Anda di halaman 1dari 60

LAB MANUAL FOR JNCIA

Version 1.0

CONTENTS:
1. About Juniper Routers
2. Classification of Juniper Routers
2.1. Difference between J, M, T, E and MX series of juniper routers
3. Juniper Router Architecture
3.1. Routing Engine
3.2. Packet Forwarding Engine
3.2.1. Switching Control Board
3.2.2. FPC
3.2.3. PIC
3.3. Routing Engine Hardware Components
3.4. Router Boot Methods
4. J-Series Router Overview
4.1. J2320 Router Front Panel and its components
4.2. Rear Panel of J2320 router
4.3. J-Series Router Configuration
4.4. PIM Modules for J-Series
4.5. PIM and VOIP Module Overview
4.5.1. Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs
4.5.2. Dual-Port Serial PIM
4.5.3. Dual-Port T1 or E1 PIM
4.6. Brief Overview of J2320, J2350, J4350, J6350 Routers
5. M-Series Router Overview
5.1. M7i Front Panel and its Components
5.2. M7i Rear Panel
5.3. Brief Overview of M7i, M10i, M40e, M120 and M320 Routers
6. JUNOS Command Line Interface
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

7. Router Interfaces
7.1. Permanent Interfaces
7.2. Transient Interfaces
8. Interface Representation
8.1. On J-Series Routers
8.2. On M-Series and T-Series Routers
8.3. On MX-Series Routers
9. Routing Fundamental Labs
9.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Entering configuration mode on a router and exit
9.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Setting host name
9.3. Lab Exercise 3 : Setting routers domain name
9.4. Lab Exercise 4 : Configure the root password (Encrypted Password)
9.5. Lab Exercise 5 : Configure a DNS name server
9.6. Lab Exercise 6 : Configure a backup router
9.7. Lab Exercise 7 : Router interface address configuration
9.8. Lab Exercise 8 : Shut down an interface
9.9. Lab Exercise 9 : Set interface description
9.10. Lab Exercise 10 : Configuring encapsulation on a physical interface
9.11. Lab Exercise 11 : Configuring keepalives
9.12. Lab Exercise 12 : Set keepalive timers
9.13. Lab Exercise 13 : Configuring management ethernet interface(fxp0)
9.14. Lab Exercise 14 : Setting bandwidth on an interface
9.15. Lab Exercise 15 : Setting the hold-time value on a physical interface
9.16. Lab Exercise 16 : Setting the DTE clock rate
9.17. Lab Exercise 17 : Basic gigabit ethernet configuration on a J-series router
9.18. Lab Exercise 18 : Configuring speed on sonet interface
9.19. Lab Exercise 19 : Show chassis commands on J and M series routers
9.20. Objective Test 1
10. Static Routing Labs
10.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Configuring static routes
10.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Ping Test
10.3. Lab Exercise 3 : Telnet
10.4. Lab Exercise 4 : Traceroute
10.5. Objective Test 2
11. Policies Configuration Labs
11.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Routing policy lab 1
11.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Routing policy lab 2
11.3. Objective Test 3

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

12. RIP Configuration Labs


12.1. Lab Exercise 1 : RIP configuration
12.2. Objective Test 4
13. Dynamic Routing Labs
13.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Ping test by configuring RIP
13.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Ping test by configuring OSPF with multiple areas
14. Show Commands Labs
14.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Show commands lab
15. OSPF Labs
15.1. Lab Exercise 1 : OSPF configuration
15.2. Lab Exercise 2 : OSPF configuration and verification
15.3. Objective Test 5
16. BGP Labs
16.1 Lab Exercise 1 : BGP configuration
17. Juniper Switch Models
18. EX Series Switches Overview
18.1. EX2200 Switch
18.1.1. EX2200 Front Panel
18.1.2. Chassis LEDs
18.1.3. EX2200 Rear Panel
18.2. EX2500 Switch
18.3. EX3200 Switch
18.4. EX4200 Switch
18.5. EX4500 Switch
18.6. EX8200 Switch
19. Connecting and Configuring an EX Series Switch
20. QFX Series Switch - QFX3500 Switch Overview
21. Basic Switch Labs
21.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Entering configuration mode on a switch and exit
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

21.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Setting Hostname


21.3. Lab Exercise 3 : Set interface description
21.4. Lab Exercise 4 : Shutdown an interface
21.5. Lab Exercise 5 : Basic CLI commands
21.6. Lab Exercise 6 : Configure bandwidth on an interface
21.7. Lab Exercise 7 : Configuring ether-options on the gigabit ethernet switch
interface
21.8. Lab Exercise 8 : Configuring the management IP address on EX series switch
22. Lab Exercises on VLAN
22.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Define VLANs
22.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Configure a port for membership in that VLAN
22.3. Lab Exercise 3 : Configuring an interface as a trunk port
22.4. Lab Exercise 4 : Configuring VLANs on EX series switch
22.5. Lab Exercise 5 : Configuring Routed VLAN interface (Inter-VLAN routing) on
a switch
22.6. Objective Test 6
23. Lab Exercises on Spanning tree protocol and VSTP
23.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Configuring STP Timers
23.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Setting bridge priority on switch
23.3. Lab Exercise 3 : Configuring port priority
23.4. Lab Exercise 4 : Verifying STP
23.5. Lab Exercise 5 : Enabling VSTP on all VLANs
23.6. Lab Exercise 6 : Enabling VSTP on a VLAN using a single VLAN-ID / VLANName
23.7. Objective Test 7
24. Lab Exercises on PoE
24.1. Lab Exercise 1 : Configuring guard-band and maximum power on PoE enabled
interface
24.2. Lab Exercise 2 : Configuring power management mode on PoE enabled
interface
24.3. Lab Exercise 3 : Disabling a PoE interface
24.4. Lab Exercise 4 : Setting power priority on all PoE enabled interfaces
25. Final Exam
25.1. Objective Test Final Exam
26. Appendix
26.1. Answer keys for objective test 1
26.2. Answer keys for objective test 2
26.3. Answer keys for objective test 3
26.4. Answer keys for objective test 4
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

26.5. Answer keys for objective test 5


26.6. Answer keys for objective test 6
26.7. Answer keys for objective test 7
26.8. Answer keys for objective test final exam

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

1. About Juniper Routers


Main products offered by Juniper include T-Series, M-Series, E-Series, MX-Series, J-Series routers,
EX-Series Ethernet switches and SRX-Series Security products. JUNOS is the operating system that
runs on most of the juniper's networking equipment.

2. Classification of Juniper Routers:


The routers are classified in to M-series, J-series, T-series, E-series, and MX-series based on the
functionality. Some frequently used models are given below:
M-Series: M7i, M10i, M40e, M120, M320
J-Series: J2320, J2350, J4350, J6350
T-Series: T320, T640, T1600, TX Matrix, TX Matrix Plus
E-Series: E120, E320, ERX310, ERX705, ERX710, ERX1410, ERX1440
MX-Series: MX80, MX240, MX480, MX960

2.1 Differences between different series of juniper routers are


1. Juniper J-Series routers are a series of enterprise routers called as modular
routers for enterprises running desktops, servers, VoIP etc applications and
these kind of routers are typically deployed at remote offices or branch
locations.
2. Juniper M-Series routers are called Multiservice Edge routers designed for
enterprise and service provider networks.
3. Juniper T-Series routers are a series of core routers designed for high-end
and core networks with throughput from 320 Gbit/s to 25.6 Tbit/s with a max
forwarding rate of 30.7 billion pps.
4. Juniper E-Series routers are a series of broadband services routers or edge
routers which provides multiple services including broadband remote access
server, broadband video services, security services, NAT etc on a single
platform.
5. Juniper MX-Series routers are a family of high-performance Ethernet
Services routers with powerful switching features and are designed for highperformance service providers and enterprises.
Note: However, please note that we will be discussing only the J-series and some M-series
routers in this manual. Other products are beyond the scope of this manual.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

3. Juniper Routers Architecture


The central principle of the Juniper Networks platform centers on a separation of the control and
forwarding planes within the router. These are Routing Engine and Packet Forwarding Engine as
shown below.

3.1. Routing Engine


The Routing Engine is the central location for control of the system in a juniper networks
router and it consists of an Intel-based PCI platform running JUNOS software. The Routing
Engine constructs and maintains one or more routing tables. From the routing tables, the
Routing Engine derives a table of active routes, called the forwarding table, which is then
copied into the Packet Forwarding Engine.
Functions of the routing engine include the following

Handling of routing protocol packets


Management Interface
Configuration Management
Accounting and alarms
Modular Software
Scalablity

3.2. Packet Forwarding Engine


The Packet Forwarding Engine is the central location for data packet forwarding through
the router. The main portions of the Packet Forwarding Engine are the following:
Switching control board.
Flexible PIC Concentrator, and
Physical Interface Card
3.2.1 Switching Control Board
The switching control board contains a PowerPC CPU and 64MB of RAM that
operates the components of the circuit board itself, but doesn't participate in
packet forwarding. The Internet Processor ASIC is located on the control board
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

and accesses the forwarding table for route lookups.


3.2.2. Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC)
The Flexible PIC Concentrators on a router house the PICs which connect the
router to network media and its main function is to connect the PICs installed in
it to the other router components.
The Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC) connects to both the switching control
board and the router's interfaces within the Packet Forwarding Engine.
3.2.3. Physical Interface Card (PIC)
PIC is an interface card through which network cables carry data transmissions
to and from the network plug. A PIC installs into a FPC.

3.3. Routing Engine Hardware Components


The Routing Engine consists of various components like Processor, DRAM, EPROM,
Crypto Accelerator Module, Compact Flash.
i. Processor
The processor runs JUNOS software to maintain the router's routing tables and
routing protocols and creates the packet forwarding switch fabric for the router.
ii. DRAM
DRAM buffers incoming packets and provides storage for the routing and
forwarding tables and for other Routing Engine processes
iii. EPROM
EPROM stores the serial number of the Routing Engine.
iv. Crypto Accelerator Module
Crypto Accelerator Module is a processor card that enhances performance of
cryptographic algorithms used in IP security (IPSec) services.
The cryptographic algorithms supported include Advanced Encryption Standard
(AES), Data Encryption Standard (DES), triple DES (3DES), Hashed Message
Authentication Code-Message Digest 5 (HMAC-MD5), and HMAC-Secure
Hash Algorithm 1 (SHA-1).
v. Compact Flash
Compact Flash component provides primary storage for software images,
configuration files, and microcode. J-series routers have a primary or internal
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

compact flash located on the system board.

3.4. Router Boot Methods


J2320 and J2350 router can boot from the following given three devices.
i. Internal Compact Flash
ii. External Compact Flash
iii. USB Storage Device
J4350 and J6350 can boot from two devices namely
i. Compact Flash disk
ii. USB Storage Device

4. J-Series Router Overview


J Series Services Routers running JUNOS Software provide stable, reliable, and efficient IP routing,
WAN and LAN connectivity, and management services for small to medium-sized enterprise networks.
The J-series juniper router runs Junos with MPLS, IP4/6, QOS, multicast, firewall and IPsec VPN.
J-series Services Routers support network interfaces for E1, E3, T1, T3, Fast Ethernet, serial, Point-toPoint Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE), and ISDN media.

Slot numbering for J2320 router

Slot numbering for J2350 router

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

4.1. J2320 Router Front Panel and its Components


The front panel of the J2320 router is as shown below

The cross section as indicated by AA is provided in an enlarged scale below:

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

10

The components are explained below:


Physical Interface Module (PIM)
PIMs provide the physical connection to various network media types. The PIM receives
incoming packets from the network and transmits outgoing packets to the network.
Power Button and Power LED
The power button can be used to power the service router on and off. The power LED
located at the upper left of the LED dashboard is green color when on and it can be in two
states. i. On steadily state which means power is functioning correctly ii. Blinking state
which means power button has been pressed and quickly released and the router is shutting
down.
Status LED
Status LED changes from off to blinking green when the system is powered on. It can be in
the following states:

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

11

Color

State

Description

Blinking

Router is starting up or
performing diagnostics

On steadily

Router is operating
normal

Blinking

Error has been detected

Green

Red

Alarm LED
The alarm LED lights can be either yellow or red. If yellow, indicates a minor condition
that requires monitoring or maintenance. If red, indicates major condition that can result in
a system shutdown.
HA LED
The High availability (HA) LED lights when the router starts but otherwise remains unlit
and this is mostly for future use.
Reset Config Button
This button is used to return the router to either the rescue configuration or the factory
default configuration.
Console Port
Through the console port, a RJ-45 serial cable can be used to connect to the routing engine
and the router can be configured using CLI from the chassis console port.
USB Port
The USB ports on the front panel of the router accept a USB storage device or USB storage
device adapter with a compact flash installed and can act as a secondary boot device if the
internal compact flash fails on startup.
ESD Point
The electrostatic discharge point located at the front of the chassis minimizes the risk of
electrical discharge in potentially hazardous environments.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

12

4.2. Rear Panel of J2320 router

4.3. J-Series Router Configuration


There are two user interfaces to monitor, configure, troubleshoot and manage a service
router. They are JUNOS CLI and J-web Interface.
5.3.1 JUNOS Command Line Interface
JUNOS CLI is a Juniper Networks Command Shell that runs on top of a UNIXBased OS Kernel. The CLI provides command help and command completion
and commands are executed when Enter key is pressed.
The CLI has two modes Operational mode and Configuration mode. The CLI
commands are organized hierarchically with commands that perform a similar
function grouped together under the same level.
Steps for starting the CLI
1. Establish a connection with the services router 2. Log in using username and
password. After log in, enter a UNIX shell 3. Start the CLI
%cli
user@host>
The prompt ">" indicates that the CLI has started.
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

13

5.3.2. J-Web Interface


J-Web is a web-based GUI that allows operating a router without commands. It
allows to monitor, configure, troubleshoot, and manage the router on a client by
means of a web browser with HTTP (Hyper Test Transfer Protocol) or HTTPS
(HTTP over Secure Sockets Layer) enabled. Quick configuration wizards
simplify basic configuration and minimizes the risk of error.

4.4. PIM Modules for J-Series


PIMs supported for J-Series are categorized into uPIM, ePIM.
4.4.1 PIM
PIM (Physical Interface Module) is a network interface card that is installed on
a J-series Services Router, to provide physical connections to a LAN or a WAN
4.4.2 uPIM (Universal Switching PIM)
uPIM is a particular type of PIM, such as the Gigabit Ethernet uPIM, which can
be universally inserted in any slot on a J2320, J2350, J4350, or J6350 Services
Router.
The difference is ePIM slots has PCI and PCI-X bus connection whereas PIM
slots only has PCI bus connection. A uPIM either uses the PCI or the PCI-X
bus depending on what slot the uPIM is installed in. Naturally better
performance is expected with ePIM slots.
4.4.3 ePIM (Enhanced PIM)
ePIM is a particular type of high-speed PIM, such as the Gigabit Ethernet ePIM
or 4-port Fast Ethernet ePIM, which can be inserted only in high-speed slots
(slots 3 and 6 on a J4350 Services Router, or slots 2, 3, 5, and 6 on a J6350
Services Router).

4.5. PIM and VoIP Module Overview


J-Series routers accept PIMs and Avaya VoIP modules in the slots on the front of the
chassis.
Some of the supported PIMs include the following and are explained below

1-Port, 6-Port, 8-Port and 16-Port Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs


Dual-Port Serial PIM
Dual-Port T1 or E1 PIM

Avaya VoIP modules are controlled by the Avaya Communication Manager (CM) software
rather than the JUNOS software and are installed in the router chassis like PIMs.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

14

4.5.1. Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs


Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs are available in four versions i.e, 1-Port, 4-Port, 8-Port,
16-Port and are supported on J2320, J2350, J4350 and J6350 service routers.
1-Port Gigabit Ethernet uPIM
These have small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceivers which allows
different connectors. SFP is as shown in the figure below

A 1-port Gigabit Ethernet uPIM is as shown

Gigabit Ethernet uPIM can be inserted in any slot on J2320, J2350, J4350 and
J6350 service routers. High-speed slots are slots 3 and 6 on the J4350 router,
and slots 2, 3, 5, and 6 on the J6350 router.
Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs features are
The multiport uPIMs can be used as switches in the access layer
Link speed for 8-port and 16-port Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs is
configurable to 10, 100, or 1000 Mbps, and transmission mode is
configurable to half or full duplex. The 1-port and 6-port SFP Gigabit
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

15

Ethernet uPIMs cannot be manually configured-they are set at 1000


Mbps and full duplex.
1-port and 6-port Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs use SFP transceivers to allow
different connectors to be used on uPIM ports. These SFP Gigabit
Ethernet uPIMs support 1000Base-SX, 1000Base-LX, and 1000Base-T
SFPs. They do not support 1000Base-LH SFPs.
8-port and 16-port Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs-and SFPs on the 1-port and
6-port uPIMs-support 1000Base-T RJ-45 connectors. The limitations are
that Gigabit Ethernet uPIMs do not support SNMP and the interfaces
can be configured up to a max MTU size of 9014 bytes.
4.5.2. Dual-Port Serial PIM
The Dual-Port Serial PIM provides a physical connection to serial network
media types through two serial interface ports.

The key features of dual-port serial PIM are


Onboard network processor
Auto selection of operation modes based on data terminal equipment
(DTE) or data communication equipment (DCE) cables
Local and remote loopback diagnostics
Configurable clock rate for the transmit (Tx) clock and receive (Rx)
clock
4.5.3. Dual-Port T1 or E1 PIM
The Dual-Port T1 PIM and Dual-Port E1 PIM provide a physical connection to
T1 or E1 network media types. Each PIM has two physical T1 or E1 ports with
an integrated channel service unit (CSU) or data service unit (DSU).
Dual-port T1 PIM is shown below

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

16

Dual-port E1 PIM is shown below


Their key features include

Onboard network processor


Integrated CSU/DSU-Eliminates the need for a separate external device
56-Kbps and 64-Kbps modes
ANSI T1.102, T1.107, and T1.403 standards compliance
G.703, G.704, and G.706 E1 standards compliance
Independent internal and external clocking system
Loopback, bit error rate test (BERT), T1 facilities data link (FDL), and
long buildout diagnostics

4.6. Brief Overview of J2320, J2350, J4350, J6350 Routers


1. J2320
The J2320 Services Router is primarily designed for remote and branch offices.
The J2320 routers are entry level service routers which gives up to 600 Mbps
throughput performance, has four built-in Gigabit Ethernet ports. It has three
PIM slots for additional LAN/WAN connectivity, Avaya VoIP Gateway, and
WAN acceleration. They are used for one or two broadband, T1, or E1
interfaces with integrated services.
Fixed Interfaces: 4 Gigabit Ethernet ports
No of pim slots: 3
2. J2350
The J2350 Services Router is primarily designed for branch offices. The J2350
router which has 4built-in Gigabit Ethernet ports gives up to 700 Mbps
performance. It gives five PIM slots. They are usually used for multiple
broadband, T1, or E1 interfaces with multiple integrated services
Fixed Interfaces: 4 Gigabit Ethernet ports
No of pim slots: 5

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

17

3. J4350
The J4350 Services Router is designed primarily for regional and branch
offices. The J4350 enterprise router gives up to 1Gbps in performance. They
are usually used for DS3, E3, and Metro Ethernet interfaces with integrated
services. It has six PIM slots. Two of these slots are enhanced-performance
slots that provide additional performance to multiple Gigabit Ethernet
configurations.

Fixed Interfaces: 4 Gigabit Ethernet ports


No of pim slots: 6
4. J6350
The J6350 Services Router is designed primarily for regional and central
offices. The J6350 gives up to 2 Gbps in performance. It has six PIM slots for
additional LAN/WAN connectivity, Avaya VoIP Gateway, and WAN
acceleration. These routers have optional redundant power supplies for high
system availability. The J6350 Services Router is a higher-performance system
than the J4350 Services Router.

Fixed Interfaces: 4 Gigabit Ethernet ports


No of pim slots: 6

5. M-Series Routers Overview


The Juniper Networks M Series is a family of high-performance, multiservice edge routers, with
advanced routing features that delivers exceptional flexibility and reliability over a wide range of
connectivity options without compromise.
Designed for high-performance service providers and enterprises, the M7i, M10i, M120, and M320 can
be deployed in the small and medium core, multiservice edge, collapsed POP routing, peering, route
reflector, campus or WAN gateway applications. Speeds range from DS0 up to OC192/STM-64 and 10
GbE.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

18

Advanced routing features supported include MPLS, multicast, QoS, and high availability. Services
supported include a broad array of VPNs, network-based security, real-time voice and video,
bandwidth on demand, rich multicast of premium content, IPv6 services, granular accounting and much
more.

5.1 M7i Front Panel and its Components

The components are explained below


PIC
A PIC (Physical Interface Card) is an interface card through which network cables carry
data transmissions to and from the network plug. A PIC installs into a FPC (Flexible PIC
Concentrator). M7i router accommodates four PICs.
FIC
In addition to four PICs, M7i router includes a built-in FIC (Fixed Interface Card) that
provides two fast Ethernet ports or one gigabit Ethernet port depending on which FIC was
ordered. FPC 0 holds PIC slots (0 to 3) and FPC 1 holds fixed interfaces (Two Fast
Ethernet or One Gigabit Ethernet).
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

19

FIC Receives incoming packets and transmits outgoing packets to the network, displays
alarm status, and takes PICs online and offline.
ESD Point
The ESD Point (Electrostatic discharge point) located at the front of the chassis minimizes
the risk of electrical discharge in potentially hazardous environments.
Routing Engine
Routing Engine maintains the routing tables, manages the routing protocols, controls the
interfaces, controls some chassis components, and provides the interface for system
management and user access.

5.2 M7i Rear Panel

Some of the components are explained below


CFEB
CFEB (Compact Forwarding Engine Board) provides route lookup, management of shared
memory, transfer of outgoing data packets, and transfer of exception and control packets;
includes built-in tunnel interface and optional Adaptive Services PIC.
Power Supplies
Power Supplies distributes needed voltages to components.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

20

5.3 Brief overview of M7i, M10i, M40e, M120 and M320 Routers
1. M7i
The M7i Multiservice Edge Router is 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) in height and supports
7+ Gbps throughput. The M7i is ideal as an IP/MPLS provider edge router in
small PoPs or as an enterprise routing solution for Internet gateway or branch
aggregation.
The M7i router supports various PICs, including ATM, channelized, Ethernet,
IP services, and SONET/SDH interfaces.
The router accommodates up to four Physical Interface Cards (PICs). In
addition to the PICs, the Fixed Interface Card (FIC) provides two Fast Ethernet
ports or one Gigabit Ethernet port, depending on your configuration.
PICs are interchangeable between the M7i and M10i routers.
2. M10i
The M10i Multiservice Edge Router is cost-effective fully redundant M Series
edge router, combined with Junos OS reliability features, the M10i router is the
product of choice for enabling reliable and secure services in small and medium
PoPs.
The router supports up to eight PICs, including ATM, Channelized, Gigabit
Ethernet, IP Services, and SONET/SDH interfaces
The M10i router supports up to eight Physical Interface Cards (PICs). PICs are
interchangeable between the M7i and M10i routers.
3. M40e
The M40e Multiservice Edge Router provides a dense, highly redundant
platform primarily targeted for dense dedicated access aggregation and provider
edge services in medium and large PoPs.
PICs are available in supported media types, including Asynchronous Transfer
Mode (ATM), Channelized DS3, E1, E3, T1, Ethernet, SONET/SDH, and IP
services.
The router accommodates up to eight Flexible PIC Concentrators (FPCs) (FPC
0 to FPC 7), which can each be configured with a variety of network media
types, altogether providing up to 32 OC12/STM4, 32 Gigabit Ethernet, or eight
OC48/STM16 ports per system. FPCs supported by M40e router are FPC,
Enhanced Plus FPC1, Enhanced Plus FPC2
PICs are compatible with the M120 and Juniper Networks T320 and T640 Core
Routers.
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

21

4. M120
M120 router is the newest addition to M-Series, capable of supporting MPLS
services at Layers 2 and 3, including Layer 3 VPNs, the M120 is designed to
deliver superior redundancy and facilitate the transport of legacy Frame Relay
and ATM traffic over high-bandwidth Ethernet links.
The router supports various PICs, including ATM, Channelized, Gigabit
Ethernet, IP services, and SONET/SDH interfaces.
The M120 delivers support for 128 GE subscriber ports, with 10 GB Ethernet
or OC 192 uplink capability in an affordable, compact form factor
The router is a quarter-rack chassis that supports up to six FPCs. Four slots
accept FPCs of Types 1, 2, and 3 and two slots accept Compact FPCs (CFPCs).
Each FPC can be configured with a variety of network media types, altogether
providing up to 130 physical interface ports per system. The CFPC slots are
identical to the Type 1, 2, and 3 FPC slots, but feature a smaller form factor to
provide higher density 10-Gigabit interfaces.
FPCs supported by M120 router are FPC1, FPC2 and FPC3. PICs are
compatible with M40e, T320, and T640 routers.
5. M320
The M320 Multiservice Edge Router is a high performance, 10 Gbps-capable,
distributed architecture edge router ideal for medium-size backbone cores
requiring predictable performance for feature-rich infrastructures.
The router supports up to eight FPCs providing SONET/SDH OC-48/STM16,
SONET/SDH OC192/STM64, and 160-Gigabit Ethernet media.
The router is a half-rack chassis that supports up to eight Flexible PIC
Concentrators (FPCs) providing up to 64 SONET/SDH OC48/STM16, 16
SONET/SDH OC192/STM64, or 160 Gigabit Ethernet ports for the router.
FPCs supported by M320 router are Enhanced II FPC 1, Enhanced III FPC 1,
Enhanced II FPC 2, Enhanced II FPC 3, Enhanced III FPC 2, Enhanced III FPC
3. PICs are compatible with M40e, M120, T320, and T640 routers.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

22

6. JUNOS Command Line Interface


The operating system software that powers the Juniper routers is called JUNOS. The software is
modular and standards based. Another important feature of JUNOS is that the software is platform
independent (within Juniper hardware systems, not to be confused with other vendor hardware), thus
delivering the same scalability and security across several hardware platforms.
JUNOS CLI is a simple to use, text-based command interface. We give various commands on CLI for
configuring, troubleshooting and monitoring the software.
JUNOS primarily supports two types of command modes.
a) Operational Mode
b) Configuration Mode
a) Operational Mode:
When we log in to the router and the CLI starts, we are at the top level of the CLI operational mode. In
this mode, we enter the commands for
1. Controlling the CLI environment, and
2. Monitor and troubleshoot network connectivity, and
3. Initiating the Configuration Mode.
Frequently used commands in this mode include ping, show, traceroute, configure, etc.
b) Configuration Mode:
We use the Configuration mode for configuring the JUNOS software by creating a hierarchy of
configuration statements. We enter the configuration mo9+de by using the command "configure" as
shown below:
user@host>configure
Entering configuration mode
[edit]
user@host#
Issuing the commands one at a time using CLI can configure a JUNOS router or alternately, we can
configure by creating a text (ASCII) file that contains the statement hierarchy. Remember to activate
the configuration by using the command "commit" on the router.
As shown in the above example, the generic configuration prompt is user@host#. Ofcourse, we can
change the prompt by using appropriate command.
Statement Hierarchy:
We use the above configuration mode commands to create a statement hierarchy, and then configure
the JUNOS software. The term "statement hierarchy" is used to define the sequence of commands used
for configuring a particular feature (or features) of the router. An example statement hierarchy is given
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

23

below:
user@host>configure
Entering configuration mode
[edit] ----Top level
user@host#edit protocols ospf
[edit protocols ospf] ----protocols ospf hierarchy level
user@host#
"set" commands are used to configure specific leaf statements.
Ex: user@host#set hello-interval 14

7. Router Interfaces
Juniper Networks platform has primarily two types of interface. These are:
Permanent interfaces, these are always present in the router and
Transient interfaces, these can be inserted or removed from the router by user.

7.1. Permanent Interfaces:


Each router has two permanent interfaces. These are:
a. Management Ethernet interface: This interface enables us to access the
router using ssh, and telnet. The interface uses out-of-band connectivity, and
does not provide packet forwarding capabilities for the transit data packets.
b. Internal Ethernet interface: Connects the Routing Engine (running the
JUNOS Internet software) to the Packet Forwarding Engine. The router uses
this interface as the main communications link between the JUNOS software
and the components of the Packet Forwarding Engine. The Internal Ethernet
interface is configured automatically when the JUNOS software boots.

7.2. Transient Interfaces:


Transient Interfaces are the interfaces that receive user's data packets from the network and
transmit the packets to the network. These interfaces are physically located on a Physical
Interface Card. They can be inserted and removed at any time.
These interface need to be configured before using it. We can also configure the interfaces
that are not in the chassis. When the JUNOS software activates the router's configuration it
finds out the interfaces that are present and activates only those interfaces.
In addition, each router has two serial ports, labeled console and auxiliary. Console port can
be used to connect tty-type terminals to the router. The auxiliary port can connect to a
modem.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

24

8. Interface Representation
8.1. On J-Series routers
On the J-series routing platform, when information about an interface is displayed, the
interface type, the slot in which the Physical Interface Module (PIM) is installed, 0, and the
configured port number is specified.
In the physical part of the interface name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from the
PIM number, and a slash (/) separates the PIM, 0, and port numbers. And the syntax is:
type-pim/0/port
Each of the terms are explained below:
type: is the one that uniquely identifies the type of physical interface. It is a two-character
word and can be one of the following:
ae-Aggregated Ethernet interface
at-ATM interface
e1-E1 interface (including channelized STM-1 interfaces)
e3-E3 interface
fe-Fast Ethernet interface
fxp-Management and internal Ethernet interfaces
ge-Gigabit Ethernet interface
gr-Generic Route Encapsulation tunnel interface
ip-IP-over-IP encapsulation tunnel interface
lo-Loopback interface
ml-Multilink interface
so-SONET/SDH interface
t1-T1 interface (including channelized DS-3 and OC-3 interfaces)
t3-T3 interface (including channelized OC-12 interfaces
se-Serial interface
pim: Physical Interface Module (PIM) provides the physical connection to various network
media types. It is the slot in which the PIM is installed.
0: it is the pim module number
port: it is the port number to be configured
For example, on a J-series router J2320, assuming that slot 1 is populated with single port
gigabit ethernet card, the interface is uniquely identified as below:
ge-1/0/0

8.2. On M-Series routers and T-Series routers


Using JUNOS software, a typical interface configuration will have the following syntax:
type-fpc/pic/port
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

25

Each of the terms are explained below:


type: is the one that uniquely identifies the type of physical interface. It is a two-character
word as stated above.
fpc: is the physical slot number in the chassis where the interface is located.
pic: is the slot number on the FPC where the interface is located.
port: is the location on the PIC where the interface port (to which the interface is
connected) is located.
For example, M7i router will have one fixed FPC (FPC1) that contains internal ports, and
FPC 0 for external PIC cards. Assuming that FPC0, PIC1 is populated with dual port fast
ethernet card, the ports are uniquely addressed as below:
fe-0/1/0 for the first fast ethernet port, and
fe-0/1/1 for the second fast ethernet port.
Note:
Some physical interfaces use channel numbers instead if unit numbers. These numbers are
represented using colon instead of period like media_type-fpc/pic/port:channel Number

8.3. On MX-Series routers


On the MX-series routers when information about an interface is displayed, the interface
type, the slot in which the Dense Port Concentrator (DPC) is installed, the slot on the DPC
in which the Physical Interface Card (PIC) is located, and the configured port number are
specified.
In the physical part of the interface name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from the
DPC number, and a slash (/) separates the DPC, PIC, and port numbers. And the syntax is:
type-dpc/pic/port
type: is the one that uniquely identifies the type of physical interface. It is a two-character
word as stated above.
dpc: is the slot number in which the Dense Port Concentrator (dpc) is installed
pic: is the slot number on the dpc
port: it is the port number to be configured

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

26

9. ROUTING FUNDAMENTAL LABS


The following labs can be performed using CertExams.com Juniper network simulator. The
software may be downloaded from the Juniper Junos Simulator product page. Further,
please note that the Demo version will support limited commands. All labs are supported
only in the full version of the software.

9.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : Entering configuration mode on a Router, and exit


Description: A basic exercise, that shows how to enter configuration mode, and exit from
the same. Choose R1 from the network diagram, and exit.
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode
2. Get back to the operational mode
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#exit
user@R1>
Back

9.2 :Lab Exercise 2 : Setting Host Name


Description:Set the router host name. Go to N/W diagram and choose device R1.
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode
2. Set hostname as juniper1
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit system
[edit system]
user@R1#set host-name juniper1
[edit system]
user@juniper1#exit
[edit]
user@juniper1#exit
Back

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

27

9.3 : Lab Exercise 3 : Setting Routers domain Name


Description:Set the routerdomain name. Go to N/W diagram and choose device R1.
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode
2. Set domain name as mydomain.net.
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit system
[edit system]
user@R1#set domain-name mydomain.net
[edit system]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#
Back

9.4 : Lab Exercise 4 : Configure the Root Password (Encrypted


Password)
Description: This lab demonstrates configuring encrypted password on the router.
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode
2. Move to the root-authentication hierarchy
3. Set the encrypted password as 24adr3e
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit system root-authentication
[edit system root-authentication]
user@R1#set encrypted-password 24adr3e
[edit system root-authentication]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#
Back

9.5 : Lab Exercise 5 : Configure a DNS Name Server


Not available in demo version

9.6 : Lab Exercise 6 : Configure a Backup Router


Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

28

Not available in demo version

9.7 : Lab Exercise 7 : Router Interface address Configuration


Not available in demo version

9.8 : Lab Exercise 8 : Shut down an Interface


Not available in demo version

9.9 : Lab Exercise 9 : Set Interface Description


Not available in demo version

9.10 : Lab Exercise 10 : Configuring the Encapsulation on a Physical


Interface
Not available in demo version

9.11 : Lab Exercise 11 : Configuring Keepalives


Not available in demo version

9.12 : Lab Exercise 12 : Set Keepalive Timers


Not available in demo version

9.13 : Lab Exercise 13 : Configuring the management Ethernet interface


(fxp0)
Not available in demo version

9.14 : Lab Exercise 14 : Setting Bandwidth on an interface


Not available in demo version

9.15 :Lab Exercise 15 : Configuring the hold-time value on a physical


interface to damp interface transitions
Not available in demo version

9.16 : Lab Exercise 16 : Configuring the DTE Clock Rate


Not available in demo version

9.17 : Lab Exercise 17 : Basic gigabit ethernet configuration on a J-series


router
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

29

Not available in demo version

9.18 : Lab Exercise 18 : Configuring speed on sonet interface


Not available in demo version

9.19 : Lab Exercise 19 : Show chassis commands on J and M series routers


Not available in demo version

9.20 : Objective Test 1 : Answer the following questions


1. For which two functions is the Routing Engine responsible? (Choose two.)
A. packet forwarding
B. queuing functions
C. routing protocol control
D. JUNOS software operation
2. Which command would correctly define a router's host-name?
A. # set ip host-name
B. > set ip host-name
C. # set system host-name
D. > set system host-name
3. The interface ge-0/2/3 is located in which flexible PIC concentrator slot?
A. 0
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
4. How many FPC slots are there on M40 router?
A. 2
B. 4
C. 6
D. 8
5. Which command configures an address of 192.168.1.1 with a mask of 255.255.255.0 on
interface ge-0/0/0?
A. set ip interface ge-0/0/0 address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
B. set ip interface ge-0/0/0 address 192.168.1.1/24
C. set interface ge-0/0/0 ip4 address 192.168.1.1 mask 255.255.255.0
D. set interfaces ge-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.1.1/24
6. Which protocol family is required prior to assigning an IP address to an interface?
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

30

A. family ip
B. family ip6
C. family inet
D. family inet4
7. Which operational command allows a user to view the exhaust temperatures of a Juniper
device?
A. show chassis state
B. file list alarm
C. show chassis alarms
D. show chassis environment
8. In which mode are users allowed to configure the device, including interfaces, protocols,
user access, and system hardware properties?
A. priviledged mode
B. configuration mode
C. monitoring mode
D. operational mode
9. Which command is used to retrieve the serial numbers of a Juniper device?
A. show version
B. show chassis hardware
C. show hardware detail
D. view hardware database
10. What are the primary responsibilities of the RE?
A. Control routing protocol traffic, perform route look-ups
B. Forward data traffic, perform route filtering
C. Maintain routing protocols, control software processes
D. Manage interfaces, reassemble packets from shared memory

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

31

10. STATIC ROUTING LABS


10.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : Configuring Static Routes
Description: Configure static route 172.16.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 with next hop address
of 192.16.2.1.
syntax: ip route prefix mask {address|interface} [distance]
prefix mask: is the ip route prefix and mask for the destination.
address|interface: Use either the next hop router ip or the local router outbound interface
used to reach the destination.
distance: is the administrative distance and an optional parameter.
Instructions:
1. Enter into Global Configuration Mode
2. Configure a static route to a destination sub-network (172.16.1.0) with 24-bit subnet
mask and next hop IP address of 172.16.2.1.
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit routing-options
[edit routing-options]
user@R1#edit static route 172.16.1.0/24
[edit routing-options static route 172.16.1.0/24]
user@R1#set next-hop 172.16.2.1
[edit routing-options static route 172.16.1.0/24]
user@R1#exit
[edit routing-options]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#
Back

10.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : Ping test


Not available in demo version

10.3 : Lab Exercise 3 : Telnet


Not available in demo version

10.4 : Lab Exercise 4 : Traceroute


Not available in demo version

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

32

10.5 : Objective Test 2 : Answer the following questions


Not available in demo version

11. POLICIES CONFIGURATION LABS


11.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : Routing Policy Lab 1
Description: Use this lab to configure the routing policy on router, by specifying the match
condition to accept all rip routes, that is checked against the source address of the route
advertised.
Instructions:
1.Enter into configuration mode.
2.Create a policy statement by name as same as riproutes.
3.Create a term under the policy created above by the name as AdvRip.
4.Create a match condition and specify to accept rip routes under the above term.
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes]
user@R1#edit term AdvRip
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes term AdvRip]
user@R1#edit from
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes term AdvRip from]
user@R1#set protocol rip
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes term AdvRip from]
user@R1#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes term AdvRip]
user@R1#edit then
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes term AdvRip then]
user@R1#set accept
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes term AdvRip then]
user@R1#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes term AdvRip]
user@R1#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement riproutes]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#
Back

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

33

11.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : Routing Policy Lab 2


Not available in demo version

11.3 : Objective Test 3 : Answer the following questions


Not available in demo version

12. RIP CONFIGURATION LAB


12.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : RIP Configuration
Description: Use this lab to configure the RIP on router, by applying an export and import
policies at their respective hierarchical levels.
Instructions:
1.Enter into configuration mode.
2.Enable RIP routing on the router.
3.Create a group called neighborRouters apply an export policy riproutes to this group.
4.Specify the neighbor interface as so-0/0/0 under the above created group and apply an
import policy riproutes to this neighbor.
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit protocols rip
[edit protocols rip]
user@R1#edit group neighborRouters
[edit protocols rip group neighborRouters]
user@R1#set export riproutes
[edit protocols rip group neighborRouters]
user@R1#edit neighbor so-0/0/0
[edit protocols rip group neighborRouters neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R1#set import riproutes
[edit protocols rip group neighborRouters neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R1#exit
[edit protocols rip group neighborRouters]
user@R1#exit
[edit protocols rip]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#
Back

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

34

12.2 : Objective Test 4 : Answer the following questions


Not available in demo version

13. DYNAMIC ROUTING LABS


13.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : Ping test by configuring RIP
Description: The purpose of this lab is to configure RIP Routing and other required
commands to advertise these rip routes on all the devices and test for ping command.
Applicable network diagram is given below:

Note: .1 on router 1 So refers to 192.168.1.1. Similarly other IP addresses to be interpreted.


Instructions:
1.Assign the IP address of all the devices as given below

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

35

Device Interface IP Address

Mask

R1

So-0/0/0 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0


So-0/0/1 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

R2

So-0/0/0 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0


So-0/0/1 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0

R3

So-0/0/0 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0


So-0/0/1 192.168.2.2 255.255.255.0

2.Enable RIP routing on all the devices


3.Specify the policy to accept the rip routes on all the devices
4.Apply an import policy and an export policy (policy created above) on all the devices.
5.From R1 issue a ping command to R2 and R3
On R1:
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet
[edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
user@R1#set address 192.168.3.1/24
[edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet
[edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet]
user@R1#set address 192.168.1.1/24
[edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term
[edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term]
user@R1#edit from
[edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term from]
user@R1#set protocol rip
[edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term from]
user@R1#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term]
user@R1#edit then
[edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term then]
user@R1#set accept
[edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term then]
user@R1#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement R1pol term R1term]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

36

user@R1#edit protocols rip group R1grp


[edit protocols rip group R1grp]
user@R1#set export R1pol
[edit protocols rip group R1grp]
user@R1#edit neighbor so-0/0/0
[edit protocols rip group R1grp neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R1#set import R1pol
[edit protocols rip group R1grp neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R1#exit
[edit protocols rip group R1grp]
user@R1#edit neighbor so-0/0/1
[edit protocols rip group R1grp neighbor so-0/0/1]
user@R1#set import R1pol
[edit protocols rip group R1grp neighbor so-0/0/1]
user@R1#exit
[edit protocols rip group R1grp]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#commit
commit complete
[edit]
user@R1#
On R2:
user@R2>configure
[edit]
user@R2#edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet
[edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
user@R2#set address 192.168.1.2/24
[edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
user@R2#exit
[edit]
user@R2#edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet
[edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet]
user@R2#set address 192.168.2.1/24
[edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet]
user@R2#exit
[edit]
user@R2#edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term
[edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term]
user@R2#edit from
[edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term from]
user@R2#set protocol rip
[edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term from]
user@R2#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term]
user@R2#edit then
[edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term then]
user@R2#set accept
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

37

[edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term then]


user@R2#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement R2pol term R2term]
user@R2#exit
[edit]
user@R2#edit protocols rip group R2grp
[edit protocols rip group R2grp]
user@R2#set export R2pol
[edit protocols rip group R2grp]
user@R2#edit neighbor so-0/0/0
[edit protocols rip group R2grp neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R2#set import R2pol
[edit protocols rip group R2grp neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R2#exit
[edit protocols rip group R2grp]
user@R2#edit neighbor so-0/0/1
[edit protocols rip group R2grp neighbor so-0/0/1]
user@R2#set import R2pol
[edit protocols rip group R2grp neighbor so-0/0/1]
user@R2#exit
[edit protocols rip group R2grp]
user@R2#exit
[edit]
user@R2#commit
commit complete
[edit]
user@R2#
On R3:
user@R3>configure
[edit]
user@R3#edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet
[edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
user@R3#set address 192.168.3.2/24
[edit interfaces so-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
user@R3#exit
[edit]
user@R3#edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet
[edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet]
user@R3#set address 192.168.2.2/24
[edit interfaces so-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet]
user@R3#exit
[edit]
user@R3#edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term
[edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term]
user@R3#edit from
[edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term from]
user@R3#set protocol rip
[edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term from]
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

38

user@R3#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term]
user@R3#edit then
[edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term then]
user@R3#set accept
[edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term then]
user@R3#exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement R3pol term R3term]
user@R3#exit
[edit]
user@R3#edit protocols rip group R3grp
[edit protocols rip group R3grp]
user@R3#set export R3pol
[edit protocols rip group R3grp]
user@R3#edit neighbor so-0/0/0
[edit protocols rip group R3grp neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R3#set import R3pol
[edit protocols rip group R3grp neighbor so-0/0/0]
user@R3#exit
[edit protocols rip group R3grp]
user@R3#edit neighbor so-0/0/1
[edit protocols rip group R3grp neighbor so-0/0/1]
user@R3#set import R3pol
[edit protocols rip group R3grp neighbor so-0/0/1]
user@R3#exit
[edit protocols rip group R3grp]
user@R3#exit
[edit]
user@R3#commit
commit complete
[edit]
user@R3#
On R1:
user@R1>ping 192.168.2.2
user@R1>ping 192.168.2.1
Back

13.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : Ping test by configuring OSPF with multiple areas
Not available in demo version

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

39

14. SHOW COMMAND LAB


14.1 : Lab Exercise 1 :Show Commands
Description: This exercise demonstrates various basic show commands available.
Instructions:
1. Issue show version brief command.
2. Issue show cli command.
3. Issue show cli history command.
user@R1>show version brief
user@R1>show cli
user@R1>show cli history
Back

15. OSPF LABS


15.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : OSPF Configuration
Description: Use this lab to configure the OSPF on router with an area 0.
Instructions:
1.Enter into configuration mode.
2.Enable OSPF routing on the router.
3.Put the interfaces so-0/0/0 and so-0/0/1 under area 0.
user@R1>configure
[edit]
user@R1#edit protocols ospf
[edit protocols ospf]
user@R1#edit area 0
[edit protocols ospf area 0]
user@R1#edit interface so-0/0/0
[edit protocols ospf area 0 interface so-0/0/0]
user@R1#exit
[edit protocols ospf area 0]
user@R1#edit interface so-0/0/1
[edit protocols ospf area 0 interface so-0/0/1]
user@R1#exit
[edit protocols ospf area 0]
user@R1#exit
[edit protocols ospf]
user@R1#exit
[edit]
user@R1#
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

40

Back

15.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : OSPF configuration and verification


Not available in demo version

15.3 : Objective Test 5 : Answer the following questions


Not available in demo version

16. BGP Labs


16.1 : Lab Exercise 1 :BGP Configuration

Note: This Lab is divided in to 7 sections. Please refer the figure above for all the sections

Section I : To configure the BGP peer sessions


Description: This lab exercises demonstrates the configuring BGP peer sessions
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode.
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

41

2. Move to interfaces hierarchy


3. Configure the interfaces to Peers A, B, C, and D
4. Exit from the interfaces hierarchy
user@E>configure
[edit]
user@E#edit interfaces
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/0 description to-A
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 10.10.10.1/24
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/1 description to-B
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet address 10.10.10.5/24
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/2 description to-C
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/2 unit 0 family inet address 10.10.10.9/24
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/3 description to-D
[edit interfaces]
user@E#set ge-0/0/3 unit 0 family inet address 10.21.7.1/24
[edit interfaces]
user@E#exit
[edit]
user@E#
Back

Section II : Setting the AS number


Not available in demo version

Section III : Create BGP group and add the External neighbor addresses
Not available in demo version

Section IV : Specify the AS number of the external AS


Not available in demo version

Section V : Add the peer D and set the AS number at the individual neighbor level
Not available in demo version

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

42

Section VI : Set the peer type to external BGP (EBGP)


Not available in demo version

Section VII : Setting the bgp hold-time


Not available in demo version

17. Juniper Switch Models


Juniper switches are available in two series
a. EX Series Ethernet Switches : Deliver high performance, carrier-class solutions built to meet the needs
of today's converged branch office, campus, and data center networks.
b. QFX Series : High-performance devices deliver Juniper's unique QFabric architecture, supporting
thousands of ports within a single-tier data center or cloud network with ultra-low latency, high resiliency,
and the simplicity of a single switch.

18. EX Series Switches Overview


18.1. EX2200 Switch
Juniper Networks EX2200 Ethernet switches provide connectivity for low-density environments.
EX2200 switches are available in models with either 24 or 48 built-in network ports and four
uplink ports, with Power over Ethernet (PoE) either available in all built-in network ports or not
available in any built-in network port. All models provide network ports that have
10/100/1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet connectors and four uplink ports. These switches run under
Junos OS for EX Series switches. Each EX2200 switch has four uplink ports that support 1gigabit small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceivers for use with fiber connections and copper
connections. PoE ports provide electrical current to devices through the network cables so that
separate power cords for devices such as IP phones, wireless access points, and security cameras
are unnecessary.

Version 1.0

Model Number

Access Ports

PoE Enabled Ports

EX2200-24T-4G

24 Gigabit Ethernet

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

43

EX2200-24P-4G

24 Gigabit Ethernet

All 24 ports

EX2200-48T-4G

48 Gigabit Ethernet

EX2200-48P-4G

48 Gigabit Ethernet

All 48 ports

18.1.1. EX2200 Front Panel


The front panel of an EX2200 switch consists of the following components:

Network portsdepending on the switch model, either of:


24 or 48 10/100/1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet ports, with Power over
Ethernet (PoE) not available in EX2200-24T and EX2200-48T
24 or 48 10/100/1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet ports, with Power over
Ethernet (PoE) available in EX2200-24P and EX2200-48P

4 built-in SFP uplink ports

2 chassis status LEDs

4 port status mode LEDs

Mode button

18.1.2. Chassis LEDs


The front panel of an EX2200 switch has two chassis status LEDs labeled SYS and
ALM on the far right side of the panel, above the uplink ports.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

44

LED Label

Color

State and Decription

ALM

Unlit

There is no alarm

Amber

There is a minor alarm

Red

There is a major alarm

Green

On steadily : The switch is


functioning normally

SYS

Blinking : The switch is


booting
Off : The switch is off

18.1.3. EX2200 Rear Panel


The rear panel of the EX2200 switch consists of the following components:

Version 1.0

Management Ethernet port

USB port

Console port

Protective earthing terminal

ESD point

Air exhaust
Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

45

Serial number ID label

AC power cord inlet

18.2. EX2500 Switch


The EX2500 line of ethernet switches delivers a compact, energy efficient ethernet solution for
10 gigabit Ethernet GbE top-of-rack data center access deployments where high performance,
low latency and high availabilty are key requirements.
The EX2500 switch has 24 SFP+ ports, 2 management ports, and 1 console port. (The EX2500
switch contains 24 10-gigabit Small Form-Factor Pluggable Plus (SFP+) ports and 2 1-gigabit
management ports. The 10-gigabit SFP+ ports can accept 10-gigabit optical transceivers or Direct
Attach Cables (DACs). This 1U switch is rack mountable in either the horizontal or vertical
direction, depending on your application.)
Model Number

Description

EX2500-24F-FB

24-port Gigabit Ethernet/10-Gigabit Ethernet


SFP

EX2500-24F-BF

24-port Gigabit Ethernet/10-Gigabit Ethernet


SFP

Note: SFP+ Ports: 24 Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP+) ports are located on the front panel.
These ports accept approved optical SFP+ transceivers or direct access cables (DACs).
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

46

18.3. EX3200 Switch


The EX3200 line of Ethernet switches offers a simple, cost-effective solution for low-density
branch and regional offices.
EX3200 switches are available in models with either 24 or 48 ports and with either all ports
equipped for Power over Ethernet (PoE) or only 8 ports equipped for PoE. EX3200 switches with
a DC power supply installed do not provide PoE. All models provide ports that have
10/100/1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet connectors and optional 1-gigabit small form-factor
pluggable (SFP) transceivers, 10-gigabit small form-factor pluggable (SFP+) transceivers, or 10gigabit small form-factor pluggable (XFP) transceivers for use with fiber connections.
Model

Access Ports

No of PoE enabled ports

EX3200-24T

24 Gigabit Ethernet

First 8 ports

EX3200-48T

48 Gigabit Ethernet

First 8 ports

EX3200-24P

24 Gigabit Ethernet

All 24 ports

EX3200-48P

48 Gigabit Ethernet

All 48 ports

EX3200-24T-DC

24 Gigabit Ethernet

EX3200-48T-DC

48 Gigabit Ethernet

18.4. EX4200 Switch


Juniper Networks EX4200 Ethernet Switches provide connectivity for medium- and high-density
environments and scalability for growing networks.
EX4200 switches are available in models with 24 or 48 ports and with either all ports equipped
for Power over Ethernet (PoE) or only 8 ports equipped for PoE. All models provide ports that
have 10/100/1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet connectors and optional 1-gigabit small form-factor
pluggable (SFP) transceivers, 10-gigabit small form-factor pluggable (SFP+) transceivers, or 10gigabit small form-factor pluggable (XFP) transceivers for use with fiber connections.
Additionally, a 24-port model provides 100Base-FX/1000Base-X SFP ports. This model is
typically used as a small distribution switch.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

47

Model

Ports

PoE enabled ports

EX4200-24T

24 Gigabit Ethernet

First 8 ports

EX4200-48T

48 Gigabit Ethernet

First 8 ports

EX4200-24P

24 Gigabit Ethernet

All 24 ports

EX4200-48P

48 Gigabit Ethernet

All 48 ports

EX4200-24F

24 Gigabit Ethernet

EX4200-24T-DC

24 Gigabit Ethernet

EX4200-48T-DC

48 Gigabit Ethernet

EX4200-24F-DC

24 Gigabit Ethernet

18.5. EX4500 Switch


EX4500 switches provide connectivity for high-density 10-Gigabit Ethernet data center top-ofrack and aggregation deployments. Typically, EX4500 switches are used in data centers where
they can be positioned as the top device in a rack to provide connectivity for all devices in the
rack.

Version 1.0

Model

Access Port Configuration

EX4500-40F-FB

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

EX4500-40F-BF

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

EX4500-40F-FB-C

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

EX4500-40F-BF-C

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

EX4500-40F-DC-C

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

48

EX4500-40F-VC1-FB

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

EX4500-40F-VC1-BF

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

EX4500-40F-VC1-DC

40-port GbE/10GbE SFP/SFP+

Note: The FB and BF in the model number indicate the direction of airflow of the chassis:

FBFront-to-back airflow
BFBack-to-front airflow

The C in the model number indicates the Converged Enhanced Ethernet (CEE) status of switch:

CCEE capable
NoneNot CEE capable

The DC in the model number indicates that the switch model supports DC power supply.
The VC in the model number indicates that the switch model can be used in a Virtual Chassis
configuration.

18.6. EX8200 Switch


The EX8200 line of modular Ethernet switches is a family of high-performance, highly available
platforms for use in high-density 10GbE data centers, campus aggregations and core networks.
Juniper Networks EX8200 Ethernet line cards offer a variety of interfaces for supporting highdensity 100 Mbps, Gigabit and 10 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) deployments. Four versions of the
EX8200 Ethernet line cards are available, each of which supports a consistent set of features and
capabilities: the EX8200-48T, the EX8200-48F, the EX8200-8XS and the EX8200-40XS.
Three of these cards are available in Extra Scale (ES) configurationsthe EX8200-48T-ES, the
EX8200-48F-ES and the EX8200-8XS-ESwhich are optimized for large-scale deployments
such as large campuses, global data centers, or cloud-based applications.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

49

Ethernet Line Card Specifications


EX820048T/EX820048T-ES

EX820048F/EX820048F-ES

EX82008XS/EX82008XS-ES

EX8200-40XS

EX8200EX8200-2XS48PL/EX8200 4OP/EX8200-48TL
2XS-4OT

48 RJ-45

48 SFP

8 SFP+

40 SFP/SFP+

48 RJ-45

40 RJ-45 / 4 SFP
/2 SFP+

PoE/PoE 0
+ ports

48/12 (48PL
only)

40/12 (40P only)

Port
speed

100/1000 Mbps 10 Gbps

1 Gbps/10 Gbps

10/100/1000
Mbps

10/100/1000
Mbps; 100/1000
Mbps; 10 Gbps

Port
quantity
and type

10/100/1000
Mbps

19. Connecting and Configuring an EX Series Switch (CLI Procedure)


Set the following parameter values in the console server or PC:

Baud Rate9600
Flow ControlNone
Data8
ParityNone
Stop Bits1
DCD StateDisregard

To connect and configure the switch from the console using the CLI:
1. Connect the console port to a laptop or PC using the RJ-45 to DB-9 serial port adapter. The RJ-45
cable and RJ-45 to DB-9 serial port adapter are supplied with the switch.
EX2200, EX3200, or EX4200 switchThe console port is located on the rear panel of the
switch.
EX4500 switchThe console port is located on the front panel of the switch.
EX8200 switchThe console port is located on the Switch Fabric and Routing Engine (SRE)
module in slot SRE0 in an EX8208 switch or on the Routing Engine (RE) module in slot RE0
in an EX8216 switch.
2. At the Junos OS shell prompt root%, type ezsetup.
3. Enter the hostname. This is optional.
4. Enter the root password you plan to use for this device. You are prompted to re-enter the root
password.
Note: The initial login name and password on EX-series switches:
login: root
password: <no password>

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

50

The device is shipped with no password; simply press the enter key.
Note: For security reasons, create a password for the Root ID.
5. Enter yes to enable services like Telnet and SSH. By default, Telnet is not enabled and SSH is
enabled.
6. Use the Management Options page to select the management scenario:

Configure in-band management. In this scenario you have the following two options:
Use the default VLAN.
Create a new VLANIf you select this option, you are prompted to specify the VLAN name,
VLAN ID, management IP address, and default gateway. Select the ports that must be part of
this VLAN.

Configure out-of-band management. Specify the IP address and gateway of the management
interface. Use this IP address to connect to the switch.

7. Specify the SNMP Read Community, Location, and Contact to configure SNMP parameters. These
parameters are optional.
8. Specify the system date and time. Select the time zone from the list. These options are optional.
9. The configured parameters are displayed. Enter yes to commit the configuration. The configuration is
committed as the active configuration for the switch.
10.(For EX4500 switches only) Enter the request chassis pic-mode intraconnect operational mode
command to set the PIC mode to intraconnect.
You can now log in with the CLI or the J-Web interface to continue configuring the switch.

20. QFX Series Switch - QFX3500 Switch Overview


The Juniper Networks QFX3500 Switch is a high-speed, multipurpose switch especially designed for nextgeneration data centers that provides a total switching capacity and throughput of 640 Gbps.
48 10-Gbps access ports in the switch use small form-factor pluggable plus transceivers (SFP+) and operate
by default as 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. Optionally, you can choose to configure up to 12 of the ports as
2-Gbps, 4-Gbps, or 8-Gbps Fibre Channel (FC) interfaces, and up to 36 of the ports as 1-Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces. 4 40-Gbps uplink ports in the switch use quad, small form-factor pluggable plus (QSFP+)
transceivers.
SFP+ Access Ports
The QFX3500 switch has 48 access ports (0-47) that support small form-factor pluggable plus (SFP+) and
small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceivers, as well as SFP+ direct attach copper cables, also known as
Twinax cables.

Up to 48 of the access ports can be used for SFP+ transceivers or SFP+ direct attach copper cables.
10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ transceivers and SFP+ direct attach copper cables can be used in any
access port. 2-Gbps, 4-Gbps, or 8-Gbps Fibre Channel SFP+ transceivers can be used in ports 0

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

51

through 5 and ports 42 through 47.

Up to 36 of the access ports can be used for SFP transceivers. Gigabit Ethernet SFP transceivers can
be used in ports 6 - 41.

QSFP+ Uplink Ports


The QFX3500 switch has four uplink ports (Q0-Q3) that support up to four 40-Gbps quad small form-factor
pluggable plus (QSFP+) transceivers.

Note: Please refer to the below network diagram for the switch exercises given in the next sections.

21. Basic Switch Labs


21.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : Entering configuration mode on a switch and exit
Description: A basic exercise that shows how to enter configuration mode and exit from
the same. Choose SW1 from the network diagram and exit.
Instructions
1. Enter into configuration mode
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

52

2. Get back to the operational mode


user@SW1>configure
[edit]
user@SW1#exit
user@SW1>
Back

21.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : Setting Hostname


Description: Set the switch hostname as junipersw. Choose SW1 from the network
diagram.
Instructions
1. Enter into configuration mode
2. Set hostname as junipersw
user@SW1>configure
[edit]
user@SW1#edit system
[edit system]
user@SW1#set host-name junipersw
[edit system]
user@junipersw#exit
[edit]
user@junipersw#exit
Back

21.3 : Lab Exercise 3 : Set interface description


Description: In this exercise, description to an interface is set by using set description
command.
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode
2. Set the description of interface ge-0/0/0 as "interface-ge-0/0/0"
user@SW1>configure
[edit]
user@SW1#edit interfaces ge-0/0/0
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]
user@SW1#set description "interface-ge-0/0/0"
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

53

[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]


user@SW1#exit
[edit]
user@SW1#
Back

21.4 : Lab Exercise 4 : Shutdown an interface


Not available in demo version

21.5 : Lab Exercise 5 : Basic CLI commands


Not available in demo version

21.6 : Lab Exercise 6 : Configure bandwidth on an interface


Not available in demo version

21.7 : Lab Exercise 7 : Configuring ether-options on the gigabit ethernet


switch interface
Not available in demo version

21.8 : Lab Exercise 8 : Configuring the management IP address on EX


series switch
Not available in demo version

22. Lab Exercises on VLAN


22.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : DefineVLANs
Description: This exercise demonstrates the commands required to create VLANs on the
switch.
Instructions
1. Create VLAN 10 and 20 by using the command syntax set vlans <vlan-name> vlan-id <vlanid-number>
2. Verify the same using show vlans command
user@SW1>configure
[edit]
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

54

user@SW1#set vlans marketing vlan-id 10


[edit]
user@SW1#set vlans support vlan-id 20
[edit]
user@SW1#commit
[edit]
user@SW1#exit
user@SW1>show vlans
Back

22.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : Configure a port for membership in that VLAN


Not available in demo version

22.3 : Lab Exercise 3 : Configuring an interface as a trunk port


Not available in demo version

22.4 : Lab Exercise 4 : Configuring VLANs on EX series switch


Not available in demo version

22.5 : Lab Exercise 5 : Configuring Routed VLAN interface (Inter-VLAN


routing) on a switch
Not available in demo version

22.6 : Objective Test 6 : Answer the following questions


Not available in demo version

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

55

23. Lab Exercises on Spanning tree protocol and VSTP

23.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : Configuring STP Timers


Description: This lab exercise demonstrates configuring spanning-tree protocol timers.
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode on SW1
2. Use the command set stp hello-time/forward-time/max-age <value> to configure the various
STP timers on the switch
3. Verify the configuration using show configuration command.
user@SW1>configure
[edit]
user@SW1#edit protocols
[edit protocols]
user@SW1#set stp forward-delay 20
[edit protocols]
user@SW1#set stp hello-time 5
[edit protocols]
user@SW1#set stp max-age 30
[edit protocols]
user@SW1#exit
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

56

[edit]
user@SW1#commit
[edit]
user@SW1#exit
user@SW1>show configuration
Note: i. Hello-Time: Determines how often the switch broadcasts hello messages to other
switches.
ii. Forward-Time: Determines how long each of the listening and learning states last before the
interface begins forwarding.
iii. Max-Age: Determines the amount of time the switch stores protocol information received on
an interface.
Back

23.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : Setting bridge priority on switch


Description: This exercise demonstrates the command required to configure switch priority
of a VLAN.
Instructions:
1. Enter into configuration mode on SW1
2. Issue the command "bridge-priority <priority-value> to configure the switch priority of a
VLAN.
user@SW1>show spanning-tree interface
user@SW1>configure
[edit]
user@SW1#edit protocols
[edit protocols]
user@SW1#set stp bridge-priority 12288
[edit protocols]
user@SW1#exit
[edit]
user@SW1#exit
Note: The switch priority can be configured thus making it more likely to be chosen as the root
switch. Priority range is 0 to 61440 in increments of 4096, default is 32768.
Back

23.3 : Lab Exercise 3 : Configuring port priority


Not available in demo version
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

57

23.4 : Lab Exercise 4 : Verifying STP


Not available in demo version

23.5 : Lab Exercise 5 : Enabling VSTP on all VLANs


Not available in demo version

23.6 : Lab Exercise 6 : Enabling VSTP on a VLAN using a single VLANID / VLAN-Name
Not available in demo version

23.7 : Objective Test 7 : Answer the following questions


Not available in demo version

24. Lab Exercises on PoE


24.1 : Lab Exercise 1 : Configuring guard-band and maximum power on
PoE enabled interface
Description: This exercise demonstrates the commands required to configure parameters
like guard-band and max power on a PoE enabled interface.
Instructions
1. Enter into PoE hierarchy mode on SW2 that has PoE enabled ports.
2. Guard-band syntax is Set guard-band <watts>. Range to be set is 0 through 19 where
default value is 0
3. Maximum power syntax is Set interface (all | interface-name) maximum-power <watts>.
Range to be set is 0.0 through 18.6 for EX3200 and EX4200 switches and 0.0 through 30.0 for
EX2200 switches and Default is: 15.4 for EX3200 and EX4200 switches and 30.0 for EX2200
switches
4. Verify using show poe interface command that display status of all PoE ports on the switch.
user@SW2>configure
user@SW2#edit poe
[edit poe]
user@SW2#set guard-band 12
[edit poe]
user@SW2#set interface ge-0/0/0 maximum-power 18.6
[edit poe]
user@SW2#exit
[edit]
user@SW2#commit
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

58

[edit]
user@SW2#show
user@SW2>show poe interface
Note:
Guard-band: Reserve a specified amount of power out of the PoE power budget in case of a
spike in PoE consumption.
Maximum-Power: Set the maximum amount of power that the switch can supply to the PoE
port.
Back

24.2 : Lab Exercise 2 : Configuring power management mode on PoE


enabled interface
Not available in demo version

24.3 : Lab Exercise 3 : Disabling a PoE interface


Not available in demo version

24.4 : Lab Exercise 4 : Setting power priority on all PoE enabled


interfaces
Not available in demo version

25. FINAL EXAM


25.1 : Objective Test Final Exam : Answer the following questions
Not available in demo version

26. Appendix
26.1. Answer keys for objective test 1
1. C, D
2. C
3. A
4. D
Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

59

5. D
6. C
7. D
8. B
9. B
10. C

26.2. Answer keys for objective test 2


Not available in demo version

26.3. Answer keys for objective test 3


Not available in demo version

26.4. Answer keys for objective test 4


Not available in demo version

26.5. Answer keys for objective test 5


Not available in demo version

26.6. Answer keys for objective test 6


Not available in demo version

26.7. Answer keys for objective test 7


Not available in demo version

26.8. Answer keys for objective test 8


Not available in demo version

Disclaimer:
CertExams.com is not associated with Juniper Systems Inc nor any other company.
Junos is a trade mark of Juniper Systems Inc. and duly recognized.

Version 1.0

Copyright 2002 2012 CertExams.com

60