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Planning

Handbook

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PLANNING HANDBOOK
Contents

Section

Title

Page

Introduction

2-1

Civil/Structural

2-2

II

Rigging

2-4

III

Equipment

2-5

IV

Piping

2-9

Electrical

2-14

VI

Instrumentation

2-17

VII

Miscellaneous

2-19

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PLANNING HANDBOOK
INTRODUCTION
One of the responsibilities of a Construction Team is the preparation of plans and use of schedules outlining the
sequence of the work activities required to complete a project. Normally, a master milestone schedule is
established indicating the start dates and completion dates of the various units or activities in a plant. It is from
this milestone schedule that the Construction Team must develop their schedules. It is normal practice to develop
detailed schedules for each major area listing all the scoped activities and their interrelationship. These area
construction schedules should become the backbone for the manpower planning, progress curves, and 90-day and
detailed activity schedules.
This handbook is intended to provide a check-list of activities that should be given consideration by the
Construction Team when they develop their schedules. Not all the items listed apply to every project, but many
will. Some of the items should be indicated on overall area schedules and other items are for detailed activity
schedules. The items are grouped by major commodity/activity (i.e., civil, rigging, equipment, etc.). The list
must be reviewed along with the project contract, specifications, drawings, etc., to make it completely useful.

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SECTION I
CIVIL/STRUCTURAL
1) Schedule the foundations to match the rigging requirements, the delivery of equipment, and common
excavations.
2) Check the U/G utility drawings to coordinate the excavation/foundation schedule.
3) Show all major (deep) foundations, sumps, pits, etc.; include the method for shoring the excavation
(sheet piling?) and dewatering the hole (wellpoints?). Schedule the removal of the shoring and
dewatering systems. Show other activities that are restrained until the excavation is backfilled.
4) Do a detailed schedule on the construction of all buildings. This activity should start as early as
possible. Include all architectural items on the schedule and the HVAC systems.
5) For elevated concrete slabs, roof decks, compressor pedestals, etc., be sure to include:
a) Time to install shoring to support the form work for the concrete deck (Note: Indicate the type of
shoring to be used)
b) Cure time after the slab has been poured before the shoring can be removed
6) For projects that are doing the testing of concrete and soil on site, show the delivery and setup of the
soils/concrete lab equipment before the start of permanent plant construction. (Note: Be sure plenty
of spares for the equipment are available)
7) Some tanks have an asphalt pad or aspaltic sand cushion as a part of the foundation. Schedule the
installation of this item prior to tank erection. Also schedule the delivery of the necessary
construction equipment to do this operation.
8) Schedule the completion of the foundations for the various piperacks and the erection of piperack steel
as early as possible.
9) Check the drawings for any fireproofing requirements for structural steel. Schedule this operation
after the inspection and signoff of the steel. Show the method used to fireproof the steel
(i.e., precasting, gunnite, cost in situ, or mastic).

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10) Check the structural steel drawings for the foundations to miscellaneous platforms, structures, or freestanding pipe supports. Sometimes these foundations are only shown on the structural drawings and
not on the foundation drawings. Also check the pipe support drawings for any foundations that do
not appear on the foundation drawings. Schedule the completion of these foundations prior to area
paving.
11) Schedule the arrival of anchor bolts, sleeves, and imbedded fabricated metal prior to pouring
foundations.
12) Schedule the completion of all cathodic protection installations prior to area or road paving.

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SECTION II
RIGGING
1) Schedule the delivery of heavy lift vessels on a separate rigging schedule as well as on the area
schedules.
2) Schedule the arrival of the heavy lift construction equipment (i.e., transport dollies, slings, spreader
bars, gin poles, heavy lift cranes, etc.) to match the arrival of the heavy lift vessels. Because of the cost
of heavy lift equipment, strong efforts should be made to schedule the delivery of the heavy lift vessels
within a limited time envelope. This is particularly true if the heavy lift equipment is rented.
3) Indicate on the area schedules the zones that are sterilized by a heavy lift (i.e., foundations that must be
left out for access, U/G utilities that can not be installed, steel or vessel that can not be set, etc.). (Note:
Check the route the vessel will travel through the plant for U/G utilities that may not be able to take
the wheel load of the dollies and for height, width, and turning radius clearances)
4) Schedule the pouring of foundations for gin poles or deadmen early enough to ensure the concrete is
up to strength prior to the lift being made.
5) Schedule the erection and removal of all temporary installations required for a major lift.

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SECTION III
EQUIPMENT
1) Coordinate the U/G, foundation, and rigging schedules when determining the sequence of vessel
setting. Where possible, limit the number of set-ups the rigging group has to do in an area.
2) Schedule the installation of vessel internals (i.e., trays, pall rings, ballast rings, screens, catalyst
support beds, chemicals, etc.) Schedule the issuing of the procedures to load the vessels with chemicals
or pall rings. (Note: Field-check all quantities to be sure surplus material has been ordered)
3) After system testing, schedule the cleaning, inspection, installation or checking of demisters, factoryinstalled trays, and final flange-up and sign-off of the vessels. (Note: Shell and tube exchangers and
reboilers are usually not field-inspected)
4) After columns and drums have been set and grouted, schedule the fireproofing of the vessel skirts, if
this is required. Fireproofing should be done before insulation. (Note: In cryogenic service, check for
any special insulation requirements on the vessel skirt)
5) After the vessels have been set, grouted, the platforms and ladders installed, and the piping/instrument
trim installed on the vessel, schedule the insulation of the vessels. (Note: In cryogenic service, be
sure enough clearance has been allowed between the vessel and vertical attachments for insulation
contraction joints (i.e., 2.2x insulation thickness)
6) On heavy wall, field-erected vessels or when aluminum welding is required, schedule the delivery of
any special X-ray source.
7) Schedule the delivery of all special welding equipment, heat treating equipment, testing equipment,
and the arrival or training of special qualified welders for the erection of heavy wall vessels or any
other specialized welding process. This is very important on overseas jobs.
8) After power-on in an area, show the run-in of all motors. For fin fan exchangers, show balancing of
the fin fan blades. Also, if required, show the installation of field-run lube oil tubing to the fin fan motors.

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9) For all turbines, either steam or gas-riven, schedule:


a) After the piping systems have been tested and the steam or gas is available, schedule the blowing
of these lines clean before the running of the turbine. In high pressure service,this is a major
operation. Show the design, fabrication,and installation of any additional steam/gas blow spool.
This design should be done early to allow for the purchase of any additional piping materials. For
gas turbines, the area becomes hot once gas is introduced in the area with the subsequent
consequences. (Note: Often this operation can not be done during regular work hours for
noise/safety reasons; therefore, as the time approaches to do this operation, it should be scheduled
very carefully. Also, depending on the piping configurations involved, this operation can take
3 to 4 weeks.)
b) All instrumentation must be checked out prior to testing the turbine. (Note: Permanent and
instrument power must be available)
c) Check the P&IDs for the required utilities to run the turbine, and schedule the availability of the
utilities prior to rolling the turbine.
10) For motor run-in, check the P&IDs for utilities to the motor (i.e., cooling water, lube oil, etc.) and
schedule these utilities as well as power on for motor run-in. Also, all instrumentation to the motor
must be installed, calibrated, loop checked, etc., prior to running in the motor.
11) For pumps, compressors, or similar equipment once the driver has been run-in then schedule:
a) The final alignment of the equipment to the driver without the piping attached to the equipment.
b) The final alignment of the piping equipment
c) Final couple-up of driver to the equipment
d) Check the P&IDs for the required utilities to the compressor and schedule these. The required
utilities should include any buffer gas requirements as well as cooling water, instrument air,
nitrogen, etc. (Note: On grassroot plants, be sure the utility plants and systems are completed
early enough in the project so that they are available when the major equipment is run)

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12) Before running any rotating equipment, the lube oil system is usually flushed clean after all the
piping, both vendor and Bechtels, is installed. This is a major operation taking between 4 to 6
weeks and should be started as soon as possible. If pickling of the lube oil system is required,
schedule the letting of the subcontract for this operation. Include in the frame for pickling the lube
oil pipingand the disassembly and reassembly of the lube oil system. (Note: For lube oil flushes, be
sure enough lube oil, gaskets, filters, screen, etc. has been ordered for the flush. Check to see if the
flushing oil has to be replaced with new oil prior to final acceptance of the system.)
13) For large diameter, field-erected tanks, schedule the availability of water for hydrotesting after the
tank has been erected. If low chloride or demineralized water is required for this operation, show that
on the schedule. (Note: Show the quantity of water required and whether the water is to be used to test
another tank or system after the test is completed. If a settlement test is required for the tank, show
this on the schedule. Allow time in the schedule for the tank to be cleaned after the hydrotest.
Indicate who (Bechtel or the S/C) cleans the tank. Determine when piping erection can begin on the
tank, and show this on the schedule.)
14) On tanks, pits, or sumps that are field-lined, show this activity after testing of the tank.
15) Schedule the final cleanout and inspection of pits or sumps. Also, if required, schedule the
installation and testing of sealed/air-tight cover plates on pits or sumps.
16) On projects where:
a) Construction power is different from permanent power and/or Permanent power will not be available
in a unit until after a lube oil system is ready for flushing, then the lube oil flush can be started before
permanent power is available by:
b) Installing a temporary transformer to switch construction power to the proper voltage for the lube
oil motor, or
c) Substituting a temporary motor for the permanent motor that can run on construction power.

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17) On lube oil flushes, it is often desirable to heat the oil to a higher temperature than the factorysupplied heaters are capable of; therefore, it is necessary to purchase temporary immersion heaters.
If this is desired, then the delivery of these temporary heaters should be shown on the schedule.
18) If a project requirement, schedule a drain-down test for seal oil systems on rotating equipment.
19) Show on the schedule any special requirements for testing pumps or compressors, for example,
running a propane compressor on air. (Note: Manufacturers instructions and concurrence must be
issued for an operation like this)
20) Determine if hot or optical alignment of rotating equipment is required. If so, schedule this operation
including the letting of subcontract to cover this work and the delivery of the necessary optical
equipment.
21) Schedule the approval of the grouting procedures for each type of equipment. Then, schedule the
arrival of the necessary materials and tools to grout the equipment.
22) Schedule the arrival of slide plates that go under the legs of exchangers or reboilers prior to setting
the equipment.
23) Some tanks have a cathodic protection mat underneath the tank bottom. If this is required, schedule
the delivery and installation of this equipment prior to the erection of the tank. Also schedule the
installation of anodes on seawater-cooled heat exchangers, if required.
24) For boilers or field-erected heat exchangers, show the number of tubes to be rolled and/or seal-welded
on the schedule. Also schedule the arrival of the necessary tools to roll the tubes.

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SECTION IV
PIPING
1) For large diameter cooling water lines or any lined pipe:
a) Show patching of field welds, if required, or the field lining procedure.
b) Show manual cleaning and inspection of a system before initial operation.
c) If the lines underground show: (Note: This applies to most U/G lines)
1) Excavation of trenches
2) Special bed preparation, if required, or anchor blocks
3) Any shoring or dewatering requirements
4) Patching of the external wrapping, fieldwelds, and final jeeping of the pipes wrapping
5) Test is required
6) Final backfilling
2) Show drawing preparation and the installation of pump, turbine, compressor, and vessel small bore
piping trim.
3) Testing of the piping systems:
a) Schedule preparation of the test P&IDs including the MTO for test blinds, flanges, etc.
b) Schedule the preparation of the actual test packages.
c) If pneumatic testing is a requirement, schedule the purchase and delivery of pneumatic test
compressor. (Note: These compressors are long-delivery items and expensive. Check that plenty
of spare parts are purchased.)
d) If stainless steel piping is to be hydrotested, schedule the availability of low-chloride water.
e) Show the delivery of hydrotest equipment (i.e., test pumps, calibrated gauges, high pressure test
hoses, gaskets, etc.).

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4) Show completion of pipe testing as a restraint on the completion of piping installation and, depending
on the project specifications, painting. (Note: Some specifications do not allow the welds to be
painted before testing.)
5) If the plant has cold or cryogenic insulation, show completion of the pipe supports after the
completion of the cold insulation. (Note: In cold and cryogenic insulation system, often high density
insulation material is used at pipe supports that are external to the insulation - Bechtel standard S4
shoe. This high density insulation and the S4 shoe can be installed prior to system testing if the
high density insulation does not cover a weld. Doing this is particularly useful for pipe runs in piper
racks along sleeperways. This will eliminate the need for temporary supports. Also, because of the
design characteristics and cost of cold insulation, it is not advisable to insulate between the welds as
is sometimes done with hot insulation.)
6) Show the final setting of spring hangers.
7) Indicate the erection, testing, and sometimes painting or field-erected tanks as restraint on installing
the piping and instrumentation on the tank. (Note: On large diameter tanks, check to see if a
settlement test is required and if so, schedule this time period)
8) If a Bechtel responsibility, schedule the:
a) Flushing, blowing, or cleaning of all lines after system testing.
b) Installation of orifice plates after item 8a.
c) Pulling, calibrating, and reinstalling all safety valves approximately 3 to 4 weeks prior to plant
completion.
d) Change out the valve packing, gaskets, or seals prior to startup.
e) Lubricating of all valves.

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9) Schedule the delivery of the stress relieving equipment to match the beginning of pipe fabrication or
erection. Schedule the start of stress relieving right after the start of pipe fabrication or erection.
Stress relieving of a system must be completed prior to system testing. (Note: Check to be sure that
plenty of heater strips and blankets have been ordered because these items are consumables)
10) Schedule the installation of steam/heat tracing before the start of piping insulation. Also on vessels
in cold service, some instruments require steam/heat tracing, and this should be scheduled prior to the
release of the vessels for insulation.
11) If a utility system such as nitrogen, water, steam, etc., retain their parent unit/plant number within a
major process area, these systems should be identified clearly on the process area schedule as part
of that areas responsibilities.
12) Show the installation of vendor-supplied piping system, particularly fire sprinkler system. Check the
take-off and schedule the time accordingly. Order spare materials, especially odd-ball size pipe and
fittings.
13) Schedule the delivery of any special welding equipment, welding rods, or special qualified welders for
an activity. This is required if aluminum welding or some other specialized welding must be done
on a project.
14) If extensive epoxy lining or fiberglass-reinforced piping is being used in a hot weather region,
schedule the preparation/construction of a refrigerated storage area for the various epoxy ingredients.
This is necessary to extend the shelf life of the material.
15) Schedule the final cleaning of all sewer systems and manholes prior to turnover to the client.
16) For large diameter, carbon-steel suction lines, schedule the sand blasting or manual cleaning of these
lines prior to erection of the spools. Schedule the final inspection of all compressor suction lines for
cleanliness prior to system startup. The discharge lines of compressors should also be checked for
cleanliness to prevent dirt from getting into the recycle valves.

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17) Schedule and closely monitor any aluminum or other specialized pipe spools that are fabricated
offsite.
18) Schedule the qualification of specialized welders (i.e., aluminum, heavy wall, chrome moly, etc.).
19) If in Bechtels scope, schedule final leak testing of entire systems prior to startup. If the system is in
cold service, the flanges and valves will be insulated after the system is leak tested, not after
cooldown.
20) Schedule the loading of piperacks within a unit separately from the erection of spool piping.
21) If scheduling the erection of the piping on a spool piece basis, be sure to include field run pipe in the
piece count (i.e., a field run downcomer from a tower should be handled just like a spool).
22) Schedule the final P&ID checks after moaning and testing of a system but before system turnover.
23) When preparing a pipe testing schedule:
a) Have the precommissioning/startup group identify their priorities on P&IDs.
b) Compare this to the test P&IDs to determine the necessary testing sequence to meet these
priorities and schedule accordingly.
c) If the QRS program is being used on the project, the system-sort capability of this program can
be used to identify the To-Go portion of each test package. Load the pipe test system identifying
code in the system column of QRS next to each entry that is not completed. Each week, when
QRS program is run, a sort by system/test identifying the line numbers to go in each test package
can be printed out.
24) When using pneumatic testing, schedule the tests so that the high pressure air can be cascaded from
one test to another.

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25) If cathodic protection is being used on the underground piping systems, schedule the installation of
the necessary anodes, test posts, insulating flanges, etc., along with the installation of the U/G piping.
(Note: Insulating flanges are generally very sensitive. They must be tested and wrapped with
insulating tape immediately after installation or a short will develop across the face of the flange
from dirt or water ingress.)
26) On area schedules, distinguish between carbon steel, stainless steel, and alloy piping systems.

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SECTION V
ELECTRICAL
1) Treat the erection of generators as mechanical equipment.
2) On grassroot projects:
a) Often the utilities run from the blackstart generator are those required to bring the main generators
on stream; therefore, schedule the completion of the blackstart generators and associated
electrical switchgear/substations early enough to allow time for the startup of the utility systems
required to run the main generators.
b) If construction power and permanent power distribution systems have different voltages, schedule
the purchase and installation of the necessary transformers and switchgear to make the two systems
compatible. This is necessary to:
1) Provide sufficient load to run and test the permanent generators
2) Provide backup to the permanent generators during the initial startup of the plant
3) Eliminate the cost of construction power earlier
4) Provide additional capacity to the blackstart generator
3) Schedule the erection and energizing of all substations within an area as well as the primary
substations. This should be well-coordinated with the need of the areas.
4) When direct-burial cable is being used on a project, schedule the arrival of all cable in trenches prior to
the start of cable pulling because it is very difficult to open a trench a second time once it has been
backfilled or to keep trenches open waiting for the arrival of cable.
5) Check the actual spacing of parallel power and instrument direct-burial cable trenches. Sometimes
these trenches are too long to make it practical to dig two trenches; therefore, on in-trench must be
used and the cables properly spaced. When this occurs, schedule the excavation of the cable trenches
to match the arrival of all the instrument and power cables in a trench.

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6) If direct-burial cable is being used, schedule the purchase/precasting of the cable tiles to cover the
cable if the cover is not being poured into place.
7) Schedule the delivery of red oxide powder for the concrete used in precast tiles or electrical/instrument
ductbanks. (Note: Be sure plenty is ordered because it is always used)
8) Within a unit, schedule the installation of high voltage, low voltage, lighting, and instrument cable
separately.
9) Schedule delivery, installation, checkout, and startup of any instrument power system. This will be a
restraint on the start of loop checking. (Note: Instrument power is dependent on permanent power)
10) Schedule the delivery, installation, checkout, and startup of any backup-battery systems.
11) Schedule the delivery, installation, termination, and checkout of specialized relay/control boards.
12) Schedule the start cable meggering and checkout prior to energizing a system. (Note: Check that the
necessary testing gear has been ordered)
13) Schedule the setting, termination, checkout, and energizing of all major electrical equipment/
substations within a unit.
14) Show on the schedule the means to be used to load test the generators. Remember:
a) Many generators cannot run under low load conditions.
b) Diesel drivers will foul under long-term, low-load conditions.
c) Secondary substations or the equipment to be run from the substations may not be ready when it is
time to test the generators.
Therefore, this item must be given due consideration early in the project.
15) Schedule and monitor closely the delivery of all MCC units and switchgear.
16) Coordinate the installation of U/G ductbanks/cable trenches with the other U/G facilities and
foundations.

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17) Schedule the completion of U/G grounding within a unit prior to the completion of area paving.
If U/G electrical cable runs that go under concrete paving are to be marked with factory-purchased
markers, schedule the delivery of these markers.
18) Schedule the installation of light fixtures behind the erection of structures or platforms on vessels.
Order spare reflectors and bulbs to cover construction damage.

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SECTION VI
INSTRUMENTATION
1) Schedule, review, and monitor closely the delivery of all instruments, control valves, relay boards,
control panels, etc. These items should be flagged as soon as any problems arise.
2) Schedule the completion of all civil and architectural items in the control room prior to the arrival of
the control panels on site.
3) Schedule the delivery of any interconnecting diagrams or drawings being supplied by the control
panel vendor that the field required to install the panels.
4) Schedule permanent power and instrument power to be available at/or immediately after the setting of
the control panels in the control room.
5) Show on the schedule the testing of instrument tubing, level gage assemblies, strong backs, etc., if this
is a project requirement.
6) If a project requirement, schedule the meggering of all instrument cables.
7) Schedule the delivery of any calibration gases for analyzers, gas/smoke detectors, etc.
8) Schedule instrument wire installation and continuity (point-to-point) checks as separate activities.
These items lag behind the installation of field instruments but precede loop checking.
9) For local or main control panels, the schedule should show:
a) Pulling of the cable to the panel.
b) Setting of the panels.
c) Termination of cable at the panel.
d) Continuity checks.
e) Availability of instrument power or air.
f) Final loop checking.
10) Schedule the installation of instrument stands and local instruments after the completion of the
majority of the piping in an area.

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11) Schedule the fabrication and installation of instrument strong backs of Christmas Trees that are
installed on vessels prior to the installation of instruments on the vessels.
12) Schedule the installation of instruments by major and minor categories.
13) Sometimes minor instruments such as pressure or temperature gauges are not installed until
2 to 3 weeks before turnover of the unit. This should be discussed with the various superintendents
and scheduled accordingly.
14) Schedule the final calibration and loop checking of all instruments to start shortly after pipe testing
has started and instrument power is available but to be completed prior to system turnover. (Note:
Before any equipment is tested, all instrumentation to that item must be installed, calibrated, loop
checked, etc.)
15) On overseas projects, schedule the delivery and set up the instrument test bench/calibration
equipment shortly after the beginning of permanent plant construction.
16) Control valves and instruments are routinely checked in the instrument shop before being issued to
the field; therefore, there is no need to schedule this activity.
17) Where possible, develop a loop check schedule showing on a priority basis the systems that are needed
and the number of loops to be checked per system.
18) Schedule the approval from the client or the responsible government agencies for all test procedures
and forms prior to testing instruments or safety valves. The same holds true for loop checking.

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SECTION VII
MISCELLANEOUS
1) When scheduling piping or vessel insulation, distinguish between hot and cold insulation systems.
2) If part of the plant is to be built by a subcontractor, schedule the letting of these subcontracts with
enough lead time for the subcontractor to purchase the necessary materials, mobilize, and do the work
within the limits of the project/area schedules. Be sure the contract documents require a detailed
schedule from the subcontractor.
3) If a subcontractor is performing a work operation that is dependent on Bechtel to release this work in
stages, (i.e., painting and insulation) then never give the subcontractor a schedule of specific items to
be released to him. Only commit a specific quantity of work to be released to the subcontractor each
week/month. This quantity should be sufficient for the subcontractor to complete his work within the
limits of the area/project schedule.
4) Area schedules should show when the initial and final field take-offs of all quantities are to be done.
5) On grassroots projects, target completion dates should be established for all portions and phases of the
project. Close attention should be paid to the completion of utilities and offsite areas early in the
project to allow for downstream activities to occur early enough for the process units to be started up
on schedule. Often all the attention is concentrated on the process units, and the other units take
second priority. This, in fact, is backward to what is required.
6) Schedule the early awarding of all purchase orders or subcontracts for HVAC equipment. These are
long-delivery systems that are often ordered too late in the project. The delivery of this equipment
can easily extend to 6 months ex-works if it is to be installed in a Class I electrical area.
7) When scheduling overseas projects, always allow sufficient delivery time for shipping and customs.
This can vary from 2 to 4 months. Strong emphasis should be placed on ordering all materials as
early as possible, and always order more than one expects to require because it will be used.

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8) On all area schedules, show the required arrival date of all vendor representatives. Determine the
required lead time to get a vendor representative to site, and schedule when the notice of invitation
should be sent out. On overseas projects, allow plenty of time for obtaining passports, visas, letters
of invitations from the host country/client, etc. This is extremely important and should be
monitored closely.
9) On grassroots or overseas projects, schedule the initial and final schemes for supplying raw water to
the project. Water often becomes critical to construction, testing, and plant operation.
10) For LNG storage tanks or similar vessels that require long-duration purging with nitrogen, show this
activity after completion of testing but before the introduction of gas.
11) For grassroot projects, schedule all temporary/construction utilities that may be required for the initial
startup of the plant. This may include the fire water system for cooling water, construction air
compressors or generators, nitrogen bottles, etc.
12) While painting is a relatively minor item in the construction of a plant, this item should be given
adequate attention on projects that are fabricating their own piping or structural steel. Plans
should be made from the beginning of a project as to how this item should be handled. Early
attention will save many manhours later in the project. Always remember that it is easier
to sandblast and paint piping and steel in the laydown yard than in-place.
13) Review the project contract documents, particularly the section covering the turnover of the plant to
the client and clearly identify on the various schedules all items that are Bechtels responsibility.
14) About 8 to 10 weeks prior to turnover of a plant to the client, prepare a turnover schedule of items that
must be done to complete on schedule. This schedule should include:
a) Remaining testing should be done.
b) Remaining moan items.
c) Cleaning of sewers and manholes.
d) Preparation of the necessary documentation that must accompany the turnover package.

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e) All final work items.


f) The delivery of outstanding materials.
g) Special items required by the contract.
15) If cable tray fireproofing is required, schedule the completion of cable pulling in open cable trays early
enough to allow for the installation of cable tray fireproofing. This should be completed prior to plant
turnover.
16) A master schedule index should be maintained on all projects. This index should list:
a) Schedule numbers.
b) Schedule titles.
c) Date last updated and issued.
d) Date to be updated and reissued.
e) Distribution, include those copies posted in offices, conference rooms, and sent to the client.
17) Schedule the arrival of the necessary surveying equipment and spare parts early in the project.
Also schedule the establishment of the survey controls monuments.
18) All schedules should be approved by the responsible superintendent, thereby making him responsible for
the schedule, not the scheduler.
19) When practical, indicate the bulk quantities to be installed on the schedule.
20) On grassroots or overseas projects, detailed schedules should be developed for the construction of all
temporary utilities and facilities since the construction of the permanent plant is solely dependent on
these items.
21) On all schedules, indicate the actual date an activity started and finished. This will become valuable
historical information.
22) If an activity is behind schedule, indicate the reason on the schedule and what is being done
to correct the problem.

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23) For all activities (structural, civil, site, electrical, etc.), schedule the start and completion of all final
inspections and moans. This activity should start early enough to allow for a clean turnover package
to the client.

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