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Annual Report 2011

CIP

th

Cover
Anniversary:

Celebrating
the impacts

International Potato Center

The International Potato Center

(known by its

Spanish acronym CIP) is a research-for-development organization with a


focus on potato, sweetpotato, and Andean roots and tubers. CIP is dedicated
to delivering sustainable science-based solutions to the pressing world issues
of hunger, poverty, gender equity, climate change and the preservation of
our Earths fragile biodiversity and natural resources.

Our vision is roots and tubers improving the lives of the poor.
Our mission is to work with partners to achieve food security, wellbeing, and gender equity for poor people in root and tuber farming and food
systems in the developing world. We do this through research and innovation
in science, technology, and capacity strengthening.

Contents

Statement from the Board Chair


Foreword from the Director General
Introduction
CIP = A smart investment for reducing poverty and hunger
Stories
Seeds of success for smallholder farmers in Kenya
Sweetpotato-in perpetuity: insurance for a changing world
Resistance makes the dierence between having enough to eat or not
in the Andes
Alternatives for Asia-Pacic: shining light on underground treasures to improve
food security
Speeding breeding to meet urgent needs in Mozambique
A major boost for biofortication: new use of NIRS technology revolutionizing
food fortication eorts
A decade of pro-poor innovations: the Papa Andina experience
Fostering farming-as-business mentality among smallholder producers
Cow cafeteria: using sweetpotato as animal feed in East Africa
One system, many gains from a common CGIAR corporate platform
Tapping stakeholder synergies: designing the new CGIAR Research Program
on Roots, Tubers, and Bananas
Outputs 2011
CIP sta publications 2011
CIP in 2011
Financial report
List of donors
Global contact points
Executive committee
CIPs internal structure
Sta list
CGIAR centers

4
6
9
10
13
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
37
38
49
50
52
53
56
57
58
65

STATEMENT FROM

the Board Chair

In 2011, the CIP Board of Trustees met in Beijing China, along with Chinas Minister of Agriculture Han. Pictured from left to right are:
S. Ayyappan, Jose Valle-Riestra, Stella Williams, Simon Best, Pamela K. Anderson (CIP, DG), Hon. Han Changfu (Minister of Agriculture),
Peter VanderZaag (Board Chair), Phyllis Kibui, Zhang Taolin (Vice-Minister of Agriculture), Lu Xiaoping.

2011 was an exciting year for CIP. We celebrated the Centers 40th

anniversary

and set into place a new organizational structure to lead CIPs management and research
agenda into a new decade of growth, challenges, and opportunities.
Today, CIP employs a sta of over 600 people, spread across oces in nearly 30 dierent
countries. In the coming years, we anticipate that CIPs size and reach will expand considerably.
The organizations complexity and expected growth require strong, sophisticated management
including a full complement of senior-level administrators. They also drive the need for a
atter structure to decentralize decision-making and accountability, while also recognizing
the strong and diverse leadership talent base of our sta around the world.
This year, CIP instituted a new level of senior leaders at CIP headquarters and in its four regions.
Several new positions were created. For the rst time, CIP has a Chief Operating Ocer (COO),
Chief Financial Ocer (CFO), and Deputy Director for the CIP China Center for Asia and the
Pacic (DDG-CCCAP). In addition, there are four new Regional Operations Leaders (ROLs) for
each of CIPs global regions: Latin America-Caribbean (LAC); Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA); South,

West and Central Asia (SWCA); and East and Southeastern Asia-Pacic (ESEAP). This group
will serve to help strengthen management processes, further cross-center coordination, and
ensure ecient program management, donor relations, and accountability.
Another important organizational change in 2011 included the renement of CIPs research
areas. New Regional Scientic Leader (RSL) positions were created for Potato or Sweetpotato in
each of CIPs global regions. The number of Global Scientic Leaders (GSLs) was also expanded
to reect the growing importance of cutting-edge work being conducted in CIPs global
programs. Along with providing scientic leadership and oversight, these leaders identify and
coordinate cross-cutting issues across regions or between geographic and global programs.
Finally, seven Research Support Units were identied, with a Manager for each and a Head to
oversee them all. Each unit has specic infrastructures, capital, instrumentation, facilities, and
talent needed to deliver research support services and create new business opportunities.
CIP maintained solid scal management in 2011, despite a year of nancial uncertainties due to
global economic conditions, and in a context of major system and funding structure changes.
The consortium of international agricultural research centers, known as the CGIAR, of
which CIP is a member, began implementation of fundamental reforms in 2011. These
included transformations in funding structures, organizational framework, and cross-center
collaborations. The approval and implementation process for 15 new cross-organizational
CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs) was begun. CIP participates in seven of the CRPs. It leads the
CRP on Roots, Tubers, and Bananas, which was formally approved in November and is set to
begin implementation on January 1, 2012.
Like CIP, the CGIAR also celebrated a 40th anniversary in 2011. As we pass this auspicious
milestone together, we look forward to a promising future, built on the legacies of our shared
investments, and turned to meet the challenges of a changing world.
We are grateful to CIPs sta, partners, and donors for their dedication and support.
CIPs is a great mission. We look forward to advancing it together for decades to come.
Peter VanderZaag
Chair, CIP Board of Trustees

FOREWORD FROM

the Director General


ner
eral
a
In 2011, CIP celebrated its

40th anniversary
ry. We

are very proud of thiss

sulted from CIPs four decades of


milestone, and of the innovations and advances that have resulted
commitment to agricultural research for development.
o feature some of the impacts of CIPs
For this edition of CIPs Annual Report, we have chosen to
ure today builds upon four decades of
work, recognizing that much of the progress we measure
research investment and dedication.
estment in CIP activities. The results showed
CIP recently conducted an analysis of returns on investment
that annual net benets from CIP research have exceeded $225 million for the last 10 years. It
n excellent rate of return for our donors.
is an impressive sum, which clearly represents an
The analysis of returns was based on 15 impact assessment case studies, spanning an
array of technologies (e.g., new varieties,, improved seed or seed systems, integrated pest
be. The case studies evaluate economic and poverty
management) and regions around the globe.
ctivities, conducted in collaboration with national
reduction impacts for targeted CIP activities,
nd other key partners.
partners
agricultural research systems (NARS) and
th analysis of returns study in greater
The introductory story in this Annuall Report highlights the
e examples of some of the breadth of CIPs impacts, from
detail. Subsequent stories feature
oods to illustrations of how they have changed the lives of
the provision of global public goods
individual end users.
The stories in this report also demonstrate that often the eects of our research-forh beyond economic impacts to include benets such as increased
development eorts stretch

human capital, cultural pride,


de, social cohesion, or management
ement of natural resources.
re
Further
ings as greater preservation
ation of biodiversity, better use of underutilized
under
benets include such things
ro
op , and more resilient
resilie food systems, which are more dicult to quantify.
root and tuber crops,
ike to
t take
ake this opportunity
a
oppo unity to recognize all of the individuals who have worked
I would like
IP
P ove
e the
e pa
past four decades
ecades as researchers, sta members, advisors, and leaders.
with CIP
over
a
eeply gratef
g
to
o the donors, policymakers, and other key partners who have
We are also
deeply
grateful
pp ed us,
pported
s, often taking
takin
ki deep
de personal interest in the priorities, course, and outcomes of
supported
IPss work.
wor Finally, I want
wan to
oa
CIPs
acknowledge the role of all of our stakeholders, from the Heads off
State, bu
ness leaders,
ers and donors to the individual extension workers, lab technicians, and
business
smallho
er farmers. B
smallholder
By sharing their ideas, inputs, and innovations they have helped us to

CIP ARCHIVES

keep our
o research
esearch targeted
targ
and grounded in reality.

Thank you one


on and all. May we continue
ontinue to work together
togethe successfully through
h the decades to
come, advancing
ng CIPs vision of roots and tubers improving the lives of the poor.
Pamela K. Anderson
Director General

Introduction

CIP = A SMART INVESTMENT

for reducing poverty and hunger


Annual net benets from CIP research have exceeded
$225 million for the last 10 years, according to an
analysis of impact studies conducted in 2011.

Latin America. They also include stakeholders


in National Agricultural Research Services
(NARS) and partners from public, private, notfor-prot, academic, and other sectors.

For CIPs donors, the return on investment in

The challenge for R4D organizations like CIP

CIP represents a handsome dividend, indeed.

is that large-scale impacts require sustained,

But the real beneciaries of investments in

long-term investments. It was not until 1990

agricultural research for development (R4D)

nearly 20 years after its founding that CIP was

are the research stakeholders and end-users

able to get out of the red with returns from

who reap the rewards of new technologies,

research projects exceeding the organizations

capacity strengthening, and improved

annual budget. As CIP technologies matured,

opportunities. CIP end-users range from

the impacts of those investments continued

semi-subsistence women potato farmers in the

to increase. By the mid-1990s, they were

East African highlands to small sweetpotato-

generating seven times more economic

producing households in mixed crop-livestock

value on a yearly basis than CIPs annual

systems in Asia, and poor potato consumers in

expenditures.
Much of the bang for the

350
Varieties

Seed

IPM

300

buck measured through

million USD

CIP impact studies has


250

resulted from improved

200

seed technologies and the


development of improved

150

varieties. Integrated pest


100

management practices also

50

gure increasingly in return


on investment calculations.

0
1971 1974

1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010

Figure 1. Net annual benets from CIP technologies show that


returns on investment in CIPs research are signicant, but
require sustained, long-term investments.

10 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

(Figure 1).
The estimates of impacts
are based on detailed case

studies measuring the adoption of an array

contributions to human capital development,

of technologies developed by CIP and its

and to other livelihood assets such as physical

partners. In each case, the studies identify who

capital and improved social cohesion,

benets from the use of the technology and

are undeniably important benets. But

where, the adoption prole, and the additional

quantifying these additional gains entails

total value that accrues from its use over time.

extensive research. Because impacts usually


occur outside the time frame of a standard

Since benets accumulate over a long period

project, special attention needs to be given

of time and the prole of benets varies with

to funding impact work and developing an

each technology, researchers apply a discount

impact culture in the planning, funding, and

when summing future benets to calculate

implementation of research programs.

the net present value of the investment.

Net benets from CIP research

Table 1 presents estimated returns on


investment for various CIP technologies by

have exceeded $225 million for

crop and by region as documented in the

the last 10 years.

impact studies. For example, the most recent


study of varietal adoption in potatoes shows
that by 2008, CIP-related varieties covered over

The trend toward lower investment in long-

one million hectares worldwide. Applying a

term global research initiatives, such as

discount rate of 5% gives a net present value of

breeding, threatens to compromise these

the investment in improved potato varieties of

advances. Likewise, pressures from donors

more than $121 million.

to produce short-term results for targeted


programs are moving investment away

The estimates in Table 1 are conservative. Not

from up-stream research that may produce

all success stories have been documented,

the biggest impacts in the longer run.

nor does all CIPs work lend itself to economic

Impact studies have an important role in

measurements. CIPs role in the preservation

demonstrating the value of this strategic

of biodiversity maintains options for

research, raising awareness and ensuring

varietal change for future generations. CIPs

continued donor investment.

Table 1. Impact studies and estimated net present value of investment ($millions)
Varieties

Potato

Seed systems

Integrated Crop

Post-harvest utilization/

Management

enterprise development

Cent. Africa

($27)

Tunisia -

($21)

Tunisia - ($64)

China

($11.9)

India

($18)

Peru

($1.8)

Peru

($5.4)

Vietnam - 1 ($2.1)

Peru

($0.06)

World

($121)

Egypt

($2.9)

Vietnam - 2 ($5.1)
Sweetpotato

Peru

($3.0)

China

($550)

Dom.Rep. ($1.1)

(Sichuan-Starch, feed)

Cuba

(Vietnam-feed)

($21.7)

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 11

12 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Stories

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 13

SEEDS OF SUCCE
SUCCESS
S

for smallholder farmers


rm
me
er in Kenya
15,000 African smallholder growers are reaping
higher yields and increased incomes thanks to
capacity strengthening and improved potato

CIP D. BORUS

production technologies.

Christine
tine Nashuru
Nash
hur cutss the gure
g
of a traditional
Maasai woman,
an, tall and shy. She lives in the
Transmara
smara D
District
istr of Kenya, in the southwestern
Rift Valley Province. Christine did not access
formal education, but thanks to a CIP-led training
course, she has pioneered the production of
seed potato in her district. Christine sold over
10.3 tons of seed potato in 2010, worth over
US$4,000, and she is expecting more than 80
tons of seed from her 4 acres for 2011.
This is an unusual role for a Maasai woman. By
tradition, the pastoralist Maasai are consummate
cattle-herders. I hope your cattle are well, is a
standard greeting.
But potatoes are taking on increased importance
in Transmara District, and in the region more
broadly, with rising demand. Yields remain low,
however, for many farmers who lack access
to quality seed or awareness of better seed
management practices.
In August 2009, Christine was selected to attend
a course on potato seed production held in
Nairobi and organized by CIP. The course focused
on the use of three-generation (3G) seed
multiplication strategy.
The 3G seed strategy is geared to producing
large numbers of minitubers, to be used as seed,
through very rapid multiplication. The point is to
yield sucient, high-quality potato seed more
quickly than through conventional methods in three eld generations, instead of the usual
seven required. The rapid multiplication means
production costs are lowered, and the risk of
pest or disease contamination is reduced.

Christine Nashuru (far left) is seen as a darling of the village and has trained
other Maasai women from her district on how to grow seed and ware potato.

14 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

CIP is leading 3G projects in Kenya, Rwanda,


and Uganda, with public and private partners.

TThe
he stories of success
CIP V. GWINNER

include men, too


A
Amon
Mgendi, a pota
potato farmer in
n the Ta
Taita
district of Kenya
Kenya, has been practicing
p
potato
farming for several
his opportunity
everal decades.
deca s. But h
tuni
to make it a lucrativ
lucrative business
usines only
nly p
presented
d
itself after the 3G training.
training
I started planting potatoes
otat s in 1984,
4, ssays
Amon, but the problem
lack of qu
quality
m was
w lac
seed. For a long time I relied
ied on potatoes
po oe from
m
the local markets as seed. Many
times
M
im itt was
w
Amon Mgendi stands before his shop, built from the proceeds of
disastrous, as my crop was of
often damaged
am
by
his successful seed potato elds.
diseases. The training opened
ed my eyes,
ye and
now I can nance other projects
ect with
h the proceeds from potatoes.

Amon has been planting aboutt o


one acre of seed every season, garnering a net prot of about $600 (KSh.
50,000). More than 100 potato farmers
arm have since beneted from his seed. Unlike his neighbors, whose
potato crop reeled under devastating eects of bacterial wilt and late blight in 2011, his farm stands out as
center of excellence. With the earning from his potatoes, Amon has started a retail shop and a posho mill
(for grinding wheat or maize into our).
Christine and Amon are not alone. According to the district reports, there are approximately 60 trained
farmers working either individually or in groups who are now doing seed business in Kenya up from only
20 when the project began.

Christine is now a darling of the


village; she is like light put on a hill
for all to see her success.
The private sector collaboration is key to
increasing capacity and broadening adoption
of quality seed. It also helps accelerate the
availability of improved varieties that are more
adapted to local conditions and demands.
With increased adoption of the 3G strategy and
better management techniques, average yields
have increased by 20% for more than 15,000
smallholder potato growers.

As for Christine, she has never looked back.


Not only is she driving better seed production
in her district, she is also training other farmers
in her region, mostly women, to produce
better seed and ware potatoes. As one of her
trainees notes, Christine is now a darling of
the village; she is like light put on a hill for
all to see her success. She has brought seed
to our doorstep and trained us in potato
production. We now feed our families with the
nutritive potatoes.
See: Video Seed for Change about the role
of potatoes in Africa at http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=ZDdZN1_zibQ

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 15

SWEETPOTATOIN
EETPOTATOIN PERPETUIT
PERPETUITY:
P

insurance
insu
ance for a changing world
A new agreement between CIP and the Global
Crop Diversity Trust is paving the way to support,
conserve, and make available sweetpotato
varieties today, and for the future.

The sweetpotato germplasm collection at CIP


comprises 7,777 accessions, including 4,615
landraces (native varieties), 1,984 breeding lines
(improved varieties), and 1,178 samples of wild
sweetpotato. They originate from Asia, Africa,
the Americas, and the Pacic Islands. It is the
largest and most diverse sweetpotato collection
in the world. The purpose of the collection is to
conserve living samples to ensure that genetic
resources are available now for use by farmers,
plant breeders, and researchers, and that they
are secure for the long term.
Sweetpotato is the potato of the tropics. It is a
tough crop, able to grow in high temperatures
and arid conditions with little demand for
either water or fertilizer. Sweet potato ranks
as the worlds seventh most important food
crop, principally because of its versatility and
adaptability.
The material preserved in CIPs genebank holds
great promise for the future. Sweetpotato
is thought to have much potential for yield
improvement, and the orange-eshed varieties
are a highly eective food for combating
rampant vitamin A deciency in Sub-Saharan
Africa and parts of Asia.
In 2007, sweetpotato experts from around the
world gathered at a CIP-organized workshop
in the Philippines to address the concern that

16 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

the precious biodiversity of sweetpotato could


be lost. There was clear agreement among
the participants of the need to regenerate
sweetpotato material, which was at risk of being
lost due to climate change, explains Genoveva
Rossel, sweetpotato curator for CIPs genebank.
The workshop led to an agreement, signed
in 2011, between CIP and the Global Crop
Diversity Trust to provide US$1 million over ve
years from the Trust to support the sweetpotato
collection in CIPs genebank.
One of the principle functions of a genebank is
to duplicate and maintain clonal collections to
secure their conservation and use. The genetic
diversity they hold is critical for developing
varieties that can adapt to dierent needs
and preferences of producers and consumers,
and to the shifting pressures and conditions
associated with climate change.
The sweetpotato accessions are conserved in
the genebank both as seeds and as in vitro
plantlets. Cryopreservation is also used to
preserve plant material indenitely. CIP is
collaborating with the Global Crop Diversity
Trust and researchers from six collaborating
countries to develop cryo-preservation
protocols, standardizing methodologies for longterm preservation of sweetpotato accessions.
Sweetpotato specialists are a very collaborative
group, here at CIP and globally, notes Rossel.
We work with colleagues across all parts of
CIP, whether its regarding the identication of
selected clones for improved varieties, analysis
of nutritional value and quality, genetic analysis,
or ensuring the distribution of clean material for
colleagues and institutions around the world.

CIP ARCHIVES

Sweetpotato germplasm is conserved in CIPs genebank as in vitro plantlets, among other methods, to ensure its long term preservation,
conservation, and availability.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 17

RESISTANCE MAKES
ES TH
THE
ED
DIFFERENCE
FF

between having enough


oug
gh
h to
o eat or not

in the Andes
xcessive
e rains
r
an
and an increased presence of
Two CIP-developed
P-developed potato varieties were vital in Exc

e fac
ral disaster and the pressures of
the
face of natural

CIP S. DE HAAN

lim
ange
climate
change.

late
la blight
ight disease
ase have had devastating eects
in
n Andean
Ande regions
gion reliant on potato for food,
nutrition,
nu
and income.
i
When the Cusco region

Extreme weather
wea
events in the Andes, such as excessive rains and oods, are increasing the devastating eects of late blight disease,
highlighting the importance and impact of disease-resistant varieties.

18 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

CIP ARCHIVES

of Peru was declared a national emergency


area due to ooding, it was largely thanks to
two CIP-developed late blight resistant potato
varieties, called Pallay Poncho and Puka Lliclla,
that the food security of local communities
was preserved.
Under high stress conditions, the yield of
these two potatoes has been about 8-times
higher than any of the 150 native potato
varieties grown in the district, explains Stef de
Haan, CIP potato breeder. He adds, they have
made the dierence between having enough
to eat, or not.

Eects of climate change are


making it so that formerly untouched areas are falling victim
to the potatoes most feared disease, late blight, which is causing
more damage with each year.
Under normal conditions, Pallay Poncho
and Puka Lliclla give yields of 15-16 tons per
hectare, compared to 5 tons per hectare with
the traditional native potatoes. In periods of
high late blight damage, the dierence is even
greater. The yields hold up for the improved
varieties but drop to only around 2 tons per
hectare for the traditional varieties.
The rst time that late blight began to wipe
out potato harvests at higher altitudes in
Peru was in 2003. CIP joined forces with the
Peruvian Ministry of Agriculture and Perus
National Institute of Agrarian Innovation (INIA)
to address the problem. Twenty clones from
CIP with expected late blight resistance went
through evaluation and participatory selection
with the 200 families in the aected area.
After 5 years, the two clones with the best
properties were chosen. They were ocially

The impact of late blight disease is visible in this Andean


potato eld.

released by INIA as Pallay Poncho and Puka


Lliclla.
The highlands of Peru are continuing to
experience heavier than average rains and
rising temperatures.
Eects of climate change are making it so
that formerly untouched areas are falling
victim to the potatoes most feared disease,
late blight, which is causing more damage
with each year, says CIP agronomist, Manuel
Gastelo. Investigation by CIP suggests
that small-scale farmers are not replacing
traditional varieties with improved ones.
Rather, as they are averse to risk, they grow
the improved varieties along with numerous
native ones as a sort of insurance against
disaster. So far, it is a strategy that seems to be
paying o.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 19

ALTERNATIVES FO
FOR
RA
ASIA-PACIFIC:
IA PACIFIC:

nd
derground
shining light on un
underground
treasures to improve
pro
ove food secu
sec
security
cur
urity
crops to create more diverse and sustainable
food systems in Asia-Pacific in the face of socioeconomic and agro-environmental changes.
Food security in Asia-Pacic is more than just
cereals, says Dindo Campilan, who, as CIPs
Regional Lead for South Western and Central
Asia, has been a major proponent for expanding
the understanding of the role and potential of
root and tuber crops in the region. Even in ricebased food systems, explains Campilan, roots
and tubers rank among the top food staples in
the region, providing aordable nutrition plus
key opportunities to increase incomes through
greater production and the development of
higher value products.

Potato, sweetpotato,
cassava, yams, aroids,
and other locally
important species are
highly associated with
indigenous groups and
resource-poor households.
They are also important crisis
mitigation crops in the face of natural disasters,
agro-environmental changes, or food price
hikes. The global grain price crisis of 2008 helped
bring greater attention to the importance of
these crops. In 2011, this renewed interest
culminated in a new CIP program, called Food
Security Through Asian Root and Tuber Crops
(FoodSTART).
IFAD ROME

A new project is promoting root and tuber

Some of CIPs greatest impacts have been in


the Asia-Pacic region. Signicant economic
advances and gains in livelihood assets have
been measured though impact studies.
Examples range from the adoption of improved
potato varieties and better disease management
practices for sweetpotato in China to the use of
sweetpotato as animal feed in Indonesia and
Vietnam, among others.
The Asia-Pacic region has the highest
production, consumption, and utilization of root
and tuber crops in the world. Thus the potential
for even greater impacts is vast. But the value of
root and tuber crops remains underappreciated.
Roots and tubers face a negative image in
the region either as poor peoples food or as
unhealthy and fattening.

20 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Dindo Campilan demonstrates the diversity and versatility


of root and tuber crops at an international knowledge share
fair, dubbing them the regions underground treasures.

CIP PHILIPPINES

FoodSTART team partners launching the program in Pasig City, Philippines, June 17, 2011

FoodSTART includes partners from key


national and regional research organizations,
CGIAR centers, and development partners in
the public, NGO, and private sectors. Target
countries include China, India, Indonesia,
Bangladesh, and the Philippines. There is an
emphasis on indigenous communities (including
ethnic minorities) and on women, as critical
stakeholders for reaching household food
security and nutrition objectives.

Root and tuber crops are really

Priority locations are being determined through


mapping and comprehensive data analysis to
identify areas where reliance on root and tuber
crops overlaps with high incidences of poverty
and food insecurity. Forward-looking scenarios
are assessing potential impacts of technological
and policy interventions regarding root and
tuber crops within the context of climate change
pressures. Another emphasis of the program
is on the versatility of root and tuber crops not
only for home production, consumption, and
sale but also as processed products and for use
as animal feed.

Additional eorts are looking to boost the image


and use of these crops through communication
and knowledge sharing activities using media,
social media, and extension workers. Program
partners are also identifying root and tuber crop
champions among celebrities, chefs, and program
stakeholders.

underground treasures. Through


innovative products, policies, and
capacity strengthening we can
make sure their bounty isnt wasted.

Root and tuber crops are really underground


treasures, concludes Campilan, through innovative
products, policies, and capacity strengthening we
can make sure their bounty isnt wasted. Hopefully,
FoodSTART will help jumpstart that eort.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 21

SPEEDING
S
EDING BREEDING

to meet
meet urgent needs in Mozambiq
Mozambique
CIP is dramatically reducing the time it takes to
release new potato and sweetpotato varieties
with follow-up projects to ensure dissemination
and their availability to farmers.

Fifteen drought-tolerant orange-eshed


sweetpotato (OFSP) varieties and seven new
potato varieties were released in Mozambique
in 2011 thanks to exciting approaches designed
to radically shorten the time it takes to develop
improved varieties.
We want to revolutionize conventional
breeding, using accelerated breeding and other
advanced breeding methods, explains Robert
Mwanga, a CIP sweetpotato breeder based in
Uganda.
With sweetpotato, the goal is to get much
needed OFSP to farmers more quickly to help
combat widespread vitamin A deciency. CIP
scientists and partners are using a method
known as accelerated breeding to develop
varieties rich in beta-carotene (for vitamin
A) and suited to local needs, conditions, and
preferences. Accelerated breeding involves
rapid multiplication of new varieties using many
concurrent sites at early stages in the breeding
cycle. This compares to conventional methods
that use fewer sites over longer time periods,
explains Maria Andrade, a CIP sweetpotato
breeder based in Mozambique. The method is
cutting by half the time needed to develop new
varieties.
The achievements are part of a program
emphasis on breeding in Africa, for Africa. We
are investing in the development of diverse

22 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

sweetpotato types that will provide national


programs with a wide range of parents
that have the preferred combination of
characteristics to use in their own breeding
programs, says Mwanga.
The goal regarding potato is to lessen
Mozambiques costly dependence on imported
seed, at a time when consumer demand for
potato is rising. With timely availability of seed
for well-adapted varieties, we can enhance
the sustainability and economics of potato
production in Mozambique, notes Dieudonne
Harahagazwe, a CIP seed system specialist
based in Malawi. In recent years, Mozambiques
government has been prioritizing food
security, including the adaptation of agricultural
regulations to fast track getting seeds to the eld.

We want to revolutionize conventional breeding, using accelerated


breeding and other advanced
breeding methods.
CIP also works with partners to help ensure
that new varieties actually reach smallholder
farmers and enter into production, market, and
consumption systems where their potential
impacts on peoples lives can be realized.
The release of multiple new varieties at once
not only helps end users, it also benets
researchers. Usually, only one new variety
is released at a time, explains Merideth
Bonierbale, who leads CIPs global breeding
program, so there is little possibility to
understand why one variety spreads quickly

notes Bonierbale, we can collect and compare


information on aspects such as farmers and
consumers choices, other factors that can
determine varietal success, and the costs and
benets of production.
CIP A. NAICO

while another does not. New varieties are all


subject to the same institutional procedures
and made available simultaneously to farmers
and end-users. We now have interesting
opportunities to study uptake pathways,

CIPs Maria Andrade and Irene de Souza (USAID-retired), show o one of 15 newly released OFSP varieties in
Mozambique thanks to accelerated breeding methods.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 23

A MAJOR BOOST FOR BIOFORTIFICATION:

new use of NIRS technology revolutionizing


food fortication eorts
A key tool pioneered and applied at CIP saves
time and money in the hunt for vitamin- or
mineral-rich crop samples.

Near-Infrared Reectance Spectroscopy may


sound like a mouthful, but it represents a very
useful and low-cost method for estimating
concentrations of nutritional components
in crops. Known as NIRS, it is now being
used in a new way in CIPs Quality and
Nutrition Laboratory (QNLAB) that is radically
strengthening the biofortication program
and its potential impacts on combatting
malnutrition and its devastating consequences.
Biofortication uses breeding to increase levels
of nutrients such as iron, zinc, and vitamin A,
which occur naturally in staple food crops.
It is an eective and sustainable means for
addressing nutrient deciencies and improving
health outcomes, particularly for malnourished
populations in remote areas.
NIRS was traditionally used to analyze
macronutrients such as protein, starch, and fat,
explains Thomas zum Felde, a CIP scientist who
pioneered the adaptation of NIRS technology
for evaluating critical micronutrients, such as
iron, zinc, and pro-vitamin A carotenoids. The
work is central to CIPs biofortication research
eorts, such as those aimed at boosting iron
values in potato to address chronic anemia
in the Andes and for combating vitamin A
deciency in Africa and Asia with orangeeshed sweetpotato varieties, among others.
Large numbers of samples must be analyzed
to identify those with naturally high nutrient
values that can be used for biofortication

24 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

breeding programs. NIRS provides a fast and


low cost solution.
With NIRS, CIP scientists can analyze
pro-vitamin A carotenoids, iron, zinc, protein,
starch, glucose, fructose, and sucrose in potato
and sweetpotato in less than two minutes for
a cost of only US$5. In comparison, chemical
analysis of pro-vitamin A carotenoids using
High Performance Liquid Chromatography
(HPLC) takes one hour at a cost of US$45 per
sample. Similarly, chemical analysis of mineral
content with Inductively Coupled Plasma
spectrometry (ICP) requires 20 minutes and
costs US$12 per sample.
Imagine the cost and time savings for
analyzing up to 40,000 samples annually that
breeding programs at CIP require, points out
Zum Felde.
Preparing samples for NIRS is also much
simpler than for chemical analysis, and it does
not require the use of chemical solvents. In
the last four years, CIPs Quality and Nutrition
Lab has evaluated more than 130,000
sweetpotato samples and over 6,000 potato
samples for breeding programs. The Lab has
also collaborated with HarvestPlus under the
umbrella of a NIRS feasibility study to evaluate
nutrients in crops such as maize, wheat, rice,
cassava, millet, and beans from other CGIAR
centers (CIAT, CIMMYT, ICRISAT, IITA, and IRRI).
Based in Lima, the Quality and Nutrition Lab
(QNLAB) is expanding its reach to create a
global NIRS network. In 2011, that network
began to facilitate the analysis of sweetpotato
samples in SubSaharan Africa, including
Uganda, Mozambique, and Ghana. Plans are to
expand the network to Rwanda and China.

NIRS 4

China

NIRS 4 - satellite
(CIP-China)
India

Haiti

Bangladesh

Dominican Republic

Vietnam

Nigeria

NIRS 1

NIRS 1 - master
(CIP-Lima HQ)

Tanzania

NIRS 6 - satellite
(CIP-Ghana)

Sri Lanka

Kenya
Chiclayo
San Ramn
La Molina
Caete

NIRS
R 6

NIRS 2

Malawi
Mozambique

Indonesia

NIRS 2 - satellite
(NARO-Uganda)

Brazil

NIRS 5
NIRS 5 - satellite
(ISAR-Rwanda)

NIRS 3
NIRS 3 - satellite
(CIP-Mozambique)

Sweetpotato NIRS - network locations


Sweetpotato field trial locations

Future applications for NIRS may also include


the ability to assess dierent stress tolerances
in crops, since NIRS can detect and evaluate the
metabolites that plants produce when subjected
to stress condition.

Imagine the cost and time savings

We still have a lot of ideas to implement for


meeting the needs of research, concludes
Gabriele Burgos, who leads CIPs QNLAB. Our
vision is to be a worldwide reference laboratory
for micronutrient analysis of root and tuber and
other crops with a view to improving human
health, reducing poverty, and alleviating hidden
hunger.

at CIP require.

for analyzing up to 40,000 samples


annually that breeding programs

Further information is available at: QNLAB www.cipotato.org/qnlab

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 25

A DECADE OF PROPOOR
PROPOOR INNOVAT
INNOVATIONS:

the Papa Andina ex


experience
pe
er ence
generated innovations and unleashed the
potential of native potato for increasing and
diversifying incomes for small-scale Andean
farmers.
Selling native potatoes to the industry has
changed our lives says Victoriano Meza, a farmer
from Perus central Andes. It has meant additional
income to build a house for his family and equip
it with satellite internet so that my children can
learn quickly and get a better future. Mr. Meza is
one of thousands of small-scale Andean farmers
benetting from a new boom in the market for
native potatoes, and from pro-poor innovations
to link them to the native potato market chain,
spearheaded by CIPs Papa Andina program.
Papa Andina is a CIP partnership program,
which works in collaboration with research
organizations, public partners, the private sector,
and NGOs. For over 10 years it has functioned
as an innovation broker in the Andean potato
sectors of Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador.
Product innovations from Papa Andina have
opened new market niches and brought higher
prices for farmers. Examples include awardwinning Tikapapa (bagged native potatoes),
packaged traditional dehydrated chuo,
and native potato chips originally pioneered
through Papa Andinas Participatory Market
Chain Approach (PMCA) and taken up by large,
multi-national companies. By promoting the
integration of corporate social responsibility,
Papa Andina has helped ensure that the benets
of corporate involvement reach small farmers
and are socially and environmentally sustainable.

26 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Other Papa Andina results include new public


policies and practices to invest in the sector,
regulate product quality, and raise the prole
of native potatoes as a high-value product and
cultural asset. For example, the establishment
of an annual national potato day in Peru has
elevated the native potato from poor mans
food to a point of national pride. Technological
innovations spearheaded by Papa Andina
range from improved seed systems for native
potatoes to the application of integrated crop
management techniques and improved postharvest management using simple processing
equipment.
The impacts of its projects and methods have
benetted small-scale farmers and their families
directly. In Bolivia, new potato products sold to
supermarkets have enabled farmers to receive
3040 percent higher prices than in traditional
markets. The innovation network in Ecuador
(Plataforma) has enabled farmers to raise yields
by 33 percent, improving input:output ratios
by 20 percent, resulting in a fourfold increase in
gross margins per hectare.
CIP C. FONSECA

The programs participatory approaches have

Product innovations, such as this packaged chuo, have


come from Papa Andinas participatory methods linking
small-scale producers to high value market chains.

J. L. GONTERRE

Selling native potatoes to industry is changing lives and creating new opportunities for smallholder Andean farmers, and their families.

With more than 700,000 farming families


working in the Andean potato sector, the
indirect impacts are likely to be far greater, not
only regarding incomes but also in terms of
cultural, social, and personal assets. As notes
farmer Nolberta Inostroza, Now I produce and
sell with less work, earn more, and take pride in
sharing the native potatoes that I take care of, as
my ancestors did before me.

Now I produce and sell with less


work, earn more, and take pride in
sharing the native potatoes that
I take care of, as my ancestors did
before me.
Added to these are further collateral benets
to farming communities and parallel sectors
stemming from the boom in demand. In fact,
demand is so strong that in spite of increasing
supplies, prices for fresh and processed native
potato products continue to rise.

Designed for the Andean context, the Papa


Andina tools and methods also have been
applied successfully elsewhere. For example,
the Participatory Market Chain Approach has
been adapted to train and connect farmers to
sweetpotato or potato market chains in Africa
and Asia, and to vegetable, milk, and coee
value chains in Latin America.
The legacies of Papa Andina are particularly
important as it faces its next decades. June
2011 marked the close out of the original Papa
Andina Program, with a new iteration beginning
in a broader context of food security across the
Andean highlands. Its reach is expanding to
include Colombia and Venezuela, along with the
original targets of Peru, Ecuador, and Bolivia.
Andr Devaux, who has led Papa Andina,
concludes: Papa Andina has become a
working model, even a philosophy, which will
live on beyond the program itself. The model
has created a horizontal space for eective
interactions among diverse partners to better
articulate research and development and to
better address needs and improve livelihoods for
small producers.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 27

FOSTERING
RING FARMINGASBUSINESS
FARMINGASBUSINE MENTA
MENTALITY

among
amo
g smallholder producers
Bringing business and marketing skills to the
forefront can improve smallholders capacity
to introduce and benet from market-driven

CIP ARCHIVES

innovations.

Eorts to support farmer capacity strengthening


often focus on increasing production and
improving crop management. While these skills
are critical, the concept of developing marketing
skills is often neglected or introduced only as an
afterthought. Lessons from CIP success stories
suggest, however, that introducing a business

Market chain producers, processors, wholesalers, and retailers work together to create and market innovative potato products.

28 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

story:

CIP ARCHIVES

Success

Ida Rosida of West Java,


Indonesia, participated in the
farmer business school training
with the hope of enhancing
her meager household income.
She is now a full-time potato
processing entrepreneur.
Her specialized potato chips
feature the intact potato skin
and come in new varieties,
based on consumer and retailer
suggestions. They are marketed under the brand, Cumelly, which was an
innovation of the farmer business school initiative.

orientation to smallholder producers can spur


innovation and create greater linkages to value
market chains.
For farmers to link with markets, they need to
learn not only to produce, but to produce for
the market, says Dindo Campilan, CIPs Regional
Leader for South West and Central Asia, who has
helped introduce Farmer Business Schools in his
region.
Campilans insights are based on work
conducted by CIP to introduce innovations for
improving on-farm productivity, postharvest
value addition, and market development. The
Farmer Business School approach, being piloted
in Indonesia, takes marketing as a starting point
for determining what, how, and for whom to
produce. It combines methodological elements
of the Participatory Market Chain Approach
developed by CIPs Papa Andina Program to
increase innovation and market access for native
potato farmers in the Andes with farmer eld
school and business learning approaches.

Farmer business schools provide a group-based


and participatory learning environment for
smallholder farmers to foment marketing ideas,
conduct small-scale experiments for improving
crop quality and production, and pick up business
skills. They learn to develop a business plan, use
market analysis tools, and meet with market chain
stakeholders such as industry representatives.
Participants also pick up knowledge and
strategies for handling supply chain issues.
Another benet of the Farmer Business School
model is that it serves to support farming
communities in using local resources such as
crop genetic diversity and traditional know-how
for selling products to elite urban consumers and
supermarkets.
Business skills of negotiation and strategy play a
key role, too. Successful farm business requires
the capacity not only for technological change
but also for nurturing relationships among
market chain actors based on trust, collaboration,
and coordination.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 29

COW CAFETERIA:

using sweetpotato aas aan


animal
nim
ma feed
in East Africa
Lessons
ns from CIPs work in Asia are being applied
app
mp
ions for livestock and dairy farmers
to improve
options
nE
ica
in
East Africa
Youre
ure a livestock specialist,
ialist, what
w
are you
doing
g working with sweetpotato?
wee
Ben Lukuyu
laughs
h as he describes
es this typical reaction from
his co
colleagues at the
e IInternational Livestock
Research
ea
Institute (ILRI)
LR in Nairobi, where he
workss with
w the multi-partner East African
Dairy D
Development (EADD) project. But it is
sweetpotatos highly promising potential as an
animal feed that interests Lukuyu, and has him
teaming up with Sammy Agili, a CIP sweetpotato
breeder and other public and private partners
in East Africa. Their goal: to better exploit
sweetpotatos potential as a healthy and easily
available livestock feed.
Two decades ago, CIP conducted similar research
testing varieties of livestock forage using
sweetpotato in countries such as Vietnam and
China. Results showed that mixtures based on
easily available resources were a clear formula
for success: The pigs are growing faster, their
skins are shinier and best of all, it takes a lot less
time to prepare feed for them, was a comment
from farmer Ta Van Hien in Pho Yen Province
in 1999. More recently, a CIP project in PapuaIndonesia using sweetpotato-based formulas
as pig feed showed positive impacts on farmers
incomes and on other livelihood indicators, such
as human capital, social cohesion, and physical
structures.
We are drawing on CIPs many years of
experience in Asia, where they successfully use
sweetpotato in livestock systems, says Lukuyu.
In China, 25-30% of sweetpotato crops are used

30 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Such work is particularly


for aanimal
al ffeed. Su
relevant
Africa, which has the
ant iin East A
highest per capita
highes
api consumption of livestock
products (e.g.,
(e.g., dairy cattle, pig, and goats for
meat and milk) of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).
TThe project is part of CIPs Sweetpotato
Action for Security and Health in Africa
(SASHA) initiative, which aims to reposition
sweetpotato in food economies of SSA to
alleviate poverty and undernutrition.
Currently, smallholder livestock and dairy
producers in East Africa face increasing
feed costs and challenges. High population
pressures have increased the competition
for grains as food or livestock feed. Major
shortages occur during the dry season, and
quality feed concentrates demand a price
many cannot aord. Napier grass, which is
used in Kenya as a primary feed for dairy
farming, requires signicant allocations of
land and is currently suering from a major
outbreak of a disease called head smut and
stunt.
Increased use and production of
sweetpotato may provide a solution.
Sweetpotato vines oer more protein and
dry matter per unit area and require less
land than other staple livestock feeds.
Sweetpotato roots that are too small for
human consumption or sale also make good
feed.
CIP and EADD are working directly with
pig and dairy farmers in Kenya, Rwanda,
and Uganda. They are guiding adaptive
participatory research to test the feasibility
and business case for using sweetpotato
vines as silage and leaf protein supplements.
On-station and farm-based experiments

We like to call it the cow cafeteria, explains


Lukuyu. We want to give farmers options for
mixing sweetpotato vines and roots with locally
available feed resources and come up with
feeding strategies to best respond to their needs
and demands.
ILRI

are testing low-cost silage-making techniques


and dierent blends using roots, vines, and
other feeds. They are also trying varieties under
dierent cropping regimes and analyzing
nutritional components under varying
conditions.

Smallholder livestock and dairy producers in East Africa face increasing feed costs and challenges. Sweetpotato may
provide a solution.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 31

ONE SYSTEM, MANY GAINS

from a common CGIAR corporate


platform
One Corporate System represents a whole new
level of collective action and transformative
change that will vastly increase collaboration,
information sharing, and eciencies across the
CGIAR Centers and Research Programs.

CIP is joining eight other CGIAR Centers


and the Consortium Oce to integrate their
diverse project, nancial, and human resource
management systems into a common corporate
platform, known as One Corporate System
(OCS). The move is expected to create an
automated and interconnected system that will
boost eciencies, support greater cross-Center
coordination, and result in better investments of
donor funding.
OCS is a Center-driven initiative. CIP was an
early proponent of the project, recognizing
the economic and organizational gains to be
derived from adopting a joint system. Current
calculations suggest that each participating
Center is saving approximately US$500,000
by implementing a common platform
and purchasing a system jointly instead of
individually. And there are signicant annual
savings in equipment and maintenance costs
associated with using a commonly hosted
infrastructure.
Research and administrative teams from
numerous Centers have invested considerable
time and eort over several years to identify
needs, align terminology, and analyze processes
and requirements in preparation for the new
system. In 2011, they devoted weeks to faceto-face workshops and reviews, along with
multiple conference calls and remote meetings

32 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

to compare processes, test proposals and


prototypes, and prepare for implementation.
OCS is already recognized as a model of CGIAR
collaboration. But it is also unconventional
and complex, notes Carlos Alonso, CIPs
Executive Director for Strategy and Corporate
Development, who has been spearheading the
project for CIP and coordinating much of the
collaboration with other Centers.
Culling through the details of the system
prototypes and design specications has
required enormous commitment, patience, and
compromise from all the parties involved. The
process has not been without its frustrations.
OCS involves 10 institutions scattered around
the world, with 10 dierent corporate cultures,
diverse cultural backgrounds, and locations
across many time zones, notes Alonso. But
what makes this eort unique is that we are allll
inspired by a shared vision of doing things better
and a common purpose to make OCS a success,
he concludes.

individual
vidua

INTEGR

Finalization of the OCS design, reconciliation of


Center systems to the common one (known as
localization), training, and implementation of
the new system are slated to begin in 2012 for
a rst group of participating Centers. CIP will
be among the initial implementers, along with
the Consortium Oce and the International

Con
nso

Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), and the


World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), followed by
Bioversity International and the International
Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT).

CONSORTIUM
OFFICE
France

CIMMYT
Mexico

ICARDA
Syria

ICRISAT
India

BIOVERSITY
INTERNATIONAL
Italy
IFPRI
USA
AFRICA RICE
Benin

CIAT
Colombia
IWMI
Sri Lanka

forward-tthin
nking
g
ILRI
Kenya

IRRI
Philippines

aautomated
initiativ

F
Finances
Fina
Proj
roject
process

nine
ne
finance

others

One
O
System
Sy

committed
aapproach
ppro
conceived

WORLDFISH
Malaysia

across

centers
directors
group

center-driven

multiple

CIP
Peru

CIFOR
Indonesia

WORLD
AGROFORESTRY
CENTRE
Kenya

IITA
Nigeria

function
nctions

ls

Rice Research Institute (IRRI) Joining in a


second phase will be WorldFish, AfricaRice, the
International Center for Agricultural Research
in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), the International

CGIA
CG
AR
CGIAR
GIA

develo
ev p

Centers
RATED
ED
managementt
rtium concep
rt
ption
development wider
even
collaboration
ollabo
administra
ministr
trative
Corporate
engaged syste
operational
operat
tem
Office
f e
Human supp
support designed
i d
resources
r
cross-centerr

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 33

TAPPING STAKEHOLDER SYNERGIES:

designing the new CGIAR Research


Program on Roots, Tubers, and Bananas
Incorporating stakeholder perspectives was a
critical part of the process of building a proactive
interaction to rene program components and
dene impact pathways.

How do you create a dynamic, interactive

Roots, Tubers
and Bananas
The CRPs are broad initiatives involving multiple
CGIAR Centers and many partners. They are
designed to advance the research objectives of
the CGIAR system aimed at reducing poverty
and hunger, improving health and nutrition, and
enhancing ecosystem resilience. The CRPs reect
an ethos that emphasizes proactive consultation
with stakeholders for program design and
implementation.
Putting that principle into practice is
described in a new publication, co-authored
by collaborators from each of the four CGIAR
CIAT N. PALMER

dialogue among 255 stakeholders, across three


continents, in less than two months, when the
goal is to design a new global program aimed
at maximizing impacts? This was the challenge
put to a team of collaborators from multiple
organizations, which developed the CGIAR
Research Program (CRP) on Roots, Tubers and
Bananas for Food Security and Income. Their
discovery: while not an ideal scenario, the
pressures of a tight schedule, coupled with good
will and new synergies, can sometimes lead to
creative, successful outputs.

RESEARCH
PROGRAM ON

The new program reects an ethos that emphasizes proactive consultation with stakeholders for program design and
implementation.

34 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Incorporating stakeholder perspectives in


international agricultural research: the case of the
CGIAR Research Program for Roots, Tubers and
Bananas for Food Security and Income provides an
instructive case-study of successful stakeholder
consultation. It describes the process used to
engage stakeholders and incorporate their
feedback into program design, with lessons learned
and experiences that can serve others looking to
replicate, adapt, or build upon this example.
This document not only oers insights on how
stakeholder consultation can eectively ag
important priorities in the project design phase,
but also what methods worked best in achieving
quality interaction, says Graham Thiele, leader
of CIPs Social and Health Sciences Division, who
formed part of the intercenter group leading the
design of the program proposal.
One interesting nding of the case-study regards
the eectiveness of dierent methods for
gathering stakeholder input. To be as inclusive
as possible with limited time and money,
stakeholder input was gathered via regional
workshops, on-line surveys, and one-on-one
interviews, for a total of over 200 participants.
Among those methods, the on-line surveys
proved to be surprisingly agile and eective for
gathering and integrating responses in real time,
including new ideas. They garnered feedback
from 150 respondents, with detailed responses
which were in many cases quite novel, thoughtful,
and highly useful for the program proposal.
This comment from the leader of an international
NGO in Africa gives a avor: Roots, tubers, and

The perspectives of dierent stakeholders raised our ability to reect


a more integral understanding of
challenges and opportunities.

Incorporating stakeholder perspectives


in international agricultural research: the
case of the CGIAR Research Program for
Roots, Tubers and Bananas for Food
Security and Income

2011-3 Working Paper

centers involved in the Roots, Tuber, and


Banana research program - CIP, Bioversity
International, the International Center for
Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), and the International
Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA).

Jonathan Woolley, Vincent B. Johnson, Bernardo Ospina,


Berga Lemaga, Tania Jordan, Gary Harrison, Graham Thiele

ISSN 0256-8748
Social Sciences
Working Paper
No. 2011- 3

Incorporating stakeholder perspectives is available online at:


http://cipotato.org/cipotato/publications/pdf/005751.pdf

bananas are not usually well positioned within


agricultural extension, as decision makers
do not have a full appreciation of their true
importance. Quality data on true level of
production, perhaps through remote-sensing
methodologies, is an essential starting point.
Input from stakeholders served to rearm
the importance of core components of the
program, and also shed further light on
cross-cutting issues, such as gender, climate
change, knowledge sharing, and capacity
strengthening.
The perspectives of dierent stakeholders
raised our ability to reect a more
integral understanding of challenges and
opportunities. It makes the program planning
more grounded, and ultimately more likely
to achieve objectives that will result in real
development impacts, explains Vincent
Johnson of Bioversity, who led the consultation
taskforce. Without this perspective, we could
never have delivered a convincing program
proposal within the deadline, he concludes.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 35

36 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Outputs
2011

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 37

CIP STAFF

Publications 2011
Journals Articles
Adda, C.; Atachi, P.; Hell, K.; Tamo, M. 2011. Potential use of the bushmint, Hyptis suaveolens, for the control
of infestation by the pink stalk borer, Sesamia calamistis, on maize in southern Benin, West Africa. Journal
of Insect Science. ISSN 1536-2442. 11:13 p.
Attaluri, S.; Sangakkara, U.R.; Costa, W.A.J.M. de. 2011. Physiological adaptability of sweetpotato (Ipomoea
batatas) genotypes as inuenced by seasons with emphasis on orange-eshed sweetpotato. Indian Journal
of Agricultural Sciences. (India). ISSN 0019-5022. 81(1):33-37.
Attaluri, S.; Sangakkara, U.R.; Costa, W.A.J.M. De. 2011. Stability analysis for yield in sweetpotato (Ipomoea
batatas) genotypes with special reference to orange-eshed sweetpotato. Indian Journal of Agricultural
Sciences. (India). ISSN 0019-5022. 81(7):585-589
Blandon-Diaz, J.U.; Forbes, G.A.; Andrade-Piedra, J.L.; Yuen, J.E. 2011. Assessing the adequacy of the
simulation model LATEBLIGHT under Nicaraguan conditions. Plant Disease. (USA). ISSN 0191-2917.
95(7):839-846.
Buytaert, W.; Cuesta-Camacho, F.; Tobon, C. 2011. Potential impacts of climate change on the
environmental services of humid tropical alpine regions. Global Ecology and Biogeography. (UK). ISSN
1466-822X. 20(1):19-33.
Cavatassi, R.; Gonzales-Flores, M.; Winters, P.; Andrade-Piedra, J.; Espinosa, P.; Thiele, G. 2011. Linking
smallholders to the new agricultural economy: The case of the Plataformas de Concertacion in Ecuador.
Journal of Development Studies. (UK). ISSN 0022-0388. 47(10):1545-1573.
Cervantes-Flores, J.C.; Sosinski, B.; Pecota, K.V.; Mwanga, R.O.M.; Catignani, G.L.; Truong, V.D.; Watkins, R.H.;
Ulmer, M.R.; Yencho, G.C. 2011. Identication of quantitative trait loci for dry-matter, starch, and -carotene
content in sweetpotato. Molecular Breeding. (Netherlands). ISSN 1380-3743. 28(2):201-216.
Cole, D.C.; Orozco, F.; Pradel, W. ; Surquillo, J.; Mera, X. ; Chacon, A.; Prain, G. ; Wanigaratne, S.; Leah, J.
2011. An agriculture and health inter-sectorial research process to reduce hazardous pesticide health
impacts among smallholder farmers in the Andes. BMC International Health and Human Rights. (UK). ISSN
1472-698X. 11(Suppl 2):S6.
Cole, D.C. ; Orozco, F.A.; Ibrahim, S.; Wanigaratne, S. 2011. Community and household socioeconomic
factors associated with pesticide-using, small farm household members health: a multi-level, longitudinal
analysis. International Journal for Equity in Health. (UK). ISSN 1475-9276. 10(54):10 p.
Cuellar, W.J.; Cruzado, R.; Fuentes, S.; Untiveros, M.; Soto, M.; Kreuze, J.F. 2011. Sequence
characterization of a Peruvian isolate of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus: Further variability and a model
for p22 acquisition. Virus Research. (Netherlands). ISSN 0168-1702. 157(1):111-115.
Cuellar, W.J.; Souza, J. de.; Barrantes, I.; Fuentes, S.; Kreuze, J.F. 2011. Distinct cavemoviruses interact
synergistically with sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (genus Crinivirus) in cultivated sweet potato. Journal
of General Virology. (UK). ISSN 0022-1317. 92(5):1233-1243.

38 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

De Souza, J.; Cuellar, W.J. 2011. Sequence analysis of the replicase gene of sweet potato caulimo-like
virus suggests that this virus is a distinct member of the genus Cavemovirus. Archives of Virology. (Austria).
ISSN 0304-8608. 156(3):535-537.
Fonseca, C.; Huarachi, E.; Ordinola, M. 2011. [A technological innovation experience for artisan
production of dehydrated potato: Tunta]. Una experiencia de innovacion y difusion en la produccion
artesanal de la papa deshidratada: Tunta. Revista Latinoamericana de la Papa. (Colombia). ISSN 1019-6609.
16(1):99-125.
Garrett, K.A.; Forbes, G.A. ; Savary, S.; Skelsey, P.; Sparks, A.H.; Valdivia, C.; Bruggen, A.H.C. van.; Willocquet,
L.; Djurle, A.; Duveiller, E.; Eckersten, H.; Pande, S.; Vera Cruz, C.; Yuen, J. 2011. Complexity in climate-change
impacts: an analytical framework for eects mediated by plant disease. Plant Pathology. (UK). ISSN 0032-0862.
60(1):15-30.
Gibbs, M.; Bailey, K.B.; Lander, R.D.; Fahmida, U.; Perlas, L.; Hess, S.Y.; Loechl, C.U. ; Winichagoon, P.; Gibson,
R.S. 2011. The adequacy of micronutrient concentrations in manufactured complementary foods from lowincome countries. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis. (USA). ISSN 0889-1575. 24(3):418-426.
Gibson, R.W.; Mpembe, I.; Mwanga, R.O.M. 2011. Benets of participatory plant breeding (PPB) as
exemplied by the rst-ever ocially released PPB-bred sweet potato cultivar. Journal of Agricultural
Science. (UK). ISSN 0021-8596. 149(5):625-632.
Gildemacher, P.R.; Schulte-Geldermann, E.S.; Borus, D.; Demo, P.; Kinyae, P.; Mundia, P.; Struik, P.C. 2011.
Seed potato quality improvement through positive selection by smallholder farmers in Kenya. Potato
Research. (Netherlands). ISSN 0014-3065. 54(3):253-266.
Gonzales, L.; Nino, L.; Gastelo, M.; Suarez, F. 2011. [Evaluation and selection of potato clones for their
resistance to late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in Merida State, Venezuela]. Evaluacion y seleccion de
clones de papa con resistencia a candelilla tardia en el estado Merida, Venezuela. Revista Latinoamericana
de la Papa. (Colombia). ISSN 1019-6609. 16(1):142-150.
Goss, E.M.; Cardenas, M.E.; Myers, K.; Forbes, G.A.; Fry, W.E.; Restrepo, S.; Grunwald, N.J. 2011. The plant
pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the
Irish potato famine pathogen, P. infestans. PLoS ONE. ISSN 1932-6203. 6(9):e24543.
Guberman, J.M.; Ai, J.; Arnaiz, O.; Baran, J.; Blake, A.; Baldock, R.; Chelala, C.; Croft, D.; Cros, A.; Cutts, R.J.;
Genova, A. Di; Forbes, S.; Fujisawa, T.; Gadaleta, E.; Goodstein, D.M.; Gundem, G.; Haggarty, B.; Haider, S.;
Hall, M.; Harris, T.; Haw, R.; Hu, S.; Hubbard, S.; Hsu, J.; Iyer, V.; Jones, P.; Katayama, T.; Kinsella, R.; Kong, L.;
Lawson, D.; Liang, Y.; Lopez-Bigas, N.; Luo, J.; Lush, M.; Mason, J.; Moreews, F.; Ndegwa, N.; Oakley, D.; Perez
Llamas, C.; Primig, M.; Rivkin, E.; Rosano, S.; Shepherd, R.; Simon, R.; Skarnes, D.; Smedley, D.; Sperling, L.;
Spooner, W.; Stevenson, P.; Stone, K.; Teague, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.X.; Whitty, B.; Wong, D.T.; Wong-Erasmus,
M.; Yao, L.; Youens-Clark, K.; Yung, C.; Zhang, J.; Kasprzyk, A. 2011. BioMart Central Portal: An open database
network for the biological community. Database. ISSN 1758-0463. 40(D1):D1077-D1081.
Hell, K.; Mutegi, C. 2011. Aatoxin control and prevention strategies in key crops of Sub-Saharan Africa.
African Journal of Microbiology Research. ISSN 1996-0808. 5(5):459-466.
Honfo, F.G.; Hell, K.; Akissoe, N.; Hounhouigan, J.; Fandohan, P. 2011. Eect of storage conditions on
microbiological and physicochemical quality of shea butter. Journal of Food Science and Technology.
(India). ISSN 0022-1155. 48(3):274-279.
Horton, D.; Thiele, G.; Oros, R.; Andrade-Piedra, J. ; Velasco, C.; Devaux, A. 2011. Knowledge management
for pro-poor innovation: The Papa Andina case. Knowledge Management for Development Journal. ISSN
1947-4199. 7(1):65-83.
Ierna, A.; Tenorio, J. 2011. Eects of pre-sowing treatment on plant emergence and seedling vigour in true
potato seed. The Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology. ISSN 1462-0316. 86(5):467-472.
Khazaie, H.; Mohammady, S.; Monneveux, P.; Stoddard, F. 2011. The determination of direct and indirect
eects of carbon isotope discrimination () stomatal characteristics and water use eciency on grain yield

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 39

in wheat using sequential path analysis. Australian Journal of Crop Science. (Australia). ISSN 1835-2693.
5(4):466-472.
Kromann, P.; Pradel, W. ; Cole, D.; Taipe, A.; Forbes, G.A. 2011. Use of the environmental impact quotient
to estimate health and environmental impacts of pesticide usage in Peruvian and Ecuadorian potato
production. Journal of Environmental Protection. ISSN 2152-2197. 2(5):581-591.
Legay, S.; Lefevre, I.; Lamoureux, D.; Barreda, C.; Tincopa Luz, R.; Gutierrez, R.; Quiroz, R.; Homan,
L.; Hausman, J.F.; Bonierbale, M.; Evers, D.; Schaeitner, R. 2011. Carbohydrate metabolism and cell
protection mechanisms dierentiate drought tolerance and sensitivity in advanced potato clones
(Solanum tuberosum L.). Functional and Integrative Genomics. (USA). ISSN 1438-793X. 11(2):275-291.
Li, C.; Wang, J.; Chien, D.H.; Chujoy, E.; Song, B.; Zaag, P. vander. 2011. Cooperation-88: A high yielding,
multi-purpose, late blight resistant cultivar growing in Southwest China. American Journal of Potato
Research. (USA). ISSN 1099-209X. 88(2):190-194.
Mamani, D.; Sporleder, M.; Kroschel, J. 2011. Efecto de materiales inertes de formulas bioinsecticidas
en la proteccion de tuberculos almacenados contra las polillas de papa. Revista Peruana de Entomologia.
(Peru). ISSN 0080-2425. 46(2):43-49.
Mekonen, S.; Alemu, T.; Kassa, B.; Forbes, G. 2011. Evaluation of contact fungicide spray regimes for control
of late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in southern Ethiopia using potato cultivars with dierent levels of
host resistance. Tropical Plant Pathology. (Brazil). ISSN 1982-5676. 36(1):21-27.
Mujica, N.; Kroschel, J. 2011. Leafminer y (Diptera: Agromyzidae) occurrence, distribution, and parasitoid
associations in eld and vegetable crops along the Peruvian coast. Environmental Entomology. (USA). ISSN
0046-225X. 40(2):217-230.
Mwanga, R.O.M.; Niringiye, C.; Alajo, A.; Kigozi, B.; Namukula, J.; Mpembe, I.; Tumwegamire, S.; Gibson,
R.W.; Yencho, C.G. 2011. NASPOT 11, a sweetpotato cultivar bred by participatory plant-breeding approach
in Uganda. HortScience. (USA). ISSN 0018-5345. 46(2):317-321.
Mwanga, R.O.M.; Ssemakula, G. 2011. Orange-eshed sweetpotatoes for food, health and wealth in
Uganda. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability. (UK). ISSN 1473-5903. 9(1):42-49.
Namanda, S.; Gibson, R.; Sindi, K. 2011. Sweetpotato seed systems in Uganda, Tanzania, and Rwanda.
Journal of Sustainable Agriculture. (USA). ISSN 1044-0046. 35(8):870-884.
Nelles, W. 2011. Environmental education, sustainable agriculture, and CGIAR: History and future
prospects. Comparative Education Review. (USA). ISSN 0010-4086. 55(3):398-423.
Njenga, M.; Karanja, N.; Prain, G.; Lee-Smith, D.; Pigeon, M. 2011. Gender mainstreaming in
organisational culture and agricultural research processes. Development in Practice. (UK). ISSN 0961-4524.
21(3):362-373.
Ordinola, M. 2011. Innovaciones y desarrollo: El caso de la cadena de la papa en el Peru. Revista
Latinoamericana de la Papa. (Colombia). ISSN 1019-6609. 16(1):39-57.
Ortiz, O.; Orrego, R.; Pradel, W.; Gildemacher, P.; Castillo, R.; Otiniano, R.; Gabriel, J.; Vallejo, J.; Torres, O.;
Woldegiorgis, G.; Damene, B.; Kakuhenzire, R.; Kasahija, I.; Kahiu, I. 2011. Incentives and disincentives
for stakeholder involvement in participatory research (PR): lessons from potato-related PR from Bolivia,
Ethiopia, Peru and Uganda. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability. (UK). ISSN 1473-5903.
9(4):522-536.
Oyarzun, P.J.; Krijger, A.K.; Garzon, C.D.; Leon, D.; Kromann, P.; Yuen, J.E.; Forbes, G.A. 2011. Evaluation of
host susceptibility, pathogen aggressiveness and sporangial survival in soil as factors aecting incidence of
potato tuber infection by Phytophthora infestans in Ecuador. Tropical Plant Pathology. (Brazil). ISSN 19825676. 36(3):141-149.
Patil, B.L.; Ogwok, E.; Wagaba, H.; Mohammed, I.U.; Yadav, J.S.; Bagewadi, B.; Taylor, N.J.; Kreuze, J.F.;
Maruthi, M.N.; Alicai, T.; Fauquet, C.M. 2011. RNAi-mediated resistance to diverse isolates belonging to two

40 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

virus species involved in Cassava brown streak disease. Molecular Plant Pathology. (UK). ISSN 1464-6722.
12(1):31-41.
Quiroz, R.; Yarleque, C.; Posadas, A.; Mares, V.; Immerzeel, W.W. 2011. Improving daily rainfall estimation
from NDVI using a wavelet transform. Environmental Modelling & Software. (Netherlands). ISSN 1364-8152.
26(2):201-209.
Rana, R.K.; Sharma Neeraj, K.; Kadian, M.S.; Girish, B.H.; Arya, S.; Campilan, D.; Pandey, S.K.; Carli, C.; Patel,
N.H.; Singh, B.P. 2011. Perception of Gujarat farmers on heat-tolerant potato varieties. Potato Journal.
(India). ISSN 0970-8235. 38(2):121-129.
Rios, A.A.; Kroschel, J. 2011. Evaluation and implications of Andean potato weevil infestation sources
for its management in the Andean region. Journal of Applied Entomology. (Germany). ISSN 0931-2048.
135(10):738-748.
Roullier, C.; Rossel, G.; Tay, D.; McKey, D.; Lebot, V. 2011. Combining chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites
to investigate origin and dispersal of New World sweet potato landraces. Molecular Ecology. (UK). ISSN
0962-1083. 20(19):3963-3977.
Savary, S.; Nelson, A.; Sparks, A.H.; Willocquet, L.; Duveiller, E.; Mahuku, G.; Forbes, G.; Garrett, K.A.; Hodson,
D.; Padgham, J.; Pande, S.; Sharma, M.; Yuen, J.; Djurle, A. 2011. International agricultural research tackling
the eects of global and climate changes on plant diseases in the developing world. Plant Disease. (USA).
ISSN 0191-2917. 95(10):1204-1216.
Scott, G.J.; Suarez, V. 2011. Growth rates for potato in India and their implications for industry. Potato
Journal. (India). ISSN 0970-8235. 38(2):100-112.
Segnini, A.; Posadas, A.; Quiroz, R.; Milori, D.M.B.P.; Vaz, C.M.P.; Neto, L.M. 2011. Soil carbon stocks and
stability across an altitudinal gradient in southern Peru. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation. (USA). ISSN
0022-4561. 66(4):213-220.
Sharma, N.; Kumar, P.; Kadian, M.S.; Pandey, S.K.; Singh, S.V.; Luthra, S.K. 2011. Performance of potato
(Solanum tuberosum) clones under water stress. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences. (India). ISSN 00195022. 81(9):825-829.
Silvestre, R.; Untiveros, M.; Cuellar, W.J. 2011. First report of potato yellowing virus (Genus Ilarvirus) in
Solanum phureja from Ecuador. Plant Disease. (USA). ISSN 0191-2917. 95(3):355.
Simon, R.; Fuentes, A.F.; Spooner, D.M. 2011. Biogeographic implications of the striking discovery of a
4,000 kilometer disjunct population of the wild potato Solanum morelliforme in South America. Systematic
Botany. (USA). ISSN 0363-6445. 36(4):1062-1067.
Sparks, A.H.; Forbes, G.A.; Hijmans, R.J.; Garrett, K.A. 2011. A metamodeling framework for extending the
application domain of process-based ecological models. Ecosphere. (USA). ISSN 2150-8925. 2(8):14 p.
Temme, A.J.A.M.; Claessens, L.; Veldkamp, A.; Schoorl, J.M. 2011. Evaluating choices in multi-process
landscape evolution models. Geomorphology. (Netherlands). ISSN 0169-555X. 125(2):271-281.
Thiele, G.; Devaux, A.; Reinoso, I.; Pico, H.; Montesdeoca, F.; Pumisacho, M.; Andrade-Piedra, J.; Velasco,
C.; Flores, P.; Esprella, R.; Thomann, A.; Manrique, K.; Horton, D. 2011. Multi-stakeholder platforms for
linking small farmers to value chains: Evidence from the Andes. International Journal of Agricultural
Sustainability. (UK). ISSN 1473-5903. 9(3):423-433.
Tumwegamire, S.; Kapinga, R.; Rubaihayo, P.R.; LaBonte, D.R.; Gruneberg, W.J.; Burgos, G.; Felde, T.
zum.; Carpio, R.; Pawelzik, E.; Mwanga, R.O.M. 2011. Evaluation of dry matter, protein, starch, sucrose,
-carotene, Iron, Zinc, Calcium, and Magnesium in East African sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam]
germplasm. HortScience. (USA). ISSN 0018-5345. 46(3):348-357.
Tumwegamire, S.; Rubaihayo, P.R.; LaBonte, D.R.; Diaz, F.; Kapinga, R.; Mwanga, R.O.M.; Gruneberg,
W.J. 2011. Genetic diversity in white- and orange-eshed sweetpotato farmer varieties from East Africa
evaluated by simple sequence repeat markers. Crop Science. (USA). ISSN 0011-183X. 51(3):1132-1142.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 41

Vimala, B.; Sreekanth, A.; Binu, H.; Gruneberg, W. 2011. Variability in 42 orange-eshed sweet potato
hybrids for tuber yield and carotene and dry matter content. Gene Conserve. (Brazil). ISSN 1808-1878.
10(41):190-200.
Xu, X.; Pan, P.; Cheng, S.; Zhang, B.; Mu, D.; Ni, P.; Zhang, G.; Yang, S.; Li, R.; Wang, J.; Orjeda, G.; Guzman, F.;
Torres, M.; Lozano, R.; Ponce, O.; Martinez, D.; Cruz, G. de la.; Chakrabarti, S.K.; Patil, V.U.; Skryabin, K.G.;
Kuznetsov, B.B.; Ravin, N.V.; Kolganova, T.V.; Beletsky, A.V.; Mardanov, A.V.; Genova, A.D.; Bolser, D.M.;
Martin, D.M.A.; Li, G.; Yang, Y.; Kuang, H.; Hu, Q.; Xiong, X.; Bishop, G.J.; Sagredo, B.; Mejia, N.; Zagorski, W.;
Gromadka, R.; Gawor, J.; Szczesny, P.; Huang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Liang, C.; He, J.; Li, Y.; He, Y.; Xu, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, B.;
Du, Y.; Qu, D.; Bonierbale, M.; Ghislain, M.; Herrera, M.R.; Giuliano, G.; Pietrella, M.; Perrotta, G.; Facella, P.;
OBrien, K; Feingold, S.E.; Barreiro, L.E.; Massa, G.A.; Diambra, L.; Whitty, B.R.; Vaillancourt, B.; Lin, H.; Massa,
A.N.; Georoy, M.; Lundback, S.; DellaPenna, D.; Buell, R.; Sharma, S.K.; Marshall, D.F.; Waugh, R.; Bryan, G.J.;
Destefanis, M.; Nagy, I.; Milbourne, D.; Thomson, S.J.; Fiers, M.; Jacobs, J.M.E.; Nielsen, K.L.; Sonderkaer, M.;
Iovene, M.; Torres, G.A.; Jiang, J.; Veilleux, R.E.; Bachem, C.W.B.; Boer, J. de.; Borm, T.; Kloosterman, B.; Eck, H.
van.; Datema, E.; Lintel Hekkert, B. te.; Goverse, A.; Ham, R.C.H.J. van.; Visser, R.G.F. 2011. Genome sequence
and analysis of the tuber crop potato. Nature. (USA). ISSN 0028-0836. 475(7355):189-195.
Yada, B.; Tukamuhabwa, P.; Alajo, A.; Mwanga, R.O.M. 2011. Field evaluation of Ugandan sweetpotato
germplasm for yield, dry matter and disease resistance. South African Journal of Plant and Soil. (South
Africa). ISSN 0257-1862. 28(2):142-146.
Zuniga, N.; Cabrera, H.; Gastelo, M.; Haan, S. de.; Cabello, R.; Pacheco, M.A. 2011. Avances de
mejoramiento genetico de papa en la ultima decada en Peru. AgroInnova. (Peru). 2(6):22-23.

Books, Book Chapters, Conference Papers


Alcazar, J.; Baimey, H.; Kroschel, J. 2011. Patogenicidad de aislamientos nativos de nematodos
entomopatogenos procedentes de la region andina. In: Sociedad Entomologica del Peru (SEP), Lima.
Resumenes. 53. Convencion Nacional de Entomologia. Lima (Peru). 7-10 Nov 2011. Lima (Peru). SEP;
Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. ISBN 978-612-46103-0-1. p. 13. ISSN 2225-362.
Andrade Piedra, J.; Reinoso, J.; Ayala, S. (eds). 2011. Memorias del IV Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa.
Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton
Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP;
Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP).
131 p
Arimod, M.; Hawkes, C.; Ruel, M.T.; Sifri, Z.; Berti, P.R.; Leroy, J.L.; Low, J.W.; Brown, L.R.; Frongillo, E.A. 2011.
Agricultural interventions and nutrition: Lessons from the past and new evidence. In: Thompson, B.
Amoroso, L. (eds). Combating micronutrient deciencies: Food-based approaches. Oxfordshire (UK). CAB
International; FAO. ISBN 978-1-84593-714-0. pp. 41-75.
Ashby, J.; Heinrich, G.; Burpee, G.; Remington, T.; Ferris, S.; Wilson, K.; Quiros, C. 2011. Preparing groups
of poor farmers for market engagement: Five key skill sets. In: Batiano, A. Waswa, B. Okeyo, J.M. Maina, F.
Kihara, J. (eds). Innovations as key to the Green Revolution in Africa: Exploring the scientic facts. Dordrecht
(Germany). Springer. ISBN 978-90-481-2541-8. v. 1. pp. 103-111.
Bievre, B. de; Calle, T. 2011. El manejo del paramo y los limites para el cultivo de papas: Algunas
reexiones desde la experiencia del proyecto Paramo Andino. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala,
S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda
(Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura,
Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo
Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio CIP. pp. 38-40.

42 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Caedo, V.; Alfaro, A.; Kroschel, J. 2011. Manejo integrado de plagas de insectos en hortalizas: Principios
y referencias tecnicas para la Sierra Central de Peru. Lima (Peru). Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). ISBN
978-92-9060-407-5. 48 p.
Caedo, V.; Kroschel, J. 2011. Abundancia y diversidad de Carbidae presente en los campos de papa
de la Sierra central del Peru. In: Sociedad Entomologica del Peru (SEP), Lima. Resumenes. 53. Convencion
Nacional de Entomologia. Lima (Peru). 7-10 Nov 2011. Lima (Peru). SEP; Universidad Nacional Agraria La
Molina. ISBN 978-612-46103-0-1. p. 42.
Canepa, P.; Panta, A.; Tay, D. 2011. The eect of antioxidants on the cryopreservation recovery of two
potato cultivars following post-thawing culture. In: Panis, B. Lynch, P. (eds). Proceedings of the First
International Symposium on Cryopreservation in Horticultural Species. 1. International Symposium on
Cryopreservation in Horticultural Species. Leuven (Belgium). 05-08 Apr 2009. Bologna (Italy). International
Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS). ISBN 978-90-66054-70-7. pp. 101-105. Acta Horticulturae. ISSN
0567-7572. no.908.
Cayambe, J.; Montesdeoca, F.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Produccion de semilla prebasica de papa en
el sistema aeroponico en Ecuador: Evaluacion de soluciones nutritivas. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso,
J. Ayala, S.(eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011.
Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura,
Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo
Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio CIP. pp. 101-104.
Devaux, A.; Andrade Piedra, J.; Ordinola, M.; Velasco, C.; Hareau, G. 2011. La papa y la seguridad
alimentaria en la region andina: Situacion actual y desaos para la innovacion. In: Andrade Piedra, J.
Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun
2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda Ministerio de
Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca Universidad Estatal de Bolivar INIAP Consorcio de la Papa FAO
Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 10-14.
Devaux, A.; Ordinola, M.; Horton, D. (eds). 2011. Innovation for development: The Papa Andina
experience. Lima (Peru). International Potato Center (CIP). ISBN 978-92-9060-410-5. 418 p.
Espinoza, S.; Montesdeoca, L.; Vasquez, P.; Pallo, E.; Acosta, M.; Quishpe, C.; Lopez, J.; Monteros, C.; Haro, F.;
Yumisaca, F.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Papas nativas de colores: Un negocio con responsabilidad social.
In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda
(Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda
Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio
de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 20-21.
Fonseca, C.; Ordinola, M. 2011. Mejorando la competitividad de la agroindustria rural: El caso de la
tunta en el altiplano peruano. Lima (Peru). Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP); Proyecto INCOPA;
Alianza Institucional de la Papa y Derivados; Iniciativa Papa Andina; Agencia Suiza para el Desarrollo y la
Cooperacion (COSUDE). ISBN 978-92-9060-412-9. 62 p.
Gibson, R.W.; Mpembe, I.; Mwanga, R.O.M. 2011. The role of participatory plant breeding as exemplied
by the release of the sweetpotato variety NASPOT 11 in Uganda in 2010. In: Halford, N. Semenov, M. (eds).
Systems approaches to crop improvement. Wellesbourne (UK). Association of Applied Biologists. 71-76.
Aspects of Applied Biology. ISSN 0265-1491. no.107.
Hibon, A.; Adegbola, P.Y.; Hell, K.; Thiele, G. 2011. Contraintes et opportunites pour lintroduction de
nouveaux produits sur les marches locaux des racines et tubercules au Benin. Lima (Peru). International
Potato Center (CIP). Social Sciences. 54 p. Social Sciences Working Paper. ISSN 0256-8748. no.2011-4.
Juarez, H.; Plasencia, F.; Haan, S. de. 2011. Zooming in on the secret life of genetic resources in potatoes:
High technology meets old-fashioned footwork. Esri Conservation Map Book. Redlands (USA). Esri. pp. 64-67.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 43

Kroschel, J.; Caedo, V.; Alcazar, J.; Miethbauer, T. 2011. Manejo de plagas de la papa en la region
andina del Peru. Lima (Peru). Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). ISBN 978-92-9060-409-9. 85 p. Guia de
Capacitacion.
Kroschel, J.; Sporleder, M.; Juarez, H.; Tonnang, H.; Carhuapoma, P.; Gonzales, J.C. 2011. Como el
cambio climatico afectara la distribucion y abundancia de la polilla de la papa: Un analisis utilizando
modelos fenologicos y sistemas de informacion geogracas. In: Sociedad Entomologica del Peru (SEP),
Lima. Resumenes. 53. Convencion Nacional de Entomologia. Lima (Peru). 7-10 Nov 2011. Lima (Peru). SEP;
Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. ISBN 978-612-46103-0-1. p. 23. ISSN 2225-362.
Kroschel, J.; Alcazar, J.; Caedo, V.; Miethbauer, T.; Zegarra, O. 2011. Introduccion y difusion de un
nuevo manejo integrado de plagas de la papa en la sierra central del Peru. In: Sociedad Entomologica del
Peru (SEP), Lima. Resumenes. 53. Convencion Nacional de Entomologia. Lima (Peru). 7-10 Nov 2011. Lima
(Peru). SEP; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. ISBN 978-612-46103-0-1. p. 31. ISSN 2225-362.
Kwambai, T.K.; Omunyin, M.E.; Okalebo, J.R.; Kinyua, Z.M.; Gildemacher, P. 2011. Assessment of potato
bacterial wilt disease status in North Rift Valley of Kenya: A survey. In: Batiano, A. Waswa, B. Okeyo, J.M.
Maina, F. Kihara, J. (eds). Innovations as key to the Green Revolution in Africa: Exploring the scientic facts.
Dordrecht (Germany). Springer. ISBN 978-90-481-2541-8. v. 1. pp. 449-456.
Maila, G.; Taipe, A.; Forbes, G.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Validacion del simulador de epidemias late blight
LB2004 con clones precoces y resistentes de papa (Solanum tuberosum). In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso,
J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011.
Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura,
Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo
Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 124-127.
Maldonado, L.; Fonseca, C.; Ordinola, M. 2011. Estudio de caso: Evaluacion de impacto de la intervencion
del proyecto INCOPA en Puno. Lima (Peru). Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP); Proyecto INCOPA;
Iniciativa Papa Andina. ISBN 978-92-9060-406-8. 67 p.
Maldonado, L.; Ordinola, M.; Manrique, K.; Fonseca, C.; Sevilla, M.; Delgado, O. 2011. Estudio de caso:
Evaluacion de impacto de la intervencion del proyecto INCOPA/CAPAC en Andahuaylas. Lima (Peru). Centro
Internacional de la Papa (CIP); Proyecto INCOPA; Iniciativa Papa Andina. ISBN 978-92-9060-401-3. 84 p.
Mencias, D.; Paucar, B.; Montesdeoca, F.; Taipe, A.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Evaluacion de bacterias en
la produccion de semilla prebasica de papa. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4.
Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno
Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia , Acuacultura y
Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum
Progressio; CIP. pp. 105-107.
Misiko, M.; Almekinders, C.; Barker, I.; Borus, D.; Oggema, J.; Mukalama, J. 2011. Kenya: A company, a
cooperative and a family. In: Mele, P. Van Bentley, J.W. Guei, R.G. (eds). African seed enterprises: Sowing the
seeds of food security. Wallingford (UK). CAB International. ISBN 978-1-84593-843-7. pp. 142-155.
Monneveux, P.; Ribaut, J.M. (eds.). 2011. Drought phenotyping in crops: From theory to practice. Texcoco
(Mexico). CGIAR Generation Challenge Programme; International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center
(CIMMYT). ISBN 978-970-648-178-8. 2 v.
Monneveux, P.; Ribaut, J.M. (eds.). 2011. Plant phenotyping methodology. Texcoco (Mexico). CGIAR
Generation Challenge Programme; International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). ISBN
978-970-648-178-8. v.1, 211 p.
Monneveux, P.; Ribaut, J.M. (eds.). 2011. Application to specic crops. Texcoco (Mexico). CGIAR Generation
Challenge Programme; International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). v.2, 475 p.
Morales, W.; Taipe, P.; Forbes, G. 2011. Concentracion e infeccion de esporangios de Phytophthora
infestans (Mont.) de Bary en pre-emergencia de tuberculos de papa (Solanum tuberosum). In: Andrade

44 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 2830 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio
de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa;
FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 69-71.
Morocho, M.; Yumisaca, F.; Monteros, C.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Efecto de epocas de cosechas de tres
cultivares de papa (Solanum tuberosum L.) sobre el rendimiento y calidad de fritura para hojuelas de
colores. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa.
Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton
Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP;
Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 91-92.
Orrego, R.; Manrique, K.; Quevedo, M.; Ortiz, O. 2011. Mejorando la calidad de nuestra semilla de papa
mediante la seleccion de las mejores plantas, seleccion positiva: Guia de campo para agricultores. Lima
(Peru). Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). ISBN 978-92-9060-403-7. 71 p.
Pallo, E.; Taipe, A.; Yumisaca, F.; Panchi, N.; Espinoza, J.; Montesdeoca, F.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011.
Efecto de la seleccion positiva en el rendimiento del cultivo de papa. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso,
J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011.
Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura,
Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo
Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 111-113.
Panchi, N.; Taipe, A.; Yumisaca, F.; Pallo, E.; Montesdeoca, F.; Espinoza, S.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011.
Enfermedades y plagas que afectan la calidad de la semilla de papa y efecto de la seleccion positiva. In:
Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda
(Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda
Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia , Acuacultura y Pesca Universidad Estatal de Bolivar INIAP Consorcio
de la Papa FAO Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio CIP. pp. 108-110.
Panchi, N.; Pallo, E.; Montesdeoca, F.; Yumisaca, F.; Espinoza, S.; Taipe, A.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011.
Produzcamos nuestra semilla de papa de buena calidad: Guia para el agricultor. In: Andrade Piedra, J.
Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun
2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de
Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa;
FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 118-119.
Panta, A.; Tay, D.; Ynouye, C.; Roca, W. 2011. The eect of pre-culture temperature treatment on the
cryopreservation of potato shoot-tips. In: Panis, B. Lynch, P. (eds). Proceedings of the First International
Symposium on Cryopreservation in Horticultural Species. 1. International Symposium on Cryopreservation
in Horticultural Species. Leuven (Belgium). 05-08 Apr 2009. Bologna (Italy). International Society for
Horticultural Science (ISHS). ISBN 978-90-66054-70-7. pp. 509-512. Acta Horticulturae. ISSN 0567-7572.
no.908.
Park, Y.; Cho, K.; Cho, J.; Chang, D.; Kim, H.; Cho, H.; Landeo, J. 2011. Evaluation of late blight resistance and
agronomic characteristics for B3C1 clones and its segregating progenies under long-day conditions in
Korea. 94. Annual Meeting of the Potato Association of America. Corvallis (USA). 15-19 Aug 2010. American
Journal of Potato Research. (USA). ISSN 1099-209X. 88(1):60.
Paron, P.; Claessens, L. 2011. Makers and users of geomorphological maps. In: Smith, M. Paron, P. Griths,
J.S. (eds). Geomorphological mapping. Methods and applications. Oxford (UK). Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-44453446-0. pp. 75-106. Developments in Earth Surface Processes. ISSN 0928-2025. no.15.
Perez, W.; Forbes, G. 2011. Guia de identicacion de plagas que afectan a la papa en la zona andina. Lima
(Peru). Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP). ISBN 978-92-9060-402-0. 48 p.
Quiroz, R.; Posadas, A.; Yarleque, C.; Heidinger, H.; Barreda, C.; Raymundo, R.; Carbajal, M.; Loayza,
H.; Tonnang, H.; Kroschel, J.; Forbes, G.; Haan, S. de. 2011. Retos para la produccion sostenible de papas

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 45

en un clima cambiante: Una perspectiva de investigacion. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds).
Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador).
Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia,
Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano
Populorum Progressio; CIP. p. 37.
Rio, A. del.; Bamberg, J.; Centeno-Diaz, R.; Soto, J.; Salas, A.; Roca, W.; Tay, D. 2011. Microsatellite (SSR)
marker analysis to examine the eects of pesticide contamination on the genetic diversity of potato
species. 94. Annual Meeting of the Potato Association of America. Corvallis (USA). 15-19 Aug 2010.
American Journal of Potato Research. (USA). ISSN 1099-209X. 88(1):35-36.
Sanchez, D.F.; Panta, A.; Tay, D.; Roca, W. 2011. Cryopreservation of ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus Cal.) and
oca (Oxalis tuberosa Mol.) shoot tips using the PVS2 droplet-vitrication method. In: Panis, B. Lynch, P. (eds).
Proceedings. 1. International Symposium on Cryopreservation in Horticultural Species. Leuven (Belgium).
05-08 Apr 2009. Bologna (Italy). International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS). ISBN 978-90-6605470-7. pp. 339-346. Acta Horticulturae. ISSN 0567-7572. no.908.
Schaeitner, R.; Ramirez, J.; Jarvis, A.; Evers, D.; Gutierrez, R.; Scurrah, M. 2011. Adaptation of the potato
crop to changing climates. In: Yadav, S.S. Redden, R.J. Hateld, J.L. Lotze-Campen, H. Hall, A.E. (eds). Crop
adaptation to climate change. Oxford (UK). John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-8138-2016-3. pp. 287-297.
Segnini, A.; Souza, A.A.; Novotny, E.H.; Bonagamba, T.J.; Posadas, A.; Quiroz, R.; Milori, D.M.B.P.; Neto, L.M.
2011. Characterization of peatland soils from the high Andes by 13C NMR spectroscopy. 15. Meeting of
The International Humic Substances Society. Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, Islas Canarias (Spain). 27 Jun - 2 Jul
2010. (Spain). IHSS. v. 2, pp. 352-355.
Taipe, P.; Forbes, G.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Estimacion del nivel de susceptibilidad a Phytophthora
infestans en genotipos de papa. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso
Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo
Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca;
Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio;
CIP. pp. 72-74.
Torres, L.; Montesdeoca, F.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Oferta y demanda de innovaciones tecnologicas en
un contexto de mercado con agricultores alto andinos de baja escala: Caso CONPAPA. In: Andrade Piedra,
J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun
2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de
Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa;
FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 24-26.
Torres, L.; Montesdeoca, F.; Gallegos, P.; Castillo, C.; Asaquibay, C.; Valverde, F.; Orozco, F.; Perez, C.;
Monteros, C.; Cuesta, X.; Taipe, A.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Inventario de tecnologias de papa generadas
por INIAP y CIP en Ecuador. In: Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso
Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda (Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo
Descentralizado del canton Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca;
Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP; Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio;
CIP. pp. 130-131.
Triveno, G.; Ordinola, M.; Samanamud, K.; Fonseca, C.; Manrique, K.; Quevedo, M. 2011. Buenas practicas
para el desarrollo de la cadena productiva de la papa: Experiencias con el proyecto INCOPA en el Peru. Lima
(Peru). Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP); Proyecto INCOPA; Iniciativa Papa Andina. ISBN 978-92-9060405-1. 126 p.
Vasquez, L.; Caedo, V.; Kroschel, J. 2011. Evaluacion del efecto de Spinosad, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp.
tenebrionis y nematodos entomopatogenicos sobre la pulguilla de la papa Epitrix yanazara Bechyne 1959
(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) en papa (Solanum tuberosum). In: Sociedad Entomologica del Peru (SEP),

46 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Lima. Resumenes. 53. Convencion Nacional de Entomologia. Lima (Peru). 7-10 Nov 2011. Lima (Peru). SEP;
Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. ISBN 978-612-46103-0-1. p. 56.
Walker, T.; Thiele, G.; Suarez, V.; Crissman, C. 2011. Hindsight and foresight about sweetpotato production
and consumption. Lima (Peru). International Potato Center (CIP). Social Science. 25 p. Social Sciences
Working Paper. ISSN 0256-8748. no.2011-6.
Woolley, J.; Johnson, V.B.; Ospina, B.; Lemaga, B.; Jordan, T.; Harrison, G.; Thiele, G. 2011. Incorporating
stakeholder perspectives in international agricultural research: The case of the CGIAR Research Program
for Roots, Tubers and Bananas for food security and income. Lima (Peru). International Potato Center (CIP).
Social Science Department. 45 p. Social Sciences Working Paper. ISSN 0256-8748. no.2011-3.
Yumisaca, F.; Morocho, M.; Aucancela, R.; Vasquez, P.; Monteros, C.; Andrade Piedra, J. 2011. Conservacion
in situ y reintroduccion de papas nativas con pequenos agricultores de la provincia de Chimborazo. In:
Andrade Piedra, J. Reinoso, J. Ayala, S. (eds). Memorias. 4. Congreso Ecuatoriano de la Papa. Guaranda
(Ecuador) 28-30 Jun 2011. Guaranda (Ecuador). Gobierno Autonomo Descentralizado del canton
Guaranda; Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Acuacultura y Pesca; Universidad Estatal de Bolivar; INIAP;
Consorcio de la Papa; FAO; Fondo Ecuatoriano Populorum Progressio; CIP. pp. 86-87.
Zaag, P. vander.; Anderson, P.K.; Godfrey, J.E.; Best, S.G. 2011. Roots for life: Securing the world potato
collection for future generations. 94. Annual Meeting of the Potato Association of America. Corvallis (USA).
15-19 Aug 2010. American Journal of Potato Research. (USA). ISSN 1099-209X. 88(1):67.

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 47

48 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

CIP in 2011

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 49

FINANCIAL REPORT

The International Potato Centers total revenues reached


US$33.8M in 2011, 2% below those of 2010. They
included US$9.2M of unrestricted contributions, US$24M
of restricted donations and US$0.6M of other revenues,
consisting of interests earned on investments and
exchange rate gains.

Unrestricted contributions decreased by USD$2.2M in


2011 from USD$11.4M to USD$9.2M as a result of the
transition from unrestricted contributions to the new
CGIAR Research Programs, which are considered restricted
contributions. Restricted contributions increased by
USD$1.6M from USD$22.4M to USD$24M.
During 2011, 41 new restricted proposals were submitted
to donors, for a total of US$30.5M. In this same period, 36
proposals were approved, for a total value of US$22.1M.

Revenues (US$ thousands)


24,000
18,000

Expenditures (US$ thousands)

12,000
24,000
6,000
18,000

Restricted

Unrestricted
2008

2009

2010

12,000
2011

6,000

Restricted

Unrestricted

CIP achieved a USD$ 0.07M surplus in 2011. The Centers


reserves, measured as net assets minus net fixed assets
were USD$8.1M, a slight decrease with respect to 2010
due to the utilization of USD$0.6M in designated Net
Assets for the implementation of a new Enterprise
Resource Planning system.

2008

Financial Reserves (US$ thousands)

Indirect Cost Ratio

9,000

25%

8,000

20%

7,000

15%

6,000

10%

5,000

2009

2010

2011

31.4%

30.6%

2010

2011

30%

5%
2006

2007

50 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

2008

2009

2010

2011

2009

Unrestricted expenditures decreased by 10% from


US$10.8M to US$9.7M. CIPs indirect cost ratio reached
20.6%. In 2010, the Center finished the revision of its
cost structure and cost allocation methods in line with
full costing principles in FG5. The 2009 indirect rate was
revised for comparison.
The liquidity indicator (measured as net working capital
plus long-term investments divided by the daily average
expenditures excluding depreciation) decreased from 120
days in 2010 to 113 days in 2011. The financial stability
indicator (calculated as the unrestricted net assets minus
net fixed assets, divided by the daily average expenditures
excluding depreciation) decreased from 100 days to 92
days in 2011. Both indicators are within the acceptable
ranges of the CGIAR.

Liquidity (Acceptable range 90/120 days)

Audited financial statements


Statement of financial position
Year ending December 31, 2011 and 2010 (USD $000)

120

100

97

DAYS

112

104

99
93

96

93

80

US$

Current assets
Cash and cash equivalent

7,775

3,147

15,135

17,060

4,032

5,593

Employees

123

160

Others

672

309

Investments
Account receivable:
Donors

Inventory

343

578

Advances

2,525

1,464

Total current assets

399

225

31,004

28,536

66

581

Non-current assets

92

Investments, non-current

60
40

2010

US$
ASSETS

Prepaid expenses
120

2011

Furnishing and equipment, net

51

Total non-current assets

20

Total assets

4,431

4,484

4,497

5,065

35,501

33,601

2011

2010

US$

US$

15,272

12,681

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Liabilities and net assets


Current liabilities

Adequacy of Reserves (Acceptable range -75/90 days)

Accounts payable
Donors

120

Employees

100

Others

104
97

DAYS

80

95

93

89

93

90

92

84

60
40

Accruals and provisions


Total current liabilities

51

20

Accruals and provisions


2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

217
5,512

399

430

21,093

18,840

1,260

1,003

Non- current liabilities


Employees

231
5,191

Total non-current liabilities


Total liabilities

597

707

1,857

1,710

22,950

20,550

Net assets

CIPs financial position as of December 2011 is presented


in the table below. A copy of the complete audited
financial statements may be requested from the office
of the Director for Finance and Administration at CIP
headquarters in Lima, Peru.

Designated

6,001

6,661

Undesignated

6,550

6,390

Total net assets

12,551

13,051

35,501

33,601

Total liabilities and net assets

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 51

DONOR LIST
STATEMENT OF GRANT REVENUE Donors (For the year ending 31 December, 2011) (US$ 000)

Unrestricted

CGIAR Secretariat
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Government of Belgium
Government of Switzerland
Global Enviroment Facility (GEF)
Irish Aid
Government of Germany (BMZ/GIZ)
Government of Australia
Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)
Cabinda Gulf Oil Company Limited (Chevron)
Government of Canada
Government of Spain
New Zealand Aid Programme (NZAID)
Common Fund for Commodities (CFC)
African Development Bank
UK Department for International Development (DFID)
Food and Agriculture Organization of The United Nations (FAO)
HarvestPlus Challenge Program
Government of Peru
Fondo Regional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (FONTAGRO)
European Commission
Government of China
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD)
Government of Austria
The McKnight Foundation
Government of The Republic of Korea
The Global Crop Diversity Trust
CGIAR Systemwide Livestock Programme (SLP)
Government of India
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
National Science Foundation (NSF)
The Howard G. Buett Foundation (HGBF)
Fundacin Accion Contra el Hambre
Government of Denmark
The Scottish Government International Development Fund
Government of Colombia
ICGEB-TWAS-UNESCO/IBSP Joint Programme on Capacity Building in Basic Molecular Biology
International Development Research Centre (IDRC)
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD)
Generation Challenge Program (GCP)
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)
Aid for Africa
Government of Finland
Government of Philippines
Government of Ecuador
The OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID)
Conservation International Foundation
Asociacin Pataz
Syngenta Crop Protection AG
International Fund for Agricultural Research (IFAR)
FONDOEMPLEO
TOTAL

52 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

4,933

1,954
1,089
215
343
519

120

Restricted

Total

3,634
5,261
3,490

8,567
5,261
3,490
1,954
1,608
1,543
1,517
1,464
930
737
695
635
577
486
378
368
308
300
289
231
208
169
144
129
126
120
115
110
107
102
86
74
56
40
39
38
26
22
21
20
19
17
16
16
12
12
10
7
7
6
4
4
3
2

519
1,543
1,302
1,121
411
737
695
635
577
486
378
368
308
300
289
231
208
169
144
9
126
120
115
110
107
102
86
74
56
40
39
38
26
22
21
20
19
17
16
16

12
12
10
7
7
6
4
4
3
2
9,194

24,030 33,224

GLOBAL CONTACT POINTS

24
18

CHINA

INDIA
19 2122
23
20
11

8 9

ECUADOR
2

13 12
14

PERU

3 4

26

KENYA
5
6

10
7

25

15
16
17

CIP
Headquarters

Latin America and


the Caribbean (LAC)
Regional Oce

Country Oces:
1. Cali (Colombia)
2. Quito (Ecuador)
3. Lima (Peru)
4. Huancayo (Peru)
5. San Ramon (Peru)
6. Cochabamba (Bolivia)

Sub-Saharan
Africa (SSA)
Regional Oce

7. Sao Carlos (Brazil)


8. Kumasi (Ghana)
9. Cotonou (Benin)
10. Huambo (Angola)
11. Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)
12. Nairobi (Kenya)
13. Kampala (Uganda)

South, West and


Central Asia (SWCA)
Regional Oce

14. Ruhengeri (Rwanda)


15. Lilongwe (Malawi)
16. Blantyre (Malawi)
17. Chimoio (Manica
Province, Mozambique)
18. Tashkent (Uzbekistan)
19. New Delhi (India)

East and Southeast Asia


and the Pacic (ESEAP)
Regional Oce

20. Shillong (India)


21. Kathmandu (Nepal)
22. Dhaka (Bangladesh)
23. Bhubaneswar (India)
24. Beijing (China)
25. Lembang (Indonesia)
26. Los Baos (Philippines)

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 53

CIP Headquarters
International Potato Center (CIP)
Avenida La Molina 1895, La Molina, Lima, Peru
P.O. Box 1558, Lima 12, Peru
Tel: +51 1 349 6017 / 5783 / 5777
Fax: +51 1 317 5326
Email: cip@cgiar.org
Website: www.cipotato.org

Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)


Regional Oce
Santa Catalina Experimental Station
Panamericana Sur Km 1
Sector Cutuglahua Canton Meja
Apartado 17-21-1977
Quito, Ecuador
Tel: +593 2 3006 443/30069063
Fax: +593 2 3006 154
Email: cip-quito@cgiar.org or
a.devaux@cgiar.org
San Ramon Experimental Station
International Potato Center (CIP)
Ex Fundo El Milagro s/n
Chanchamayo
San Ramn, Peru
Tel: +51 064 331086
Email: r.duarte@cgiar.org
Huancayo Experimental Station
Fundo Santa Ana s/n Hualahoyo
El Tambo
Huancayo Junn, Peru
Tel: +51 064 246767
Email: v.otazu@cgiar.org

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)


Regional Oce
c/o ILRI Campus
Old Naivasha Road, Uthiru, Nairobi, Kenya
P.O. Box 25171, Nairobi 00603, Kenya
Tel: +254 20 422 3602
Fax: +254 20 422 3001 / 3600
Email: cip-nbo@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Ghana
c/o CSIR - Crop Research Institute

54 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

P.O. Box 3785, Fumesua, Kumasi, Ghana


Tel: +233 322 060929
Fax: +233 51 60396
Email: e.carey@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Uganda
Naguru Hill, Katalima Road, Plot 106
P.O. Box 22274, Kampala, Uganda
Tel: +256 414 286 209
Fax: +256 414 286 947
Email: b.lemaga@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Mozambique
c/o Instituto de Investigao Agraria
de Mozambique (IIAM)
Avenida das FPLM 2698
Box 2100, Maputo, Mozambique
Tel / fax: +258 21 461 610
Email: m.andrade@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Malawi
Chitedze Research Station, SARRNET Building
P.O. Box 31600, Lilongwe 3, Malawi
Tel: +265 1 707 014
Fax: +265 1 707 026
Email: p.demo@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Republic of Angola
Centro Internacional da Batata (CIP)
Rua Coluna do Sul
Casa No 2
Bairro Cidade Alta
Huambo
Republic of Angola
Tel: +244 9141 36087
Fax: +244 2412 22687
Email: b.kowalski@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Benin
c/o IITA/Africa Rice
B.P. 08 tri-postal 0932
Cotonou, Benin
Tel: +229 21 350 188, ext. 260
Fax: +229 21 350 556
Email: k.hell@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Ethiopia
c/o ILRI - Ethiopia
P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa
Ethiopia
Tel: +251 11 617 2291
Fax: +251 11 617 2001
Email: s.schulz@cgiar.org

South, West and Central Asia (SWCA)


Regional Oce
CGIAR Centers Block, NASC Complex
DPS Marg, Pusa Campus, New Delhi 110012, India
Tel: +91 11 2584 0201 / 3734
Fax: +91 11 2584 7481
Email: cip-delhi@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Orissa
c/o RCCTCRI, Dumuduma
Bhubaneswar-751019, Orissa, India
Tel: +91 674 247 2244
Fax: +91 674 247 0768
Email: s.attaluri@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Uzbekistan
c/o ICARDA- PFU
P.O.Box 4564, Tashkent 100 000, Uzbekistan
Courier address:
c/o ICARDA- PFU
6, Osiyo Street, 100 000 Tashkent, Uzbekistan
Tel: +998 71 237 1782
Fax: +998 71 120 7125
Email: c.carli@cgiar.org
Project Oce - Nepal
c/o International Centre for Integrated
Mountain Development
G.P.O. Box 3226, Khumaltar, Kathmandu, Nepal
Tel: +977 1 500 3222
Fax: +977 1 500 3299 / 3277
Tel. (ILRI switchboard): +251 11 617 2000
Email: m.spordeler@cgiar.org
Project Oce - Bangladesh
USAID Horticulture Project,
CIP/AVRDC Bangladesh
H 1/A, HB Tower, Road # 23,
Gulshan-1, Dhaka-1212.
Bangladesh
Tel: +88 02 9854240
Email: s.a.begum@cgiar.org

China
Tel: +86-10-6210-9999
Fax: +86-10-6210-9990
Email: cip-china@cgiar.org
Regional Oce - China
c/o The Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Zhong Guan Cun South Street 12
Beijing, Peoples Republic of China
Tel: +86 10 8210 5690
Fax: +86 10 8210 5690
Email: cip-china@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Indonesia
c/o BALITSA
Jl.Tangkuban Perahu no. 517
P.O. Box 8404 Lembang-Bandung 40391, Indonesia
Courier address:
c/o BALITSA Jl.Tangkuban Perahu no. 517, Lembang
Bandung, 40391, Indonesia
Tel: +62 22 278 5591 / 5586
Fax: +62 22 278 5549
Email: cip-eseap@cgiar.org
Liaison Oce - Philippines
PCARRD Complex, Los Baos, Laguna 4030, Philippines
Tel: + 63 49 536-8185; +63 49 536-1662
Email: cip-manila@cgiar.org
Project Oce - Vietnam
Phong 215, Nha A,
Vien Chan nuoi
Thuy Phuong, Chem
Tu Liem, Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel: +84 4 741 0004
Fax: +84 4 741 0003
Email: tnguyen@cgiar.org

East and South East Asia and the Pacic


(ESEAP)
CIP-China Center for Asia and the Pacic (CCCAP)
708 Pan Pacic Plaza
A12 Zhongguancun Nandajie
Beijing 100081

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 55

EXECUTIVE COMMIT
COMMITTEE
TT E

Back row: Michael Gerba, David Theriault, Paolo Donini, Lu Xiaoping, Carlos Alonso.
Front row: Ulrika Martinius, Pamela K. Anderson, Amalia Perochena.

56 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

CIPS
PS INTERNAL
NTE
T R
STRUCTURE

Board of Trustees

External Relations
Mariella Altet

Director General
Pamela K. Anderson

Exec. D. for Strategy


and Corporate
Development
Carlos Alonso

Chief Operations
Ocer, COO
David Theriault

DDG for Research


Paolo Donini

Executive Ocer
for Research Mgmt
Philippe Monneveux

Human Resources
Head
Ulrika Martinius

Technology Head
Carlos Varela
da Silva

Administration
Head
Eduardo Ferreyra

LAC

Regional
Operations
Leader
Andre Devaux

RSL
Regional
Science
Leader-Potato
Andre Devaux

ESEAP

Regional
Science
LeaderSweetpotato
Andre Devaux

Regional
Operations
Leader
Susan Corning

Regional
Science
Leader-Potato
Recruiting

Regional
Science
Leader-Sweetpotato SSA
Jan Low

Regional
Operations
Leader
Julian Parr

Regional
Science
Leader-Potato
Carlo Carli

Regional
Science
Leader-Sweetpotato Asia
Dindo Campilan

CPAD
Head
Valerie Gwinner

Library
Head
Cecilia Ferreyra

Head of Research
Support Units
Amalia Perochena

GLOBAL
ROL

SSA

Grants and
Contracts Head
Michelle Rodrigo

REGIONS

SWCA

Chief Financial
Ocer, CFO
Michael Gerba

DDG -CCCAP
Xiaoping Lu

Regional
Operations
Leader
Frank Hawke

Regional
Science
Leader-Potato
Recruiting

Regional
Science
Leader-Sweetpotato Asia
Dindo Campilan

Genetic Resources
Global Science
Leader
Stef De Haan

Genetics and Crop


Improvement
Global Science
Leader
Merideth Bonierbale

Genomics and
Biotechnology
Global Science
Leader
Marc Ghislain

Integrated Crop and


Systems Research
Global Science
Leader
Oscar Ortiz

Social and Health


Sciences Global
Science Leader
Graham Thiele

DD -CCCAP
Frank Hawke

UNITS
Genebank
David Tay
Germplasm
Acquisition and
Distribution, GADU
Janny Van Beem
Integrated IT and
Computational
Research
Reinhard Simon
Science
Laboratories
Rosario Herrera
Experimental
Station and
Greenhouses
Recruiting
Innovation and
Outcomes
Recruiting
Impact Assessment
Monitoring and
Evaluation
Guy Hareau

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 57

CIP STAFF LIST


THE LIST REFLECTS INFORMATION UP TO 31 DECEMBER 2011

1. Administration
Oce of the Director General
Anderson, Pamela K., Director General
Alberco, Roque, Audiovisual Technician
Altet, Mariella, Manager for External Relations
Gorvenia, Jos, Driver
Huanes, Martha, Acting Executive Assistant
Infantas, Viviana, Visitors Ocer
Mendoza, Julio, Driver

Puccini, Alfredo, Multimedia Designer


Taipe, Elena, Graphic Designer
Torres, Jos, Graphic Designer
Library
Ferreyra, Cecilia, Head Librarian
Garca, Daniel, Library Auxiliary
Hoyos, Alexis, Library Auxiliary
Lay, Griselda, Library Assistant

Oce of the Chief Operating Ocer


Theriault, David, COO
Koechlin, Bertha, Executive Assistant

Oce of the Executive Director for Strategy


and Corporate Development
Alonso, Carlos, EDGSCD
Koechlin, Bertha, Executive Assistant

Oce of the Deputy Executive Director for


Strategy and Corporate Development
Perochena, Amalia, DEDSCD
Chiscul, Eduardo, Junior Finance Assistant

Oce of the Deputy Director General for


Research
Donini, Paolo, DDG-Research
Monneveux, Philippe, Executive Ocer
Salinas, Lilia, Executive Assistant

Grants & Contracts


Rodrigo, Michelle, Head
Carrillo, Gonzalo, Grants & Contracts Specialist
Harrison, Gary, Proposal Manager/Technical Writer
Mel, Isabel, Bilingual Secretary
Romero, Flor de Mara, Grants & Contracts Administrator

Communications and Public Awareness


Department
Gwinner Valerie, Head
Avendao, Juan Carlos, Exhibits/Display Auxiliary
Becker, Jacqueline, Media Specialist
Delgado, Ruth, Exhibits/Display Assistant
Echeanda, Edda, Multimedia Developer
Fernndez-Concha, Nini, Graphic Designer
Lafosse, Cecilia, Chief Designer
Lanatta, Mara Elena, Departmental Assistant
Morales, Anselmo, Graphic Designer

58 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Capacity Strengthening Department


Nelles, Wayne, Head
Suito, Mercedes, Administrative Assistant

Finances Department
Gerba, Michael, Chief Finance Ocer
Alburqueque, Luis, Finance Assistant
Arenas, Elena, Projects Analyst
Bardalez, Eliana, Regional Accountant
Barrantes, Katia, Finance Analyst
Copete, Victoria, Finance Analyst
Espinoza, Mercedes, Junior Finance Assistant
Garca, Harry, Finance Assistant
Lucero, Elisa, Junior Finance Assistant
Mendoza, Patricia, Restricted Projects Supervisor
Monteverde, Carla, Assistant Accountant
Neyra, Gladys, Administrative Assistant
Orellana, Sonnia, Cashier
Patio, Milagros, Budget Supervisor
Peralta, Eduardo, Restricted Project Accountant
Seminario, Karla, Junior Finance Assistant
Saavedra, Miguel, General Accountant
Sarmiento, Marily, Junior Finance Assistant
Tapia, Csar, Restricted Project Accountant
Zambrano, Mamerto, Oce Auxiliary
Zapata, Susana, Restricted Project Accountant
Zuiga, Carlos, Finance Assistant
Zuiga, Tania, Treasurer

Administration Oce
Ferreyra, Eduardo, Head
Crdova, Silvia, Executive Assistant
Logistics
Arellano, Tito, Warehouse Chief
Auqui, Filomeno, Purchasing Assistant
Crdenas, Bryan, Purchasing Assistant
Dueas, Javier, General Services Assistant
Ganoza, Ximena, Procurement Supervisor

Garay, Rogger, Warehouse Auxiliary


Garca, Ral, Import Purchasing Assistant
Kuwae, Ikeho, Purchasing Assistant
Noa, Martn, General Services Auxiliary
Pozada, Angel, Warehouse Assistant
Ramos, Jenner, Import Purchasing Assistant
Vences, Luciana, Local Purchasing Assistant
Maintenance
Alarcn, Willy, Maintenance Technician
Blanco, Dalmecio, Maintenance Technician
Dvila, Rogger, Maintenance Technician
Franco, Manuel, Maintenance Technician
Palomino, Juan, Maintenance Technician
Pelez, Pedro, Maintenance Technician
Quispe, Kini, Maintenance Technician
Yancce, Jos, Maintenance Technician
Zapata, Saturnino, Maintenance Technician
Motor Pool
Alminagorta, Luis, Driver
Curasi, Mario, Driver
Enciso, Cirilo, Driver
Enciso, Wilmer, Motor Pool Mechanic
Garay, Marino, Driver
Marquina, Juan, Driver
Cleaning
Auqui, Carlos, Janitor
Ccenta, Alberto, Janitor
Enciso, Facundo, Janitor
Mamani, Jaime, Janitor
Reception
Bruno, Genaro, Receptionist
Security
Briceo, Antoln, Plant Security
Montalvo, Hugo, Plant Security
Tintaya, Telo, Plant Security
Vsquez, Lisardo, Plant Security

Human Resources and Lodging & Food Services


Martinius, Ulrika, Head
Castillo, Mara Cecilia, Human Resources Analyst
Garca, Erika, Administrative Assistant
Gmez, Sandra, Human Resources Assistant
Gzman, Melissa, Human Resources Assistant
Isla, Roco, Social Worker, Social Welfare and Health
Supervisor
Lazarte, Carla, Human Resources Manager
Marcovich, Rosario, Administrative Assistant
Polo, William, Human Resources Analyst
Schmidt, Lucero, Nurse
Varas, Yoner, Salary Administrator
Lodging and Food Services
Alfaro, Jorge, Cooking Attendant
Barrios, Telo, Cooking Attendant
Chvez, Ral, Cook
Ferreyros, Mnica, Lodging and Food Services Supervisor
Lapouble, Sor, Lodging and Food Services Assistant
Llallico, Joel, Cooking Attendant
Navarro, Tela, Room & Linen Attendant
Vargas, Gerardo, Cooking Attendant
Ventura, Jernimo, Cooking Attendant
Venturo, Quico, Cook

Information Technology Unit


Varela, Carlos, Head
Aliaga, Jos, Network Administrator
Del Villar, Roberto, Server Administrator
Garca, Paulo, Helpdesk Assistant
Guillermo, David, Systems Assistant
Junchaya, Jos, Systems Auxiliary
Llantoy, Csar, Helpdesk Assistant
Navarro, Mayra, Systems Assistant
Oru, Ral, Systems & Security Administrator
Puchuri, Jacqueline, Administrative Systems Analyst
Rodrguez, Sal, Web Systems Analyst
Torres, Edgardo, Systems Development Administrator
Valdivieso, Peter, Helpdesk Administrator

2. Research Divisions
Division 1: Impact Enhancement
Graham, Thiele, Anthropologist, Division Leader
Ashby, Jacqueline, Research Coordinator (Colombia)
Campilan, Dindo, Sociologist, CIP-SWCA Regional Leader
Fonseca, Cristina, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Grant, Frederick, Nutritionist Project Manager (Nairobi)
Hareau, Guy, Agricultural Economist
Hell, Kerstin, Marketing and Post Harvest Specialist
Kleinwechter, Ulrich, Post Doctoral Fellow
Labarta, Ricardo, Regional Economist (Nairobi)
Low, Jan, Economist, CIP-SSA SASHA Project Manager
Maldonado, Luis, Economist, Intermediate Researcher
Mbabu, Adiel, Project Manager
Miethbauer, Thomas, Associate Scientist
Ouedraogo, Herman, Nutritionist (Nairobi)
Prain, Gordon, Social Anthropologist
Pradel, Willy, Zoologist, Intermediate Researcher
Sindi, Kirimi, Impact Specialist
Surez, Vctor, Statistics Assistant
Vsquez, Zandra, Administrative Assistant

Division 2: Genetic Resources Conservation and


Characterization
Tay, David, Plant Biologist, Division Leader
Barrientos, Marleni, Laboratory Technician
Bendez, Nstor, Research Technician
Biondi, Jorge, Research Assistant
Callaaupa, Julio, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Crdenas, Jos, Laboratory Technician
Crdenas, Sal, Laboratory Auxiliary
Carrillo, Oscar, Research Technician
Chvez, Oswaldo, Systems Assistant
Cruzado, Juan, Research Technician
Espinoza, Francisco, Research Technician
Espinoza, Giancarlo, Laboratory Auxiliary
Fernndez, Vctor, Research Technician
Gago, Amparo, Research Technician
Garca, Luis, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Garca, Wendy, Laboratory Auxilairy
Gaspar, Oswaldo, Field/Greenhouse Auxiliary
Gmez, Ren, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Gonzales, Roberto, Research Technician
Javier, Miguel, Research Technician
Lpez, Serapio, Research Technician

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 59

Manrique, Ivn, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher


Martn, Mariana, Administrative Assistant
Panta, Ana, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Ramrez, Carlos, Research Technician
Robles, Olegario, Research Technician
Robles, Ronald, Biologist, Research Assistant
Rodrguez, Wilder, Research Technician
Rojas, Edwin, System Analyst
Rojas, Hctor, Laboratory Auxiliary
Rojas, Luis, Systems Assistant
Romero, Sandra, Research Technician
Rossel, Genoveva, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Ruz, Mario, Research Technician
Salas, Alberto, Agronomist, Research Associate
Snchez, Juan, Research Technician
Soto, Julin, Biologist, Research Assistant
Torres, Pilar, Laboratory Technician
Uribe, Lucio, Research Technician
Valverde, Miguel, Laboratory Auxiliary
Vargas, Fanny, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Velsquez, Eduardo, Laboratory Auxiliary
Villagaray, Rosalva, Research Technician
Vicencio, Domingo, Field & Greenhouse Auxiliary
Vivanco, Francisco, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Vollmer Rainer, Research Assistant
Ynga, Alberto, Research Technician
Zea, Brenda, Biotechnologist, Research Assistant
Germplasm Acquisition & Distribution Unit
van Beem, Janny, Head
Falcn, Rosario, Biologist, Intermediate Research
Grande, Enrique, Research Technician
Lara, Ral, Greenhouse Auxiliary

Division 3: Germplasm Enhancement


and Crop Improvement
Bonierbale, Merideth, Senior Potato Breeder,
Division Leader
Agili, Sammy, Breeder, Research Assistant
Alfaro, Delio, Research Technician
Aliaga, Vilma, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Alva, Eduar, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Amors, Walter, Agronomist, Research Associate
Andrade, Mara, Sweetpotato Breeder and Seed Systems
Specialist (Mozambique)
Aponte, Maruja, Research Technician
Asto, Rene, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Attaluri, Sreekanth, Sweetpotato Agronomist and
Research Coordinator (India)
Baca, Helga, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Bastos, Carolina, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Blanco, Mnica, Administrative Assistant
Burgos, Gabriela, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Cabello, Rolando, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Carey, Ted, Sweetpotato Breeder (Ghana)
Carli, Carlo, Potato Seed Production Specialist
Carpio, Rossemary, Research Assistant
Cayhualla, Edith, Research Technician
Cho, Kwangsoo, Visiting Scientist
Cruzado, Regina, Research Assistant
De Haan, Stefan, Potato Breeder
Del Villar, Faviola, Research Technician

60 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Daz, Federico, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher


Daz, Luis, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Erquinio, Efran, Field/Greenhouse Auxiliary
Eyzaguire, Ral, Statistician, Research Assistant
Fernndez, Luciano, Research Technician
Fernndez, Mximo, Research Technician
Frisancho, Julio, Research Technician
Gallo, Patricia, Secretary
Garca, Paulo, Research Technician
Gastelo, Manuel, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Gati, Jean Maurine, Scientic Assistant
Ghislain, Marc, Head Applied Biotechnology
Laboratory (Nairobi)
Gmez, Flix, Research Technician
Gmez, Jhon, Field/Greenhouse Auxiliary
Gmez, Walter, Research Technician
Gruneberg, Wolfgang, Sweetpotato Breeder Geneticist
Gutirrez, Luis, Research Technician
Gutirrez, Raymundo, Agricultural Engineer,
Research Assistant
Harahagazwe, Dieudonne, Seed Systems Specialist
(Mozambique)
Heider, Bettina, Germplasm Curator and Pre-Breeding
Specialist
Herrera, Rosario, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Huaccachi, Juan, Research Technician
Hualla Vilma, Biologist, Research Assistant
Huamani, Kelvin, Biologist, Research Assistant
Kadian, Mohinder Singh, Potato Agronomist (India)
Lindqvist-Kreze, Hannele, Biotic Stress Geneticist
Loayza, Wilder, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Lozano, Marco, Laboratory Auxiliary
Manrique, Sandra, Ph.D. Biologist, Intermediate
Researcher
Martnez, Napolen, Field Laborer
Martnez, Roberto, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Mihovilovich, Elisa, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Montenegro, Daniel, Junior Research Assistant
Munive, Susan, Research Technician
Muoa, Lupita, Research Technician
Murrieta, Raquel, Secretary
Mwathi, Margaret, Plant Molecular Biologist
Orbegozo, Jeanette, Biologist, Research Assistant
Ordoez, Benny, Research Technician
Ormachea, Milagros, Biologist, Research Assistant
Orrillo, Matilde, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Porras, Eduardo, Research Technician
Portal, Leticia, Biologist, Research Assistant
Pozo, Vctor, Research Technician
Prentice, Katterine, Biologist, Research Assistant
Quispe, Dora, Junior Research Assistant
Ramos, Martn, Research Technician
Ramos, Shamir, Research Technician
Reyes, Eddy, Research Technician
Rivera, Cristina, Biologist, Research Assistant
Rodrguez, Daniel, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Rodrguez, Jos, Research Technician
Romn, Mara Lupe, Biologist, Research Assistant
Romero, Edgar, Laboratory Auxiliary
Romero, Elisa, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Salas, Elisa, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Salcedo, Carlos, Greenhouse Auxiliary

Snchez, Jacqueline, Research Technician


Snchez, Laura, Research Technician
Sosa, Paola, Research Technician
Tasso, Carolina, Junior Research Assistant
Tumwegamire, Silver, Breeder, Research Assistant (Uganda)
Untiveros, Milton, Biologist, Research Assistant
Vega, Jorge, Research Technician
Vlez, Jos, Research Technician
Wamalwa, Lydia, Research Assistant
Zum Felde, Thomas, Plant Breeder/NIRS Specialist

Division 4: Crop Management & Production


Systems
Ortiz, Oscar, Agricultural Innovation Scientist,
Division Leader
Abidin, Erna, Sweetpotato Production Specialist (Malawi)
Alarcn, Nikolai, Research Technician
Alcazar, Jess, Agronomist, Research Associate
Arellano, Jaime, Research Technician
Barreda, Carolina, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Caedo, Vernica, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Carbajal, Mariella, Research Assistant
Carhuapoma, Pablo, Statistician, Research Assistant
Chuquillanqui, Carlos, Agronomist, Intermediate Research
Claessens, Lieven, Soil Scientist (Kenya)
Cruz, Mariana, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Cuellar, Wilmer, Post-Doctoral Fellow
De la Torre, Elvin, Laboratory Technician
Demo, Paul, Potato Specialist, Liaison Scientist
Espinoza, Hugo, Research Technician
Ezeta, Fernando, Agronomist
Flores, Betty, Research Assistant
Forbes, Gregory, Pathologist
French, Edward, Scientist Emeritus
Fuentes, Segundo, Plant Pathologist, Research Associate
Gamarra, Heidy, Biologist, Research Assistant
Gamboa, Soledad, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Gvilan, Carla, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Girish, Basavapatna Halappa, Potato Scientist
Gonzales, Manuel, Laboratory Technician
Guerrero, Beder, Greenhouse Auxiliary
Guerrero, Jos, Systems Assistant
Gutarra, Liliam, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Heidinger, Haline, Enviroment Engineer, Research
Assistant
Huamn, Eva, Research Technician
Kadian, Mohinder Singh, Potato Agronomist (India)
Kakuhenzire, Rogers, Regional Potato Research Fellow
(Uganda)
Kowalski, Britta, Potato Agronomist, Project Leader
(Angola)
Kreuze, Jan, Molecular Virologist
Kroschel, Jurgen, Entomologist
Lanatta, Amalia, Administrative Assistant
Lemaga, Berga, Potato Agronomist (Uganda)
Len-Velarde, Carlos, Agricultural Systems Analysis
Specialist
Loayza, Hildo, Research Assistant
McEwan, Margaret, Research Leader on OFSP Technology
Transfer Dissemination (Kenya)
Mendoza, Carlos, Research Technician
Menete, Zelia, Technology Transfer Specialist

Meza, Marco, Research Technician


Miethbauer, Thomas, Associate Scientist
Mujica, Norma, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Muller, Giovanna, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Ochoa, Francisco, Research Technician
Orrego, Ricardo, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Paredes, Catalina, Research Technician
Prez, Ana, Junior Research Assistant
Prez, Willmer, Plant Pathologist, Intermediate Researcher
Ponce, Luciano, Research Technician
Posadas, Adolfo, Physicist, Research Associate, Liaison
Ocer Brazil
Quirz, Roberto, Land Use Systems Specialist
Quispe, Gian, Research Technician
Raymundo, Rub, GIS, Research Assistant
Rojas, Mecy, Research Technician
Snchez, Juan, Research Technician
Santivaez, Sonia, Secretary
Schulte-Geldermann, Elmar, ICP Specialist
Sierralta, Alexander, Laboratory Technician
Silva, Luis, Database Technician
Sporleder, Marc, Entomologist, ICM Specialist
Taipe, Jaime, Research Assistant
Tenorio, Jorge, Biologist, Intermediate Researcher
Tonnang, Henri, Entomologist
Trebejo, Marcelo, Research Technician
Trillo, Antonio, Research Technician
Valdivia, Roberto, Agronomist, Coordinator Altagro-Puno
Valdizn, Ivonne, Administrative Assistant
Vega, Adan, Research Technician
Ventura, Fredy, Laboratory Technician
Vinueza, Marcelo, Research Technician
Yarlequ, Christian, Research Assistant
Zamudio, Julia, Administrative Assistant
Zegarra, Octavio, Biologist, Research Assistant
Zorogasta, Percy, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher

Field Research Support - La Molina


Duarte, Roberto, Agronomist, Field/Greenhouse
Supervisor
Alburqueque, Juan, Field Laborer
Barrientos, Herminio, Gardener
Callaupa, Francisco, Field Laborer
Cumpa, Jhony, Field Laborer
Domnguez, Augusto, Field Laborer
Espinoza, Israel, Gardener
Huarcaya, Alberto, Field Laborer
Lara, Carmen, Secretary
Mena, Vctor, Greenhouse/Field Laborer
Merma, Luis, Greenhouse/Field Laborer
Noa, Fernando, Field Laborer
Olmedo, Jos, Field Driver
Quino, Miguel, Research Technician
Zamora, Marco, Field Laborer

Field Research Support - Huancayo


Otaz, Victor, Experimental Stations Superintendent
Ayquipa, Agustn, Driver
Blas, Walter, Mechanic
Cardoso, Reymundo, Field Laborer
Cipriano, Jorge, Field Laborer
Colachagua, Eloy, Research Technician

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 61

Cosme, Anastacio, Research Technician


Coz, Armando, Driver
Cristbal, Juan, Field Laborer
Falcn, Jos, Cooking Attendant
Flores, Julin, Oce Auxiliary
Frisancho, Rebeca, Agronomist, Field/Greenhouse
Supervisor
Gaspar, Demetrio, Field Laborer
Gaspar, Henry, Cooking Attendant
Limaylla, Jenny, Administrative Assistant
Maguia, Sergio, Research Technician
Marn, Fernando, Maintenance Technician
Montes, Marco, Field Laborer
Piana, Vanna, Administrative Assistant
Porras, Jorge, Warehouse Assistant
Romero, Emeterio, Field/Greenhouse Auxiliary
Surez, Julio, Field Laborer
Vega, Ricardo, Field/Greenhouse Auxiliary
Velasco, Diogardo, Field/Greenhouse Auxiliary

Field Research Support - San Ramn


Duarte, Roberto, Agronomist, Field/Greenhouse
Supervisor
Castilln, Maromeo, Field Laborer
Espinoza, Angel, Research Technician
Llacta, Eusebio, Field Laborer
Quispe, Hctor, Research Technician

4. Regional Oces
Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC)
Regional Oce, Quito, Ecuador
Devaux, Andre, Regional Leader LAC
Alcocer, Julio, Field Laborer
Ayala, Sofa, Project Assistant
Burbano, Rosa, Accountant
Calle, Tania, Research Assistant (Pramo Andino)
De Bivre, Bert, Liaison Ocer
Espinoza, Jorge, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Jimnez, Jos, Network Management and Systems
Maintenance
Lema, Martha, Field Laborer
Lutuala, Gabriel, Field Laborer
Morales, Washington, Field Administrator
Oa, Marlene, Administrative Assistant
Pallo, Edwin, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Patio, Segundo, Field Laborer
Potos, Byron, Research Assistant
Rodrguez, Tatiana, Information Ocer (Pramo Andino)
Reinoso, Lidia, Field and Greenhouse Laborer
Ruggiero, Susana, Training Advisor (Pramo Andino)
Taipe, Jaime, Research Assistant
Vinuesa, Marcelo, Research Technician

Research Informatics Unit

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)

Simon, Reinhard, Head


Crdova, Ral, Systems Assistant
De Mendiburu, Felipe, Statistician, Research Assistant
Flores, Mirella, Systems Technician
Gonzales, Juan Carlos, Systems Assistant
Hirahoka, Daniel, Systems Auxiliary
Jurez, Henry, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Riis-Jacobsen, Jens, Data Management Specialist (Nairobi)
Rojas, Edwin, Systems Analyst

Regional Oce - Nairobi, Kenya

3. Partnership Program
Papa Andina
Devaux, Andr, Agronomist, Program Coordinator
Andrade, Jorge, Coordinator of Papa Andina in Ecuador
and InnovAndes Project
Egsquiza, Rolando, Consultant
Espinoza, Santiago, Technical Assistant, InnovAndes
Project (Ecuador)
Flores, Paola, Technical Assistant of Papa Andina (Bolivia)
Kromann, Peter, Consultant (Ecuador)
Lpez, Gastn, Consultant, Regional
Manrique, Kurt, Agronomist, Intermediate Researcher
Ordinola, Miguel, Consultant
Pallo, Edwin, Technical Assistant, McKnight project
(Ecuador)
Ramirez, Melissa, Secretary
Rojas, Abel, Coordinator of IssAndes Project (Bolivia)
Vela, Ana Mara, Administrative Assistant
Velasco, Claudio, Coordinator of Papa Andina in Bolivia

62 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

Stockdale, Dorvin, Regional Leader


Ghislain, Marc, Regional Leader SSA (i)
Agili, Sammy, Breeder, Research Assistant
Borus, Dinah, Research Assistant
Claessens, Lieven, Soil Scientist (Kenya)
Gati, Jean Maurine, Scientic Assistant
Gatimu, Rosemary, Technician
Irukan, Quinata, Plant Laboratory Technician,
Kaguongo, Wachira, Agricultural Economist,Research
Assistant
Kioko, Christopher Musau, Administrative Assistant
Labarta, Ricardo, Regional Economist (CIP-Nairobi)
Maina, George, Driver
Mambiri, Gilbert, Driver/Oce Assistant
McEwan, Margaret, Research Leader OFSP Technology
Transfer Dissemination
Mwathi, Margaret, Plant Molecular Biologist
Mogere, Kefa, Regional Accountant
Ndoho, Emily, Accountant
Mulwa, Chalmers, Research Assistant
Mwamba, Rael, Accountant
Ochieng, Bruce, Research Assistant
Odeny, Elijah, Driver
Ouedraogo, Herman, Nutritionist (Nairobi)
Riis-Jacobsen Jens, Data Management Specialist (Nairobi)
Schulte-Geldermann Elmar, ICP Specialist
Sindi, Kirimi, Impact Specialist
Reuben, Anangwe, Cleaner
Shimaka, Wyclie, Driver
Wambugu, Stella, Reseach Assistant
Wanjohi, Luka, Research Assistant

Wamalwa, Lydia, Research Assistant


Zani, Naomi, Administrative Assistant

Liaison Oce, Benin


Hell, Kerstin, Marketing and Post Harvest Specialist
Dahoundo, Leandre, Technician/Driver

Liaison Oce, Ghana


Carey, Ted, Sweetpotato Breeder
Alhassan, Yusif, Research Assistant
Halidu, Osman, Administrative Assistant
Obeng, Bio, Researcher Ocer
Osman, Halidu, Administrative Assistant
Tweneboah, Shadrack, Cleaner/Assistant
Zakariah, Muhammad-Awal, Finance/Admin Ocer

Liaison Oce, Kampala, Uganda


Lemaga, Berga, Potato Agronomist, Liaison Scientist
Agaba, Joseph, Security Guard
Ameru, Martha, Secretary
Atong, Moses, Oce Messenger
Kakuhenzire, Rogers, Regional Potato Research Fellow
Mayanja, Sarah, Research Assistant
Migisa, Isaac, Driver
Mwanga Robert, Sweetpotato Breeder
Najjingo, Janefrances, Accountant Assistant
Ogwal, Martin, IT Specialist
Okobdi, Moses, Technical Sweetpotato Breeder
Okonya, Joshua Sikhu, Entomology
Ssekyewa, Henry, Technical Sweetpotato Breeder
Ssenyonjo Andrew, Laboratory Technician
Tumwegamire, Silver, Breeder, Senior Assistant
Breeder SSA
Tumwirize, Ronald, Driver, Purchasing Assistant
Wakulira, N. Rachel, Accountant
Namanda, Sam, Agronomist, Research Assistant, Tanzania

Liaison Oce, Lilongwe, Malawi


Demo, Paul, Potato Specialist, Liaison Scientist
Chadzala, Tiwonge, Laboratory Technician
Chidobvu, John, Field Technical Assistant
Chifundo, Banda, Technical Assistant
Chimwala, Lucius, Research Assistant
Chinoko, Gift, Labboratory/Field Technician
Chipembere, Elias, Mechanic/Driver
Kazembe, John, Field Technical Ocer
Kumukumu, Ephrain, Driver/Field/Oce Assistant
Mvula Bakolo Thokpzani, Field Technician
Mvula, George, Accounts Assistant
Ndovi, John, Driver/Field/Oce Assistant
Njiwa, Godknows, Accountant/Administrative Assistant
Phiri, Pearson, Field Technical Assistant
Sopo, Owen, Marketing Ocer,

Liaison Oce, Mozambique


Andrade, Mara, Sweetpotato Breeder and Seed
Systems Specialist
Alvaro, Abilio dos Santos, Agronomist, Research Assistant
Armando, Lourenco, Driver
Artur, Tanquene, Field Worker

Banze, Esmeralda, Field Worker


Chichualo, Alda, Field Worker
Chiconela, Luisa, Greenhouse Worker
Chivambo, Benildo, Field Auxiliary
Daia, Odete, Accountant
Devuvane, Jose, Driver
Duzenta, Jorge, Field Worker
Elias, Rachid Abdul, Field Technician
Fanheiro, Joaqui, Field Worker
Guambe, Abrahamo Alberto (Gardener)
Jeque, Joao, Agroprocessing Technician
Jorge, Fernandes J., Technician
Mabui, Arlindo Lucas, Field Technical Assistant
Machel, Julieta, Field Worker
Mauariha, Jos Albino, Driver, Gaza
Mazive, Arnaldo, Field Worker
Mbambi, Estevao Mango, Monitoring and Evaluation
Mubetei, Silva, Field Worker
Munguambe, Shelzia, Greenhouse Worker
Munhaua, Bernardino, Field Technician
Naico, Albino, Agricultural Economist, Research Assistant
Ndimande, Fabiao, Field Worker
Nhanteme, Claudia, Field Worker
Nhanteme, Gloria, Field Worker
Peixe, Jacinta, Field Worker
Ricardo, Jos, Breeder, Research Assistant
Ruco, Amelia Ozias, Accountant and Administrator
Sitoe, Mario Francisco, Field Worker
Sondo, Luisa, Field Worker
Sozinho, Alberto, Field Worker
Tembe, Rosa, Field Worker
Viegas, Adilia, Virologist

Liaison Oce, Huambo, Angola


Kowalski, Britta, Potato Agronomist, Project Leader
Alberto Diambo, Driver
Andrade, Caetano, Driver
Andrade, Paulo, Accountant and Administrative
Assistant
Kupatia, Florencia, Principal Accountant
Mango, Estevao, Monitoring & Evaluation Ocial
Tchipilica, Pedro, Driver

Liaison Oce, Ethiopia


Schulz, Steen, Liaison Scientist, Ethiopia
Abiyot Aragaw, Senior Research Assistant
Abdulwahab, Aliyi, Research Assistant
Andarsa, Daniel, Driver
Abera, Bereket Negash, Driver
Asfaw, Frezer, Data Proccessing Assistant
Berhanu, Tewodros, Driver
Gebre, Azeb Haileselassie, Junior accountant
Gebrekidan, Abraha, Driver
Gebreselassie, Solomon, Monitoring & Evaluation
Specialist
Hailemariam, Gebrehiwot, Project Coordinator
Kalkidan, Damte, Administrative Assistant
Kassa, Nebiat, Program Assistant
Melese, Biruk Girma, Junior Accountant
Tesfay, Haile, Project Coordinator
Tsigie, Mahlete, Oce and Finance Manager

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 63

South, West and Central Asia (SWCA)


Regional Oce - New Delhi, India
Campilan, Dindo, Sociologist, Regional Leader
Anjan, Barik, Oce Driver
Arya, Sushma, Associate Administrative Ocer
Bharti, Ashok, Administrative Ocer
Jagram, Oce Assistant
Kadian, Mohinder Singh, Potato Agronomist
Kumar, Raj Barun, Administrative Assistant
Kumar, Vinod, Oce Driver
Shahid, Ali, Research Assistant
Sharma, Neeraj, Research Assistant
Surjit, Vikraman, Economist

Liaison Oce, Orissa, India


Attaluri, Sreekanth, Sweetpotato Agronomist
and Research Coordinator

Liaison Oce, Tashkent, Uzbekistan


Carli, Carlo, Potato Seed Production Specialist)
Scientist Liaison Ocer
Gadjieva, Narmina, Secretary/Translator
Ibragimov, Zokhid, Research Assistant, Agr. Economics
and Marketing
Khalikov, Durbek, Agronomist Assistant
Khegay, Eduard, Oce Driver
Kim, Galina, Secretary
Kuchkarova, Minavar, Oce Attendant
Muzaar, Aliev, Administrative Ocer
Yugay, Tamara, Accountant
Yuldashev, Firuz, Research Assistant, Potato Breeding

Rosmiati, Een, Janitor


Satiman, Partono, Driver
Soplanit, Albert, Research Associate
Sukendra, Mahalaya, Associate Scientist
Syahputra, Aris Triono, Research Assistant
Tikai, Pita, National Coordinator (Solomon Island)
Tjintokohadi, Koko, Assistant Scientist

Liaison Oce, Los Baos, Philippines


Aquino, Mylene, Sr. Administrative Ocer
Barlis, Angelica, Sr. Administrative Associate
Bertuso, Arma, Research Fellow
De Chavez, Hidelisa, Research Assistant
Nadal, Marietta, Sr. Oce Manager
Sister, Lorna, Associate Scientist

Project Oce, Vietnam


Nguyen, Thi-Tinh, Animal Scientist, Liaison Scientist
Nguyen, Thia Hoa, Cleaner
Huy Chien Dao, Project Coordinator
van Huyen Le, Research Assistant

Project Oce, Dhaka, Bangladesh


Mohidul, Hasan, Research Assistant

Project Oce, Kathmandu, Nepal


Sporleder, Marc, Entomologist, ICM Specialist

East and Southeast Asia and the Pacic (ESEAP)


CIP-China Center for Asia and the Pacic CCCAP
Lu, Xiaoping, Deputy Director General of CCCAP
Hawke, Frank, Deputy Director of CCCAP

Regional Oce, Beijing, China


Hawke, Frank, Regional Operations Leader, ESEAP
Chen, Guangmin, Field Laborer
Forbes, Greg, Pathologist
Gu, Jianmiao, Administrative Ocer
Li, Wenjuan, Research Associate
Shi-an, Liu, Driver
Xie, Kaiyun, Liaison Scientist

Liasion Oce - Lembang, Indonesia


Ezeta, Fernando, Agronomist
Prasetya, Budhi, Research Assistant
Isman, Research Aide
Kossay, Luther, Research Assistant
Nawawi, Kusye, Sr. Oce Administrator
Muid, Nakeus, Field Assistant

64 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

www.cgiar.org
cgiar.o
CGIAR CENTERS
CIP is a member of CGIAR.
CGIAR is a global agriculture research partnership for a food secure future. Its science is carried
out by the 15 research centers who are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration
with hundreds of partner organizations. www.cgiar.org

for a food secure future

CIMMYT
Mexico

CONSORTIUM
OFFICE
France

ICARDA
Syria

ICRISAT
India

BIOVERSITY
INTERNATIONAL
Italy
IFPRI
USA
AFRICA RICE
Benin

CIAT
Colombia
IWMI
Sri Lanka
WORLD
AGROFORESTRY
CENTRE
Kenya

IITA
Nigeria
CIP
Peru

Africa Rice
Bioversity International
CIAT
Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
CIFOR
Center for International Forestry Research
CIMMYT Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maz
y Trigo
CIP
Centro Internacional de la Papa
ICARDA International Center for Agricultural Research
in the Dry Areas

ILRI
Kenya

ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI

WORLDFISH
Malaysia
CIFOR
Indonesia
IRRI
Philippines

International Crops Research Institute for the


Semi-Arid Tropics
lnternational Food Policy Research Institute
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
lnternational Livestock Research Institute
lnternational Rice Research Institute
lnternational Water Management Institute
World Agroforestry Centre
WorldFish

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 65

CGIAR CENTERS
CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food secure future. Its science is carried out by
the 15 research centers of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partner
organizations.
CIP is a member center of the CGIAR Consortium

for a food secure future

CIMMYT
Mexico

CONSORTIUM
OFFICE
France

ICARDA
Syria

ICRISAT
India

BIOVERSITY
INTERNATIONAL
Italy
IFPRI
USA
AFRICA RICE
Benin

CIAT
Colombia
IWMI
Sri Lanka
WORLD
AGROFORESTRY
CENTRE
Kenya

IITA
Nigeria
CIP
Peru

Africa Rice
Bioversity International
CIAT
Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
CIFOR
Center for International Forestry Research
CIMMYT Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maz
y Trigo
CIP
Centro Internacional de la Papa
ICARDA International Center for Agricultural Research
in the Dry Areas

66 International Potato Center Annual Report 2011

ILRI
Kenya

ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI

WORLDFISH
Malaysia
CIFOR
Indonesia
IRRI
Philippines

International Crops Research Institute for the


Semi-Arid Tropics
lnternational Food Policy Research Institute
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
lnternational Livestock Research Institute
lnternational Rice Research Institute
lnternational Water Management Institute
World Agroforestry Centre
WorldFish

Credits

International Potato Center


CIP. 2012. CIP 40th anniversary: celebrating the impacts
International Potato Center Annual Report 2011
2012, International Potato Center
ISSN 0256-6311
DOI: 10.4160/0256-6311/2011
Hecho el Depsito Legal
en la Biblioteca Nacional del Per No 2005-9640
Readers are encouraged to quote or reproduce material from this report.
As copyright holder CIP requests acknowledgement and a copy of the
publication where the citation or material appears. Please send this to the
Communications and Public Awareness Department
at the address below.
International Potato Center
Apartado 1558, Lima 12, Per
cip@cgiar.org
www.cipotato.org
Press run: 500
April 2012
Writing
Valerie Gwinner
Production coordinator
Cecilia Lafosse
Design and layout
Nini Fernndez-Concha

TAREA ASOCIACION GRAFICA EDUCATIVA PASAJE MARA AUXILIADORA 156164 BREA, LIMA-PERU

International Potato Center Annual Report 2011 67

BackCover

International Potato Center Av. La Molina 1895 La Molina Apartado 1558


558 Lima 12, Per

www.cipotato.org