzinfluencedand Miles does not provide carbon
copies of the original versions.
An abundance of vocalists are employed on
this album, and some of the more famous ones
include Nona Hendryx on In Time and two

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62

arrangements of The Same Thing and Roberta


Flack on both versions of Its a Family Affair.
Hendryx and Flack are very different singers:
Hendryx (who was part of the great 1970s vocal
trio Labellebest remembered for their 1974 hit
Lady Marmeladealong with Patti LaBelle
and Sarah Dash) is an edgy funk-rocker, while
Flack has bridged the gap between soul and the
world of folk-rock, singer/songwriters and soft
rock. Flack, in her 1970s heyday, often appeared
on the R&B charts yet also appealed to fans of
Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Janis Ian and Joni
Mitchell. Yet Hendryx and Flack were both important contributors to the era of Baby Boomer
music, and both of them fit right in on Global
Noizes Stone tribute.
Thank You For Talking to Me, Africa is
really Stones 1969 hit, Thank You (Falettinme
Be Mice Elf Agin), which Sly & the Family
Stone revisited on their 1971 album Theres a
Riot Going On and renamed Thank You For
Talking to Me, Africa for that version. Miles
and his associates keep the song in the funk/soul
realm, but with a twist: the Global Noize version
is influenced by Indian pop. Those who havent
listened to a lot of modern Indian music (as opposed to traditional Indian classical music) might
have a hard time imagining funk and Indian
music being combined, but in fact, funk, hip-hop
and dance-pop have influenced plenty of modern
Indian music (including bhangra). And the Indian element doesnt make Global Noizes version of Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf
Agin), a.k.a. Thank You For Talking to Me,
Africa, any less funky.
Although not jazz per se, Sly Reimagined
puts an intriguing spin on Stones classics and
reminds us how important his contributions
were.

Bill Warfield

A WINDOW THAT SHOWS ME THE


MOONPlanet Arts Network 301233. Your
reputation is None of Your Business; Subconscious Lee; A Window That Shows Me the Moon;
Triple Threat; The Revs; Aubade; The Bumpkin
Grows a Pumpkin; Kill Flo.
PERSONNEL: Bill Warfield, trumpet and flugelhorn and arrangements; Dave Riekenberg,
alto and soprano saxophone; Don Braden, tenor
saxophone; Sam Burtis, trombone; Kenny
Werner, piano; Vic Juris, guitar; Gene Perla,
bass; Scott Neumann, drums.
By Eric Harabadian
The leader Bill Warfield talks about growing up in Baltimore, Maryland and playing hard
bop tunes in local bars, for dances and such. His
recollections seem to recall a bygone era where
that kind of music was plentiful to the general
public and almost part of the landscape. This

was the music that initially inspired him as a


young man and set him on the path to what he is
doing today. He also recalls one major benefit of
doing those seminal gigs and that is the aspect of
jamming. Warfield occasionally got to sit in with
legends like Sonny Rollins, Blue Mitchell,
Sonny Stitt and James Moody. He absorbed that
knowledge like a sponge and gave him an added
appreciation for the improvisational art form.
But, as he states in the liner notes, that romance is gone. In his estimation that version of
the jazz scene is essentially gone. Today jazz has
taken more of an academic stance rather than a
street or club orientation to perpetuate itself.
Warfields goal with this album was to bring
some of that feel back and recreate the sound of
early jazz groups when the music was new and
anything was possible. He has certainly accomplished that here. The personnel list blossoms
with seasoned veterans and Warfield leads the
charge with intricate arrangements that refer to
the classics but are fresh and challenging for
modern ears.
As one scans through the track listing here
it is immediately apparent that the listener is on
for an adventurous and imaginative ride. The
leaders own amusingly titled Your Reputation
is None of Your Business kicks things off and it
features a melody and structure that is somewhat
angular and left-of-center. It seems to venture
into several different directions, with odd chord
placements and a topsy turvy sense of equilibrium. Each soloist here naturally has their own
voice which is sent into overdrive maneuvering a
mix of consonant and dissonant intervals. Lee
Konitzs Subconscious Lee is another atypical
tune, with an intrepid and complex head that sets
up some inventive performances from the crew.
The pieces driving swing brings out the best in
everyone. The title track takes center stage and
offers a smooth and tranquil respite for a moment. Its a delicate and well conceived tune
featuring a sweet intro from pianist Kenny
Werner. He lays the groundwork for Warfields
deep and modally-based dedication to dreamers
and childhood innocence. The rhythms percolate
calmly here but eventually heat up to a relaxed
simmer. Triple Threat is an Afro-Cuban piece
in 12/8. Written by Rodgers Grant, it is a fairly
easy tune for the average listener to groove to
despite its asymmetrical nature. And the soloists
seem to fall right in line in a comfortable fashion. The Revs by Milt Jackson brings kind of a
traditional blues element to the proceedings. Its
a fairly simple and direct melody that seems to
effortlessly engage all the soloists here. Further
evidence of Warfields inventiveness as a composer and arranger can be found in the tune
Aubade. The structure is based on a four note
motif by composer Francis Poulenc blended with
chord changes taken from Wayne Shorters tune
ESP. It is a tribute to two music greats that
have provided continued inspiration to Warfield
and all involved with this project. Two final
compositions by the leader here are The Bumpkin Grows a Pumpkin and Kill Flo. Both take
a somewhat lighthearted route, with the former
featuring whimsical piano runs and the latter
expansive textures and McCoy Tyner-like harmonies.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

(continued on page 64)


To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Ken Messer
TSUNAMI
privately issued
www.facebook.com/kennethmesser1 Rebound;
Kalimba Waltz; Ms. Scriven; Far Horizons;
Travonna Trance (take 1); Tsunami; Eastern
Parallel; Las Entcantadas; Pastel Blossoms;
Travonna Trance (take 2)
PERSONNEL: Ken Messer, tenor, soprano,
kalimba, theremin; Stan Smith, guitar; Aaron
Quinn, guitar, electric sitar; Ted Royalty, vibes,
steel drums; Brad Mellin, cello, bass; Steve
Perakis, bass; Geoff Sullivan, drums; Joe Nelson, percussion
It would not be an understatement to call
Ken Messers The Phoenix Project (which is
based in Columbia, Ohio) a bit unconventional
for a jazz group. Ken Masser, who writes all of
the groups material, not only plays tenor and
soprano but occasionally the kalimba (an African
thumb piano) and the theremin. While both Stan
Smith and Aaron Quinn are on guitars, the lead
voice is often cellist Brad Mellin who sometimes
switches to bass. In addition to bassist Steve
Perakis, drummer Geoff Sullivan and occasion-

ally Joe Nelson on percussion, the band features


Ted Royalty on the unusual double of vibraphone and steel drums, two instruments that
have less in common than one might think. With
this instrumentation, it is not unusual for a frontline of cello, theremin and steel drums to be
heard, or kalimba, vibes and two guitars. The
Phoenix Projects potential is almost unlimited.
In addition to the wide range of tone colors,
the groups styles are quite intriguing. Some of
its performances sound like a high-quality fusion
band from the 1970s, with Brad Mellins bowed
cello hinting at violinist Jean-Luc Ponty. But in
addition to mixing together jazz and rock, the
group performs post bop jazz, ambient music,
ska, and music from India, Pakistan and Brazil.
They effortlessly blend different styles and idioms whenever it fits the piece they are playing,
or simply their mood at the time. The overall
results are always jazz with the Phoenix Project,
in addition to being very open to other styles,
avoiding ever being predictable.
The groups privately issued double-CD
Tsunami holds ones interest throughout. The
opening Rebound is a feature for guitarists
Stan Smith and Aaron Quinn. The guitar playing
is both competitive and complementary, and
made of even stronger interest by the fact that
Quinn used to be Smiths star pupil.
While Kalimba Waltz has Messer playing
the thumb piano near its beginning, this piece
(which is not a waltz) is surprisingly harddriving, especially considering its title. The
quirky ballad Ms. Scriven has very original
chord changes and sometimes straddles the

boundary between inside and outside. The


rhythmically complicated Far Horizons, which
could be considered avant-ska, has its own unusual groove.
Travonna Trance is a mixture of Asian
music, ambient and modern jazz. This one-chord
vamp features Ken Messer on the eerie-sounding
theramin, has the cello in the lead much of the
way, and features colorful ensemble playing by
the guitars. The spirited jam gives the impression
that it could go on much longer, and actually it
does because two versions of the piece are included.
Tsunami is much more peaceful than one
would expect from its title although the post bop
groove does inspire some heated moments. This
multi-sectioned performance allows one to appreciate the many colors of the group.
The electronic introduction played by the
theremin on Eastern Parallel sets an introspective mood that grows in passion and intensity
due to the cello, steel drums and sitar solos. The
flavor of Indian music is felt throughout the
piece. Las Entcantadas, a melodic number
with the flavor of Brazil, has guitar, tenor and
cello solos. Pastel Blooms is quite atmospheric
and picturesque with strong spots for cello vibes
and soprano. Tsunami concludes with the second
lengthy version of Travonna Trance.
Although yet not that well known outside of
Ohio Ken Messers The Phoenix Project has
created music on Tsunami that should be of
strong interest for most jazz listeners.

Ron Oswanski
DECEMBER MOONTames Records 002.
Web: Palmetto-Records.com, RonOswanski.com. White Meadow; Solo Per Undia; Decembers Moon; Ukrania Polka; Mercury Retrograde; The Rain Song; Sleeping Beauty; 80-80;
Milk of the Moon; Standard Tile; Kayak; Evanessence
PERSONNEL: Ron Oswanski, organ, acoustic
piano, accordion, producer; Tim Ries, soprano
saxophone, tenor saxophone, producer; Jay Azzolina, electric guitar, acoustic guitar; John
Abercrombie, electric guitar; John Patitucci,
acoustic bass, electric bass; Ian Froman, drums;
Clarence Penn, drums.
By Alex Henderson
In the jazz world, the Hammond B-3 organ
continues to be closely identified with Jimmy
Smith and his soul-jazz disciples (Richard
Groove Holmes, Charles Earland, Shirley
Scott, Jack McDuff, Johnny Hammond Smith,
Jimmy McGriff, Don Patterson, among countless
others). And its understandable that the B-3 still
has that reputation: soul-jazz gave us a lot of
great recordings that were funky, warm, hard64

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

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swinging, infectious and accessible at the same


time. But as great as Smith was, jazz organ
needed to evolveand evolve it did with the
innovative Larry Young and many of the organists he influenced (including John Medeski, Barbara Dennerlein, Sam Yahel and Larry Goldings). Ron Oswanski is another organist with a
Young-influenced post-Smith perspective, and
that perspective is very much in evidence on his
first album as a leader, December Moon.
No one will mistake this CD for a soul-jazz
album by McDuff, McGriff or Holmes: the performances are mostly post-bop and fusion. At
times, December Moon leans post-bop; other
times, it leans fusion. But either way, the improvisation factor is consistently highand
Oswanski is joined by an impressive cast that
includes Tim Ries on soprano and tenor sax,
John Abercrombie on electric guitar, Jay Azzolina on acoustic and electric guitar, John Patitucci on acoustic and electric bass, Ian Froman
on drums and Clarence Penn on drums and percussion. In addition to playing the organ,
Oswanski plays the acoustic piano and the accordion as secondary instruments.
One of the tracks that finds him on acoustic
piano is Fred Herschs Evanessence, a very
straight-ahead trio performance with Patitucci
and Penn. And Oswanski also plays the acoustic
piano on an unlikely version of Led Zeppelins
The Rain Song, which he has no problem
transforming into instrumental jazz. But the
Hammond organ is clearly his main instrument
on December Moon, an album that illustrates his
skills as both a soloist and a composer. Al-

though Oswanski has no problem interpreting


material by other improvisers (another highlight
of this album is his version of trumpeter/
flugelhornist Kenny Wheelers Kayak), seven
of the CDs 12 selections are Oswanski originalsand they range from the intriguing 80-808 to the driving White Meadow to the gently
reflective Milk of the Moon.
Oswanski switches to accordion for the late
polka musician Verne Meisners Ukrania
Polka, and he has fun showing his appreciation
of East European folk traditions. The interesting
thing is that on the accordion, Oswanski sounds
a bit tango-ish and hints at the famous Argentinean bandonen player Astor Piazzolla (the accordion-like bandonen is a prominent instrument
in tango). So on Ukrania Polka, Oswanski is
giving the listener jazz improvisation, an Eastern
European groove and tango-ish accordion all at
the same time.
Its good to see the younger organists learning the lesson Larry Young taught usthat there
is life after the great Jimmy Smith and his disciples for the Hammond B-3and on December
Moon, its clear that Oswanski learned that lesson well.

Aaron Parks
ARBORESCENCEECM Records 19232.
Web: ECMRecords.com. Asleep in the Forest;
Toward Awakening; Past Presence; Elsewhere;
In Pursuit; Squirrels; Branchings; River Ways;
A Curious Bloom; Reverie; Homestead

PERSONNEL: Aaron Parks, acoustic piano;


Sun Chung, producer, photography; Rick Kwan,
engineer; Sascha Kleis, graphic design

By Alex Henderson
Jazz, after all these years, still has its dogmatists
who insist that jazz improvisers are obligated to
sound a certain way. Many of them are bop
snobs who cant see past 1950s-style hard bop.
But as great as bop is, there is room for many
other jazz styles as welland that includes the
type of ECM aesthetic that Aaron Parks brings to
his unaccompanied solo-piano effort, Arborescence. This 2011 recording is a long way from
the hard-swinging exuberance of bop piano:
Parks, who plays original material exclusively
on Arborescence, offers post-bop with a strong
Euro-classical influence.
No one will accuse Parks of trying to cram
as many notes as possible into Past Presence,
River Ways, Asleep in the Forest or
Homestead. Parks makes extensive use of
space, choosing his notes methodically and deliberately. His performances are reflective, calm
and full of introspection; aggression is not part
of the picture. And his direct or indirect influences on Arborescence range from Keith Jarrett
(who has recorded for ECM) to Paul Bley to
French classical composer Erik Satie (b. 1866, d.
1925). In other words, Arborescence is a recording that is perfect for ECM and is quite
faithful to the ECM aestheticwhen a CD has
been influenced by both Jarrett and Satie, thats
as ECM-ish as it gets. ECM has been in business
since 1969, and its good to see that the label is
still being true to its brand after 44 years.
Unaccompanied solo piano has come in
many forms over the years. The stride pianists of
the 1920s and 1930s (who included James P.
Johnson, Willie The Lion Smith and Fats
Waller) and the boogie woogie pianists who
were not far behind them (such as Meade Lux
Lewis) thrived on hard-swinging exuberance
when they played by themselves. And solo piano
can also work really well in a hard bop setting,
of course. The absence of a drummer and a bassist certainly doesnt mean that an acoustic pianist
cant swing aggressively and passionately. But
Parks is going for something more ethereal and
pastoral on Arborescence, and that outlook
serves him well.

Art Pepper
UNRELEASED ART, VOL. VIII: LIVE AT
THE WINERY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1976
Widows Taste Records 13001. Web: ArtPepper.Net. Caravan; Band Intros; Ophelia; Heres
That Rainy Day; Talk About Smith Dobson and
Intro to What Laurie Likes; What Laurie Likes;
66

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

The latest CD Release,

Why Stop Now Ubuntu


GroundBlue Records

As I began preparing my thoughts


and writing the music for this CD,
I wanted to fulfill the opportunity of
bringing forth a message of unity.

"Five releases in the last six years, each recording


showcasing exponential growth and a lyrical soul that is
for the most part unmatched by contemporaries today
finds Michael Pedicin at the very top of his game. . .
The cover of the Coltrane tune "Tunji" may be the most
authentic and well conceived rearms of a Coltrane
piece on record. . . A dynamic release and celebration
of life and of the gift of music."
http://tinyurl.com/for-Michael-Pedicin-review
"Whether you know it or not you've been digging
Pedicin's sax for 45 years . . . With a jazz suite
inspired by the happenings in Newtown, this soulful
set shows an artist continuing to hit new high spots
while at the top of his game."
http://tinyurl.com/Michael-Pedicin-review

IN THIS ISSUE!

Then I Saw You from new release


is featured on Jazz Inside Compilation CD
Ubuntu means human kindness, an African
philosophy that echoes Michaels constant hope for
peace and connectedness in our world, a connection
that is celebrated and proclaimed through his personal
voice, the saxophone. From the very first notes of the
surging title track that opens this album, through the
beautifully inspired impromptu solo that takes it home,
the listener is in for a powerful ride on a gracefully
navigated harmonic steeplechase.
Tenor saxophonist Michael Pedicin
responded with brawny-toned,
aggressively virtuosic solos deeply
influenced by John Coltrane
Don Heckman, LA Times

PUBLICITY
Terri Hinte
hudba@sbcglobal.net
510 234 8781

WHY STOP NOW UBUNTU review:


http://curtjazz.com/2013/10/09/album-reviewmichael-pedicin-why-stop-now-ubuntu/
RADIO
mcpro@earthlink.net
800 729 7450

REPRESENTATION
Sherry Marcus Milano
smarcusmilano@gmail.com
610 805 3640

WEBSITE: michaelpedicin.com

Straight Life; Saratoga Blues


PERSONNEL: Art Pepper, alto saxophone;
Smith Dobson, acoustic piano; Jim Nichols,
acoustic bass; Brad Bilhorn, drums; Laurie Pepper, liner notes, photography; Wayne Peet, mastering

By Alex Henderson
No less than 31 years have passed since the
death of Art Pepper, who was only 56 when he
died of a stroke in Los Angeles on July 15, 1982.
But his work still commands attention after all
these years, and hardcore collectors have been
delighted by the Unreleased Art series. Released
on Widows Taste Records (a label owned by his
widow, Laurie Pepper), the series has offered
previously unreleased recordings by the alto sax
giantand this CD focuses on an appearance at
a jazz festival held at the Paul Masson Winery in
Northern California on September 6, 1976.
The mid- to late 1970s were a very productive time for Pepper, whose Living Legend session of 1975 was his first studio album as a
leader since 1960. Many of the albums he recorded during that period were excellent, but
stylistically, they were much different from Pep-

68

pers 1950s dates (which focused on cool jazz


and bop). During his extended absence from
recording, Pepper was greatly influenced by
John Coltrane and modal post-bopand that
Coltrane influence is evident throughout this
CD, which finds Pepper joined by Bay Area
musicians Smith Dobson (acoustic piano), Jim
Nichols (upright bass) and Brad Bilhorn
(drums). Pepper is in fine form at the Masson
Winery, performing two originals from Living
Legend (the funky What Laurie Likes and the
good-natured Ophelia) as well as Straight
Life, the standard Heres That Rainy Day,
Duke Ellingtons Caravan and the gritty
Saratoga Blues. The altoist really tears it up on
his aggressive performance of Caravan, which
draws heavily on Afro-Cuban jazz without forgetting the songs Middle Eastern/Arabic appeal.
But on a 10-minute Heres That Rainy Day,
Pepper reminds the audience how compelling a
ballad player he could be. Pepper is as expressive on Heres That Rainy Day as he is on the
barnburners, and through it all, there is no denying how much Coltrane affected his playing after
the 1950s. Pepper was often compared to Lee
Konitz and Paul Desmond during his youth, but
after his return to recording studio albums as a
leader in 1975, long-time followers noted his
ability to incorporate elements of Coltranes playing without allowing his own identity to become obscured.
The sound quality on Unreleased Art, Vol.
VIII (a soundboard recording) isnt up to audiophile standards, but its goodand it has no
problem capturing the vitality of the perform-

ances. Although not released with casual listeners in mind, this is a CD that hardcore collectors
will be happy to get their hands on.

Bryn Roberts
FABLES19/8 Records 1030. Web: BrynRoberts.com, Nineteeneight.com. Corlears
Hook; Nightsong; Canadian Tuxedo; December;
In the Still of the Night; The Invention of Writing; Fables; Guess Ill Hang My Tears Out to
Dry
PERSONNEL: Bryn Roberts, acoustic piano;
Seamus Blake, tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone; Orlando LeFleming; acoustic bass; Johnathan Blake, drums.
By Alex Henderson
Winnipeg, Canada native Bryn Roberts has
shown himself to be quite versatile since his
move to New York City in 2001. The acoustic
pianist/electric keyboardist plays plenty of
straight-ahead jazz gigs as both a leader and a
sideman, yet he has also backed his share of nonjazz artists (including folk-rocker Dar Williams).
But Roberts straight-ahead jazz side prevails on
Fables, his third album as a leader. Roberts
doesnt play any electric keyboards or get into
any rock or funk rhythms on this December 2012
recording, which finds him leading an acoustic
quartet that employs Orlando LeFleming on
upright bass, Johnathan Blake on drums and the
big-toned Seamus Blake on tenor sax and soprano sax. The material is straight-ahead postbop, most of it composed by Roberts himself.
The lyrical improviser performs two standards on this eight-song, 56-minute CD: Cole
Porters In the Still of the Night and Jule
Styne/Sammy Cahns Guess Ill Hang My
Tears Out to Dry. But everything else on Fables was composed by Roberts, whose material
tends to be on the noir-ish side. The songs favor
a dusky type of sound, and that is true on the
discs more energetic selections (including
Corlears Hook, Canadian Tuxedo and the
title track) as well as on more laid-back offerings
such as Nightsong, December and the pensive ballad The Invention of Writing.
Whether he is on tenor sax or soprano sax,
Seamus Blake is a definite asset on Fables and
does a lot to help Roberts achieve that nocturnal
sound. Roberts features Seamus Blake extensively, which is a plus. But on occasion, the
saxman lays outwhich turns Roberts, LeFleming and Johnathan Blake into a cohesive piano
trio. And Roberts fares well as a trio pianist on
In the Still of the Night and Guess Ill Hang
My Tears Out to Dry, the only songs on the CD
that dont feature Seamus Blake on either tenor
or soprano sax. The rule on Fables is: if its a

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Matt Savage
Presents

A Bigger Celebration
A Bigger Celebration is a coming-of-age album
and a celebration of life and youth. Its Matts most
ambitious release to date. The goal, says Matt,
is to capture lifes enjoyable experiences.

Tour Dates:
Saturday, November 30, 2013 Washington, DC. 8:30 PM & 10:30 PM. Bohemian Caverns. 2001 Eleventh St. N.W.
Matt Savage with Marcus Strickland on tenor sax, James King on bass and Nasar Abadey on drums. (202) 299-0800
Saturday, December 7, 2013 Philadelphia, PA. 8:00 PM & 10:00 PM. Chris Jazz Caf. 1421 Sansom Street.
Matt Savage with Ben Flocks on tenor sax, Lee Smith on bass and Dan Monaghan on drums. (215) 568-3131
Saturday, December 21, 2013 Baltimore, MD. 8:00 PM & 9:30 PM. An Die Musik LIVE! 409 North Charles St.,
2nd Floor, Matt Savage with Tim Green on alto sax, James King on bass and Nasar Abadey on drums. (410) 385-2638

standard, Seamus Blake is laying outand if its


a Roberts original, Seamus Blake is featured.
Some jazz snobs would like to see Roberts
playing jazz exclusively. But the fact that he is
capable of playing with a folk-rocker like Dar
Williams one minute and a delivering an acoustic post-bop album like Fables the next speaks
well of him. Roberts diversity should be encouraged, not discouraged. And his straight-ahead
jazz side serves him well on Fables.

ish. After the second player adds his ideas to the


music, the full group performs the work, making
a few changes and improvements along the way.
The result is a set of music that has been composed by all five musicians, with the two main
collaborators getting the composers credit.
For this concept to work, all of the musicians in the group must be on a high creative and
technical level. That is certainly true of the
members of Sketches. As a trumpeter and a composer, Matt Holman has been a major asset with

Sketches
VOLUME ONE Baldhill 091012
www.sketchesmusic.com. Trust; Dark; Cornerstone; Dusk On The Porch; Shadow Search;
Knew; Chain Letter CCC #1; Running With The
Princess
PERSONNEL: Matt Holman, trumpet, flugelhorn; Jeremy Udden, alto; Jarrett Cherner, piano;
Martin Nevin, bass; Ziv Ravitz, drums
By Scott Yanow
The group Sketches and their first CD are
built on an unusual concept. When one thinks of
collaborative compositions, it usually means that
either two or three musicians get together to
write a song, or a band engages in some free
improvisation, making up the piece as they go
along with each of the musicians making contributions. However Sketches does something
much different. Each of the five musicians
brought in a sketch or an idea for a song, giving
the incomplete piece to another musician to fin-

such notables as Fred Hersch, John Hollenbeck,


Darcy James Argue and Kurt Elling. Altoist
Jeremy Udden has led Plainville, a group that is
open to the influences of country and folk music,
and has worked with Either/Orchestra, Dominique Eade, the Jazz Composers Alliance, Steve
Lacy, Sam Rivers, and Maria Schneider. Pianist
Jarrett Cherner has performed with the Marcus
Shelby Jazz Orchestra, Travis Sullivans Bjorkestra, and Terrence Brewer. Drummer Ziv
Ravitz, who was born and raised in Israel, has
worked extensively with Lee Konitz and performed with Hal Crook, Joel Frahm, Joe Lovano,
Tomasz Stanko and Esperanza Spaulding among
others. All five of the musicians also work as
educators including the busy bassist Marvin

Nevin who teaches at the Stanford Jazz Workshop.


But more important than their long lists of
credits is that these five musicians all have compatible styles and listen closely to each other,
two qualities that give Sketches its own group
sound.
Their Volume One begins with Trust, a
haunting and memorable theme that should be
covered by others. Built off of a four-note melodic riff, the theme and its attractive chord
changes inspire fine solos from altoist Udden
and pianist Cherner, with Holman on flugelhorn
leading the final ensembles. The brooding ballad
Dark fits its title, hinting in spots at the mid1960s Miles Davis Quintet. Cornerstone is a
relaxed modern post bop piece that includes one
of Holmans best solos of the set.
The medium-slow bluesy Dusk On The
Porch gives Udden and Cherner opportunities
to show off their soulfulness and creativity over
the blues chord changes. The spooky theme of
Shadow Search inspires some advanced improvising including some heated interplay by the
two horns. It segues logically into the similar
mood of Knew which features the rhythm
section on a quietly emotional ballad. Chain
Letter CCC #1 is a brief group melody while
the closing Running With the Princess is a
cinematic and episodic work.
With consistently fine solos (pianist
Cherner is particularly inventive) and worthy
themes, Volume One is an excellent start for
Sketches.

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70

Gary Smulyan
Dominic Chianese
BELLA
NAPOLICapri
74129
www.CapriRecords.com. Funiculi Funicula;
Anema e Core; Fenestra Che Lucive; Marechiare; Peque; O Sole Mio; O Saracino; A Vucchella; Dicitencello Vuie; Tre Veglia e Sonno;
Santa Lucia Lontana
PERSONNEL: Gary Smulyan, baritone; Dominic Chianese, vocals; Gary Versace, piano, accordion; Martin Wind, bass, Matt Wilson,
drums; Joseph Brent, mandolin, violin
By Scott Yanow
Throughout its history, jazz has always
borrowed from other types of music, adopting
repertoire, styles and approaches from other
idioms and turning them into jazz. With all of
the different types of fusions that have taken
place, and considering the strong contributions
that Italian-Americans have made to jazz
through the years, it is surprising that the Neapolitan melodies of the late 1800s have rarely
ever been heard in jazz settings.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

From the start of jazzs history, ItalianAmericans have been prominent in jazz. Included in any list of major artists would have to
be cornetist Nick La Rocca (leader of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band), clarinetists Leon
Roppolo (of the New Orleans Rhythm Kings)
and Tony Parenti, trumpeter-singer Louis Prima,
violinist Joe Venuti, guitarist Eddie Lang, bass
saxophonist Adrian Rollini, tenor-saxophonist
Flip Phillips, clarinetist Buddy DeFranco, Louis
Prima, Louis Bellson, Lennie Tristano, Scott
LaFaro, Vince Guaraldi, Bucky and John Pizzarelli, Pat Martino and Al DiMeola just to name a
few. But while some of these and other ItalianAmerican jazz artists have occasionally performed an Italian song or two, Bella Napoli
might very well be the first full-length project of
this sort.
The co-stars of this CD are baritonist Gary
Smulyan and Dominic Chianese on vocals. Smulyan has been one of the major baritonesaxophonists of the past decade 30 years. He has
worked with quite a few big bands (including the
Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, the Dave Holland Big
Band, the Dizzy Gillespie All Star Big Band and
Carla Bley) but is at his best in freewheeling
combos. His musical role model is Pepper Adams and he has a similar sound and an oftenferocious attack.
Dominic Chianese comes from a completely different world. As an actor he is most
famous for being in the Godfather Part II, and
The Sopranos. When things got slow in his earlier years, he gained experience singing Italian
songs in restaurants and bars. At 82 he still has a
strong voice and adds a very authentic quality to
this unusual album.
For the set of traditional Neapolitan melodies from the late 1800s and early 20th century,
Jeff Lederer wrote arrangements that also utilize
Gary Versace on piano and accordion, bassist
Martin Wind, drummer Matt Wilson and, as a
real asset, Joseph Brent on mandolin and occasional violin. This group proves very capable of
playing both swinging jazz and romantic Italian
melodies.
The first two songs set the standard for the
entire project. The instrumental Funiculi Funicula has Smulyan caressing the melody and,
after spots for bass and piano, he takes a hardcharging solo that Pepper Adams would have
been proud of over modernized chord changes
that recall Giant Steps in a few spots. Anema
e Core has a romantic theme that is played first
by Smulyan and then sung quite well by
Chianese. After piano and baritone solos with
very nice mandolin played in the background,
there is a second warm vocal.
Of the 11 songs, six have appearances by
Dominic Chianese including his unaccompanied
vocal on the closing Santa Lucia. Smulyan
gets plenty of solos including on a rollicking
Afro-Cuban version of Marechiare and the
uptempo O Saracino. The latter song has some
fine accordion playing by Versace as does the
eccentric Tre Veglia e Sonno. Throughout the
set, the mandolin solos of Joseph Brent give the
music a period flavor.
This unique effort deserves a few listens.

To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

Andy Snitzer
THE RHYTHM Native Language NLM0978.
NativeLanguage.com. Candy; Velvet; Devotion;
Breaking; No Exit; Sirens Serenade; Kinetic;
Caso De Amor; And Again; Above Us All; Realise
PERSONNEL: Andy Snitzer, saxophones, keyboards; David Mann, woodwinds; Bernd
Schoenhart, Teddy Kumpel, Paul Pesco, Paul
Livant, Chuck Loeb, guitar; Alain Mallet, keyboards; James Genus, Tim Lefebvre, bass; Michael White, Shawn Pelton, Graham Hawthorne,
drums; Till Bronner, Jim Hynes, Tony Kadleck,
trumpet; Michael Davis, trombone; Matt Dine,
oboe

always keeps the melody and the groove in mind


when he plays, even when he is wailing with
intensity.
All but two of the selections on The Rhythm
clock in between 4:16 and 5:20, so this is music
recorded with the hope of gaining radio airplay.
Snitzer gets to the point quickly in his playing,
riding over the grooves established by several
different rhythm sections. The backup musicians
often include a conventional four-piece rhythm
section with guitar, utilize electronic MIDI programming in spots, and sometimes have two or
three horns punching out R&B riffs for Snitzer
to play over. Mat Dines oboe is an asset on
Above Us All.
The Rhythm is one of Andy Snitzers
strongest recordings to date and will be enjoyed
by those who enjoy soulful and jazz-inspired
dance music.

By Scott Yanow
Andy Snitzer would probably never call
himself strictly a jazz musician. While jazz is
part of his language, his contemporary music
also includes large doses of R&B, pop, soul,
funk, and so-called smooth jazz. His tone on
various saxophones is influenced by David
Sanborn, Grover Washington Jr. and the more
commercial side of Michael Brecker. There are
also times on tenor when he hints strongly at
Stan Getz, particularly on the bossa-nova Caso
De Amor from his new CD The Rhythm.
Born in Philadelphia 51 years ago, Snitzer
started on clarinet and also played guitar and
piano before settling on the saxophone when he
was 15. He was as influenced by rock as he was
by jazz, and his gritty tone and high-powered
sound reflect many hours of gigging with loud
groups. At the University of Miami he played
lead alto in Miamis Concert Jazz Band and went
on a tour with Bob James who is credited with
discovering the young saxophonist.
In 1984, Andy Snitzer moved to New York,
became a session musician, and in 1994 released
his first CD as a leader, Ties That Bind. His version of Youve Changed became a hit and he
began to record regularly as a leader. He also
guested on recordings by guitarist Chuck Loeb
and Bob James (Restless). Snitzer toured with
the Rolling Stones in 1994 and 1997 and in 1998
he became a permanent member of Paul Simons
backup band, succeeding Michael Brecker. He
has also performed with many pop and rock
artists including Eric Clapton, Beck, Aretha
Franklin, Dr. John and Christina Aguilera.
It is not surprising that Andy Snitzers music, including his The Rhythm CD, is not for
those who only listen to explorative jazz.
Snitzer, like David Sanborn, is essentially a melodic player who adds soul and a bluesy feeling
to every song he interprets. He is skilled at caressing melodies and adding beauty to the music.
He can improvise well (as he shows on Caso
De Amor and some of the other selections), but

Spyro Gyra
THE RHINEBECK SESSIONS Crosseyed
Bear
Productions
CEB
1045
www.SpyroGyra.com. Serious Delivery; Wishful
Thinking; Not Unlike That; Sorbet; I Know What
You Mingus; Off The Cuff; Clubhouse Jam;
Odds Get Even; Who Knew!
PERSONNEL: Jay Beckenstein, saxophones;
Tom Schuman, keyboards; Julio Fernandez,
guitars; Scott Ambush, bass; Lee Pearson,
drums, percussion
By Scott Yanow
It is a little hard to believe but in 2014
Spyro Gyra will be celebrating its 40th anniversary. A difficult group to classify, Spyro Gyra
could be considered the quintessential pop/jazz
band, or perhaps they play rhythm & jazz, or is it
crossover? Popular from nearly the beginning,
Spyro Gyra has sometimes been overly criticized
in the jazz world, being blamed for the rise of
so-called smooth jazz. While some of the
groups recordings have hinted at smooth, the
band has always been more soulful, bluesy and
chance taking than most of the smooth stars, and
it is simply not fair to blame the likes of Kenny
G. on Spyro Gyra!
The Rhinebeck Sessions is Spyro Gyras
30th album. It differs from their previous recordings in two ways. The Rhinebeck Sessions is
the first album since the groups debut to be
released on an independent label, which points
out once again the decline of the record industry.
More importantly, it is their first CD to be improvised in the studio, and all nine songs are
listed as being composed by Spyro Gyra rather
than individual members.
Despite the improvising, the music on The
Rhinebeck Sessions is not that much different

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

71

than what one normally hears from Spyro Gyra.


This is not an avant-garde or a free form album.
The band jammed for three days in the studio
and came out with grooving tunes that were
lightly funky, full of passion and catchy,. The
musicians have become so familiar with each
others styles through the years that they reacted
quickly to each idea, quickly establishing melodic phrases and grooves.
It has long been true that Spyro Gyra is
generally more interesting from a jazz standpoint
live in concert than on many of their studio recordings simply because in their concerts they
stretch out much more with longer solos. The
music on The Rhinebeck Sessions may have
been composed and improvised in the studio but
the set has the feel of a live performance. The
opening number, Serious Delivery, is over
eight minutes long and it has a subtle Latin tinge
felt throughout the performance. A good introduction to the group, it has a strong solo from
keyboardist Tom Schuman, a bit of wa-wa guitar
from Julio Fernandez, and a melodic lead by Jay
Beckenstein.
Wishful Thinking explores several moods
with a thoughtful guitar spot during a ballad
section being a highlight. Not Unlike That and
Sorbet are a bit more typical of the Spyro Gyra
style with concise solos, infectious grooves,
some serious funk, and solid playing of the
melodies by Beckenstein.
I Know What You Mingus is a change of
pace. While not really sounding like the music of
Charles Mingus, this straight-ahead piece alternates between a medium-slow tempo and a more
cooking pace, inspiring some particularly re-

72

warding solos. Off The Cuff is happily funky


while Clubhouse Jam utilizes electronics and
bass patterns that remind one a bit of Miles
Davis early 1970s bands. Odds Get Even has
an infectious if somewhat complex rhythmic riff
serving as the basis of the song while the closing
Who Knew! has Spyro Gyra playing some
avant-funk that may surprise some of their fans.
Overall, The Rhinebeck Sessions is Spyro
Gyras strongest recording in a few years, showing that even after 40 years the fire is still there.

Karolina Strassmayer
Drori Mondlak
SMALL MOMENTS!Lilypad Music 622.
Web: KlaroMusic.com, KarolinaStrassmayer.com, Drorimondlak.com. God of Wind;
Call of the Forefathers; Seven Minutes in
Heaven; Small Moments; Three for All; Ibex
Incantations; Heidis Dream; October Sun; Last
One Standing
PERSONNEL: Karolina Strassmayer, alto
saxophone, executive producer; Cary DeNigris,
electric guitar, producer; Drori Mondlak, drums,
Ingmar Heller, bass.

By Alex Henderson
Although jazz was born in the United
States, Europe has been an important contributor
to jazz for many yearsimportant to swing,
important to bop and post-bop, important to the
avant-garde. And one group that has been making its mark in both Europe and the United
States in the early 2010s is Klaro, a European/
North American quartet that is co-led by Mexico
City-born drummer Drori Mondlak (who is of
Polish descent and has worked in Europe a lot)
and Austrian alto saxophonist Karolina Strassmayer (the other two members of the group are
guitarist Cary DeNigrisknown for his work as
a sideman for drummer Chico Hamiltonand
German bassist Ingmar Heller). Recorded in
Ludwigsburg, Germany in February 2013, Small
Moments paints an attractive picture of the pianoless Klaro and focuses exclusively on original
material. Strassmayers compositions dominate
the CD: she wrote everything on Small Moments
by herself except for Three for All (which she
co-wrote with Mondlak and DeNigris) and
DeNigris Last One Standing.
Two of Strassmayers main influences are
John Coltrane and Wayne Shorter, both giants of
the tenor saxophone known for playing the soprano sax as a secondary instrument. Strassmayer, however, doesnt play any tenor or soprano on Small Moments; she plays the alto exclusively. Yet her affection for Coltrane and
Shorter comes through in her phrasing as well as
her composing, and that is evident on Call of
the Forefathers and Heidis Dream as well as
Seven Minutes in Heaven (not to be confused

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with Miles Davis and Victor Feldmans Seven


Steps to Heaven), God of Wind and October
Sun. Coltrane didnt play a lot of alto, but that
doesnt prevent Strassmayer from using the alto
to express her appreciation of his work and
Shorters.
This CD has its more aggressive moments,
yet much of the time, Klaros performances have
an airy, ethereal, contemplative sort of quality.
That is especially true of Three For All, God
of Wind, Call of the Forefathers, Heidis
Dream and the title track, all of which make
extensive use of space. Meanwhile, Ibex Incantation is probing in a way that recalls Coltrane
on Wise One or Crescent.
Small Moments isnt groundbreaking, but
its an enjoyable, worthwhile effort that succeeds
in terms of both musicianship and composition.

Helen Sung
ANTHEM FOR A NEW DAY Concord
34496 www.concordmusicgroup.com Brother
Thelonious; Amandos Rhumba; Hidden; It
Dont Mean A Thing; Hope Springs Eternally;
Anthem For A New Day; Never Let Me Go;
Chaos Theory; Epistrophy; Equipoise
PERSONNEL: Helen Sung, piano; Seamus
Blake, tenor, alto; Ingrid Jensen, trumpet; Reuben Rogers, bass; Obed Calvaire, drums; Samuel Torres, percussion; John Ellis, bass clarinet;
Regina Carter, violin; Paquito DRivera, clarinet
By Scott Yanow
Pianist Helen Sung has been a jazz success
story. Born in Houston, she started as a student
of classical music at the age of five. Her teacher
and her parents did not want her to listen to anything but classical music and she obeyed them
for many years. She attended Houstons High
School of Performing and Visual Arts but it was
not until she was a senior at the University of
Texas in Austin that she finally attended a jazz
concert. Sung was persuaded to see Harry Connick, Jr. The solo piano section of his performance amazed her because she could tell that he
was improvising and breaking some of the
rules that her classical teachers had insisted
upon. A door had opened. While earning a
Bachelor and Masters of Music in Classical Piano Performance, she listened to every jazz recording that she could find and took whatever
jazz courses the school offered. After graduation,
she enrolled as one of only seven students in the
inaugural two-year program at the brand new
Thelonious Monk Institute.
Sung at first played music in the Boston
area before she moved to New York in 1999.
She made her first recording as a leader in 2002,
began to gain a strong reputation as a creative
To Advertise CALL: 215-887-8880

post bop pianist, and performed with Clark


Terry, T.S. Monk, Steve Turre, Lonnie Plaxico,
Terri Lyne Carrington and the Mingus Big Band
in addition to her own trios.
Anthem For A New Day is Helen Sungs
sixth album as a leader. She heads a sextet with
guest appearances by John Ellis on bass clarinet,
violinist Regina Carter and clarinetist Paquito
DRivera.
The opening selection, Brother Thelonious, is an original named after the beer rather
than after Thelonious Monk himself. The hard
bop melody inspires some passionate trumpet
playing by Ingrid Jensen, wailing tenor from
Seamus Blake, and explorative piano from the
leader.
Amandos Rhumba, one of Chick Coreas
finest tunes, is performed by Sung, Paquito
DRivera and percussionist Samuel Torres with
rhythmic handclapping by some of the other
musicians. The piano-clarinet tradeoff is quite
fun.
On her original Hidden, Helen Sung
makes her debut recording on electric piano. The
lyrical piece features concise and quietly emotional statements by Regina Carter, Jensen and
Sung. Next up is one of the most unusual versions of Duke Ellingtons It Dont Mean A
Thing that has ever been recorded. Sung purposely displays her classical roots, shows off a
little of her wit, and takes much of the tune out
of tempo. While the melody is present, the chord
structure is generally absent in favor of a vamp,
showing that this song can sound viable even
when not swung.
Seamus Blakes soprano is in the spotlight
during the jazz waltz Hope Springs Eternally.
The title cut has Sungs electric piano stating the
mysterious theme before some heated drum
breaks from Obed Calvaire. A wistful version of
Never Let Me Go with Sungs piano playing
melodically over Ellis harmonies on bass clarinet, contrasts with the hyper uptempo Chaos
Theory. The latter piece and a very un Monklike version of Epistrophy both feature plenty
of stirring alto playing from Blake. Stanley Cowells Equipoise, taken as a quiet piano solo,
concludes this well-rounded effort.
There are many highpoints to this excellent
set of modern jazz.

Verve Jazz Ensemble


ITS ABOUT TIMEVerve Jazz Ensemble,
LLC 83912. Web: verve-jazz.com. Lady Bird;
Softly, as in a Morning Sunrise; Big Swing Face;
Boplicity; Days of Wine and Roses; Jordu; Lady
Bird (Alternate Take); Softly, as in a Morning
Sunrise; Big Swing Face (Alternate Take)
PERSONNEL: Tatum Greenblatt, trumpet,
flugelhorn, producer; Jon Blanck, tenor saxophone, producer; Matt Oestreicher, acoustic

Truth is by nature
self-evident. As soon as you
remove the cobwebs of
ignorance that surround it,
it shines clear.

Mahatma Gandhi

piano, producer; Chris DeAngelis, acoustic bass,


producer; Josh Feldstein, drums, producer
By Alex Henderson
First, the disclaimer: the Verve Jazz Ensemble are not affiliated with the Verve Music
Group Records in any way, and their debut album, Its About Time, has not been released by
Verve Records. The East Coast improvisers put
it out themselves. The album is titled Its About
Time because although VJE were formed in
2006, this CD wasnt recorded until 2012so
six years passed before they finally got around to
recording their first album.
The use of the word Ensemble in VJEs
name might lead some jazz enthusiasts to assume that they are a medium-size unit with
eight, nine, ten or eleven members. But in fact,
this is largely a quintet recording, and the participants are Tatum Greenblatt on trumpet and
flugelhorn, Jon Blanck on tenor saxophone, Matt
Oestreicher on acoustic piano, Chris DeAngelis
on upright bass and Josh Feldstein on drums.
Those who tend to associate the word
Ensemble with larger outfits might argue that
they should have called themselves the Verve
Jazz Quintet, yet the word Ensemble is justifiable in their case because they favor a crisp,
focused, emotionally direct, straight-forward
hard bop/post-bop attack that recalls Art Blakey
& the Jazz Messengers. Back in the 1950s,
1960s, 1970s and 1980s, the Jazz Messengers
brought a sense of purpose to their recordings
which is what VJE do whether they are playing
hard bop of the 1950s variety or post-bop of the
1960s variety.
VJEs performance of Softly, as in a
Morning Sunrise is decidedly modal and sounds
like a cross between the Jazz Messengers and
John Coltrane, but they are more mindful of the
hard-bopping 1950s on Bill Potts Big Swing
Face, Duke Jordans Jordu and pianist Tadd
Damerons Lady Bird (a standard that was
unveiled in the late 1940s and became even more
popular in the 1950s). Lady Bird, like the
Miles Davis-associated standards Half Nelson
and Four, was among the bop songs that was
inspired by How High the Moonand VJE
also look back on jazz past with their interpretation of Miles Davis and Gil Evans Boplicity,
which was made famous by Davis seminal Birth

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www.JazzNewswire.com

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

73

Fitzgerald, Charles Linton, Mills Brothers, vocals

Our greatest
happiness does not
depend on the condition
of life in which chance has
placed us, but is always the result
of a good conscience, good health,
occupation, and freedom in
all just pursuits.

By Scott Yanow

Chick Webb
& Ella Fitzgerald

- Thomas Jefferson

of the Cool sessions of 1949 and 1950.


Boplicity, as Davis and Evans envisioned it,
was the epitome of cool jazz: subtle, relaxed,
understated. But VJE have no problem giving
the tune a hard bop makeover. And on Henry
Mancinis theme from the 1962 movie Days of
Wine and Roses, VJE demonstrate that being
lyrical and hard-swinging are not mutually exclusive. Mancinis song is as great as the movie,
which starred Lee Remick and Jack Lemmon as
a married couple who became severe alcoholicsand the fact that the characters were so
likable made the film all the more disturbing and
all the more poignant. There is a lot of history
attached to Mancinis melody, and VJE do it
justice.
Its About Time doesnt pretend to be
groundbreaking. But jazz has room for both
innovators and traditionalists, and VJEs first
album is a likable, if derivative, example of the
latter.

74

THE COMPLETE DECCA SESSIONS


(1934-1941) Mosaic MD8-252 mosaicrecords.com.
COLLECTIVE PERSONNEL: Ward Pinkett,
Edwin Swayzee, Shelton Hemphill, Louis Hunt,
Louis Bacon, Mario Bauza, Bobby Stark, Taft
Jordan, Dick Vance, Irving Randolph, trumpet;
Robert Horton, Jimmy Harrison, Claude Jones,
Sandy Williams, Fernando Arbello, Nat Story,
George Matthews, John Haughton, John McConnell, Earl Hardy, trombones; Hilton Jefferson,
Benny Carter, Louis Jordan, Pete Clark,
Chauncey Haughton, Eddie Barefield, alto, clarinet; Edgar Sampson, George Dorsey, alto;
Garvin Bushell, alto, clarinet, bass clarinet;
Elmer Williams, tenor, clarinet; Wayman Carter,
tenor, flute, baritone; Teddy McRae, tenor, baritone; clarinet, Sam Simmons, tenor;
Don
Kilpatrick, Joe Steele, Tommy Fulford, Ram
Ramirez, piano; John Trueheart, guitar, banjo;
Bernard Addison, Bobby Johnson, Ulysses
Livingston, guitar; Elmer James, bass, tuba; John
Kirby, Bill Thomas, Beverly Peer, bass; Chick
Webb, Bill Beason, Kenny Clarke, drums; Ella

As part of their 30th anniversary celebration,


the Mosaic label has released this eight-CD limited-edition box set. The 187 selections not only
contain all of the recordings that drummerbandleader Chick Webb made with Ella Fitzgerald but has the two selections that he led in 1929
(under the name of The Jungle Band), all of the
instrumentals recorded by the Chick Webb Orchestra, the performances by Ella Fitzgeralds
Savoy Eight (which has its personnel drawn
from the Webb band), the four historic numbers
by Chick Webbs Little Chicks, and the recordings by Ella Fitzgeralds Famous Orchestra
of 1940-41 which was the Webb big band after
the drummers death. There are also seven titles
by Ella with a small group in 1941 taken from
the orchestra.
Nearly everything that Chick Webb ever
recorded is on this box set, not counting radio
broadcasts. The only things missing are a foursong Louis Armstrong date from 1932 in which
Webb led the backup band, and Webbs guest
appearances on sets by Mezz Mezzrow (1934),
the Gotham Stompers (a 1937 session with musicians drawn from the Webb and Duke Ellington
Orchestras) and two numbers from 1937 by
Jimmy Mundys Swing Club Seven.
Why is Chick Webb worthy of such a comprehensive collection? Born sometime between
1902 and 1909 (the exact year is not known),
Webb emerged in New York in 1926 as a bandleader despite the fact that the tuberculosis of the
spine that he had contacted as a child caused him
to be a hunchback who was just five feet tall. A
powerful drummer who was one of jazzs first
drum soloists, Webb was cited as an inspiration
by such future stars as Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich,
Max Roach and Art Blakey. His big band was a
fixture at the Savoy Ballroom starting in 1933,
and was considered one of the most exciting jazz
orchestras by dancers in Harlem. In battle of the
band contests, Webb was able to best virtually
every visiting big band except Duke Ellingtons.
His orchestra introduced such Edgar Sampson
compositions as Stompin At The Savoy,
Blue Lou and Dont Be That Way. The four
songs by Chick Webbs Chicks feature rare early
flute solos by Wayman Carver (who was only
preceded as a jazz flutist by Alberto Socarras)
and the big band had such fine soloists as trumpeter Taft Jordan, tenor-saxophonist Elmer Williams and trombonist Sandy Williams.
And yet, only 23 or the 129 performances
recorded by the Webb Orchestra during 1934-39
are instrumentals. In 1935 Chick Webb took a
chance on a gawky and awkward but obviously
talented 18-year old vocalist named Ella Fitzgerald. Soon after she started singing with the band,
Ellas potential commercial appeal was recognized by Webb, who featured her extensively for
the next three years. While her recording of ATisket, A-Tasket was a huge hit, nearly all of
her records sold very well and she became as
well-known as Webb. Ellas joyful voice and
swinging style are instantly recognizable even

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though she had not developed into a superb scatsinger. When Chick Webb passed away in 1939,
Ella was so attached to the orchestra and was
such a strong draw that she fronted the ghost
band for three years, becoming one of the first
females to lead a big band. In reality, she had
little to do with the direction of the group (Teddy
McRae was the musical director), but it was a
mutually beneficial situation until its breakup in
July 1942.
This attractive box set, which has definitive
liner notes and superior sound, is essential for all
serious swing collectors and particularly for
those who wonder why Chick Webb is so highly
rated.

Get Your Next


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THE SUPER VILLAIN JAZZ BANDArtists


Recording Collective 2505. Web: ArtistsRecordingCollective.biz. The Yankee Poured Out
the Bacon Grease; Super Villain Jazz Band; The
muse; Like Woody; Thelmas Revenge; Alice;
The Hadron Collider; Frankliolisms (Pravo
Horo); Toxic
PERSONNEL: Matt White, trumpet, producer;

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75

It is incumbent on
every generation to pay its
own debts as it goes. A principle
which if acted on would save
one-half the wars of
the world.
- Thomas Jefferson

Evan Cobb; tenor saxophone; Don Aliquo; Joe


Davidian, acoustic piano; Jonathan Wires,
acoustic bass; Jim White, drums.

proach that sounds like a cross between the Jazz


Messengers and Miles Davis Sketches of Spain
album. And it is clear that the Super Villain Jazz
Band (which also includes tenor saxophonist
Evan Cobb, alto saxophonist Don Aliquo, pianist
Joe Davidian, bassist Jonathan Wires and drummer Jim White) shares the Jazz Messengers
ability to swing hard and sound focused. The
Jazz Messengers, for all their improvisation and
free-spirited spontaneity, had some great hooks
and played with a sense of purposeand it is
evident that White appreciates those qualities.
This CD doesnt pretend to point post-bop
in any new directions, but its an enjoyable outing from White and his colleagues.

By Alex Henderson
No less than 23 years have passed since the
death of drummer Art Blakey, but his Jazz Messengers continue to have a major influence in
hard bop and post-bop. This is a solid, if derivative, post-bop effort by trumpeter Matt White
and his Super Villain Jazz Band, and is a perfect
example of that influence. Recalling the postbop of the 1960s and 1970s, this CD gets a lot of
inspiration from Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers as well as from the recordings that trumpeters Woody Shaw and Freddie Hubbard (both of
whom were Jazz Messengers along the way)
made on their own.
Its evident that White, a big-toned trumpeter who grew up in Florida and recorded this
album near Nashville, admires Shaw and Hubbard as both trumpeters and composers. One
hears a lot of Shaw and Hubbard in Whites
attractive, full-bodied tone as well as elements of
Lee Morgan and Carmell Jones (Hubbard, Shaw,
Morgan and Jones were all influenced by the
seminal Clifford Brown). In fact, one of the
songs that White wrote for this CD, Like
Woody, pays homage to Shaw. Someone who
saw that song title without hearing the album
might wonder if White meant Woody Herman,
but those who hear that songs 1960s-like postbop melody will know that he wrote the song for
Shaw. Like Woody doesnt sound like something Herman would have done.
The only songs on this 2012 recording that
White didnt compose are Tom Waits Alice
and the Britney Spears hit Toxic, both of
which receive post-bop makeovers and work
perfectly well as acoustic straight-ahead jazz.
White takes Toxic out of dance-pop and
makes it sound like something from the Jazz
Messengers 1960s/1970s repertoire, and that
Jazz Messengers aesthetic is just as strong on the
insistent The Hadron Collider, the East European-flavored Frankliolisms (Pravo Horo) and
the moody Thelmas Revenge. On The
Muse, White takes a Spanish-influenced ap-

Always render more and better


service than is expected of you,
no matter what your task may be.
- Og Mandino
76

Phil Woods
NEW CELEBRATION - Chiaroscuro Records
CR (D) 401. Bopn Bob Dont Stop; Hank
Jones; And it Was Nowhere; Before I Left;
Goodbye Mr. Pepper; Get Birds Word; Ballad
for Hank; Shiny Pants; Heres to Alvy; You
Dont Know What Love Is.
PERSONNEL: Phil Woods, alto saxophone
(soloist); Jay Rattman, clarinet (soloist), baritone
& alto saxophone; Nelson Hill, lead alto sax,
flute, clarinet; Matt Vashlishian, alto sax, flute &
clarinet; Tom Hamilton, tenor sax, flute & clarinet; Bob Keller, tenor sax, flute & clarinet; Jim
Buckley, baritone sax & bass clarinet; Danny
Cahn, trumpet; Nathan Eklund, lead trumpet;
Chris Persad, trumpet (soloist); Vanessa Meggiolaro, trumpet; Eddie Severn, trumpet; Patrick
Dorian, trumpet; Rick Chamberlain, lead trombone; Sam Burtis, trombone; Fred Scott, trombone; Jim Daniels, bass trombone; Skip Wilkins,
piano; Evan Gregor, bass; Spencer Reed, guitar;
Tom Whaley, drums; Najwa Parkins, vocals.
By Eric Harabadian
The legendary Phil Woods composed and
arranged the majority of tunes here for an album
that is invested with performances from some of
the best ensemble players in the business. The
origin of this big band began in 1988 as the
COTA Festival Orchestra. It was originally dedicated to the great arranger/composer and tenor
sax player Al Cohn. That developed into a project dedicated to composer Dick Cone, with a
subsequent Grammy-nominated recording by
Phil Woods and the Festival Orchestra called
Celebration. This is the latest aggregation of the
group; born out of intense rehearsals at the Deer
Head Inn in Delaware Water Gap, deep in the
Pocono Mountains.
Woods has always been a brilliant soloist as
well as composer and balances the two more
than ever on this latest work. Bop n Bob Dont
Stop is a real swinging affair that sets the pace

for the direction this date will go. The tempo is


upbeat and the overall mood is joyous and celebratory. Woods, appropriately, takes one of the
first solos of the sessions and his robust and
shimmering alto tone grabs your attention immediately. The leader, indeed, shares the wealth
solo-wise, with Chris Persad rising to the occasion on trumpet. Woods dedication to the late
great pianist Hank Jones follows and features the
leaders more lyrical and subtly emotive side.
Pianist Skip Wilkins mimics the spirit and essence of Jones and is the tunes leading light.
And It Was Nowhere is based on a Fats
Navarro composition and given a mid-tempo
treatment by Woods. Tenor saxophonist Tom
Hamilton and trumpeter Persad provide the initial lyrical heat. Guitarist Spencer Reed and
bassist Evan Gregor add a bit of tasteful contrast.
Before I Left is another cleverly conceived
composition based on Turner Leytons after
Youve Gone. This features a wall of saxophones, with Woods taking a brief solo toward
the latter section of the tune. Goodbye Mr. Pepper is dedicated to the late great saxophonist
Art Pepper and is a relaxed bossa nova. It is a
nice departure from much of the straight ahead
bebop that dominates the album. The accents of
acoustic guitar and Persads flugelhorn are welcome choices. Get Birds Word naturally focuses on the saxophone as it is a dedication to
the music of Charlie Parker. Four of the groups
altoists step up, including Matt Vashlishian,
Woods, Nelson Hill and Jay Rattman. Each has
their individual and unique spins on interpreting
Bird and makes for one of the standouts on the
record. The ever sensitive Woods dedicates, yet,
another musical piece to a dear friend and brilliant clarinetist Hank DAmico called Ballad
for Hank. Rattman does some remarkable clarinet work here, with an interesting contrast in the
bridge by Reed on guitar. This is a great exercise
in the juxtaposition of various colors and moods.
Any jazz aficionado knows one of Frank Fosters most famous compositions Shiny Stockings. Woods playfully adopts his own take on
that classic with Shiny Pants. The piece builds
from the ground up, with subtle walking bass
that blossoms into a roaring full bore extravaganza. Nathan Eklunds crystal clear trumpet
cuts through the musical din like a hot knife
through butter. They begin to wind down the
proceedings with Johnny Mandels tribute to Al
Cohn called Heres to Alvy. This is a hard
swinging tune that evokes the spirit of Cohn.
Featured soloists include Woods as well as Bob
Keller and Tom Hamilton. The final track is
called You Dont Know What Love Is and was
written by Don Raye and Gene DePaul. The
songs arrangement is taken from a 50 year old
chart that still sounds fresh and vibrant today.
Its performed at a slow and reflective tempo,
allowing vocalist Najwa Parkins to grab onto
every line for full effect. Her vocals are clear,
incisive and totally on point.
At 82, Phil Woods is still a leading voice in
jazz and contemporary music as an instrumentalist, composer, arranger and bandleader. Hes
certainly hit one out of the park with this fine
extension of that rich legacy.

December 2013 Jazz Inside Magazine www.JazzInsideMagazine.com

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