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HOW

TO BE A GOOD WAITER/ WAITRESS


I WANT TO BE LIKE THEM

HOW TO BE A GOOD WAITER/ WAITRESS



1. Working Effectively and Efficiently
1.1.

Always look presentable. If you wear a uniform, make sure to keep it in excellent condition - ironed,
stain-free and neat. If there is no uniform, wear well kept, slightly formal clothing. This gives the customers a
better first impression and will keep your boss happy. Check your appearance periodically to see if you look
disheveled or have spilled something on yourself without noticing.

Keep your nails clean and tidily cut.


Wear nice looking shoes, not tennis shoes, and keep them tightly tied. Never wear
sandals.
Refrain from wearing perfume or cologne as some guests may have allergies to these
scents. Similarly, try not to smoke before work or during your break, as it can leave an
obnoxious smell.
Keep jewelry and makeup subtle and unobtrusive.

1.2.

Know the menu thoroughly. Being familiar with every item on the menu will save you a lot of time and
trouble when taking orders. Study the menu on your own time if necessary to avoid mistakes and slow orders.

Become familiar with every option for every order. If a customer orders a sandwich, you
should know which breads are available, which sides come with the sandwich, and how
to phrase these questions clearly.
Know which dishes contain meat, dairy, and common allergens, such as peanuts. Be
ready to suggest similar alternatives for customers who cannot eat those ingredients.
Familiarize yourself with the daily specials before each work shift.


1.3. Suggest additional purchases. Politely ask whether the customer would like a drink, a side, or an
upgrade to their order. Management will love you for this and your tips will increase as your customers
purchase more.
Know which liquors is expensive and high quality. Suggest their use when a customer
requests a mixed drink.
Always ask if the table would like an appetizer.
Never be pushy or deceptive. Present the option to the customer politely, and don't try
to pass off an upgrade as though it were free.

1.4. Multitask. You'll have a much easier shift if you can accomplish three tasks in one trip to the
kitchen and back. Take empty dishes from tables whenever you're on your way to the kitchen. Fill up a tray
when several tables want condiments, drinks, or similar items instead of carrying them out one by one.
Unless you are an experienced waitress who can confidently remember every task, write
your orders down immediately and make additional notes if you need to remember to do
something in five or ten minutes.


1.5. Manage your time well. Keep track of how long its been since you checked on each table, and
become familiar with how long each meal takes to cook. Plan to visit each table after they've finished each
course. Move briskly without running and try to maintain a steady pace to keep everything running
smoothly.
Pass on your knowledge of waiting times to the customer. If someone orders a well done
steak, let them know it will take longer. If a soup just ran out and the cook needs to make
a new one, let the customer know how long that will take and suggest an alternative.

1.6. Check the food before bringing it to the customer. Especially when there are special requests
involved, you can save everyone a lot of headache by making sure the order is correct before bringing it to
the table.
If an order has been messed up, let the kitchen and the customers know. Apologize for
the additional delay and, if allowed in your restaurant, try to give them a discounted meal

or something extra to make up for it.

1.7. Anticipate common requests. Most customers want ketchup with their burger. Kids frequently
drop their silverware. Once you get to know which requests are popular with which meals and customers
bring them to the table in advance. This saves both you and the customers time and makes them feel
taken care of.
Extra silverware, condiment packets, and napkins can be kept in your apron pocket, if you
have one.

1.8. Don't let a bad tip ruin your shift. Never complain to a table about a bad tip, no matter how great
your service was. Not only could you get yourself fired but it sets you up as the complaining type and
creates bad relations with the other waiting staff.
Some people never tip appropriately regardless of service. Others may not be able to
afford the tip, or may be visiting from a country where tipping is not common practice.

1.9. Never sit around doing nothing. If you have no customers to take care of, clean! There's always
work to be done in a restaurant. Show your employer that you're able to take initiative and work hard.
If your current tables do not require attention, look at the other customers as well. Some
of them may be trying to flag down a waitress for a small request that you can fill without
stepping on the toes of their wait staff.

2. Interacting with Customers for Better Tips


2.1. Introduce yourself. Make eye contact with the customers after they are seated and promptly
introduce yourself. This starts the conversation out on the right foot, leading to better tips on average, and
gives them a polite way to get your attention later.
Multitask by introducing yourself as you pass out the menus and check that every
customer has enough silverware and napkins.

2.2. Stay polite, friendly and helpful, even to angry customers. When speaking to customers, always
use respectful terms of address such as sir, ma'am, and miss. Act friendly and positive, and make your
customers feel as comfortable as possible.

Ask the customer whether they have dined at your restaurant before - that way if they
are new, first-time customers you can welcome them and offer your help with the menu.
Appear friendly, but do not get involved in the customer's conversation unless asked. Do
your job, and then leave the customer to eat or talk in relative privacy.
Always remember to smile. No matter how irritating customers or co-workers can be, just
put on a pleasant face and suck it up - this will save you a lot of drama!
Don't talk or gossip about customers even when you think they can't hear you. Remain
polite and respectful when discussing them in case they are in earshot.

2.3. Respect the customer's personal space. Never sit down at the table to take an order. Don't shake
hands or hug unless you are personal friends with the customer, or you are shaking hands to greet them as
per restaurant policy. Other physical interactions depend on the atmosphere of the place you work, and
whether you are a man or woman.

Studies of U.S. restaurants show that women who touch a customer lightly on the
shoulder, hand, or arm receive better tips from that customer on average. This should
only be done when the customer appears relaxed and comfortable, and never if the
customer is on a date with a woman. Be friendly rather than flirtatious.

2.4. Personally advise the customer about their order. If a customer asks for advice, be prepared to
answer whatever questions they have or recommend your favorite dish in each category. If a customer
orders a dish that gets a lot of complaints, try to recommend another option.
Customers like it when you give them the "inside scoop", but you shouldn't go so far as to
insult a dish unless you work in an unusually relaxed environment. Instead, steer them
away from a bad dish by recommending a similar, better option as "the chef's specialty"
or "my personal favorite".

2.5. Accommodate any reasonable request your customers make. Many people have serious reasons to
avoid certain ingredients, including potentially fatal allergies. If you aren't familiar with every dish on the
menu (which you should be), do your best to find out for them how it is prepared.
Never lie to a customer and give them an ingredient they requested to have removed. If
you can't accommodate the request, simply say so and suggest a similar alternative that
the customer can eat.
Don't question your customers. Keep in mind there are many reasons for menu change
requests, such as religious, vegetarian/vegan and cultural dietary restrictions. If the
request can be accommodated, don't ask why they made it!

2.6. Repeat the order back to your customers. Studies of U.S. establishments show that wait staff who
repeat the order to the customers receive more tips. However big or small that effect might be, it also
gives the customer a chance to correct any mistakes or change their mind.

2.7. Check on your customers regularly and give them updates. If you just got a job as a waiter or
waitress, it may take some time to get a feel for how frequently you should check on each table. At least
check in whenever they are finishing a course or if they look bored or irritated while waiting for their food.
Give them a specific time estimate if they ask how long the food will take, whenever
possible.
Stop by to refill your customers' glass whenever it gets low, or to ask if they'd like to
purchase another for non-refillable drinks.

2.8. Clear old dishes promptly but not without talking to the customer. Always ask whether the
customer is finished before removing dishes with food on them. If there is a lot of food left, ask whether
the food was all right.

Many restaurants allow their wait staff to give unsatisfied customers something extra to
make up for bad experiences. This could save your tip.


2.9. Befriend your regulars. Be friendly to people you would not normally talk to. When someone sits in
your section more than once, take the time to get to know them. You don't need to become fast friends,
but you will probably end up getting to like at least some of them.
Remember their names and favorite drinks, where they work etc. Make them feel like
they are going to a restaurant to visit a friend: you!
Try to write down the appearance and preferences of anyone who visits more than once.
The customer will be impressed if you know how they like their steak on the third visit.

2.10. Don't assume the customer wants the check, but don't leave them waiting either. Ask if there is
anything more you can get for them, and that will open the opportunity for them to ask for dessert, a take-
out item/bag, or the check.
If they state they need nothing else, then ask if they are ready for the check.
If they have to ask you, it generally means they are in a hurry, or you have waited an
excessive amount of time since you last checked on the table.
Never ask the customer if they need change. Say "I will be right back with your change,"
then come back and leave the full amount on the table.

3.

Handling Specific Situation


3.1. Pay attention to the parents when the kids are ordering. A kid might try to order an unhealthy
meal, caffeinated beverage, or other item parents might disapprove of. Give the parent a chance to object
before you repeat the order.

If the parents aren't paying attention, repeat the order back loudly and clearly,
addressing the whole table. This gives them another chance to notice.

In front of young kids, after a parent has objected, you may be able to smooth the
argument away by saying "Sorry, we're all out of soda, can I get you something else?"

If you personally disapprove of someone's choice, don't say anything. This is up for the
parents to decide, unless the order clearly violates the law, such as serving a child
alcohol.

3.2. Don't set dangerous objects near children. If you are serving hot dishes, putting down metal
utensils, or giving the table some other potentially dangerous item, do so near the parents and address
them with a "Here you are, sir/ma'am" if you need to get their attention.
3.3. Make the dining experience as fast as possible for parents with babies. Babies and young toddlers
typically have a short attention span, and if the meal drags on, the parents and the whole restaurant could
suffer as well. Check in more frequently on them than on other tables, and multitask as much as possible
to speed up the process.
Ask if you can take the drink and meal orders together instead of in two visits.
Suggest a more quickly prepared alternative if one of the customers orders a dish that
will take extra long.
This is the rare situation in which you should bring the check when you approach to clear
the final dishes. You should still ask if the customers are finished first.
Do not make the customers feel like you're trying to throw them out. Many tired and
busy parents will appreciate your prompt service, but if they are getting annoyed, back
off and let them continue the meal at their own pace.


3.4. Stay neutral in arguments over who will pay. If multiple customers at one table request to pay, try
to place the check in the center of the table instead of near one of them. Just smile and say you'll be back
to collect it if they try to involve you in the argument.


3.5. Understand how to serve tea and coffee. People get very serious about their tea and coffee, and it
pays to know how to serve it in a way that will make most people happy. Disregard this advice when
serving regulars if you know they like their drink a certain way (which you should pay attention to).

Tea drinkers are often finicky about preparation. Always be sure you know which variety
of tea they ordered, and provide plenty of milk, lemon wedges, and sugar on the side so
they can customize their drink.

Do not refill tea or coffee without asking the customer. You may be changing their
carefully prepared beverage.

Don't place the spoon in the tea or coffee before taking it to the customer. This lowers
the temperature of the drink, which some customers don't appreciate.


3.6. Ask diners if they would like water when they order caffeine or alcohol. This is more relevant for
people eating a meal than for people at the bar. Many people like to drink water in order to counteract the
dehydrating or mood-changing effects of these substances.

You may not be able to follow this rule in regions outside the United States, where
serving water is less common or comes with a price tag.

3.7. Never put an object from the floor back on the table. Even if it is just a paper advertisement or a
salt shaker, you should replace it with a new one from the kitchen. Your customers do not want to have
"floor germs" on their table.

3.8. Practice specialized tasks on your own time. Most commonly, this involves opening a bottle of
wine. Many serving tasks you find difficult can easily be practiced when you "serve" yourself dinner, so
they don't take much extra time to learn.

Most waiters who are supposed to open wine are expected to do so in front of the
customers who ordered it. Practice this task to make it seem smooth and natural.

3.9. Choose appropriate music and vary the selection. If you have control over the music selection,
keep it at a relatively low volume and choose something appropriate to the mood. Never play a full album;
mix it up so a customer who doesn't like that artist has another chance to hear something they do enjoy.
Customers at a cafe, or eating during the morning and early afternoon, usually enjoy
calming, unobtrusive music. Classical music is a good choice.
Customers eating in the evening may enjoy more energetic music, but this varies greatly
depending on the atmosphere of the establishment. Most still want the volume low so
they can talk to their friends. In any case, waitstaff rarely make music decisions for the
busiest or most formal times of day.

4.

What Do Guests Want, Anyway?


Fortunately, most guests dont demand the impossible. In fact, what they want is exceedingly
reasonable.
What do you want you are at the doctors, or buying a car, or ordering a pizza?

You want the same things your guest wants:

You want to be treated with respect. You want to be listened to.

You dont want:

To be bounced around or ignored. To be treated like a dummy.

In our business more than in most others, the product and the process matter equally. Whatever
forms the product takes (a cold beer by the pool or an expensive wine at dinner), the guest wants the
product to be well presented, to be of good quality, to taste good, to be served at the appropriate
temperature. Thats the technical element of service.

But excelling in the technical element alone will not keep your guest coming back unless you also
pay equal attention to the process. The process concerns how the guest feels hes been treated. This is
human element of services. As touchy-feely as it may sound, the human element is exceedingly important
in achieving a high level of customer satisfaction.

When Im a guest I want


1. To be listened to (and heard)
5. Basic courtesies
2.To be taken seriously
6. Following through
3. Anticipation of my needs
7. Not to be passed around
4. Dedicated attention
8. Competent, efficient services

In other words:

Greet me and make me feel comfortable.
Value me and let me know that you think Im important.
Ask how you can help me.
Listen to me and understand my needs.
Help me get what I want or solve my problem.
Invite me back and let me know that Im welcome anytime.


This is all I want. Thats it.









5.

Grooming And Uniforms

5.1.

Personal appearance and grooming standards:



5.2.

Shower at least twice a day.


Use a deodorant that is also antiperspirant, and avoid over powering after shave or
perfume.
Hair must be neat, well groomed and above the collar for all male personnel. Beards or
moustaches are not permitted in the Restaurant. Sideburns should not be lower than the
ear lobe.
For female personnel hair must be kept neatly away from the face and in manageable
fashion. Ladies who need to tie their hair back should wear a dark colored scrunch,
available at the crew bar. It is not permissible to wear different color accessories in your
hair.
Because you will be in close personal contact with guests, care should be taken to ensure
that your breath is fresh and clean. Teeth must be brushed before coming on duty each
shift, especially if you smoke.
Keep your fingernails clean and trimmed at all times. Employees should wash their hands
often, especially after touching soiled dishes and before touching food.
No earrings are allowed for male employees and personal jewelry should be kept to a
minimum. Ladies may wear tasteful and small earrings. One ring maximum should be
worn per hand.
You must always wear your name tag.
Uniforms must be in immaculate condition at all times.
Socks must match the color of your shoes. Ladies must wear skin color panty hose when
wearing a skirt, available at the crew bar.
Shoes should be clean and polished at all times.
Style



All Restaurants personnel must project a pleasant personality with a friendly and enthusiastic frame of mind.
By doing this you will convey positive body language. Your body language refers to facial expressions, eye contact,
smile, hand and body movements that control and express your feelings. When you display positive body language
you are communicating an effective service style.

A friendly tone of voice is a vital component to superior service. Speak slowly but deliberately. Do
not use a condescending or cold tone when talking to a guest
Show a genuine interest in the welfare of your guests. Listening to a guest is of vital importance in
order to fully understand what the guest has requested.
Using the guests surname communicates respect and also indicates a superior level of service.
Respect others and treat others, as you would like to be treated.
Always speak English when in public areas and in the presentence of guest.
Do not discuss personal matters or internal company business with a guest.
Continue to strive for self-improvement whether you are just arriving onboard or you have
worked at sea for many years.

6.

Restaurant Staff Specific Rules and Regulations

7.

As a member of the restaurant staff, you should not be in any of the ships public areas
unless you are on duty or have received permission from an immediate supervisor.
When coming on or off duty you must use the crew staircase. Do not use guest elevators.
The only time that you should be in any Restaurant is when you are on duty.
You may only eat your meals in the crew mess, not in Restaurant.
Smoking is not permitted during service. If you smoke before coming on duty you must
brush your teeth before reporting for duty. You should not carry cigarettes in your
uniform pockets while duty.
You should only use restrooms in the crew area or your cabin. You are not permitted to
use guest facilities.
The use of profanity or slang will not be tolerated at any time.
Do not drink or eat in the galley.
Do not run in any public area.

Dictionary For Restaurant Personnel


Plates and dishes = Vesela
English

Romanian

Plate
Soup Plate
Dessert Plate
Saucer

Farfurie
Farfurie adanca
Farfurioara de desert
Farfurioara

Cup

Ceasca

Decanter, Jug
Tray
Bread Basket
China
Egg cup
Salt and Pepper Shaker
Sugar Rack
Tea pot
Tea Kettle
Coffee Pot
Cruet Stand
Mustard Pot
Ice Bucket
Cork Screw
Wine Oppener

Carafa, decantor
Platou, tava
Cos de paine
Portelanuri
Suport ou fiert
Solnita de sare si/ sau piper
Suport zahar
Ceainic
Ibric
Cafetiera
Serviciu de otet si ulei
Borcan de mustar
Frapiera
Tirbuson
Deschizator de vinuri

Cutlery = Tacamuri
English

Romanian
Fork
Furculita
Knife
Cutit
Spoon
Lingura
Tea Spoon
Lingurita
Farfurioara pentru paine
Bread and Butter Plate
si unt
Butter Dish
Recipient pentru unt
Tong For Serve Ice
Cleste pentru gheata
Ladle
Polonic























10

Endowment of the Dining Room


=
Dotarea salii de mese
English

Romanian

Table
Chair
Stool
Table Cloth
Little Table Cloth
Anker
Napkin
Paper Napkin
Menu List
Tooth Picks

Masa
Scaun
Taburet
Fata de masa
Napron
Ancar
Servet
Servetel
Lista de meniuri
Scobitori

Meals = Mesele zilei


English
Breakfast
Brunch
Lunch
Dinner
Dinner
Supper



Romanian
Micul dejun
Mic dejun + Pranz
Masa de Pranz
Cina
Dineu
Cina



Cooking Methods
=
Metode de Gatire
English

Romanian
Fript la Gratar
Fierbere
Gatit la Cuptor
Prajire
Tocana
Coacere
Gatit la aburi

Grill
Boil
Roast
Fry
Stew
Bake
Steam

Meat = Carne
English
Beef
Veal
Pork
Lamb
Chicken
Turkey
Goose
Duck
Rabbit
Fish

Romanian
Vaca
Vitel
Porc
Miel
Pui
Curcan
Gasca
Rata
Iepure
Peste

Fish = Peste
English
Carp
Herring
Perch
Pike
Sardines
Swordfish
Trout
Lobster
Anchovies
Shrimp

Romanian
Crap
Hering
Salau
Stiuca
Sardele
Peste Spada
Pastrav
Homar
Ansoa
Crevete

Dairy Products
=
Produse Lactate
English
Milk
Sour Milk
Yoghurt
Butter
Cream

Romanian
Lapte
Lapte Acru
Iaurt
Unt
Smantana
Whipped Cream Frisca
Branza, cascaval
Cheese
Svaiter
Swiss Cheese
Branza cu mucegai
Blue Cheese
Dutch Cheese
Branza de Olanda

11

DRINKS = BAUTURI
English
Water
Mineral Water
Soda Water
Tonic Water
Tea
Coffee
Cocoa
Hot Chocolate
Lemonade
Juice
Tomato Juice
Apple Juice
Orange Juice
Grape Juice

Romanian
Apa
Apa Minerala
Sifon
Apa Tonica
Ceai
Cafea
Cacao
Ciocolata calda
Limonada
Suc (de Fructe)
Suc de Rosii
Suc de Mere
Suc de Portocale
Suc de Struguri

English
Beer
Wine
White Wine
Red Wine
Port Wine
Desert Wine
Vermouth
Champagne
Cognac
Liquor
Whisky
Gin
Rum
Cocktail

Romanian
Bere
Vin
Vin Alb
Vin Rosu
Vin de Porto
Vin de Desert
Vermut
Sampanie
Coniac
Lichior
Whisky
Gin
Rom
Cocteil

Fruits = Fructe
English
Romanian
Apple
Mar
Pear
Para
Grapes
Struguri
Cherry
Cireasa
Sour Cherry
Visina
Orange
Portocala
Peach
Piersica
Apricot
Caisa
Plum
Pruna
Melon
Pepene Galben
Water Melon
Pepene Verde
Strawberry
Capsuna
Wild Strawberry
Fraga
Black Strawberry
Mura
Raspberry
Zmeura
Blueberry
Afina
Tangerine
Mandarina
Lemon
Lamaie
Lime
Lamaie Verde
Grapefruit
Grapefruit
Banana
Banana
Fig
Smochina
Pineapple
Ananas
Coconut
Nuca de cocos
Pomegranate
Rodie
Nuts
Alune
Walnut
Nuca
Peanuts
Arahide
Sweet Chesnutt
Castane
Almond
Migdala

Vegetables = Legume
English
Romanian
Potatoes
Cartof
Tomatoes
Rosii
Beans
Fasole
Peas
Mazare
Cabbage
Varza
Cauliflower
Conopida
Carrot
Morcov
Cucumber
Castravete
Green Pepper
Ardei Gras
Hot Pepper
Ardei Iute
Onion
Ceapa
Garlic
Usturoi
Leek
Praz
Letuce
Salata
Spinach
Spanac
Parsley
Patrunjel
Dill
Marar
Parsnip
Pastarnac
Celery
Telina
Radish
Ridiche
Horse Radish
Hrean
Beet
Sfecla Rosie
Asparagus
Sparanghel
Mint
Menta
Pumpkin
Dovleac
Egg Plant
Vanata
Sweet Potatoes
Cartofi Dulci
Squash
Dovlecel
Basil
Busuioc
Olives
Masline
12

8.

MIS EN PLACE EXEMPLES

The table set up is made according with each meal which is served. Usually the restaurant
personnel make the set-up after the previous meal is finished (e.g. the set up for breakfast is made after
dinner). The mis-en-place contains the coverts for the number of persons the table is prepared, salt and
pepper shakers, flower vase, butter dish, etc.

8.1 Breakfast set-up. Flower vase, salt and pepper shakers, butter dish, sugar rack. After the guest
arrives the waiter will bring the bread basket and the coffee cream pot if necessary.
The covert for one person contains support plate, dinner knife and soup spoon (for hot and cold
cereals) in the right side, bread and butter plate with butter knife on top in the left side, fruit fork and
dinner fork in the left side. The coffee cup will be in the right side, above the dinner knife and next to it
there is the water glass.
On top of the support plate we will place a tea spoon for yogurt and another one for tea or coffee.
The spoon for coffee can be also on the coffee saucer, in the right side of the cup. The handle of the
coffee cup will be on the right side (3 o'clock).

8.2. Lunch set-up
The table set-up for lunch will contain flower vase, bread basket (placed on the table after the
guests arrives), salt and pepper shakers. The cover for a person is: support plate, dinner knife, soup spoon
(for buffet lunches if soup is not in the menu, we will not put the soup spoon on the table) in the right
side, and in the left side we will place bread and butter plate with butter knife on top, appetizer fork and
dinner fork. Above the support plate we place tea spoon, dessert fork and dessert knife. The water glass
and wine glass will be on top of the dinner knife.

8.3. Dinner set-up
The cover for one person for dinner will contain a support plate, dinner knife, soup spoon,
appetizer knife in the right, bread and butter plate with butter knife, appetizer fork, salad fork, dinner
fork in the left on top of the support place we will have the desert spoon (for ice cream), dessert fork and
knife for cakes or fruits. If required we can place on the table cocktail fork in the left (for snails or other
kind of seafood). Knife and fork for fish can be placed on the table according with the restaurant rules.
The glasses for water and wine will be placed above the dinner knife. The mis-en-place can contain 2
glasses for wine, one for red and one for white wine. The red wine glass usually is larger than the white
wine glass, because the red wine is served at the room temperature, not chilled as we serve the white
wine. If we pour chilled wine in a large glass, by the time the guest will finish the glass, the wine will not
be cold enough.
For special occasions we can place a champagne glass on the table.
During the service, the extra silverware will be removed from the table if they are not used (the
soup spoon will be removed from the table before we serve the next course, even if the spoon was not
used).
When we serve soup or cheese we must place cracker basket on the table. The cracker basket
will be removed after the guests will finished the soup.
Before we serve the main course it is necessary to leave on the table only a dinner knife and a
dinner fork.
After the main course we will remove the bread basket, the butter dish, salt and pepper shakers
and we will place coffee creamers and sugar for coffee. Before dessert is served, the dessert fork will be
placed in the left and the knife in the right. When we serve coffee a tea spoon will be placed on the
saucer, on the right side of the cup.
For large tables we will use 2-3 butter dishes and bread baskets and we will place them in the
middle of the table to be reach by each guest.
The support plate and the silverware will be placed at about 2 cm distance of the table edge.

13

The napkins will be placed on the support plate or on the bread and butter plate, according with
the restaurant rules.


8.4. Examples

8.4.1. General Example

Forks:
1. Cocktail
2. Appetizer
3. Fish
4. Main Course
5. Dessert

Knives:
6. Appetizer
7. Fish
8. Main Course
9. Dessert
10. Bread and Butter

Soup Spoon / Tea Spoon:


11. Soup
12. Dessert / coffee / tea

Glasses:
13. Water
14. Red Wine
15. White Wine
16. Liquor/ Brandies
17. Champagne

Plates:
18. Support Plate
19. Plate
20. Bread and Butter Plate
21. Salt
22. Pepper

Other:
23. Napkin
24. Client Name
25. Menu

8.4.2. Breakfast Mis-en-place

14

8.4.3

Lunch mis-en-place


8.4.4 Dinner mis-en-place

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MENIURI INTERNATIONALE
APERITIVE
SHRIMP COCKTAIL

CAPRESE SALAD

shrimp, lemon, red sauce

tomato, mozzarella, balsamic


reduction, fresh basil


ESCARGOT

Snails, garlic butter

BEEF CARPACIO


SMOKED SALMON
smoked salmon, red onion, capers,
toast bread, butter, dill

raw beef thin sliced, parmegiano, rucola, lemon

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SUPE
ONION SOUP
onion soup served very hot, melted
cheese, crouton on top

SUPE CREME
cream of brocoli
cream of asparagus
cream of corn soup

SUPE RECI
strawberry soup
pumpkin soup
cherry soup

SALATE
CAESAR SALAD

NICOISE SALAD

ice berg lettuce, caesar dressing,


croutons, parmesan, chicken or
shrimp

Chat potatoes, green beans, tuna fish,


grape tomatoes, olive oil, black olives,
lettuce, hard boiled eggs, anchovy
fillets, nicoise dressing


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MENIURI DE BAZA (MAIN COURSES)


NEW YORK STEAK

FILLET MIGNON

Served with garlic butter, vegetables,


potatoes

Served with mushed potatoes, gravy


or bearnaise sauces, vegetables,
mushrooms

GRILLED SALMON


GRILLED LAMB CHOPS

Served with asparagus, vegetables,


lemon

Served with mint sauce, Vegetables,


gravy sauce


GRILLED PORK CHOP

SURF & TURF

Served with beans & potatoes

Filet mignon, broiled lobster tail,


melted butter, lemon, potatoes,
vegetables


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T BONE STEAK
Season generously and grill over a
barbecue or griddle pan for about
seven minutes on each side. Serve
pink and juicy with lemon wedges and
a drizzle of olive oil.

DESSERTS
SUNDAE
USA dessert, consisting of ice cream and either fruit or other garnish and
whipped cream


SORBET

is a frozen dessert made from


sweetened water with flavoring
(typically fruit juice or
fruit pure, wine, and/or liqueur).

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CARROT CAKE

CHEESE CAKE

CHOCOLATE SOUFLE

APPLE STRUDEL

CRME BRULLE

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F&B COMMON TERMINOLOGY, ALERGIES, CONDIMENTS


AND SALAD DRESSINGS
SALLAD DRESSINGS
BLUE CHEESE DRESSING
Mayonnaise, crumbled Blue cheese, butter milk, sour cream, vinegar, Worcestershire
sauce, chopped onions, garlic, salt & pepper

RANCH DRESSING

Mayo, white wine vinegar, fresh lemon juice, garlic, French mustard, sugar, parmesan
cheese, Worcestershire sauce, chopped dill, chopped tarragon, chopped parsley, salt and
peeper


THOUSAND ISLAND DRESSING

Mayo, sweet relish, ketchup, chopped onions, garlic, chopped parsley, chilly sauce, lemon
juice, orange juice, horseradish, Worcestershire sauce, red and green Bell pepper, salt and
pepper


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ITALIAN DRESSING
Red wine vinegar, olive oil, mustard, chopped parsley, cold consomm, Worcestershire
sauce, chopped onions, diced green Bell peppers, salt and pepper

CAESAR DRESSING

Mayo, white vinegar, anchovies, lemon juice, chopped garlic, parmesan cheese, olive oil,
Tabasco, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper

COMMON CONDIMENTS AND SAUCES


MINT JELLY
a sweet and soft food made by boiling
sugar and fruit juice until it is thick, in this
case mint. It is especially served with lamb

MINT SAUCE
traditionally made from finely
chopped spearmint leaves, soaked
in vinegar, and a small amount
of sugar. Occasionally, the juice from a
squeezed lime is added. The sauce should
have the consistency of double cream.


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HORSERADISH CREAM SAUCE


creamy white sauce with horseradish and
mustard. Mostly served with Prime Rib.

CHIVES, SOUR CREAM, CHEDDAR CHEESE, BACON BITS

The most popular condiments for baked


potato. They can be served together or
separate, based on guest request.

BEARNAISE SAUCE
reduction of vinegar, wine, tarragon and
shallots finished with egg yolks and
clarified butter. Mostly used for beef and
fish dishes.

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE
is an emulsion of egg yolk and liquid
butter, usually seasoned with lemon
juice, salt, and a little white
pepper or cayenne pepper. In appearance,
it is light yellow and opaque, smooth and
creamy. The flavor is rich and buttery, with
a mild tang added by an acidic component
such as lemon juice, yet not so strong as to
overpower mildly-flavored foods. A very
common sauce for vegetables and a key
ingredient for Eggs Benedict.

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HP SAUCE
is a brown sauce originally produced
by HP Foods in the United Kingdom,
now produced by the H. J. Heinz
Company in the Netherlands. HP Sauce
has a malt vinegar base, blended with
tomato, dates, tamarind extract,
sweetener and spices. It usually is used
as a condiment with hot or
cold savory food, or as an ingredient
in soups or stews.

BARBECUE SAUCE
is a flavoring sauce used as a marinade, basting or topping for meat cooked In
the barbecue cooking style,
including pork or beef ribs and chicken. The ingredients vary widely even
within individual countries, but most include some variation
on vinegar and/or tomato paste as a base, as well as liquid smoke, spices such
as mustard and black pepper, and sweeteners such as sugar or molasses

A1 SAUCE

includes tomatoes, raisin paste,


distilled vinegar, corn syrup, salt,
rushed orange pure, dried garlic
and onions, herbs and spices, caramel
color and xanthan gum. The US recipe
differs from the original sauce by its
exclusion and substation of malt
vinegar and molasses.

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TABASCO
is a brand of hot sauce made exclusively
from tabasco peppers (Capsicum
rutescens var. tabasco), vinegar and salt
. It has a hot, spicy flavor. The sauce is
produced by the US-based McIlhenny
Company. The most common spicy
sauce in U.S.

COMMON ALLERGIES AND DIETS


GLUTEN ALLERGY OR GLUTEN FREE DIET
A gluten-free diet is a diet that
excludes gluten, a protein composite found
in wheat and related grains,
including barley and rye. Gluten causes
health problems in sufferers of celiac
disease (CD) and some cases of wheat
allergy.

LACTOSE INTOLERANCE
is the inability of adults to digest lactose, a
sugar found in milk and to a lesser
extent dairy products, causing side effects.
It is due to a lactase deficiency,
or hypolactasia. Congenital lactase
deficiency prevents babies from drinking
even human milk.

FAT FREE DIET


Is one that restricts fat and often saturated
fat and cholesterol as well. Low-fat diets
are intended to reduce diseases such
as heart disease and obesity. Reducing fat
in the diet can make it easier to cut
calories.

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SUGAR FREE
The most extreme form of a sugar-free diet
restricts all foods that contain added sugars
as well as fruit and any vegetables that
contain natural sugars such as peas, carrots
and parsnips. The less extreme form of the
diet permits fruit (but not juices) and
vegetables and restricts all added sugars,
honey and processed foods that contain
sugars such as sugar-sweetened drinks,
confectionery, sweet snacks, biscuits,
cakes, pastries, ice cream and desserts,
sweetened yoghurt, most breakfast cereals,
sauces, soups and marinades.

OVOLACTO VEGETARIAN DIET


Considers animal related products
acceptable, such as eggs, milk, butter but
do not eat meat.

VEGETARIAN DIET
avoids all animal products and other
derivative foods, which includes but are not
limited to butter, cheese, eggs, milk and
stocks based on beef, chicken and seafood.

VEGAN DIET
Dietary vegans (or strict vegetarians)
refrain from consuming animal products,
not only meat but, in contrast to ovolacto
vegetarians, also eggs, dairy products and
other animal-derived substances. The
term ethical vegan is often applied to those


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who not only follow a vegan diet, but


extend the vegan philosophy into other
areas of their lives, and oppose the use of
animals and animal products for any
purpose. Another term used
is environmental veganism, which refers to
the avoidance of animal products on the
premise that the harvesting or industrial
farming of animals is environmentally
damaging and unsustainable.

COMMONLY USED VERBIAGE


STARBOARD - Left side of the vessel
PORT SIDE - Right side of the vessel
FORWARD or BOW - The front of the
vessel
AFT or STERN - The back of the vessel

GALLEY Ships kitchen


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PANTRY
is a room where food, provisions, dishes, or linens are stored. Also refers to a
designated food preparation area such as cold pantry (where salads and cold
items are prepared), hot pantry (where hot appetizers are prepared only)

DISHWASHER

I-95

is a mechanical device for


cleaning dishes and eating utensi

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FOOD & BEVERAGE GLOSSARY
Aioli-garlic mayo for fish/ seafood dishes
Alfredo-creamy cheese sauce
Bolognese-meat sauce
Carbonara-made with cream, bacon, egg yolk and parmesan
Marinara-tomato sauce, garlic, herbs and onions
Arrabbiata-Spicy tomato sauce
Pesto-Cold Italian sauce made of fresh basil, pine nuts, garlic, parmesan
and olive oil.
Antipasto-Italian term for cold hors doeuvres. Usually small bites or
cocktails snacks like Parma ham, marinated vegetables, seafood or fish.

Fettuccini or Tagliatelle

Penne-Large

Flat, narrow strip of pasta

Straight tubes cut diagonal


Rigatoni

Tortellini

Short, grooved tubes of macaroni.

Small pasta stuffed with various


fillings, shaped into a ring or hat shape.


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Macaroni
It may be straight or curved, in which case it is frequently called elbow
macaroni. Elbow macaroni is more common in the US and Canada, while
British macaroni tends to be straight

GAZPACHO

SALSA

Spanish cold soup made with


cucumber, tomato, garlic, onion, red
pepper, breadcrumbs and olive oil.
Served with garlic croutons.

Mexican condiment for any kind of


dishes. Made of chopped tomatoes,
onions, lime juice, cilantro and
seasonings.

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MARTINI

is a cocktail made with gin or vodka and vermouth, and garnished with
an olive or a lemon twist. Over the years, the Martini has become one of
the best-known mixed alcoholic beverages. The traditional method of
preparation is to pour gin and dry vermouth into a mixing glass with ice
cubes, stir, strain into chilled cocktail glass, and garnish with a green olive
or a twist of lemon peel.

SHIRLEY TEMPLE

is a non-alcoholic mixed drink traditionally


made with ginger ale, a splash
of grenadine and garnished with
a maraschino cherry. Modern Shirley Temple
recipes may substitute lemon-lime
soda or lemonade.

Roy Rogers

is a non-alcoholic mixed drink made


with cola and grenadine syrup, garnished wit
h a maraschino cherry.

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