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PARTI

NG
AND
GROOVI
NG

Turning

Parting and Grooving


Cutting off and making grooves
A

In parting operations, the objective is


to seperate, as efciently and reliably
as possible. one part of the workpiece
from the other. A straight cut is made to
a depth equalling the workpiece radius
of a bar. In grooving operations, the principle is the same but with the difference
that the cut is shallower and not taken to
the centre. Grooving operations are less
sensitive in some respects because the
grooves are usually not as deep, instead
shape, accuracy and surface nish are
often demands that need more attention.
The machining process can be compared
to a facing operation in turning, where
the tool is fed radially into the centre, the
difference being that in the parting operation, the tool is a thin blade making a
narrow groove. There is material on both
sides of the tool and thus the material
to be cut through should be as little as
possible and the width of the cutting edge
should be small. This makes considerable demands on the performance, chip
forming and stability of the parting tool.
As the tool moves to the centre, and if
the spindle speed is kept the same, the
cutting speed will gradually decrease until it reaches zero at the centre. In CNClathes, the spindle speed is increased
as the tool moves towards the centre.
Any decrease in cutting speed is disadvantageous for the tool and one that can
make severe demands on the cutting
edge. As the edge approaches the centre, pressure increases as the tool is fed
in at the decreasing cutting speed.

Chip evacuation is also a critical factor


in parting operations. There is little opportunity of breaking chips in the conned
space as the tool moves deeper. The
chip-formation geometry of the cutting
edge is devoted largely to form the chip
in order for it to be evacuated smoothly.

Consequences of poor performance in


this respect are chip obstruction which
leads to poor surface quality and chip
jamming, leading to tool breakdown.

External operations : 1. Parting off, 2. Grooving, 3. Turning, 4. Proling,


5. Undercutting, 6. Face-grooving, 7. Threading

6
H

B2

7
1

Turning

Machining factors
Modern parting and grooving tools are,
in addition to being very productive, also
versatile. Most types of turning operations can be carried out with todays
indexable insert tools. Generally, operations that do not require the large overhang that the adjustable blade type of
tool offers, should be performed by the
shank type or Coromant Capto tool,
where the blade is an integrated part of
the toolholder. Maximum rigidity, which
is vital in parting, grooving, proling and
turning operations, is offered by this design. However, the adjustable blade type
tool does have an added advantage in
that it offers the exibilty of having adjustable overhang when different diameters
and deep groove-depths are involved.
It provides the shortest overhang with
maximum stability for different bar diameters.

The main cutting data and tool denitions


in parting and grooving operations are:
cutting speed (vc) which is the surface
speed at the cutting edge

Parting and grooving tools for different applications.

spindle speed (n), the machine spindle


revolutions per minute
the straight, radial feed towards the
centre (fnx)

the radial depth of cut capability of the


tool (ar) - the distance from outer diameter to the centre or bottom of groove

Vc

fnx

ar

B3

Turning

Parting off
Tool Selection
Generally, minimize tool deection and
vibration tendencies through :

- selecting the toolholder or blade with


the smallest overhang,
- choosing the largest possible shank
dimensions on the toolholder
- choosing the blade or toolholder with
the largest possible insert seat (width)
- choosing a blade height which is at
least equal to the insertion length
First tool choice for parting operations
should be tool blocks with blades, where
the blade can be adjusted to optimize
the tool reach/tool overhang. Screwclamp type insert clamping is the best
choice from a stability point of view. A
reinforced toolholder will increase stability even more.
The tool overhang should not exceed 8
times the insert width.
Different entering angles r have their uses:
The neutral insert provides a strong cut-

RH

N
F

Tool block with spring-clamp tool blade for tool overhang adjustment and a reinforced blade.

ting edge with the cutting forces being


mainly radial, providing a stable cutting
action, good chip formation and tool-life,
and excellent results through alignment
in cut. There are three types : neutral (N),
where the cutting edge is at right angles
to the feed direction of the tool with an
entering angle of zero degrees; right (R)
and left (L) handed inserts - each having
an entering angle of a few degrees.
An entering angle of a few degrees is,
however, useful in parting operations
in that the end of cut can be nished
more advantageously. If a neutral insert
is used, the part of the workpiece that
has been cut off is left with a very small

diameter protrusion (pip). A parting tool


with an entering angle can be used to
remove the pip when the cut part drops
away. The hand of the insert is selected
so that the leading corner of the cutting edge is next to the part being cut
off. The pip is then left on the workpiece
while still in the machine and removed
by the cutting edge that faces through
to the centre. Burrs will also be reduced
through the effect of the entering angle.
Inserts with an entering angle of 5 degrees are available in CF, CM and CR
geometries. Inserts with 10 and 15 degrees entering angles are available in CS
geometry.

LH

Entering angles.

B4

Cutting off the pip in parting operations.

Pip and burr free machining.

Turning

one hand and workpiece material saving


and lower cutting forces on the other.

To avoid or minimize pips and burrs, use


a sharp (ground) insert, right- or lefthanded (GF and CS for instance) with
the smallest possible angle. Although a
large angle reduces pips and burrs, the
tendency is for the cut to be more uneven and surface nish and tool-life not to
be optimum. The size of the pip is also
affected by how the workpiece part that
is cut off breaks away because of the
centrifugal forces. The size and length of
this part affects the point of parting and
for this reason, the size of the pip can be
minimized by supporting the growing instability of the workpiece being cut off.
Select dedicated inserts for the operation in question for best performance
and results.
For large depths of penetration in parting, the double-ended blade solution is
recommended.
For parting small diameter bars or components, cutting forces should be minimized through selecting small insert
widths and sharp cutting edges (such as
geoemtries CS and CF).

Application factors
For maximum stability during machining,
screw-clamp toolholders are always recommended when any axial machining
(turning) is involved. A spring-clamp
tool is only recommended for radial
machining, such as in parting off.
Recommended torque values are provided for the screw-clamp type tools. It
is important to follow these and not to
over-tighten the screw the maximum
torque is about 50% higher than what
the table indicators.
Parting off with CoroCut 2.

When parting thin-walled tubes, minimize


the cutting forces by using sharp inserts
with the smallest posible width, for instance CF and CS geometries.
The choice of insert-width is a compromise
between tool strength and stability on the

Feed rate reduction is often advantageous for performance when machining


towards the centre to minimize the
pressure on the cutting edge. Also because of the reducing pip size, the feed
should be reduced by up to 75% when
approaching the centre, around 2 mm
before the part comes off. Cutting data
should be adapted so as to minimize
possible vibration. This may lead to the
tool-life being doubled.

Feed reduction towards centre.

G
Stop the parting off operation before
reaching the centre because, due to its
weight, the disc in question could fall off
before completion. Leave the pip on the
bar to be faced off with a conventional
tool.

Spring-clamp tool for radial cuts and screw-clamp tool for radial and axial cuts.

B5

Turning

widths (la) can be used to improve stability but at the expense of wasting more
material in the cutting off operation.
The largest possible tool-shank (h and b
dimensions) should be chosen as well
as the largest blade height (h1) and insert seat width (la).

Cutting into a drilled hole correctly.

Important right-angle positioning of tool.

When parting a bar with a drilled hole,


ensure that the depth of the hole is sufcient for the width of the insert. If the hole
has been drilled with a pointed drill and
the parting tool has to enter the coned
part of the hole, the blade may deect,
generating excess forces on one corner
of the insert and which may lead to insert
chipping and inconsistent tool-life.

Mounting an insert in the CoroCut springclamp tool involves using an excentric


key to open the insert seat for the insert
to be pushed into place. Removing the
insert involves a similar procedure to
pulling the insert out of the seat.

Centre-height accuracy of cutting edge is important.

Tool positioning is an important factor


for success in parting and grooving operations. It is vital for the cutting tool to
be mounted accurately at a right angle
to the centre line of the workpiece to
be machined. Deviations will mean added stresses on the blade as it is fed
into the workpiece and result in machined surfaces that are not at. Vibrations
arise and chip formation is often disadvantageous.
The tool position as regards the centre
height of the cutting edge is also important. Deviations from the workpiece centre line should not be more than +/- 0.1
mm. Excessive deviations change the cutting action with higher cutting forces. This
can also lead to added friction between
tool and workpiece resulting in reduced
tool-life which also affects the size of the
pip.
Creating the best stability for the cutting tool set-up is especially important
in parting and deep grooving operations.
The tools involved have long thin blades
which are necessary because of the
need for accessibility. The overhang of
the blade should be minimized with the
smallest possible tool reach (ar) which
means that the adjustable blade is, in
many cases, the best alternative, even
though the shank tool with integrated
blade is the most rigid. Wider insert

B6

Cutting uid should be used with copious amounts directed onto the cutting
edge. Coolant should be supplied constantly while the insert is engaged in
cut. A coolant adaptor can be mounted
with the supply directed from above.
For tool blocks with a parting blade, the
coolant supply can be connected above
or from either side of the block.

Mounting an insert in the Q-Cut spring


clamp should always be preceeded by
applying a little coolant or oil on the insert
seat to further increase the toolholder
life. Use the special Q-Cut key for mounting and removing inserts to avoid cutting
edge damage. No pivot-holes are provided
in either the 570-type exchangeable head
tool (R/LAG 551.31) for parting and face
grooving. For these items, a small rubber
mallet should be used to tap the insert
into its position. The tip of the yellow key
should be used to extract the insert.

Typical clock-spring chips from


parting off.

Cutting uid is important in parting


and grooving.

Turning

Grooving
Machining grooves has many similarities
to parting off, especially deep grooves. Although the same toolholder systems can
be used for both parting and grooving in
many instances, the insert geometries are
dedicated to provide optimum performance and results. Grooves vary : there are
shallow grooves, deep grooves, wide grooves, external grooves, internal grooves and
face grooves.
For single grooves, a suitable insert is
applied to match the size and limits while
wider grooves can be machined in various
ways. Dedicated insert geometries, for
low and high feed applications, contribute
towards optimizing the grooving operations
by giving specic benets.

Inserts for single grooving cuts and shallow


grooving toolholders.

For single-cut grooving generally, straight


cuts can be made for groove widths of
up to 8 mm giving the best method, chip
control and tool-life. Tailor Made inserts
are made to match the specic groove
size. Chamfers can also be part of the pro-

C
Machining a wide groove.

gramme. Insert geometry GM is recommended for general groove turning and GF for
precision grooving. Processes should be
optimized in relation to the production volume. The TF and CF insert geometries have
Wiper design on the side in order to generate high surface nish on the sides of the
groove. Chamfering of the groove can be
carried out with the CoroCut 2 system using
the corners of the grooving insert. For volume production, the Tailor made alternative
of an insert that produces the complete
form of the groove should be considered as
this often halves the machining time.
The most common methods of roughmachining wide grooves, or turning between shoulders, are : multiple grooving,
plunge turning and ramping. A separate
nishing operation is usually required.

- If the width of the groove is smaller


than the depth, multiple grooving is the
most suitable method.
- If the width of the groove is larger than
the depth, plunge turning is the best
method.
- If the bar or component in question is
slender or weak, ramping is recommended.
For multiple grooving (step-over grooving)
cuts to make a wide groove, the widest
possible insert should be used and in
an alternative plunging-order. The best
chip-control and tool-life is obtained by
using an insert width leaving rings which
are then removed. The insert corner is
protected and chips are directed into the
middle of the chipbreaker. Recommended ring width is 0.6 to 0.8 times the

Multiple grooving, plunge turning and ramping are methods to make wide grooves.

B7

Turning

ves in workpiece materials with poorer


machinability.
To achieve the best roughing results in
the form of a at groove-bottom with the
best groove-side quality, see under Turning and Proling.

Plunge turning a wide groove.

B
Multiple grooving a wide groove.

Ramping of wide grooves, involves twice


the number of cuts but is suitable for
when the bar or component is slender or
weak. Radial forces are smaller, thus generating less vibration tendencies. Chip
control is also good and notch wear is
reduced especially when making groo-

insert width. It is often more suitable for


small batch production and face grooving. This is a exible method which is
quick to programme and geometry GM is
the rst choice for this method.
For plunge tuning of wide, shallow grooves, the axial turning depth should not be
larger than 0.75 times the insert width.
Geometries TF and TM are designed for
axial and radial feed directions and are
recommended for both plunging and ramping of grooves. Chip control is usually
advantageous. To improve the machining
process and tool-life, lower the cutting
forces prior to changing feed direction to
minimize vibration tendencies, stop the
feed in corners to minimize vibrations.
Strive to make use of the three edgezones (two sides and one end) of each
insert to maximize utilization.

B8

Turning operation.

Finish machining a wide groove.

To acheive the best nishing results,


care should be taken when machining
the corners of the groove. As the insert
cuts the radius of the corners, most of
the tool movement will be along the zaxis. This produces a very thin chip at
the front cutting edge which may lead to
rubbing instead of cutting and hence vibration tendencies. To prevent this, the
axial and radial depth of cut should be
0.5 1.0 mm and the rst cut should be
made into the groove, axially, where the
groove radius joins the at bottom. Then
optimize the process in relation to the
batch sizes. The Wiper effect generates
good surface nish with Ra values down
to 0.2 microns.

Turning

Circlip grooving
The need for circlips on shaft and axle
components is very common and there
are two systems suitable for these operations. Both systems have specic
widths for circlip grooves.
First choice is the three-edge T-Max U-Lock
154 system with groove widths of 1.15 to
4.15 mm for external and internal applications.

There is a tool cost advantage with the 3


cutting edges.

Second choice is the CoroCut 2 system


using the GF insert geometry with widths
1.85 to 5.15 mm for external applications.

Undercutting
Recesses for clearance, such as for subsequent grinding operations on various
shafts and axles, require dedicated inserts with round cutting edges that are
sharp and accurate. For this there are
small and large applications.
For the shallow recesses, CoroCut 1 or
2 with RO and RM insert geometries are
recommended.
For deeper recesses, T-Max Q-Cut system
with insert geometry 4U is recommended.

Circlip grooving with U-Lock (left) and CoroCut 2 (right).

C
Face grooving
Making grooves axially on the faces of
components requires tools dedicated for
the application. A face grooving tool has to
be made to clear the round groove which it
is making the toolholder has to be curved. Both the inner and outer diameter of
the groove needs to be taken into account
for the tool to be accommodated.
First-cut diameter ranges are indicated for
various tools. When a groove is machined
in several cuts, only the rst cut needs to
be considered as the tool is then accomodated to machine smaller groove diameters.

E
Facegrooving

For face grooving, the following general


points apply :

- minimize tool overhang to limit any


vibration tendencies
- keep the infeed rate low during the
rst cut to avoid chip jamming

LH

- start machining the largest diameter


and work inwards to obtain the best
chip control

- if chip control during rst cut is unsatisfactory, dwelling can be introduced.

RH
Undercutting

Choice of RH and LH tools


depending upon rotation.

B9

Turning

Wider face grooves can be


machined in different ways :

1. Roughing through multiple grooving


cuts, where 0.5 to 0.8 times the insert
width is used to open up the groove to
the required width after the rst cut. A
nishing cut can then be made along
the sides of the grooves and the groove bottom face.
The largest diameter should be cut
rst followed by work continuing inwards. The rst cut is with chip control but not chipbreaking. The following
cuts are with chipbreaking. When retracting, offset the insert slightly from
inner edge of groove.
2. The second roughing method involves
plunge cutting and nishing as in
the previous method. The axial depth
should not be deeper than 0.75 times
the insert width. A good indicator is
that if the groove is wider than it is
deep, plunge turning is recommended.
If the groove is deeper than it is wide,
multiple grooving is recommended.
3. Finishing can also be performed according to three cuts : cut 1 within
given diameter range and face towards
the radius; cut 2 nish outer diameter and radius and face inwards; cut 3
nish the inner diameter to the correct groove dimension.

2
3

2
1
3

If the outer side of the tool


blade rubs against the groove
side, make sure the tool is correctly
chosen for the diameter range in question, lift the tool slightly above the centre
line and make sure the tool is parallel to
the axis of rotation.
Toolholder selection is critical for face grooving from the CoroCut 1 and 2 systems as
well as T-Max Q-Cut and CoroCut SL. For
grooving depths of up to 4.5 mm, a special
toolholder for shallow face grooves should
be selected. Suitable inserts are grooving
and turning insert geometries type GM,

B 10

a possible solution, especially when the


tool overhang is 3-7 times the tool diameter. CoroCut SL is a good solution where
tool assemblies can be made to optimize
the application. Solid and tuned adaptors
are available within the SL-system.
CoroCut with dedicated insert geometries GF, GM, TM and TF are suitable for
internal grooving For smaller holes (diameters below 25 mm) the T-Max Q-Cut
151.3 system with insert geometry 4G
is recommended.

Different methods of making wide face grooves.

Multiple grooving or plunge grooving,


especially with narrow inserts, reduces
vibration tendencies when making wide
grooves. Finishing operations can then
be performed seperately.

If the inner side of the tool


blade rubs against the
groove side, make sure
it is the correctly chosen tool for the diameter range in question,
lower the tool slightly
below the centre-line
and make sure the tool
is parallel to the axis of
rotation.

Chip evacuation is facilitated by starting machining at the bottom of the


hole and machining outwards.
Use the best choice of right- or left-handed insert to direct chips especially in
roughing.

Facegrooving

TF and RM. For small rst cut diameters,


T-Max Q-Cut 7G and 7P are suitable.

Internal grooving
Most of the methods for external grooving can be applied to internal grooving.
Precautions may have to be considered,
as with boring in general, to ensure chip
evacuation and to minimize vibration tendencies. Tool size, overhang and set-up
should be optimized and tuned bars be

Internal grooving

Turning

B
Prole turning

Turning and proling

Modern parting and grooving tool systems can also perform turning operations for which there are dedicated insert
geometries. The stability of the CoroCut
system provides it with the capability
of machining at high cutting data even
when exposed to the radial forces during
axial turning.
When proling of various shapes is required, the CoroCut systems offers
scope for rationalization since one tool
can be used to replace right-hand and

left-hand conventional tools. The roundshape inserts have dedicated geometries for these operations, for instance
RM for medium feed rates and tougher
machining conditions; RO for stainless
steel and sticky workpiece materials and
AM, which is a sharp, positive proling
geometry for non-ferrous materials such
as aluminium. RE is recommended for
hard hard steels and RS for nishing
non-ferrous materials. The CoroCut system offers unique stability with the rail
seat design and the Wiper effect good
surface nish.

Tool deection always occurs to some


extent and some compensation may be
necessary for the difference in diameter
machined. The difference should be established and the tool drawn back so that
the correct diameter can be machined.
The adjoining diagram illustrates this process.
A screw-clamp toolholder should be selected for turning and proling operations
in view of achieving maximum stability. A
CoroCut or Q-Cut tool with the shortest
possible tool accessibility (ar) should be
applied (for Q-Cut holder type 22). If for
reasons of accessiblity this is not possible, apply a holder with a longer dimension (for Q-Cut holder type 23) with cutting data reduced accordingly.
A neutral CoroCut tool is suitable for
both opening up or completing a recess,
however, when machining with conventional tools a right- and left-hand tool is
required to achieve the same result.
In-copying is recommended to improve
chip control, minimize tool wear and to eliminate the tendency of the insert working
loose. To achieve perpendicular groove or
recess walls, radial plunging should be
carried out at each end, not one plunge
followed by turning and out-feeding.

Compensation on workpiece diameter.

B 11

Turning

When it comes to roughing, limiting deection is often an issue. Forces on the


insert should therefore be reduced prior
to changing direction of cut according to
the following sequence :

1. Infeed radially to the required depth of


cut (ap max 0.75 times insert width)
2. Retract radially 0.1 mm
3. Turn axially to opposite shoulder
position

4. Retract diagonally 0.5 mm to outside


the component
5. Feed axially to the end position (still
0.5 mm off the machined diameter)
6. Infeed radially to the required depth
of cut.

If a sufciently high feed is used with a


small D O C (or low feed and large D O C),
sufcient deection of the tool will take
place to provide the insert with the clearance needed at the front cutting edge.
But if both feed and D O C are below
recommended values, insert clearance
may be insufcient and rubbing take
place between insert and machined surface, giving rise to vibration tendencies
and poor surface nish.
A solution, therfore, may be to use insert
geoemtry TF, having a concave cutting
edge, which will minimize the contact
between insert and workpiece. Insert
geometries TF (lower feed), TM (higher
feed) and GF are designed to be used for
axial turning.

Retract radially 0.1 mm and continue the


sequence for subsequent roughing passes.
Turn axially in both directions to use both
corners of the insert and to maximize
tool-life.

to recommended levels should be used


to ensure the best cutting action.

The machining of a wide groove can be


performed using one tool, where two conventional tools might be needed. Care
should then be taken when machining the
bottom radius or chamfer. As the insert
contours the radius, most of the movement will be in the z-direction, which generates a thin chip at the front cutting edge.
This may lead to rubbing between tool and
component, rather than just cutting, and
consequently more wear and vibration
tendencies. Following the right sequence
will help to prevent this from occurring.
(See under nishing wide grooves).
When machining wide, shallow grooves
internally, the most suitable method is
to plunge turn. However, chip evacuation
needs attention, making sure that chips
are removed out of the hole and not jammed in the machining process. Chips
will always ow in the same direction as
the feed and it is therefore recommended that the direction of feed is always
towards the hole opening.
For shallow grooving with 166.0 toolholder, it is important that a shim giving an
inclination angle of zero degrees is used
in the toolholder. For machining small
holes with toolholders not having shims,
grooving bars 154.0 should be used.

B 12

Rough turning a wide groove.

Right-hand inserts can be used in righthand external and left-hand internal toolholders. Left-hand inserts can be used
in left-hand external and right-hand internal toolholders.
When it comes to axial turning with
CoroCut tools, the Wiper effect makes it
posible to generate a high surface nish
(Ra values smaller than 0.5 microns can
be achieved along with high bearing ratios). High feed rates and D O C according

When plunging into or proling corners


with round inserts, a phenomenon known
as wrap around is a problem that may occur. A large part of the cutting edge is engaged in cut which leads to considerable
pressure on the insert. If the feed rate
is reduced excessively, however, vibration
tendencies are generated. The problem
is usually solved by applying the smallest
possible insert radius in relation to the radius to be machined on the component.
A good starting point is for the feed rate
when plunging into the radius to be 50%
of that applied for the axial cut. If the insert radius has to be the same as that
of the workpiece, introduce micro-stops
(dwelling) which shortens chip length and
breaks any vibration tendencies.

Turning corners with round inserts.

fn1 = parallel cuts - max. chip thichness 0.15-0.40 mm


fn2 = radius plunging - 50% max. chip thickness

Solving wrap around effect in plunging.

Turning

Selecting tools for Parting and Grooving


How to choose your tool
1

Dene the type of operation and system to use


Identify the operation:
Parting
External or internal grooving, face grooving, shallow
grooving
External or internal turning
Undercutting, proling and choosing the most suitable
system for it.
(See Tool selection for parting and grooving tools)

Select the insert geometry and grade


Choose the insert geometry and grade.
Choose your insert size on the corresponding ordering
page.
(See Insert geometries and grades)

CoroCut XS

Select the tooling system and type of holder


Choose Coromant Capto or shank tool, depending on
clamping possibilities in turret/spindle.
Choose the right holder size on the corresponding
ordering page.
The insert seat must correspond to the size of the insert.
(See Selecting toolholder types)

Select cutting data


Find the recommended feed for selected insert chosen.
Choose the recommended cutting speed.
(See speed and feed recommendations for parting and
grooving geometries)

Tooling alternatives for Parting and Grooving


When parting and grooving the inserts are often fed deep into
the material, which sets high demands on accessibility. This
means that the tools used are generally narrow and therefore the

length of the tool increases as the diameter increases. Tools and


tooling systems with high stability is therefore important.

Conventional turrets
External

Coromant Capto integrated multi-task


machines

Blade
Shan

k too

Corom

ant C

apto

unit

Internal
ba

ro

rin
bo
nk
ha
ls

l,
r
ee
ba
st d
n tune
ing tor
i
r
r
bo ap
ba or
nk ad
ith ced
ha pto
w
r
s
o
l a
ad inf
ee C
he re
St ant
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d
an

B 13

Turning

Tool selection for parting and grooving tools


Tool system
Choice of tool holder

Parting

External grooving

Internal grooving

Face grooving

First choice

CoroCut 2-edge:
Cutting depths up to
20 mm
T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2):
Cutting depths above
20 mm
CoroCut 3 shallow cutting
depths -6.4mm

CoroCut 2-edge:
Cutting depths up to
20 mm

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.3):


Min bore 20 mm
CoroCut 2-edge:
Min bore 25 mm

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.3):


First cut diameter from
24 mm
CoroCut 2-edge:
First cut diameter from
34 mm

Alternative tools

CoroCut 1-edge:
Cutting depths above
20 mm

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2):


Cutting depths above
20 mm

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2):


Min bore 32 mm
T-MAX U-Lock:
Min bore 12 mm

CoroCut 1-edge:
Cutting depths above
20 mm

External turning

Internal turning

Undercutting

Proling

Shallow grooving

CoroCut 2-edge:
Cutting depths up to
20 mm
CoroCut 1-edge:
Cutting depths above
20 mm

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.3)


Min. bore 20 mm
CoroCut 1- and
2-edge:
Min. bore 25 mm

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2)

CoroCut 2-edge:
Cutting depths up to
20 mm
CoroCut 1-edge:
Cutting depths above
20 mm

CoroCut 2-edge
T-MAX U-Lock:
For circlip grooves

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2)

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2)


Min. bore 32 mm

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2)

T-MAX Q-Cut (151.2)

Grooving and turning as well as proling with CoroCut tools.

B 14

CoroCut 2-edge
shallow grooves

Turning

Selecting toolholder types


CoroCut 1- and 2-edge toolholders
F123

F123

F123

F123-S

F123
X123
short

F123
G123

AG123

AX123

F123
G123

long

Clamping system
Max. ar., mm

Spring/
screw

Screw

Screw

Screw

1555

816

1232

1017

Screw
4-25

Screw
3.58.0

Screw
4.5-13

Screw

Screw

12-28

Parting

Bars

Tubes

Grooving

Precision

Deep

Face grooving

Undercutting

Proling

Aluminium proling

Turning

Internal

Grooving
Turning
Proling

= Recommended tool

= Alternative tool

B 15

Turning

T-MAX Q-Cut toolholders


151.2

151.20

151.21

F151.22

F151.23

S151.22
AG151.32

AG151.22
short

AG551.31
0,90

F151.37

AF151.37
151.21

F151.42

Screw

Screw

long

A
Spring/
screw

Spring

Spring

Screw

Screw

35-100

13-45

15-32

816

1532

Screw
-

Screw

Spring

Screw

3.512

3.519.5

8.720

5.315

18

B 16

= Recommended tool

= Alternative tool

Turning

CoroCut family toolholders


There is a wide range of tool holders in the CoroCut family, both
Coromant Capto cutting units and conventional shank holders,
and blades for parting. One advantage with the CoroCut family
system is the good accessibility. In many cases one CoroCut
holder can replace two or more conventional turning holders
thus increasing the productivity.

Spring clamp blades and shank for parting

The insert seat size of the holder should correspond with the
seat size on the insert; every holder can take all the different
insert geometries available.

B
0, 7, 45 and 70 shank style screw clamp holders for different applications

C
Bars and cutting head for internal applications

Choosing the right holder for face grooving


The adjoining diagram indicates the right type of tool for different face grooving applications.

E
0 and 90 screw clamp holders and 0 bars for face grooving

CoroCut and Q-Cut external holders for face grooving are available in B-curved design as stocked item. A-curved design can be
ordered as Tailor Made.

F
0

90
B

B
90

A
A

B
B

A
R

R
0

R = right hand holder


L = left hand holder
A = A-curved
B = B-curved

B 17

Turning

CoroCut SL - external machining


CoroCut SL blades

T-Max Q-Cut SL
151.2

CoroCutSL
SL blades
blades
CoroCut

CoroTurn SL adaptors

Right hand

Left hand

Right hand

Left hand

CoroCut SL
123

CoroCut
SL 123

T-Max Q-Cut
SL 151.2

A
Coromant
Capto 0

Coromant
Capto 45

Shank 0

Shank 0
Neutral

Coromant
Capto 45

Coromant
Capto 0

B
Shank 90

Coromant
Capto 90

Coromant
Capto 90

Face grooving
blades

Face grooving
blades

CoroCut SL - internal machining


E
CoroTurn SL

Adaptors
Existing 570 bars

CoroTurn SL

Left hand

Neutral

Right hand

Coromant
Capto 90

Coromant
Capto 90

Coromant
Capto 90

Boring bar
90

G
CoroCut SL blades

CoroCut SL blades
Left hand

T-Max Q-Cut
SL 151.3

B 18

Right hand

Existing 570-cutting
heads

CoroCut SL
123

CoroCut SL
123

T-Max Q-Cut SL
151.3

Turning

Recommendations when choosing CoroCut SL cutting blades


CoroCut SL cutting blades with a screw
clamp design, should be the rst choice
for all types of grooving and parting operations. By using CoroCut 1-2 edge solution there is access to insert geometries
and grades for all types of operations
and work piece materials.

T-Max Q-Cut SL 151.3 system with its


new screw clamp design is an option for
internal operations especially in small
bores.

Combination

R
R
R
L
L
L
L
L
R
R

Combination of Cutting blade and Adaptor:

T-Max Q-Cut SL 151.2 system with a


spring clamp design, is a good choice for
deep grooving and parting operations.

Recommended
tool

Alternative tool

Not
recommended

Adaptor

570-25R..
570-32R..
570-40R..
570-25L..
570-32L..
570-40L..
570-25L..
570-32L..
570-25R..
570-32R..

Blade

C?-570-25-LF
C?-570-32-LF
C?-570-40-LF
C?-570-25-RF
C?-570-32-RF
C?-570-40-RF
C?-570-25-LX-045
C?-570-32-LX-045
C?-570-25-RX-045
C?-570-32-RX-045

B
Parting, grooving, proling, turning
CoroCut -SL
123

Q-Cut -SL
151.2

Face grooving

Q-Cut -SL
151.3

CoroCut -SL
123

Q-Cut -SL
151.3

C
Clamping system
Coupling diameter, mm
Max. ar, mm
Insert width,mm
Min. internal diameter, mm
Parting

Normal
Deep

Grooving
Proling
Turning

Face grooving
1) First cut
diameter- min. max.

Internal

Grooving
Proling

Screw clamp

Spring clamp

Screw clamp

Screw clamp

Screw clamp

25. 32. 40

25. 32. 40

25. 32. 40

32

32

12 23

20 35

6 13

12 18

8.7 10.7

1.5 7.14

2.0 8.0

2.0 8.0

2.5 6.0

2.5 5.0

4001

701

115 175

35.8 51.6

40

24

B 19

Turning

Cutting depth limitation for re-inforced CoroCut blades


Due to re-inforcement of the blade the max. cutting depth is
dependent on the work piece diameter. See adjoining diagram.
Spring clamp blades

Screw clamp blades

Work piece diameter, mm

Dm

300

300
N123D15-21A2
N123E15-21A2

250

Work piece diameter, mm

Dm

200

200

150

150

100

100

ar

ar
10

15

Max. cutting depth

10

15

20

25

Max. cutting depth

32

Shallow grooving holder for face grooving


Holder
seat
size

R/L123H25-25B1

50

50
5

R/L123E25-25B1
R/L123F25-25B1
R/L123G25-25B1

250

Insert seat
size

G
K

First cut
diameter, mm

Max cutting
depth, mm

Min Max

E
F
G
H
J
K

100
83
57
46
46
46

First cut diameters


123 -GM, -TF, -CM
-RM, -TM

min.
max.

3.5
3.5
3.5
4.5
4.5
4.5

Select correct width, geometry and system for parting of


F

Parting of tubes

Parting of bars
Component
dia, mm

Insert width, Insert


geometry
la, mm

<8
812
1216
1624
2432
3240
4048
4856

1
1.5
2
2.5
3
4
5
6

B 20

CM/CS
CM
CM
CR
CR
CR
4E
4E

Tool
system

CoroCut3
CoroCut 2&3
CoroCut 2
CoroCut 2
CoroCut 2
CoroCut 2
T-Max Q-Cut
T-Max Q-Cut

Feed
start value,
mm/r

0.05
0.07
0.08
0.08
0.12
0.15
0.18
0.20

Component
wall thickness, mm

Insert width, Insert


geometry
la, mm

<4
4 6
6 8
812
1216
1620
2024
2428

1
1.5
2
2.5
3
4
5
6

CM/CS
CM
CM
CR
CR
CR
4E
4E

Tool
system

CoroCut3
CoroCut 2&3
CoroCut 2
CoroCut 2
CoroCut 2
CoroCut 2
T-Max Q-Cut
T-Max Q-Cut

Feed
start value,
mm/r

0.05
0.07
0.08
0.08
0.12
0.15
0.18
0.20

Turning

Parting and grooving insert geometries and grades


Geometries
Application

Low feed

CoroCut
2

Medium feed

Q-Cut
151.2

CoroCut
2

CoroCut
3

Parting
bars

CF

7E

tubes

CF

7E

CM

High feed

Q-Cut
151.2

CM

5E

CM

5E

CoroCut
2

Optimizing

CoroCut
2

Q-Cut
151.2

Q-Cut
151.2

4E

CR

A
5F

9E

9E

CS

CS
Turning

Proling

TF

7G

TM

5T

RE

E-P

RM

5P

GF

4G

GM

5G

GE

E-G

RS

F-P

AM

151.4
AL

4T

RO

4P

Grooving

6G

Al proling
4U
Undercutting
TF

CM

151.3
7G

RM

151.3
7P

Face grooving
1)

1)

151.3
4G

151.3
7G

1)

1)

151.3
7P

Internal
1)

Internal machining with CoroCut inserts

Grades

Steel
Stainless steel
Cast iron
Aluminum and non-ferrous
materials
ISO S = Heat resistant super alloys
ISO H = Hardened materials

ISO-M

ISO-K

ISO-N

ISO-S

ISO-H

Wear resistance

Stable
CD10

S05F

GC
3115

GC
3115

H10

GC
1005

GC
4025

GC
4025

H13A

H13A

GC
4125

GC
4125

GC
2135

GC
2135

GC
2135

GC
2145

GC
2145

GC
2145

GC
4125

GC
4125

CB20

Conditions

ISO P =
ISOM =
ISO K =
ISO N =

ISO-P

Toughness

The CoroCut family has different carbide


grades to cover all types of workpiece materials from the very wear resistant grade
GC3115 to the toughest grade on the market GC2145. Cubic Boron Nitride and Diamond tipped inserts are also available.

Unstable

B 21

Turning

The Wiper effect with CoroCut


Surface nish in axial turning

When using geometries -TF or -TM in axial turning operations,


the wiper effect will generate much better surface nish (A)
compared to conventional tools (B). This wiper effect, generated by tilting the insert, makes it possible to increase the feed,
which results in a productivity increase.
Results from surface nish measurements from axial turning
in steel with geometries -TF and -TM are shown in the graphs
below.

CoroCut -TF

Zv
Rmax

fn

CoroCut -TM

Cutting depth, ap: 1.5 mm


Material: Steel, CMC 01.2

ap

fn

Cutting depth, ap: 1.5 mm


Material: Steel, CMC 01.2
-TM. Corner radius 0.8 mm.

-TF. Corner radius 0.4 mm.


Surface nish
Ra, m

ap

Rmax

Surface nish
Ra, m

Conventional tool.
Corner radius 0.4 mm.

2.5

2.5

1.5

1.5

0.5

0.5

Conventional tool.
Corner radius 0.8 mm.

0
0

0.1

0.15

0.2

0.25

0.3

0.1

0.15

0.2

0.3

0.25

Feed (fn) mm/rev

Feed (fn) mm/rev

E
insert with Wiper technology
r = 0.4 mm

Surface nish in parting and grooving


F

The Wiper is designed to work with radial feed (axial feed when
facegrooving). The main benet is much better surface nish
on the component (see graph below). The CoroCut 1 -2 edge
system is a system for high pruductivity parting and grooving
operations. The CoroCut insert geometries -CF and -TF, as well
as the T-MAX Q-Cut geometries -7E and -7G, are using the Wiper
technology giving much better better surface nish in parting
and single groove operations.

insert without Wiper technology


r = 0.4 mm

Surface nish
Ra, m

1.2
1.0
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2

= Wiper effect

0.05

0.1

0.15

0.2

Feed (fn) mm/rev

B 22

Turning

Parting and grooving grades


Parting off
Bars

Tubes

Turning

Proling

Security

Productivity

2135

4125

2145

2135

4125

4025

4125

4025

2135

4125

4025

3115

4125

4025

2135

4125

4025

3115

H13A

H10

H13A

1005

4125

4025

4125

1005

4125

4025

H13A

CD10

1005

S05F

Grade GC3115
Based on a hard substrate, MT-CVD coated with TiCN-Al2O3 layer.
A high wear resistant grade for grooving and turning applications
under stable conditions. Also effective in hard steels. High cutting
speeds.
Grade GC4025 rst choice for cast iron
Based on a hard gradient sintered substrate, MT-CVD coated with
TiCN-Al2O3-TiN layer. An all-round grade for ISO-P and ISO-K with
excellent combination of high wear resistance and good edge security. To be used in grooving, turning and parting-off operations
under stable conditions. Medium to high cutting speeds.
Grade GC4125 rst choice for steel
A ne grained substrate, PVD-coated with TiAlN layer. An excellent
all-round grade in all ISO-areas. First choice for parting-off tubes,
grooving and turning operations and works well in low-carbon and
other smearing materials. Low to medium cutting speeds.
Grade GC2135 rst choice for stainless steel
A MT-CVD-coated grade with TiCN-Al2O3-TiN layer. A grade for
toughness demanding operations such as parting-off to centre
and interrupted cuts. Low to medium cutting speeds.

CB20

Grooving

4125

4025

4125

1005

4125

3115

H13A
4125

1005

CB20

Aluminium
proling

H10

CD10

Undercutting

235

H13A

Face
grooving

4125

4025

2135

4125

4025

3115

H13A
H13A
CB20

1005

Grade GC2145
The markets toughest substrate, PVD coated with TiAlN layer.
For extremely toughness demanding operations, such as interrupted cuts and parting-off to centre. Low cutting speeds.
Grade H13A rst choice for non-ferrous materials
Uncoated carbide grade. Good wear resistance and toughness
combined with edge sharpness. To be used in non-ferrous and
titanium materials.
Grade H10
Uncoated carbide grade. Good edge sharpness for use in aluminium alloys and Heat Resistant Super Alloys (HRSA).

Grade GC1005 rst choice for HRSA


A ne grained carbide substrate, PVD coated with TiN-TiAlN layer.
A wear resistant grade combined with sharp edges. To be used
for nishing with close tolerances in HRSA and stainless steel.
Grade S05F
MT-CVD-coated TiCN-Al2O3-TiN layer with a ne grained carbide
substrate. For roughing to nishing in HRSA-materials.
Grade CD10 rst choice for nishing aluminium
A polycrystalline diamond (PCD) grade. An extremely wear resistant grade giving very good surface nish. To be used only for
non-ferrous materials.
Grade CB20 rst choice for hardened materials
A cubic boron nitride (CBN) grade. A wear resistant grade. To
be used for machining of hardened materials, with limited feed
and depth of cut. Eliminates grinding operations.

B 23

Turning

Feed recommendations for parting and grooving geometries


Parting
-CF

Radial feed

Stainless steels and sticky materials


Very good chip control at low feeds.
The positive geometry eliminates the risk of built up edges.
Gives soft cutting action.
Generates good surface nish, due to wiper design on the side.
Available as CoroCut 2-edged inserts.

Insert width (la), mm

Low feed choice

4.0
3.0
2.5

Wi p e r
-CM

B
Medium feed choice

0.05 0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r


Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Parting off stainless steels


Also recommended for thin walled tubes and small diameter components in all materials.
The positive geometry eliminates the risk of built up edges.
Low cutting forces resulting in reduced vibrations.
Available as CoroCut 1- and 2-edged inserts.

5.0
4.0
3.0
2.5
2.0

0.05 0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r

-CR

Rough machining
Strong cutting edges, reduce risk of edge fractures.
Suitable for parting off bars and interrupted cuts.
For steel and cast iron, but also suitable for stainless steels when there
is a need for strong edges.
Available as CoroCut 1- and 2-edged inserts.

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

High feed choice

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.5
0.05 0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r

-CM

Radial feed

First choice for shallow parting and grooving


First choice in most materials
Sharp edge line, chip breaking geometry
To be used at normal cutting speeds 100 250 m/min

Insert width (la), mm

Feed (fn), mm/r

-CS

First choice for shallow parting and grooving at low speeds


For sticky materials and ball bearing materials
Extremely sharp edge line with an open chip former
To be used in multi-spindle machines at low cutting speeds
50 m/min
To be used for non-ferrous materials at normal cutting speeds
100 250 m/min
Right (R) or left (L) hand inserts to bee used for pip and burr free
machining

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

= low cutting speed

Feed (fn), mm/r


Radial feed

-CS

= high cutting speed

Ideal solution for minimising pips and burrs on components thanks


to the sharp cutting edge and front angles of 10 and 15.

Insert width (la), mm

Recommended for small components.


Suitable for free cutting steel.

Feed (fn), mm/r

B 24

Turning

Grooving
-GF

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap ), mm

8.00

Low feed choice

8.0
6.0

5.00

3.0

4.0

4.00
3.00

2.0

2.00
1.50

3.0

-GM

la

4.0

6.00

1.0

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4


Feed (fn), mm/r

2.0

0.05

0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35


Feed (fn), mm/r

Radial feed

Grooving in all materials


Outstanding chip control.
Reduces chip width giving good surfaces.
Available as CoroCut 2-edged inserts.

Insert width (la), mm

Medium feed choice

For precision grooves


Good accuracy and repeatability due
to tight tolerances on inserts.
Low cutting forces and good surface
nishing due to sharp cutting edge.
Large number of different widths.
Designed for side turning.
Available as CoroCut 1- and
2-edged inserts.

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0

C
0.05 0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r

-GE

Cubic Boron Nitride


tipped

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Alternative for nish grooving of hardened materials


Maintains close tolerances and gives excellent nish on components.
Available as CoroCut 1-edged inserts.

8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
0

0.05

0.1

0.15

0.2

Feed (fn), mm/r

Proling
-RM

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Axial feed
Cutting depth (ap), mm

8.0

Medium feed choice

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

4
3

8.0

6.0

5.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

4.0
3.0

1
0

-RE

la

Excellent for proling in all materials


Outstanding chip control even at low
feeds and small depths of cut.
Good surface nish.
Available as CoroCut 1 and 2-edged
inserts.

G
0

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm


5

Feed (fn), mm/r


Alternative for nish proling of
hardened materials
Gives outstanding productivity and
exceptional surface nish.
Available as CoroCut 1- edged inserts.

Cubic Boron Nitride


tipped

la
8.0

2 6.0
5.0

1 4.0
Feed (fn), mm/r

3.0

0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

B 25

Turning

-RO

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm

8.00

8.0

3.0

5.00
4.00
3.00
2.00

la

3.5

6.00

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4


Feed (fn), mm/r

Excellent for proling in stainless


steel
HRSA and other sticky materials.
Outstanding chip control at low
feeds and small depths of cut.
Good surface nish. Sharp cutting
edge.
Available as CoroCut 2- edged inserts.

2.5

6.0

2.0

5.0

1.5

4.0

3.0

0.5

2.0

0
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Feed (fn), mm/r

Proling
-RS

Radial feed

Alternative for nish proling of


non-ferrous materials.
Gives outstanding productivity and
exceptional surface nish.
For use under stable conditions.
Available as CoroCut 1-edged inserts.

Axial feed
Cutting depth (ap), mm

Insert width (la), mm

Diamond tipped

8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

la

8.0

3 6.0
5.0

2 4.0
0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

3.0

Feed (fn), mm/r

0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.35 0.3 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

Aluminium proling
-AM

Radial feed

8.0
6.0

la

8.0

3
0

First choice for proling in


non-ferrous materials
Good chip ow giving good surface
nish.
Sharp cutting edge.
Available as CoroCut 2-edged inserts.

Axial feed
Cutting depth (ap), mm

Insert width (la), mm

0.1

0.2

0.3

6.0

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r

1
0

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Feed (fn), mm/r

Turning and plunge turning


-TF

Low feed choice

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm
8.0

Axial feed
Cutting depth (ap), mm
5

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

la
6.0

5.0

0.05

Wip er

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r

8.0

The excellent choice for plunge


turning
Suitable for all turning operations in
stainless steels.
The positive geometry eliminates the
risk of built up edges.
Good chip control and surface nish.
Wiper design on the side.
Available as CoroCut 1- and 2-edged
inserts.

2 4.0
3.0

1
0
0

0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

B 26

Turning

-TM

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Axial feed
Cutting depth (ap), mm
5

8.0

Medium feed choice

la

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

General turning operations


The positive geometry eliminates the
risk of built up edges.
Available as CoroCut 2-edged inserts.

8.0

6.0

5.0

4.0
3.0

2
0.05

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r

0
0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

Parting
-4E

Radial feed

First choice for parting off bars


Strong geometry ideal for interrupted cuts.
For parting off steel and cast iron.

Insert width (la), mm

High feed choice

8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.5
0

-5E

Medium feed choice

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r


First choice for parting off tubes
Particularly recommended for thin walled tubes and small diameter components in all materials.
Generates low cutting forces and hence little vibration.
For parting off stainless steel.

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.5
2.0
0

-5F

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r


Optimizer to minimize pips and burrs on components due to
sharp cutting edge, with a wide choice of front angles
Recommended for stainless steels, ductile and work hardening
materials.

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

5.0
4.0
3.0
2.5
2.0

Low feed choice

Wip er
-9E

F
0

-7E

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Feed (fn), mm/r


Alternative for good chip control at low feeds
Soft cutting action.
Low cutting forces.
Generates good surface nish, due to Wiper design.
Very good chip control.

4.0
3.0
2.5
0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

Optimizer for ball bearing operations and long chipping


materials
Good chip control giving a high productive and problem-free
production.

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm
4.0
3.0
2.5
0

0.1

0.2

Feed (fn), mm/r

B 27

Turning

Grooving
-5G

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Medium feed choice

8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
0

-4G

(N151.2)

B
Low feed choice

First choice for general purpose grooving.


Outstanding chip control.
Reduces chip width giving good surfaces.
For grooving in all materials

0.1

0.2

0.3

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Alternative choice for precision grooving.


Good accuracy and repeatability due to tight tolerances on
insert.
Low cutting forces and good chip control in a wide range
of materials.
Sharp cutting edge.

10.0
8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
0

0.1

0.2

0.3

C
-6G

0.4
0.5
Feed (fn), mm/r

0.4
0.5
Feed (fn), mm/r

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Alternative choice when chip control is of prime importance


at high production rates.
Particularly recommended for mass production operations, e.g.
cam shaft production.

8.0
6.0

High feed choice

E-G

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4
0.5
Feed (fn), mm/r

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Cubic Boron Nitride


tipped

Alternative for nish grooving of hardened materials.


Maintains close tolerances and gives excellent nish on
components.

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

0.05

0.1

0.15

0.2
0.25
Feed (fn), mm/r

Internal grooving
-4G

(N151.3)

G
Low feed choice

These inserts can only be


used with holders type
F151.37 or bars type
AG151.32

B 28

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Alternative choice for internal grooving of smallest bores.


Good accuracy and repeatability due to tight tolerances on
insert.
Low cutting forces and good chip control in a wide range of
materials.
Sharp cutting edge.

8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4
0.5
Feed (fn), mm/r

Turning

Face grooving
-7G

(N151.3)

Medium feed
choice

Axial feed

Radial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm

6.0

5.0

la

6.0
5.0

4.0

4.0
3.0

Wi p e r

0.05

These inserts can only be


used with holders type
F151.37 or bars type
AG151.32

0.1

0.15

0.2

0.25
0.3
Feed (fn), mm/r

= Axial feed, approx. range, mm/r, rst cut

First choice for face


grooving.
Good chip control both
when cutting rst groove
and opening up. Smaller
diameter grooves can be
cut. Excellent stability.
For face grooving in all
materials.

3.0

1
0

0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

First choice for internal


turning/grooving
Good chip control.
Generates good surface
nish, due to Wiper design.

Feed (fn), mm/r

= Axial feed, approx. range, mm/r, opening cut

B
-7P

(N151.3)

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm

For proling in face grooving


operations.
Good chip control both axial and
radial direction.
Well suited also for internal proling
operations.

5
These inserts
can only be used
with holders type
F151.37 or bars type
AG151.32

6.0

5.0
4.0

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

3.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

Feed (fn), mm/r

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Feed (fn), mm/r

Proling
-5P

Medium feed
choice

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm


5

8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

First choice for proling in all


materials.
Outstanding chip control even at low
feeds and small depths of cut.
Generates good surface nish.
For proling in all materials.

la

8.0

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Feed (fn), mm/r

1
0

F
0

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Feed (fn), mm/r

-4P

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm

10.0
8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

la

10.0

8.0

0.1

0.2 0.3 0.4


Feed (fn), mm/r

6.0

5.0
4.0

3.0

Optimizer for proling and turning


in stainless steels and heat resistant
materials where there is a risk of
built-up edges forming.
Generates excellent surface nish.
Diamond coated (grade CD1810) is a
good alternative for nish proling of
non-ferrous materials.Recommended
for stainless steels and heat resistant
materials.

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7

0.8 0.9 1.0

Feed (fn), mm/r

B 29

Turning

Proling
F-P

Radial feed

Axial feed
Cutting depth (ap), mm

Insert width (la), mm

Alternative for nish proling of


non-ferrous materials.
Gives outstanding productivity and
exceptional surface nish.
For use under stable conditions.

Diamond tipped

6.0
5.0
4.0

la

3 6.0
5.0

2 4.0
0

0.1

0.2 0.3 0.4


Feed (fn), mm/r

0
0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

E-P

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm

Alternative for nish proling of


hardened materials.
Gives outstanding productivity and
exceptional surface nish.

Cubic Boron
Nitride tipped

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

4
3

la

2 6.0
5.0

0 0.05

0.1 0.15 0.2


Feed (fn), mm/r

1 4.0
3.0

0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

D
-AL (N151.4)

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm

First choice for proling in nonferrous materials.


Good chip ow giving good surface
nish.
Extra long cutting head gives excellent
accessibility.
Gives unrivalled tool life and cutting
economy when using diamond coated
grade CD1810.

5
la

8.0
6.0

These inserts
can only be used
with holders type
F151.42

8.0

6.0

2
0

0.1

0.2 0.3 0.4


Feed (fn), mm/r

0
0

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Feed (fn), mm/r

Circlip grooving
G

R-/L154.0G

Radial feed

Alternative for good economy when grooving


circlips.
High productivity and reliability through low cutting
forces and little vibration.
Three cutting edges give good economy.
Recommended for use in all materials.

Insert width (la), mm

4.15
3.15
2.15

1.10
0

0.1

0.2

0.3

Feed (fn), mm/r

B 30

Turning

Turning
-5T

Radial feed

Axial feed

Insert width (la), mm

Cutting depth (ap), mm

First choice for high productive


turning with Q-Cut.
Good chip control.
Versatile - one insert can replace two
conventional (one left and one right
hand).

Medium feed choice

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0

la

3 6.0
5.0

2 4.0
0

0.1

0.2

0.3

Feed (fn), mm/r

1
0

3.0

0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

-4T

Radial feed
Insert width (la), mm

Axial feed

Alternative, especially for turning


with high feeds.
Good chip control.
Versatile-one insert can replace two
conventional. (one left and one right
hand)

Cutting depth (ap), mm

High feed choice

6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
0

0.1

0.2
0.3
Feed (fn), mm/r

la

6.0

5.0
4.0

3.0

1
0

0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5

Feed (fn), mm/r

Undercutting
-4U

For the turning of reliefs and undercuts.


Large clearance angle permits undercutting of smaller
diameters down to 23 mm.

Insert width (la), mm


8.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0

E
0

0.1

0.2
0.3
Feed (fn), mm/r

Blanks for grooving inserts


-4B

Blanks for do-it-yourself grinding of inserts for grooving.


Good chip control and low cutting forces.
Recommended for most materials.

-3B

Alternative blanks for do-it-yourself grinding of inserts for


grooving.
Larger than -4B. Recommended when -4B is too small.
Recommended for most materials.

H
Straight blanks for Do it yourself grinding are
available in 9 widths from 2.3 up to 11.6 mm.
These blanks have a at top which allows grinding
to many different shapes.

Straight insert blank.

90 blanks in R/L versions are also available,


mainly for use in the aerospace industry.

90 angled insert blank.

B 31

Turning

Cutting speed for parting and grooving tools

The recommendations are valid for use with cutting uid.

Note! For internal grooving, facegroving and undercutting the speed shouuld be reduced by 30-40 %.
ISO

CMC
No

Material

Spe-cic
cutting
force kc
0.4

Hardness
Brinell

A
CT525

GC3115

GC3020

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.5
N / mm

STEEL

ISO

C = 0.1 0.25 %
C = 0.25 0.55 %
C = 0.55 0.80 %

2000
2100
2180

125
150
170

235 170
220 155
210 145

355 185
330 140
300 125

355 185
330 140
300 125

02.1
02.2
02.2

Low-alloy 5 %

Non-hardened
Hardened and tempered
Hardened and tempered

2100
2775
2775

180
275
350

205 145
185 120
150 100

290 135
270 105
220 85

290 135
270 105
220 85

03.11
03.21

High-alloy >5%

Annealed
Hardened tool steel

2500
3750

200
325

130 100
80 55

260 115
205 75

260 115
205 75

06.1
06.2
06.3
06.33

Castings

Unalloyed
Low-alloy (alloying elements 5%)
High-alloy, alloying elements > 5%)
Manganese steel, 1214% Mn

1800
2100
2500
3600

180
200
225
250

150 100
135 85
115 70
75 50

175
200
160
90

175
200
160
90

CMC
No

Material

Spe-cic
cutting
force kc
0.4

Hardness
Brinell

GC1005

HB

CT525

GC1015

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

Cutting speed vc, m / min

Ferritic/
martensitic

Free machining steel


Non-hardened
PH-hardened
Hardened

2100
2300
3500
2800

200
200
330
330

400 175
215 95
255 110

250 180
195 135
135 95
150 100

190 140
140 105
100 75
110 80

05.20
05.21
05.22
05.23

Austenitic

Free machining steel


Austenitic
PH-hardened
Super austenitic

2300
2600
3500
3000

200
180
330
200

435 190
235 100
260 115

230 160
190 130
115 80
130 90

130
105
85
70

90
70
60
49

05.51
05.52

Austenitic-ferritic
(Duplex)

Non-weldable
Weldable

2600
3000

230
260

335 145
300 130

115
90

90
70

100
50

65
29

15.11
15.12
15.13

Ferritic/
martensitic

Non-hardened
PH-hardened
Hardened

2100
3200
2600

200
330
330

165 115

120

90

75

80

60

15.21
15.22

Austenitic

Austenitic
PH-hardened

2300
3200

180
330

160 110
95 65

115
70

90
55

15.51
15.52

Austenitic-ferritic
(Duplex)

Non-weldable
Weldable

2300
2700

230
260

100
80

85
44

60
26

Cast

Bars/forged

05.10
05.11
05.12
05.13

ISO

CMC
No

Material

0.05%C
< 0.05%C

0.05%C
< 0.05%C

Spe-cic
cutting
force kc
0.4

Hardness
Brinell

110

GC1015

N / mm2

K
CAST
IRON

B 32

HB

80
60

GC3115

GC3020

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.5

75
90
75
48

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.5

N / mm2

75
90
75
48

STAINLESS STEEL

Cutting speed vc, m / min

Unalloyed

HB

01.1
01.2
01.3

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

Cutting speed vc, m / min

07.1
07.2

Malleable

Ferritic (short chipping)


Pearlitic (long chipping)

950
1100

130
230

110
75

95
60

340 170
250 115

230 120
180 85

08.1
08.2

Grey

Low tensile strength


High tensile strength

1100
1290

180
220

90
85

70
65

290 140
250 120

250 105
205 100

09.1
09.2

Nodular SG iron

Ferritic
Pearlitic

1050
1750

160
250

75
65

60
48

260 115
205 100

180
150

85
85

Turning

A
GC4025

GC4125

GC2135

GC235

GC2145

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

Cutting speed vc, m/min


325 175
300 135
280 120

255 125
230 100
205 90

205 100
180 75
175 70

165 130
150 120
140 105

175
160
150

90
65
60

270 125
260 95
210 75

205
175
140

95
80
65

175
155
125

80
70
55

140 110
120 85
95 70

155
140
115

75
60
49

250 105
185 70

180
130

80
55

155
105

70
43

70
45

60
33

140
95

65
37

160
180
100
80

120
140
105
60

60
75
45
35

105
120
90
50

50
60
40
29

100
90
80
100

70
55
47
80

95
110
80

45
55
35

65
80
75
42

H13A

GC4125

GC2135

GC235

GC2145

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.5

Cutting speed vc, m/min


120
90
60
70

90
70
40
50

175
165
130
140

75
75
60
65

155
145
110
120

65
65
46
50

170 130
130 100
90 70
100 75

140
130
100
110

55
50
40
45

120
100
49
65

80
65
33
44

205
185
130
140

85
90
60
65

170
165
105
115

75
70
49
55

150 110
125 95
75 55
85 65

160
140
95
105

70
55
44
49

155
130

75
60

135
110

60
50

125
95

95
70

125
100

50
45

75

60

150

70

130

60

110

85

120

47

50

38

125

55

110

46

70

55

100

40

70
43

47
29

160
105

80
55

135
90

60
44

105
65

80
49

125
80

50
38

135
110

65
55

115
95

55
45

110
85

85
60

105
80

47
39

H13A

GC4025

GC4125

0.05- 0.5

0.05- 0.5

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.5

Cutting speed vc, m/min


100
70

85
55

300 160
220 100

220 110
150
85

80
80

65
60

260 125
225 110

180
150

95
80

70
60

55
44

240 105
190 90

160
130

85
65

B 33

Turning

The recommendations are valid for use with cutting uid.


Note! For internal grooving, facegroving and undercutting the speed shouuld be reduced by 30-40 %.
ISO

CMC
No

Material

Specic
cutting
force kc
0.4

Hardness
Brinell

CD10

CD1810

H10

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.5
N / mm2

N
Non-ferrous
material

ISO

30.11

Aluminium alloys

30.12

Heat resistant
super alloys

60

2000 465

2500 150

2400 715

Wrought or wrought and aged

800

100

2000 465

2500 150

805 275

750
900

75
90

2000 465
2000 465

2500 150
2500 150

825 275
510 200

700
700
1750

110
90
100

800 325
795 325
400 185

800 150
800 150
400 150

Aluminium alloys

Cast, non ageing


Cast or cast and aged

33.1
33.2
33.3

Copper and
copper alloys

Free cutting alloys, 1% Pb


Brass, leaded bronzes, 1% Pb
Bronze and non-leadad copper incl. electrolytic
copper

Material

Specic
cutting
force kc
0.4

Hardness
Brinell

H10

GC1005

Titanium

ISO

N / mm2

HB

0.05- 0.3

Cutting speed vc, m/min


180 120
150 100

Annealed or solution treated


Aged or solution treated and aged

3000
3100

200
280

20.21
20.22

Nickel base

Annealed or solution treated


Aged or solution treated and aged

3320
3600

250
350

90
80

55
50

100
90

60
55

Cast or cast and aged

3700

320

70

46

80

50

90
80
70

60
50
46

100
90
80

65
55
50

20.24

20.31
20.32
20.33

Cobalt base

Annealed or solution treated


Solution treated and aged
Cast or cast and aged

3300
3750
3800

200
300
320

23.1

Titanium Commercial
pure1)

(99.5% Ti)

1530

400

23.21
23.22

Titanium alloys1)

, near and + alloys, annealed + alloys


in aged cond, alloys, annealed or aged

1675
1690

950
1050

Specic
cutting
force kc
0.4

Hardness
Brinell

CMC
No

Material

04.1
10.1

Extra hard steel


Chilled

Hardened and tempered


Cast or cast and aged

Hardened
material
1)
2)

Positive cutting geometry and coolant should be used.


Rm = ultimate tensile strength measured in MPa.

B 34

200 130
165 110

Iron base

190 160

80
70

65
55

CB20

CC670

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.1

0.05- 0.3

20.11
20.12

0.05- 0.1

N / mm

HB

Cutting speed vc, m/min

5400
2750

60 HRC
400

130 125
200 195

S05F

Feed fn, mm/r

Rm2)

0.05- 0.5

500

0.05- 0.3

0.05- 0.5

Cutting speed vc, m/ min

Wrought or wrought and coldworked, non ageing

30.21
30.22

CMC
No

HB

110 100
110 100

Turning

H13A

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05-

0.5

Cutting speed vc, m / min


995 585

420 235

995 585
650 360
300 175
200 115
150 90

C
H13A

GC4125

GC2135

GC235

GC2145

CC670

Feed fn, mm/r


0.05- 0.3

0.05- 0.3

0.05- 0.3

0.05- 0.3

0.05- 0.3

0.05- 0.1

Cutting speed vc, m / min

50
40

37
26

70
50

38
29

50
40

29
26

50
40

37
26

40
30

30
20

30
20

23
13

45
40

28
22

40
35

26
21

30
20

23
13

25
15

20
10

600 500
500 400

20

13

30

16

25

10

20

13

15

10

250 200

35
23
20

27
15
13

50
40
30

33
22
16

45
35
25

28
17
14

35
23
20

27
15
13

30
20
15

20
10
10

410 340
350 300
320 250

175 145

200

95

70
65

38
33

70
65

60
55

G
Feed fn, mm/r
Cutting speed vc, m / min

B 35

Turning

Application hints for parting and grooving


General
Insert clamping in toolholder
A

The CoroCut family has two different insert clamping systems.


CoroCut in insert seat size D-G and all
Q-Cut insert seat sizes have a V-shaped
design giving a very secure clamping for
parting and grooving applications. (1)
CoroCut in insert seat size H-L has a
unique rail-design giving stability to the
insert clamping. This is primarily needed in operations generating side forces
such as turning and proling. (2)

Toolholder selection

Cutting uid

To minimize the risk of vibration tendencies and tool deection, always choose :
- a blade or toolholder with the smallest
tool overhang
- maximum toolholder shank dimension
- blade height (h) equal to or larger than
the blade insertion length
- blade or holder with maximum blade
width (largest possible insert seat size)
- use a CoroCut toolholder with short ar
(for Q-Cut holder type 22) if possible to
ensure good stability and straight cuts.
The reinforced holder will increase stability further.

A copious supply of cutting uid, directed


exactly at the cutting edge, should be
used while the insert is engaged and
throughout the operation.
For tool blocks a coolant adapter can be
mounted and the coolant supply connected
from above or from either side. The adapter
can be ordered as an optional extra and is
supplied with an assembly screw.

The recommended torque values for the


clamping screws are shown in tool tables
and should be used without overtightening. (The maximum torque is about 50%
higher than the table values.)
Mounting the insert: in CoroCut spring
clamp blade key
1. Mount the excentric key in the corresponding recess of the blade slot.
2. Open the tip seat (lift the key) as you
push the insert into the pocket.
Removing the insert:
1. Mount the excentric key in the corresponding recess of the blade slot.
2. Open the tip seat (lift the key) as you
pull the insert from the pocket.
Q-Cut spring clamp
Always apply a little cutting uid or oil on
the insert seat before mounting to further increase the holder life.
Use the special Q-Cut key for inserting
and extracting the insert in order to aviod
edge fractures.
No pivot holes are provided in either the
570 type exchangeable cutting heads
(R/LAG 551.31) or the smaller MBS blades for parting or face grooving. For these items a small rubber hammer should
be used to tap the insert into its nal
position. The tip of the yellow key should
be used to extract the insert.

B 36

Parting off
Optimize tool-life .

Mounting the toolholder

. by reducing the feed rate by up to


75% about 2 mm before the component
is parted off.

Make sure the toolholder is mounted at


90 degrees to the centre-line of the workpiece so as to obtain perpendiculasr surfaces in the cut and reduce the risk of
vibration tendencies.
Make sure the toolholder is mounted within plus/minus 0.1 mm especially when
parting of bars and grooving components
having small diameters. This affects cutting forces and the pip formation.

Select width, geometry and tool


system for parting off (B20)

Turning

Pips and burr minimization .

Chamfered grooves .

For shallow grooving .

. Can be achieved by using ground


right or left-handed inserts (for example
geometry G For GS) with the smallest
possible front angle that gives an acceptable component.

. can be produced with a standard GF


insert which machines the groove and
chamfers. This can be optimized with a
Tailor Made insert incorporating cutting
edges for producing chamfers specically for reducing cycle times in large volume production.

. it is very important that a zero degree


angle of inclination is used. For small
bores when using toolholders without
shims grooving a bar type 154.0 must
be used. The RH insert can be used for
RH external and LH internal toolholders.
The LH inserts for LH external and RH
internal toolholders.

Tools for large depths of


penetration
Use double ended blades for best insert
seat economy and accessibility at large
depths of penetration.
Note that when machining a large diameter workpiece or using a holder/blade
with large overhang reduce feed and cutting speed when parting to the centre, in
order to minimize pip and load on the
cutting edge.

Internal grooving .
. should have the shortest possible tool
overhang and the lightest cutting geometry
(GF or TF). Make several insertions with a
narrower insert followed by a nishing cut
or a single insertion followed by plunge
turning. Start at the bottom of the hole
and work outwards and use RH or LH inserts to direct chips when roughing. Use
large amounts of cutting uid. Consider
EasyFix sleeeves to optimize set-up and
achieve good bar clamping.

Turning
Finishing wider grooves ...
... with an axial turning operation with geometries TF or TM will provide the Wiper effect for achieving good surface nish compared to conventional turning tools.

E
Compensation when axial
turning
During axial turning or copying the tool is
subjected to a small deection, caused
by axial cutting forces. This results in a
difference (Dc/2) in diameter during
the transition between radial and axial
feed. In order to compensate for this, the
difference in diameter should be measured and the tool drawn back so that the
correct diameter is obtained.

Grooving
Finish grooving .
. can be improved by the use Wiper
technology to achieve good surface nish
in grooves and parting (geometries CF
and TF as well as 7E and 7G)

Tool rubbing in face


grooving .
. make sure that the tool is right for
the diameter range, parallel to the axis
of rotation and correct in relation to the
centre-line may need lowering or raising depending upon where rubbing takes
place (inner or outer).
See Face grooving.

Wiper

B 37

Turning

Rough turning

Finish Turning

To achieve a flat bottom and high-quality


groove-sides, follow the previously rec ommended machining sequence.

Care should be taken when machining


around the bottom radius of the groove.
Follow the previously recommended ma chining sequence.

Tool wear indicators


It is important to detect if the grade is too wear resistant
(hard) or too tough (soft), by inspecting the edge line behav
iour. Edge line having early plastic deformation (PD) indicates
the grade is too tough and a more wear resistant grade
should be used. Edge line having early chipping (small car
bide pieces broken out of edge line) indicates that the grade
is too wear resistant and a tougher grade should be used.

Plastic deformation (PD)


-

Cause

Solution

? Excessive temperature
in cutting zone.
? Unsuitable grade.

? Reduce cutting speed


and/or feed.
? Choose more wear
resistant grade.
? Improve coolant supply.

? Lack of coolant supply.

Excessive flank wear

E
Plastic deformation.

Cause

Solution

? Cutting speed too high .

? Decrease cutting
speed .
? Choose more wear
resistant grade .
? Improve coolant supply.

? Too soft grade.

Chipping.

? Lack of coolant
supply.

Built-up edge (BUE)

Cause

Solution

? Cutting edge
temperature too low.
? Unsuitable geometry
or grade.

? Increase cutting speed


and/or feed.
? Choo se a geometry
with a sharper edge .
Preferably a PVD
coated grade.

When parting to centre and in stainless material its almost


impossible to avoid BUE. Its important to minimise this
phenomenon by using the solutions above.

Chipping/breakage

Cause

Solution

? Cutting speed too high .

? Feed too high .


? Lack of coolant supply.

? Decrease cutting
speed .
? Choose more wear
resistant grade .
? Decrease feed .
? Improve coolant supply.

? Too soft grade.

Notch wear

Cause

Solution

Cause

Solution

? Too hard grade .


? Too weak geometry .

? Choose a softer grade .


? Choose a geometry for
higher feed area .
? Reduce overhang . Check
centre height.
? Re duce cutting data.

? Oxidation at the cutting


depth.
? Too high edge
temperature .

? Use varying cutting


depths .
? Re duce cutting speed .
? Improve coolant flow.

? Unstable conditions .
? Too high cutting data .

B 38

Crater wear

Turning
Grooves are often designed in many different shapes and dimensions depending on its working area. With Tailor Made tools
you can increase the productivity and make it possible to generate grooves not possible to produce with standard tools. We
tailor inserts and toolholders to suit your specic component requirements.
Inserts
For inserts choose suitable shape option (see below) plus actual dimensions according to Turning tools catalogue. Contact
your Sandvik Coromant representative and we will give a quick quotation, competitive price and delivery.

CoroCut inserts Geometries FB, RO, GF, GE

123-FB

123-RO

123-GF

123-GE

2 Edge

2 Edge

2 Edge

1 Edge
B

pe

or sha
Blank f
8.
option
Shape
options

Shape
options

10

Shape
options

11

12

16

17

F
Insert seat size

Insert width

123-GE
123-FB
123-RO
123-GF
123-FB
123-RO
123-GF
123-GE

E
E
E
1.9-2.3
1.9-2.4

F
F
F
2.3-3.4
2.8-3.2

1.9-2.3

2.3-2.8

G
G
G
2.6-3.8
2.8-3.6
3.0-3.4

H
H
H
H
3.5-4.8
3.8-4.0
4.5-5.0
3.6-5.0
4.0-5.0

J
J
J
J
4.5-5.8
5.5-6.35

K
K
K
K
5.5-6.8
6.4-7.4

L
L
L
L
6.5-8.0
7.4-8.0

5.0-5.6
4.5-6.35

5.6-7.2
5.6-6.35

7.2-8.0
6.5-8.0

Options
Insert seat
size
No of edges
Insert grade

ER

Geometry = FB, RO, GF, GE and insert seat


size = D, E, F, G, H, J, K, L
2 (1 for GE)
FB = GC4025, GC4125, H10F, H13A
RO = GC2135, GC4125, H10F, H13A, 1005, S05F
GF = GC2135, GC4125, GC1005, H13A, S05F
GE = CB20, CB50
ER-treatmentS=small, L=Large or R=Recommended

A1, A2, A3
R1, R2, R3, R4
D1, D2, D3, D4
V1, V2, V3, V4
S3, S4, S5
Tolerance

Insert width1.98.0 mm
Insert radius R1/R2/R3/R4
lengthD1/D2/D3/D4
angleV1/V2/V3/V4
Clearance angleS3/S4/S5
A1Tolerance 0.02 mm
For more GF-limits see table further on.

B 39

Turning

Quick quotation
Easy to order
Competitive delivery

T-Max Q-Cut inserts Geometries 3G, 4G and 6G


A

151.2-4G

Recommended rst choice geometry for grooving. *Options 1, 4, 5 and 8 also suitable for T-Max Q-cutter.
The face of options 4 and 5 must be symmetrical for T-Max Q-cutter.

Shape
options

1*

4*

B
Shape
options

5*

8*

C
151.2-3G

Alternative when shapes required lie outside Tailor Made range of -4G.

Shape
options

Shape
options

Shape
options

12

16

17

10

11

For applications requiring optimal chip control in width


range 610 mm.

151.2-6G
Shape
options

Options
H

Insert seat
size

20. 25, 30, 40, 50, 60

Insert
grade

3G GC4125, GC225, GC235, H13A, H10F, GC1020, GC1025


4G GC4125, GC225, GC235, S10, S30, SM30, GC415
CT525, H10A, H13A, H10F, GC1020
6GGC4025, GC235

ER

ER-treatmentS=small, L=Large or
R=Recommended

B 40

Note! For specific details regarding the options,


contact your Coromant sales representative.
A1, A2, A3
R1, R2, R3, R4
D1, D2, D3, D4
V1, V2, V3, V4
Negative land
Tolerance

Insert width1.9-11.0 mm
Insert radius R1/R2/R3/R4
Insert radius R1/R26G=0.2-2.0 mm
lengthD1/D2/D3/D4
angleV1/V2/V3/V4
T-Max Q-Cutter10
A1Tolerance 0.02 mm

Turning
For toolholders, choose the type of operation and holder according to the Turning tools catalogue. Contact your
Sandvik Coromant representative and we will give a quick quotation and competitive price and delivery.

CoroCut and T-MAX Q-Cut for parting and grooving


Shank holders

Coromant Capto

Tool design
R

Machining
limitations

Clamping system

Holder style

Screw

90
F

N
Spring
L

Reinforced blade
face grooving

Reinforced blade
parting

Blade type

Copy angle

Operation type
Turning

Parting

Radial grooving

Face grooving

Proling

E
Standard inserts

Type

Geometries

Insert sizes

Parting
Turning
Grooving

123
123
123
123
123

CF, CM, CR
TF, TM
GM

E, F, G, H, J, K
G, H, J, K, L
E, G, H, J, K, L

RM

F, G, H, J, L

123

FB, RO, GF

E, G, H, J, K, L

Proling

Valid for all operation types

Type

Geometries

Insert sizes

N151.2
N151.2
N151.2
N151.3
N151.2

4E, 5E, 5F, 4U


4T, 5T, 4U
5E, 4G, 5G, 6G, 4U
7G
4P, 5P, 4U

20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80


30, 40, 50, 60, 80
20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80
20, 25, 30, 40, 50
30, 40, 50, 60, 80

N151.2
N151.2

3G, 4G
6G

20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80


60, 80

B 41

Turning

Tailor Made GF geometry size limits

Seat size

Width of insert
la (mm)

D
E
F
G
H
H
J
K
L

1.5 - 1.9
1.9 - 2.3
2.3 - 2.8
2.8 - 3.6
3.6 - 4.3
4.41 - 5.0
5.0 - 5.6
5.6 - 7.2
7.2 - 8.0

Corner radius
re min (mm)
re max (mm)
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

0.3 - 0.6
0.3 - 0.6
0.4 - 0.7
0.4 - 0.9
0.5 - 1.0
0.6 - 0.9
0.8 - 1.2
0.9 - 1.9
0.9 - 1.5

Example: a 1.9 mm E-seat -GF insert can have a max. corner radius of 0.3 mm, while a 2.3 mm E-seat -GF insert can have a max. corner radius of 0.6 mm.

CoroCut insert blanks

Special products

Straight blanks for Do it yourself grinding are available in 9


widths from 2.3 up to 11.6 mm. These blanks have a at top
which allows grinding to many different shapes.

For even more complicated products the Sandvik Coromant special tool design facility is able to produce inserts and toolholders
to suit very specic requirements.

Straight insert blank.

90 angled insert blank.

90 blanks in R/L versions are also available, mainly for use in


the aerospace industry.

Grinding

General instructions for do-it-yourself grinding


Grinding wheel:
The grinding wheel should have the following properties:

Grain size:
Binder:
Concentration:

US Mesh 170-240 (75-55 m)


Metal
75-100

Fixture:
Standard holder R/LF151.22 is suitable as grinding xture.

Setting angles:
Recommended setting angles for grinding wheel with insert
mounted in the holder are shown in the diagram opposite.

-3B

B 42

Blank -3B with at top:


If a front clearance angle greater than 7 is
used the cutting data should be reduced.

-4B

Blank -4B with chip forming bump:


For best results do not grind the chip forming
bump the coloured area of the insert picture.