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National

Agricultural
Day
March 18

Sustaining Future Generations

A special supplement of The Standard Newspaper, Waukon, IA

2
0
1
5
National Ag Day is a day to recognize and celebrate the abundance provided by agriculture.
Every year, producers, agricultural associations, corporations, universities, government agencies
and countless others across America join together to recognize the contributors of agriculture.

Page 2

National Ag Day 3/18/15

March 11, 2015

Drones now used down on the farm


by David M. Johnson
Not that long ago when
an individual used the word
drone, one would relate to it as
a positive connotation. There
would be the visual concept of
drone bees building up the hive
and surrounding the queen bee
with a colony that was strong
against the elements.
Today, use the word drone
and one might more often think
of something pernicious, the
military-related Raptors and
Predators roaming the skies
and raining death on those
targeted in the Middle East. But
the use of drones has evolved
beyond military use and is now
becoming a positive instrument
in business and agriculture.
The military use of drones
has a history dating back to
World War II. Drone use in
the civilian sector has a more
recent history, going back

only some ve or six years.


News segments can be seen
depicting companies delivering
take-out dinners or mail ordered
goods to the front door of their
patronizing customers. Then
there are the hobbyists who
use it in addition to the radio
controlled ying craft that has
been a xture of the past.
The use of drones is now
beginning to creep into use
by farmers to improve their
agriculture operations. The
future is looking very bright
for the drone industry and
its introduction and use by
business and for farming. The
Association for Unmanned
Vehicle Systems International
predicts that the drone, or
UAV, industry could generate
up to 100,000 new jobs and
an estimated 82 billion dollars
Drones
Continued on page 10

We salute the Agricultural Industry during


National Agricultural Day.

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Doug Zieman of Luana displays the four-rotor drone he uses for crop
inspection and other purposes on his northeast Iowa farm.

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March 11, 2015

Page 3

National Ag Day 3/18/15

Farm to School efforts


providing markets for farmers
by Darin Leach
Public Information Coordinator
with USDA Rural Development
in Iowa
The United States Department of Agricultures (USDAs)
most recent Farm to School
Census indicates nearly half
of the school districts in the
state of Iowa are or plan to be
participating in some sort of
farm-to-school program. One
way schools make this farm
connection is through the purchase of local foods for student
lunches.
School can be a tremendous
place to learn about healthy
lifestyles and making good
food choices, said Bill Menner, USDA Rural Development
State Director in Iowa. There
are many USDA programs in
place to that can help schools
develop programming and services to connect todays youth

to the many exciting aspects of


agriculture.
Thanks to the efforts of the
Northeast Iowa Food and Fitness Initiative and the Northeast Iowa Food and Farm Coalition, schools in northeast
Iowa are embracing the farmto-school connection.
Northeast Iowa Food and
Fitness particularly focuses on
schools as a site to inuence
broader community shifts toward healthy living and has
spent much of its efforts on
instituting active school wellness teams, encouraging physical activity, building school
gardens, and providing nutrition education for students in
the classroom, said Teresa
Wiemerslage, regional program coordinator, Iowa State
University Extension and Outreach in northeast Iowa, who
coordinates the work of the coalition.

The mission of the coalition


is to create opportunities for
farmers to engage in the food
system. The coalition views
schools as one of those opportunities in the rural area,
which consists of school districts ranging in size from 300
to 1,500 students.
The coalition has now been
working to provide local foods
to school districts for six years.
The efforts started out small
and have grown signicantly.
This past fall, nearly 20 school
districts representing more than
12,000 students in northeast
Iowa worked with Iowa Food
Hub to purchase food from local farmers, while many other
school districts made local food
purchases directly from farmers.
Types of local foods purFarm to School
Continued on page 6

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Page 4

Thank You

March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15

Farmers battle against pests


and weeds that attack their crops

Supporting
the
Agriculture
Industry for
89 Years!

of crop damage and yield loss.


In the last few decades, science
To farmers, things that go has become an important facbump in the night do not in- tor in both agricultural-related
Proudly
clude the lurking boogeyman or businesses and the academic
Serving
23 MPG
some other creature hiding in community to providing relief
Northeast
Highway
the shadows, but, instead, can from the pests that have inunIowa for
be found in the weeds and bad dated the farming sector. Engi89 Years.
www.torkelsonmotors.com
bugs that smother and destroy neering has evolved the manufacturing aspect of agriculture
their planted future harvest.
Since the rstSAman
VE left the with more efcientSAmachinery.
VE
SAVE
,730the earth Chemical advances
60 procave and dug$2up
$3,106
$5,8have
to plant food for sustenance, duced an industry where the
nature has provided a deter- farmer has tools along with his
mined, dogged adversary that other strategies for an integratshows no surrender. As man ed pest management program
Waukon,
IAhemi, power
8 speed trans., 20 wheels, power windows
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What followed is the Bt conback this onslaught with tilling
cept,
or crops that have been
practices and later with chemi28 MPG
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modi
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to produce a protein
y
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h
ig
H
BUILDING
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playing a holding action against that is toxic to various forms of
the negative forces of the earth. insect larvae. Crops are genetiWeeds and bugs have al- cally engineered to carry the Bt
ways been enemies to farmers, trait so to control the damage
insects being the major cause done by insects. This was conby David M. Johnson

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A recent Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll was taken, a poll
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Experiment Station, ISU Extension Service and the Iowa
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Farmers
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March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15

Page 5

Farmers
Continued from page 4
management. A total of 889
farmers were surveyed and the
poll reveals that they feel they
are witnessing the increase of
resistance to their employment
of insecticide practices and the
absence of any relief in the future to this problem.
Research released by the
University of Arizona was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy
of Sciences which reported that
GM, genetically modied, crops
are becoming less and less
successful in combating crop
pests. The study concluded
that GMO crops are increasingly and quickly losing the ability
to outsmart the pests and this
could lead to a complete failure
in future GMO use and its continued implementation.
Farmers in Allamakee County and in northeast Iowa are no
strangers to these problems.
So, what are they to do? Brian
Lang, an ISU Extension Agronomist, has been involved with

this issue over a number of


years. When asked about the
concern of the possible resistance of pests to the management practices to control them,
Lang observed that its nothing
new, it has been going on for
thirty years, weeds and other pests are going to adapt to
management practices.
He has witnessed different
results with the Bt issue but that
depends on its use. The Bt
European corn borer program
has been tremendously successful with a high dose trait.
A moderate dose trait will allow
survivors, which leads to surviving genetics, added Lang.
He understands the complexity
and nuances that farmers face
each year when deciding on
the appropriate strategies and
tactics that would be conducive
to battling the pests that harm
their crops. He acknowledges
that alternative tactics are not
that simple and that if there is
no signicant change in opera-

tions to counter any resistance,


there will be problems in the future that will be more difcult to
handle because of the decision
not to change.
This agronomist points to
the strategy most farmers use
when facing the corn rootworm
problem, using a three-year
rotation, a rotation that works
extremely well. Farmers experiencing the threat from root
worm infestation usually adopt
a three-year rotation with soil
insecticides and mechanical
tillage applications employed
during the three-year rotation.
Then the elds are planted with
something else other than corn
after the third year to eliminate
the rootworm problem. This is
cited by many agronomists as
one of many practices to assist
with pest control.
There is a growing endorsement by those following this
Farmers
Continued on page 8

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Page 6

March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15


Farm to School
Continued from page 3

We support
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farmers!
Thanks for
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REISER IMPLEMENT

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THANK YOU FARM FAMILIES!

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chased included apples, watermelon, broccoli, squash,


sweet
potatoes,
peppers,
pears, yogurt, sweet corn, cucumbers, frozen strawberries,
cantaloupe, pork and turkey.
Wiemerslage said this fall
some of the larger school districts were purchasing as much
as 200 pounds of pork, 800 apples and 300 pounds of watermelon for just one meal.
The recent establishment of
National Farm to School Month
in October expands what used
to be just a week each fall
promoting homegrown school
lunches.
The Decorah Community
School District has been working with the coalition for ve
years and so far this school
year has purchased more than
$10,000 in food, according to
Chad Elliott, culinary specialist
with the school district, and he
says students are enjoying the
local food options.
We see students trying

more fruits and vegetables,


Elliott said. Some students
have even helped pick or plant
these products and they seem
to have more interest in trying
something they grew themselves. Local has a new tone
among the students today, they
know they are getting a fresher
piece of fruit or being socially responsible by consuming
these vegetables.
Elliott said district staff enjoys preparing meals with the
local food products and intends
on working with the coalition
for many years to come. Food
service directors really started
to embrace the farm-to-school
connection and we saw they
wanted to expand their purchases past the one week,
said Wiemerslage. At the same
time, the USDA was launching
Farm to School month, so the
timing for all of this coming together has been perfect.
A report issued in November
2014 by the Leopold Center

Calhoun Creamery
Salutes area farmers for
the great job they do
producing corn and
soybeans.
These crops are vital
parts of a dairy cows
diet that enable them to
produce natures most
perfect food. MILK!
Thanks to corn and
soybean producers
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and especially
CALHOUN CREAMERY!

for Sustainable Agriculture at


Iowa State University suggests
sales of local foods to grocery
stores, restaurants, schools,
residential food service operations, food hubs and other
high-volume markets are rapidly eclipsing direct-to-consumer sales at farmers markets
and from community supported agriculture arrangements.
All of this activity spells good
economic news for rural communities and farm-based businesses in Iowa, said Leopold
Center associate scientist Corry Bregendahl, who coordinated the data collection project.
Schools all across Iowa are
nding the benets of purchasing local foods.
Northeast Iowa Food and
Farm Coalition members have
learned many lessons over the
years. Here are a few of those
lessons:
Farm to School
Continued on page 7

563-538-4295
Churchtown, IA

Tom Baxter, Manager

March 11, 2015

Page 7

National Ag Day 3/18/15

Farm to School
Continued from page 6

t Start small. If a school is


snew to local food, shoot for two
yor three measurable goals such
,as sourcing all fresh apples lo-cally from August to December,
ror hosting a local foods night
-each month.
- Measuring success. What
swill success look like, is it a pur-chasing goal of 20 percent local
.foods, or is it a specic dollar
damount for local foods? Make
-sure the food service provider
-is supportive of the goals.
d Dene Local. Determine
-the denition of local to start
-identifying potential suppliers.
.A larger radius may be needed
eto source greater quantities of
-product.
Identify local products
dyou would like to serve.
eSchools should identify the
efoods they would like to serve
eand quantities needed per
month. Identify potential farmers for those products and have
discussions with potential suppliers about availability.

Farmers: Respond to bid


requests. Schools have procurement rules they need to
follow. If they contact you asking for prices and quantities, be
sure to share. They cannot buy
from you if you do not respond.
You may consider sending
them your price list at the beginning of the year.
Wiemerslage said the coalition continues its research into
light processing for schools.
The fruit and vegetable processing project is funded by
a USDA Farm to School grant
and funds from the Leopold
Center for Sustainable Agriculture.
We are working with two
commercial kitchens in the
area to investigate costs and
logistics of providing shredded cabbage, cubed squash,
diced sweet potatoes and frozen strawberries to schools,
Wiemerslage said. We also
worked with a sweet corn grower to provide a husked sweet

corn product for schools.


The price studies for this work
are still being evaluated and
coalition members continue to
collaborate with local farmers
and a new food hub to scale
up production and investment
in aggregation infrastructure to
meet school needs. They are
also working with the four rural
school districts to expand their
Farm to School programming in
hopes of increasing their local
food purchases by 200 percent
in the coming year.
Working with the Iowa Food
Hub we believe we have created a school-food program
model that has the potential
to be replicated in other parts
of the state and across the
country, Wiemerslage added.
Food service directors are using more local products in their
meals, students are more excited about healthy, local foods
and farmers and the communities we are working in are more
interconnected.

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Page 8

National Ag Day 3/18/15


Thank you area farmers
for all of your hard work!

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NH 65 Workmaster
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NH TC18, 4WD, 54 deck
JD 3720 w/ldr. & mower
MF 35 dsl.
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Krause 6200-36 finisher
Krause 6118-18 finisher
Krause 3112A-12 finisher
CIH 4300-24 field cult.
McFarlane 30 reel disc
Sunflower 6331-22
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Glencoe 6000 30 finisher
JD 724-15 finisher
JD 726-24 & 34 finisher
Wilrich 30 field cultivator
IH 490-24 disc
Case IH 4 row cultivator
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March 11, 2015

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NH HW340 discbine
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NH 1411 & 1412 discbines
NH 1465 haybine
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CIH DC102 discbine
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JD 630 discbine
JD 935 discbine
Hesston 1120 haybine
NH 311 baler & thrower
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BR7060 Silage Special
NH BR750 round baler
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Gehl 520, 12 wheel rake
Kuhn 4120 rotary rake
Kuhn 10 & 12 wheel rakes
Tonutti 10 wheel rake
H&S 8 tedder

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NH 185 tandem box
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Gehl 1410 tandem box
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Knight 8118 Expeller
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Meyer 3245 Expeller
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NH-D 100 backhoe for
skid
G8800 loader w/bucket
JD 148 loader
Huskie HH300 jack
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FORAGE EQUIPMENT
NH FX300 w/processor
NH Kemper & row heads
NH FP 230, metal
NH 900 chopper
NH 890 chopper
Gehl 1260 chopper
JD & Gehl corn & hay
hds., 2R & 3R
NH corn & hay heads
NH 28 blower
Gehl 1540 blower
Gehl 980, 16 box
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Bush Hog 8 blade
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Farmhand 817 grinder
mixer
Westfield 10x31 auger
Farm King 10 x 70 auger
Big Ox 6 cutter
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JD 443 & 444 heads
IH 843, 4 row
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Farmhand dump carts

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Farmers
Continued from page 5
issue that farmers once again
cultivate their corn as a management practice as well as
using the rotary hoe and eld
border management plus more
aggressive scouting of their
elds, for infestation and crop
damage, as positive adaptations to ghting pests. In Allamakee County, especially with
a large number of dairies and
beef producers, cover crops,
such as alfalfa, rotated in planting strategies are benecial.
But even the cover crops are
not immune to threats like their
row crop cousins.
Insects like the potato leaf
hopper can damage the development and yields of alfalfa
stands. If there is an infestation
or possible threat of the potato leaf hopper, Lang endorses a grass mix in the seeding
and also suggests in seeding
a darker green alfalfa, which
seems to be less attractive to
the hopper pest.

Other crop specialists have a


laundry list of different options
to assist the farmer in controlling and overcoming the resistance of pests to pest management practices. Besides the
rotation of crops, farmers need
to be in constant communication and in partnership with crop
specialists, ag retailers and
networking with neighbors and
other farmers, many times upto-date information is shared
that can be extremely valuable.
This communication allows the
farmer to gain knowledge that
will assist in pest management
and shows that farmer that he
is not alone, that there are others out there facing this same
problem.
The Agricultural Biotechnology Stewardship Technical
Committee, a consortium of agricultural biotechnology companies and associations, provides
a multi-year monitoring of insect populations, providing in-

formation that alerts those concerned with if and when these


populations are expanding and
what areas are being affected.
If there is a surge, then crop
specialists and scientists can
analyze the data to determine if
there is a serious threat that will
expand or if it is just an anomaly.
In the immediate future, the
National Academy of Sciences
Keck Center in Washington,
D.C. conducted a workshop
March 4. The workshop focused on comparing environmental effects of pest management practices across cropping
systems. The major goals of
the meeting, involving a panel
of experts, were to examine
trade-offs in pest management
approaches for weeds, insects
and diseases, and compare
Farmers
Continued on page 9

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Producers who expect


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Federal Hybrids
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Kermits Cell: 563-379-7569 Email: kermit@federalhybrids.com

Kermit White,
Distributor

March 11, 2015

SZABO
Construction Co., Inc.
National Ag Day 3/18/15
Over 30 years of soil conservation
Page 9

and excavation experience.

Farmers
Continued from page 8
environmental effects between
different cropping systems, including genetically engineered
(GE) and non-GE systems.
According to the press release provided by the Keck
Center, the variety of topics
included growth of organic,
traditional and genetically engineered (GE) crops; integrated pest management practices; cover cropping plus weed
management and herbicide
resistant weeds; insect ecology
in agro-systems; and disease
resistant GE crops. The workshop is related to a separate
ongoing study being conducted by the National Research
Council summarizing GE crops.
Then there is the establishment of refuge areas. In the
United States, refuge areas are
required by the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) when
planting Bt products, but the
EPA has been lax in requiring
pest refuges to be established

in crop elds to mitigate the


spread of pest resistance.
In Europe, it is nothing unusual to see this practice widely
used. Yves Carriere, a professor of entomology at the UA
College of Agriculture and Life
Sciences and a lead author on
the study of refuges, has stated that, our simulations tell us
that when 10 percent of acreage is set aside for refuges,
resistance evolves quite fast,
but if you put 30 to 40 percent
aside, you can substantially delay it.
Farmers have known that
there has always existed a
threat to their crops and it is not
getting easier to combat that
threat. There are a number of
farmers who have become relaxed with their management
decisions and have depended on one or two chemicals
or a limited pest management
practice. Besides weather, production costs and regulations,

nature is increasingly making


the farmer work a balancing act
between being environmentally friendly and economically
sound. He or she must make
decisions that protect their
crops and protect benecial
insects and wildlife from being
harmed.
The integrated pest management practices chosen by
the producer are becoming
increasingly more difcult to
choose. Finding that right t
that is positive for the producer
has always been a challenge,
but as in the past, the elements
that hurt the farmer have time
and again been defeated. This
is something the farmer realizes and accepts as part of his
profession, a profession where
technology has become more
part of the landscape, but a
landscape where the trials and
tribulations have not changed
from one generation to the
next.

SZABO
Construction Co., Inc.
Over 30 years of soil conservation
An experienced
and excavation experience.

soil conservation &


excavation company.

Excavating (All Types) Terraces


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(563)563-864-7515
864-7515 1-888-864-7518
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152S.S.West
WestStreet,
Street, Postville,
Postville, IA
IA52162
52162

Terry(All
Szabo,
Excavating
Types)President
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Water and Sewer
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(563) 864-7515 1-888-864-7518


152 S. West Street, Postville, IA 52162

Terry Szabo, President

Page 10

National Ag Day 3/18/15

Stop In & Visit With Us About


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Our Area Farmers!

R.W. PLADSEN, INC.


Waukon, IA

563-568-6357

www.pladseninc.com

Protect
your farm
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protect
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Scott Houg, Agent
111 Rossville Road
Waukon, IA 52172
Bus: 563-568-3046
scott.houg.jysw@statefarm.com

P098092

March 11, 2015

For insurance protection on


your home, outbuildings,
equipment and livestock,
contact me today.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7

State Farm Fire and Casualty Company Bloomington, IL

Drones
Continued from page 2
in economic activity between
now and 2025. It also has been
estimated that there would be
nearly a half billion dollars in
tax revenue realized by 2025,
much of it from agriculture.
The drone industry believes
the prospects for Iowa corn
and soybean farmers would
see 1,200 more jobs and an
economic impact topping 950
million dollars within the next
decade.
Drone use on the farm
and on ranches has many
applications. Ranchers out
West, with their huge expanses
of pasture ground, may use
their drones to check on herd
activity and pasture rotation
strategy. More and more crop
farmers are employing drones,
by purchasing their own drone,
to monitor compaction, their
use of fertilizer, pesticides
and herbicides, and a disease
outbreak after their crops have
been planted.

Instead of walking the elds


or ying overhead with a fast
moving airplane, the drone
provides the farmer with a tool
that enables him to use tactics
that put more dollars in his or
her pocket by reducing overuse
or encouraging more use of a
particular product to enhance
overall yields of planted crops.
There is the added advantage
for the environment as the
drone gives the farmer valuable
information to avoid the run-off
into the local water resources by
possible overuse of chemicals
or fertilizers, the drone showing
the farmer physical evidence to
avoid this overuse.
Drone use in the private
sector has produced some
concerns, especially when
considering privacy. For the
farmers in rural settings, the
privacy and safety issues that
are part of the urban landscape
have not become a problem for
agricultural use. Due to the lack

of congestion in rural areas, the


general population is less apt
to be alarmed with drone use
when the farmer is primarily
using this tool over open crop
elds. For the farmer, state
and federal governments have
given space for the use of
drones on the farm.
For now, the Federal
Aviation Administration (FAA)
has no rules or regulations for
the use of drones when utilized
for agricultural use. There is
an active review of the use of
drones by farmers by the FAA
and there may be rules for
drones weighing less than 55
pounds in the future, which
would include the majority of
drones used by farm producers.
Farmers and ranchers are free
to y their drones over their own
land as long as they y under
400 feet and dont go ying

Drones
Continued on page 11

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Contact Our
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dlyons@fmsb4me.com

bmahoney@fmsb4me.com

Cell: 563-568-1740
Home: 563-568-3529

Cell: 563-419-3002
Home: 563-568-6096

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March 11, 2015

Page 11

National Ag Day 3/18/15

Drones
Continued from page 10
near or over airports or y over
or near occupied areas outside
their private property. The
use by people or companies
for business purposes is not
allowed, and the commercial
application
by
operators
other than farmers will lead to
licensing in the future.
Luana farmer Doug Zieman
has been implementing drone
use in his farming operation
since July of 2013. This 44 yearold producer has been familiar
with all farming practices
that are implemented in his
community, but his introduction
to owning and operating a
drone was similar to navigating
uncharted waters.
I was on the internet and
saw videos of its use and
thought to myself, I need to
have one, observed Zieman.
He looked at the different
models available and went
with the basics, a helicopter
drone with four rotors and an

eight-minute battery, costing


$2,000. Ziemans drone is
just one model of many, some
helicopter units have not only
four rotors, but six and eight
rotors. On the market there are
also the xed-wing drones that
y faster and are able to cover
more territory.
Then the operator needs to
consider how he will operate
his drone, either having a drone
that is manually operated using
radio controls or employing
computer software to plot the
course of their drone. There is
also the selection of cameras
and sensors to be mounted on
the drone. Infra-red cameras
give the operator the imaging
desired to detect the health of
his crops. Healthy plants reect
more infrared radiation, which
alerts the producer to make
the appropriate decisions to
deal with unhealthy sections or
elds that require management
to correct the problem.

The drone operator may also


select the numerous cameras
available to take still pictures
or videos, the selection of the
cameras depending on the
numerous bells and whistles
desired by the operator. All in
all, the drone market with its
many models has a price range
of $1,500 to $3,500.
Zieman uses radio control for
his drone, owning four batteries
that allows him more ying
time, each battery requiring
one-half to two hours charging
after use. His unit is tted with
a GoPro camera that records
action during the ight, video
that will later be played on his
home computer. His drone can
reach a top speed of 50 miles
an hour but when surveying
elds, the helicopter unit
affords the luxury to hover and
absorb details at a slower rate

~Home & Farm~


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today!

Drones
Continued on page 12

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Page 12

March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15

We Salute The Agriculture Industry

B & K Heating & Plumbing Inc.


285 E. Greene St.

Postville, IA

(563) 864-3332
Owners: Brian Bohr & Ken Klepper

Sommer Pumper LLC.


Septic Service

SEPTIC PUMPING & HOLDING TANKS


CELL:

563-568-9004
Joel Sommer, Owner

CERTIFIED TIME OF
TRANSFER INSPECTOR

From our legendary


meats to our farm-fresh
produce and dairy,
Fareway is dedicated to
providing you and your
family with fresh items.

Drones
Continued from page 11
of speed. This particular unit is
own up to 350 feet high and
has a vertical and horizontal
range of a half mile.
At rst, Zieman practiced
around his house until he
got used to his newest farm
implement. I felt comfortable, it
seemed easy to use, reected
Zieman on his rst solo ight.
He learned that his drone can
be easily lost in the sun and
a cloudier day is conducive to
more productive results.
But his inexperience cost
him when he began to venture
out of his backyard and into
his elds. When you y it, you
have to have it visually in sight
and not allow it to y out of
range of your controller, added
this amateur drone pilot, as he
made the mistake of ying his
craft out of range of his control
unit. When this is done, the
drone will continue to y until
the battery dies.
Zieman looked and looked

for the drone and it was not


found until a year after it was
lost. The drone was found
about a half-mile away when
friends and neighbors were
moving a widow neighbors
cattle, recalled Zieman, as he
was amazed that it was not
crushed by a combine or grain
cart during harvest; apparently
the machinery straddled over
the drone unit. I would like to
think my deceased neighbor
and friend had a hand in that
good fortune of not having
that drone suffer any further
damage, added Zieman.
Disappointed
but
not
discouraged, he went out and
purchased another drone.
Making a more pronounced
effort to become familiar with his
new drone, this Luana farmer
followed his practice runs by
adventuring back out to his
elds and has become adept
at piloting the craft. With the
experience with maneuvering

the vehicle what followed were


eye-opening discoveries of the
numerous possibilities of using
a drone.
I had own over elds in an
airplane but the drone showed
me things that convinced me
of the advantages in owning
one,
observed
Zieman.
The drone, with its camera,
recorded different details not
imagined until its use. Each
drone ight showed stand
problems, issues with planter
performance, fertilizer and
spray applications that could be
improved, wet spots that might
encourage more tiling to relieve
drainage, plus how compaction
from wheel tracks affects plant
development.
Thanks to drone use,
Zieman chose to replace his
ground drive pump on his
planter to a hydraulic drive to

Drones
Continued on page 13

In Emergencies...
Seconds Count!

Grocery Dept. 563-568-5017


Meat Dept. 563-568-5018
WAUKON, IA WWW.FAREWAY.COM

Go to your closest hospital for Emergency Care.


Dont risk further illness or injury by delaying immediate treatment,
especially in the case of a heart attack or stroke.

24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICES


We
Proudly
Support
Our Area
Farmers.

Veterans Memorial Hospital


WAUKON, IOWA (563) 568-3411
Exceptional Care by Exceptional People

March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15

Drones
Drones
Continued from
from page
page 12
12
Continued

ecorrect fertilizer problems with


ehis planter, because in certain
gconditions the drive wheel was
slipping. In 2014, he planted
nwith a tracked tractor instead of
da wheeled tractor, a switch that
eeliminated the wheel tracks all
gover the eld seen the previous
.year.
, More and more ights have
tconvinced this area farmer that
hdrones are here to stay. This
dthing is not that heavy, I can put
rin on the seat beside me in my
dpick-up, so it makes it easy to
euse. I see, with an improvement
tin technology, drones used to
espray elds in 10 or 15 years,
nbelieves Zieman, as he sees
tthe local coops purchasing
the bigger models for their
,businesses.
s He believes that local
shigh
schools,
especially
othe ag departments, should
be teaching their students
sabout drone use and drone
3

Page 13

technology. Learning about


drones and their applications to
farming might encourage these
students to not only become
more interested in farming, but
also with other agri-business
aspects dealing with drone use.
Its not all work, it is fun,
added Zieman, as he not only
plays with it around and outside
his house yard, but his ying
craft has also been used when
combining, the drone following
the combine and the grain carts.
When asked if there is a place
for its use by the local livestock
farmer, such as evaluating their
herds during calving, this crop
farmer does not think that it
would be as valuable of a tool.
He was asked by a neighbor to
nd a missing cow but could
not nd the animal due to the
heavy foliage from the trees
and underbrush. As Allamakee
and Clayton counties are
known for their concentration

of wooded hills, it appears for


now that drone use would not
be practical for that application.
If anyone is interested,
Zieman said he would be
happy to share his experiences
with his ownership of a drone.
He points to using the internet,
as he did, to learn more and
he directs interested parties to
one local area business, Three
Rivers Farm Service in Elkader,
that sells drones.
As drones become more
widely used in other farming
communities, more businesses
are
becoming
active
in
promoting and marketing this
technology as another tool to
use in farming. As Doug Zieman
discovered, this unmanned
ying vehicle has opened up
many possibilities that can
only multiply as the technology
improvements advance its
use into the next decade and
beyond.

Proudly serving the local


agricultural community
for more than 100 years.
563-544-4214 or 1-888-689-1898
www.newalbinsavingsbank.com
118 Main St. NE
New Albin, IA
Call Me for Your

CROP INSURANCE
NEEDS

For all your Precision Farming needs,


contact Three Rivers today!
Serving Clayton, Delaware
and Dubuque Counties

Services Include:
Grid Soil Sampling
Variable Rate
Recommendations
Application Maps
Crop Scouting Activity
Yield Maps and Data Collection
Yield Monitor Troubleshooting
And More
204 W. Newton St.
Edgewood, IA
Contacts:
Kyle Keehner
(563) 880-3097
Sam Wilson
(563) 580-6472

Page 14

March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15


Thank You Farmers
563-568-4170

JACK SWEENEY, BROKER


Licensed in IA & MN

Stacie Cooper, John Sweeney, Bonnie Sweeney, Broker Associates/Agents


Steve Evanson, Agent

www.sweeneyrealestate.com

We are all proud


to support the
farm families in
Allamakee County!

Your hard work and


dedication is appreciated.

Hacker, Nelson
& Co., P.C., CPAs
19 1st Ave. NW, Waukon, IA

563-568-4567

Adam
Kurth,
Owner

High Efficiency
Furnaces & Air
Conditioners
Geothermal
Radiant Floor
Kitchen &
Bathroom
Remodels

563-568-3680

Kelly

101 1st Ave. NW,

Waukon, IA

Farm Statistics
Per the U.S Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics
Service (NASS) 2012 Census of Agriculture (except where noted)
ALLAMAKEE COUNTY
1728 (per FSA 2/2015)
286 acres
289,164 acres

Number of Farms
Average Size of Farm
Land in Farms

LAND IN FARMS BY LAND USE

Cropland
Pastureland
Other (woodland, etc.)
Per farm average production expenses
Per farm average net cash income

PRINCIPLE OPERATORS
Male
Female

RACE OF PRINCIPLE OPERATORS

White
Spanish, Hispanic or Latino
Asian
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Black or African American
More than one race

STATE OF IOWA
88,637 (per NASS 2012)
345 acres
30,622,731 acres

64%
10.4%
25.3%
$170,769
$66,441

85.7%
6.2%
8.0%
$267,517
$110,329

924
87

81,529
7,108

1474
4
1
1
0
0
0

129,209
584
129
9
97
45
155

We Are Proud to Serve


Our Farming Families!
Your job takes dedication, skillful
management and a lot of hard work.

Thank You!
Residential
Agricultural
Commercial

Concrete
Construction

FREE

ESTIMATES!

Chad Kelly, Owner State Licensed & Fully Insured

Poured Foundations
& All Types of Flatwork
Waukon, Iowa

563-535-7649

We are dedicated to providing quality service.

Waukon Veterinary
Service
Large & Small Animals
605 Rossville Rd., Waukon IA 563-568-2487
Craig A. Phipps, DVM, Rodney A. Smed, DVM,
Ryan B. Hammell, DVM, Joe C. Adrian, DVM,
Darlene, Dale, Carrie, Joan, Kirsten and Bryce

March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15

FSA offers the use of


Microloans for unique
operating needs
The Farm Service Agency
(FSA) developed the Microloan
(ML) program to better serve
the unique nancial operating
needs of beginning, niche and
the smallest of family farm operations by modifying its Operating Loan (OL) application,
eligibility and security requirements. The program will offer
more exible access to credit
and will serve as an attractive
loan alternative for smaller
farming operations like specialty crop producers and operators of community supported
agriculture (CSA). These smaller farms, including non-traditional farm operations, often
face limited nancing options.
Microloans can be used for
all approved operating expenses as authorized by the FSA
Operating Loan Program, including but not limited to:
Initial start-up expenses;
Annual expenses such as
seed, fertilizer, utilities, land
rents;
Marketing and distribution
expenses;
Family living expenses;
Purchase of livestock,
equipment, and other materials
essential to farm operations;
Minor farm improvements
such as wells and coolers;
Hoop houses to extend the
growing season;
Essential tools;
Irrigation;
Delivery vehicles.
SIMPLIFIED
APPLICATION PROCESS
The application process for
microloans will be simpler, requiring less paperwork to ll
out, to coincide with the smaller
loan amount that will be associated with microloans. Requirements for managerial experience and loan security have
been modied to accommodate
smaller farm operations, beginning farmers and those with no
farm management experience.
FSA understands that there
will be applicants for the ML
program who want to farm but
do not have traditional farm
experience or have not been

Page 15

raised on a farm or within a


rural community with agriculture-afliated
organizations.
Microloan program applicants
will need to have some farm
experience; however, FSA will
consider an applicants small
business experience as well as
any experience with a self-guided apprenticeship as a means
to meet the farm management
requirement. This will assist
applicants who have limited
farm skills by providing them
with an opportunity to gain farm
management experience while
working with a mentor during
the rst production and marketing cycle.
SECURITY REQUIREMENTS
For annual operating purposes, microloans must be secured
by a rst lien on a farm property
or agricultural products having a security value of at least
100 percent of the microloan
amount, and up to 150 percent,
when available. Microloans
made for purposes other than
annual operating expenses
must be secured by a rst lien
on a farm property or agricultural products purchased with
loan funds and having a security value of at least 100 percent
of the microloan amount.
RATES AND TERMS
Eligible
applicants
may
obtain a microloan for up to
$50,000, which is a change
from $ 35,000. The repayment
term may vary and will not exceed seven years. Annual operating loans are repaid within
12 months or when the agricultural commodities produced are
sold. Interest rates are based
on the regular operating loan
rates that are in effect at the
time of the microloan approval
or microloan closing, whichever
is less.
MORE INFORMATION AND
ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA
Additional information on the
FSA microloan program may
be obtained at local FSA ofces
or through the FSA website at
http://www.fsa.usda.gov.

PEACE OF MIND
FOR AMERICAS FARMER
You will always worry about
the weather, but with FMH on
your side, you can have peace
of mind about the strength,
stability, and service of your
crop insurance company.

CALL YOUR FMH AGENT TODAY!

JANE REGAN
LESCHENSKY INSURANCE AGENCY

19 Allamakee St, Waukon, IA 52172


Office: 563-568-6347 Cell: 563-380-3635
jregan@leschenskyins.com leschenskyins.com
Farmers Mutual Hail Insurance Company of Iowa is an equal opportunity provider. 2015 Farmers Mutual Hail Insurance Company of Iowa. All rights reserved.

FULL SERVICE

Machine Shop
SMALL GAS ENGINES TO
LARGE DIESEL ENGINES

Complete
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Also providing a full-line of
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805 W. Main St., Waukon, IA


Ph. (563) 568-3481

Page 16

March 11, 2015

National Ag Day 3/18/15


Century and Heritage Farm
owners encouraged to apply
In an effort to help recognize
and maintain the efforts of sustaining family farms through
generations, Iowa Secretary of
Agriculture Bill Northey encourages eligible farm owners to
apply for the 2015 Century and
Heritage Farm Program. The
program is sponsored by the
Iowa Department of Agriculture
and Land Stewardship and the
Iowa Farm Bureau and recognizes families that have owned
their farm for 100 years in the
case of Century Farms and 150
years for Heritage Farms.
These awards are an opportunity to recognize the hard
work and commitment by these
families that is necessary to
keep a farm in the same family
for 100 or 150 years, Northey
said. If you consider all the
challenges and unexpected
obstacles each of them would
have had to overcome during
their life on the farm, it gives
you a greater appreciation of
the dedication and perseverance of each of the families being recognized.
Applications are available
on the Departments website
at www.IowaAgriculture.gov by
clicking on the Century Farm or
Heritage Farm link under Hot
Topics. Applications may also
be requested from Becky Lorenz, Coordinator of the Century and Heritage Farm Program
via phone at 515-281-3645,

email at Becky.Lorenz@IowaAgriculture.gov or by writing


to Century or Heritage Farms
Program, Iowa Department of
Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Henry A. Wallace Building, 502 E. 9th St., Des Moines,
IA 50319.
Farm families seeking to
qualify for the Century or Heritage Farms Program must
submit an application to the
Department no later than June
1, 2015. The ceremony to recognize the 2015 Century and
Heritage Farms is scheduled to
be held at the Iowa State Fair
Thursday, August 20.
The Century Farm program
began in 1976 as part of the
Nations Bicentennial Celebration and 18,328 farms from
across the state have received
this recognition. The Heritage
Farm program was started in
2006, on the 30th anniversary
of the Century Farm program,
and 736 farms have been recognized. Last year 344 Century
Farms and 86 Heritage Farms
were recognized.
Century and Heritage Farm
recognitions at the Iowa State
Fair are a great celebration of
Iowa agriculture and the families that care for the land and
produce our food, Northey
said. I hope eligible families
will take the time to apply and
then come to the State Fair to
be recognized.

Growing Better Every Day...


NATIONAL AG DAY MARCH 18

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