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COURSE SYLLABUS

FALL SEMESTER 2014

Course and Prefix Number:


Course Title:
Class:
Shop Clinical/Internship:

CJC 213
SUBSTANCE ABUSE
3
Lab:
0
0
Semester Credit Hours:
3

INSTRUCTOR(S): Mr. Norlan Graves


OFFICE NUMBER(S): N/A
OFFICE HOURS: N/A
OFFICE PHONE: N/A
E-MAIL ADDRESS: ngraves631@halifaxcc.net
INCLEMENT WEATHER: (252) 536-6351
ACADEMIC & STUDENT SERVICES INFO: http://www.halifaxcc.edu
(Link=Catalog)

CLASS MEETING DAYS & TIMES: Monday at 6:00 pm

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
An in-depth study of drugs with particular attention to drug laws, detection methods
and techniques, recognition of drugs and offenders, and the various investigation
methods employed by law enforcement agencies. This course is also available
through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC).
PREREQUISITES: ENG 095 & ENG 095A
COREQUISITES: None
HCC POLICY NOTE:

Students must notify the instructor and withdraw from the class if
they do not have credit for the prerequisite course(s) listed above
or if they are no longer enrolled in the corequisite class.
FINANCIAL AID:
Students who have previously received credit for this course will not be eligible for Pell
financial assistance for the course. Students who take a course not in their major may
receive Pell financial assistance for the course. However, taking courses outside the major

LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

will eventually penalize the student when the 150% rule is applied, e.g., if taking courses not
in the major causes a student to exceed one-and-one-half (150%) of the time allotted to go
through the program. The student then becomes ineligible for Pell. Students should meet
with their advisors to discuss any concerns they have regarding their schedules.

TEXTBOOK(S), MATERIALS, AND WEB-ASSISTED RESOURCES:


REQUIRED TEXT/S
Drug Use and Abuse: A Comprehensive Introduction, 8th Edition
AUTHOR: Abadinsky; ISBN10: 1-285-07027-5 ISBN13: 978-1-28507027-8
Packed with the latest data and research, the powerful new DRUG
USE AND
ABUSE: A COMPREHENSIVE INTRODUCTION, 8e delivers a thorough,
interdisciplinary survey of all aspects of drug and alcohol abuse.
Extremely
student friendly, the text draws from the many disciplines of
history, law,
pharmacology, political science, social work, counseling, psychology,
sociology, and criminal justice--resulting in the most comprehensive
single
source available. The author explores the history of drugs, their
impact on
society, the pharmacological impact of drugs on the body, drug
policy
implications, the criminal justice system response, the drug
business, law
enforcement, theories of use, as well as the effects, treatment, and
prevention of
abuse. New coverage includes nonmedical use of prescription drugs,
synthetic
substances, the use of stimulants to treat PTSD and ADD, medical
marijuana, the connection between drug trafficking and terrorism,
and an updated analysis of the United States drug policy.
Recommended:
http://reason.com/
http://www.justice.gov/dea/index.shtml
http://www.fda.gov/
http://www.borderlandbeat.com/
Web resources:
1-800-423-0563 (Online resources for text)
LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

CAMPUS RESOURCES:

NOTE: Links to instructional services can be found at http://www.halifaxcc.edu.


(Links=HCC Programs & Organizations, Student Resources, and Learning Resources Center)
Library (LRC): 200 Building
8:00 a.m. 9:30 p.m. (Monday Thursday)
8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. (Friday)
Provides access to various electronic data services
Electronic Resources Center (ERC):
Library (200) Building
8:00 a.m. 9:30 p.m. (Monday Thursday)
8:00 a.m. -- 4:00 p.m. (Friday)
Offers computer access to students and community patrons
Learning Assistance Center (LAC): 200 Building
8:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m. (Monday Thursday)
8:00 a.m. 4 p.m. (Friday)
Offers computer-related instruction, testing, printing services to students
Student Support Center/TRIO (for qualifying students):
300 Building and Library Building
8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. (Monday Friday)
Offers tutoring in basic academic skills
Distance Learning:
Halifax Community College website
http://www.halifaxcc.edu/online/
Beth Gray-Robertson, Director of Distance Learning
robertsonb@halifaxcc.edu

ACCREDITATION & ASSESSMENT:


Halifax Community College is accredited by the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools (SACS). Accreditation is a type of quality assurance and
is a sign that the college is regularly evaluated by an outside agency that
examines everything from financial management to safety to instruction.
Because of increasing demands that all accredited colleges be accountable
to taxpayers and students, colleges must conduct ongoing assessment of
student learning outcomes. Assessment is a way of taking a look at
educational programs to see whether learning is truly occurring and ensuring
that improvements are continually being made. The various activities and
assignments that you complete in your classes will provide data to monitor
the effectiveness of the program and whether it is meeting your needs. Your
instructor will explain more as the class progresses.
COURSE PURPOSE:
The faculty members of Halifax Community College support the Colleges
mission statement by providing quality education and by promoting the
development of students by preparing them for employment.
MISSION STATEMENT:
Halifax Community College is a public, two-year, educational institution with
an open-door admissions policy. The purpose of the college is to improve the
quality of life and the educational/economic base of the service area. The
college prepares individuals of suitable age for the workforce through
vocational, technical, college transfer, and continuing education learning
opportunities.
LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

The college strives to meet the needs of the student population, business
community, area industries, and public agencies by providing low-cost,
geographically-accessible education at convenient times.
PROGRAM LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
Students will learn the history of drugs, their impact on
society, the pharmacological impact of drugs on the body, drug
policy
implications, the criminal justice system response, the drug
business, law
enforcement, theories of use, as well as the effects, treatment, and
prevention of
abuse. Students will also be able to analyze and explain the
nonmedical use of prescription drugs, synthetic substances, the use
of stimulants to treat PTSD and ADD, medical marijuana, the
connection between drug trafficking and terrorism, and an updated
analysis of the United States drug policy.
STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. The student will articulate the theories of substance abuse.
2. The student will have a firm understanding of the history of drugs.
3. The student will propose new approaches to drug policy.
4. The student will be able to analyze both sides of the drug prohibition
argument.
5. The student will be able to articulate different methods of treatment
and prevention of substance abuse.
COURSE EVALUATION CRITERIA:
Course evaluation will consist of six objective style comprehensive tests
designed to rate the students knowledge of the six subsections within this
overall body of instruction.
EVALUATION SCALE:
[Students will be responsible for all materials covered in Class and the Text.
There will be 2 tests, 2 papers and one presentation given during the
semester, for a total of 600 points.

Class Participation: Students are expected to participate daily in class.


Students can earn up to 50 participation points during the semester.
Grades will be calculated based on the total number of points received out of
Grade
the possible 650. Students must receive 70%
orAreas:
better of the total points to
receive a passing grade.
A: 100 - 93
B: 92 - 85
Paper 1 = 100 pts.

C: 84 - 77

LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF


D:EXCELLENCE
76 - 70
F: Below 69

Test 1 = 100 pts.


Paper 2 = 100 pts.
Test 2 = 100 pts.
Presentation = 200 pts.
Total = 600 pts.

ATTENDANCE/TARDINESS:

A student who discontinues attending class without communicating with


the instructor will be dropped from the class after two consecutive weeks.

Attendance:
Instructors keep a daily record of attendance. In order to achieve the maximum
benefit of this class, it is expected that you attend all classes. Per HCCs
Attendance Policy 506.00 attendance will be verified for government reports two
times per semester at the 10% mark and the 60% mark. If you do not attend class
for a substantial amount of time, you may be subject to an adverse effect on your
enrollment status in the class, your financial aid and/or your grade. It is your
responsibility to inform the instructor of any anticipated absences. If you decide
that you cannot complete this course, it is recommended that you comply with the
steps for withdrawal outlined below. A student who discontinues attending class
without communicating with the instructor will be withdrawn from the class by the
instructor.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
Plagiarism and cheating will not be tolerated. Halifax Community College
is responsible as an accredited institution for guaranteeing academic
integrity. Cheating and plagiarism destroy academic integrity.
Cheating is the intent to deceive the instructor in his or her effort to
evaluate fairly an academic assignment. Cheating includes copying
another students homework, classwork, or project (partly or entirely) and
submitting it as his or her own; giving, receiving, offering, and/or
soliciting information on a quiz, test, or exam; or plagiarism.
Plagiarism is the copying of any published work such as books, magazines,
audiovisual programs, electronic media, and films or copying the essay or
any written work of another student. Plagiarism occurs when a student
uses direct quotations without proper credit and proper punctuation and
when a student uses the ideas of another without giving proper credit.
Whenever phrasing is borrowed, even if only two to three words, the borrowing
should be recognized by the use of quotation marks and by frequent mention of the
authors name. Whenever a thought process or line of reasoning is borrowedeven
LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

if the authors exact words are not being usedthe student must give credit to the
source of the thinking.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

WITHDRAWING FROM THE CLASS: Will be as outlined in the HCC catalogue.


ID BADGES
Students must wear their ID badges on campus.
TELEPHONE USE: Students receiving emergency phone messages will be notified by
security through the colleges main switchboard.
Drugs, Alcohol, and Firearms
All state and federal laws apply on the HCC campus regarding the use, possession,
sale, etc., of drugs, alcohol, or firearms. If a student disrupts the educational
process and is thought to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, campus
Security will be notified. If the student is found to be experiencing a medical
problem, assistance will be obtained.
Cyber Conduct
Use of HCC computers in classrooms or computer labs (with the exception of the
ERC) is limited to use of software and Internet sites determined by the instructor to
be appropriate. Accessing any website or using any software not authorized by the
instructor is prohibited and will result in dismissal, referral to the Dean of Student
Services, or both.
Cell Phones, etc.: Cell phones will not be turned on while in class.
Food and Drink: Will not be allowed in classrooms.
Children
Children are not allowed in classrooms while classes are in session. Please see the
HCC Catalog for details.
Proper Behavior (Please refer to page 84 of the HCC Catalog.)
Since entrance into an institution of higher learning is completely voluntary, it is
inherent that, upon entrance into the institution, that students take upon
themselves certain responsibilities and obligations. These student responsibilities
include academic performance and social behavior consistent with the lawful
purpose of the College. The standards of behavior and performance may be higher
than is required by law of the general public. It is understood that these student
responsibilities will be in accordance with fair play. Therefore, upon voluntary
entrance to Halifax Community College, students have an obligation to adhere to
College standards. For example, physical abuse, verbal abuse, or intimidation of any
person on the premises of the College or at any function sponsored or supervised by
the College are subject to disciplinary action.
Disciplinary Removal
Upon violating either of the two policies quoted below from the Halifax Community
College student code in the Administrative Regulations & Procedures manual,
Section 510.00, a student may be asked to leave the classroom for a specified
LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

period of time, may be penalized in terms of grading, may be referred to the Dean
of Student Services, and/or may be dropped from the roll permanently.
Student Conduct
Since entrance into an institution of higher learning is completely voluntary, it is
inherent that upon entrance to the institution, students take upon themselves
certain responsibilities and obligations. These responsibilities include academic
performance and social behavior consistent with the lawful purpose of the College.
The standards of behavior and performance may be higher than is required by law
of the general public. Therefore, upon voluntary entrance into Halifax Community
College, students have an obligation to adhere to the College standards.
The following are examples of misconduct which are subject to disciplinary action.
The list does not include all examples of misconduct subject to disciplinary action.
All forms of dishonesty including cheating [and] plagiarism.
Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary
proceedings, or other activities of the College.
Failure to comply with the directions of college officials when they are acting
in the performance of their assigned duties.
Appeal Process
Student/instructor disagreements on academic matters are referred to the Dean of
Curriculum Programs. In cases involving dismissal, suspension, or discrimination,
students are referred to the Dean of Student Services. Please see the college
catalog for further information.
Students with Disabilities
If a student cannot take tests within the time allowed, cannot type, cannot
otherwise use the computer, cannot access the classroom when the
elevator is being serviced or is out of order, has visual impairment, or has
other disabilities, every reasonable effort will be made to enable students
to succeed in their studies. One thing that is absolutely required is that
the student provide Student Services or the ADA Counselor with a doctors
note describing the conditions that may get in the way of meeting
academic requirements. Then, reasonable accommodations will be made.
The written documentation is required by federal law and is not a rule
made up by Halifax Community College. Please note that the
documentation will be treated as confidential except when instructors
need to be made aware that they need to make arrangements. Please
contact Sherida Gholston, Student Support Services, Room 319,
gholstons@halifaxcc.edu.
CAMPUS SAFETY & SECURITY
Safety drills will be conducted periodically for evacuating the building in case of fire,
for moving to a safe area in case of severe weather, and for sheltering in place in
case of violence. An announcement will be made using the speakers in hallways
and classrooms. Please follow instructions carefully. You will be required to view a
training video online and to take a short quiz to be sure you fully understand your
responsibilities during an emergency on campus. All students who come to campus
for any reason, including online students, will be required to view the video and take
the quiz.
STUDENT ASSISTANCE:
LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

Students requiring assistance other than regular classroom instruction,


participation, and supervision should make the request of the instructor. Additional
attention is available during posted office hours and at other times during mutual
agreement. Tutoring is available through Student Support Services. The LRC and
library facilities are available at posted hours.

COURSE TOPICS :
The topics for this course of instruction are as follows:
1. History of drug use.
2. Theories of substance abuse.
3. Theories of substance abuse treatment/pevention.
4. Drug policy.
5. Future substance abuse trends.

COURSE SCHEDULE:
COURSE CALENDAR AND ASSIGNMENTS
08-18:

Introduction of professor and students. Syllabi


Introduction to Drug Use and Abuse Pages 1 to 19

08-25:

Introduction to Drug Use and Abuse Pages 1 to 19


The Biology of Psychoactive Substances. Pages 21 to 37

09-01:

Labor Day, no classes

09-09:
37

The Biology of Psychoactive Substances cont. Pages 21 to

09-15:
21 to 37
09-22:
09-29:

The Biology of Psychoactive Substances cont. Pages


Paper #1 Due
Psychology and Sociology of Drug Use. Pages 125 to 152
Preventing and Treating Drug Use. Pages 153 to 189

10-06:

Mid-term
LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

10-13:

Fall Break, no classes

10-20:
226

History of Drug Use and Drug Legislation. Pages 190 to


Drug Trafficking. Pages 227 to 259

10-27:

Drug Trafficking cont. Pages 227 to 259

11-03:

Drug Laws and Law Enforcement. Pages 260 to 287


Paper #2 Due

11-10:

No Classes

11-17:

Fibers, Paints, and Other Polymers. Pages 406 to 430


United States Drug Policy. Pages 289 to 310

11-24:
Pages 311 to
12-01:
12-08:
12-15:

Decriminalization, Legalization, and Harm Reduction.


334
Extensive review for final exam
Extensive review for final exam
Final Exam

LEARNING COMES TO LIFE IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE