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Enhancing relationship value between

manufacturers and distributors through


personal interaction
Author(s):
Tho D. Nguyen (University of Economics, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and University of Western
Sydney, Sydney, Australia)
Trang T.M. Nguyen (Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam)
Citation:
Tho D. Nguyen, Trang T.M. Nguyen, (2011) "Enhancing relationship value between manufacturers and
distributors through personal interaction: Evidence from Vietnam", Journal of Management
Development, Vol. 30 Iss: 4, pp.316 - 328
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02621711111126800
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Acknowledgements:
The authors would like to thank Vo Duc Tho and Tran Thanh Tung for their assistance in data
collection and Nigel Barrett for his valuable comments on an earlier draft of the paper.
This research was funded by a grant from the TRIG Project, Vietnam Ministry of Education and
Training.
Abstract:
Purpose
Realizing the importance of personal interaction in business relationships between manufacturers
and distributors, this study aims to explore the role of personal interaction in relationship value, and
subsequently in distributor performance, in a transition market, Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach
A sample of 472 distributors in the south of Vietnam was surveyed to test the theoretical model.
Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings
It was found that personal interaction drives product support, information support, and delivery
performance perceived by distributors. In addition, product support, information support, and delivery
performance are key factors that nurture the value of relationships between manufacturers and
distributors. Finally, relationship value is a determinant of distributor performance.

Research limitations/implications
A key limitation of this study is the heavy reliance on the hypotheticodeductive approach. Business
relationships of firms in transitional economies, due to differences in cultures and economies, might
exhibit some differences in value drivers. An inductive approach may be a suitable alternative method
to explore relationship value and its determinants in transition economies like Vietnam.

Practical implications
The results of this study suggest that manufacturers should invest more time and efforts in personal
interaction with their key distributors to enhance the value of their relationships with those distributors.

Originality/value
This study is the first of its kind in Vietnam, which explores the role of personal interaction in
relationship value in Vietnam.

A management tool for developing the relationships between large purchasing organisations
and small ethnic minority suppliers
Author(s):
Nicholas Theodorakopoulos (Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham, UK)
Citation:
Nicholas Theodorakopoulos, (2013) "A management tool for developing the relationships between
large purchasing organisations and small ethnic minority suppliers", Journal of Management
Development, Vol. 32 Iss: 1, pp.113 - 126
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02621711311287071
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Abstract:

Purpose
The purpose of this paper is to scrutinise the characteristics of the relationship between large
purchasing organisations (LPOs) and ethnic minority suppliers (EMSs) engaging with supplier diversity
programmes and provide an assessment and developmental framework for such organisations.

Design/methodology/approach
Having considered an array of purchasersupplier relationship frameworks in relevant streams of
literature, the paper draws on Lamming et al.'s framework to advance a tool for assessing and
developing the relationship between LPOs and EMSs.

Findings
The submitted relationship assessment and development framework brings in sharp focus the
characteristics of the relationship between LPO and EMS, providing a systematic way to examine the
interorganisational context within which EMS development takes place.

Research limitations/implications
The framework submitted could signpost future research in this field, which should take a
longitudinal, processual approach. This is necessary to provide opportunities to examine the dynamics
underlying the development of potent LPOEMS relationships in a variety of settings, including
negative instances.

Practical implications
The paper has implications for corporate policy making and practice in this arena. Assessing the
potency of LPOsEMSs relationships by applying the proffered tool can help both parties engage with
supplier diversity, to develop fruitful relationships that enhance their competitiveness.

Social implications
The latter can have social implications, as EMSs often operate in and employ people from
disadvantaged communities.

Originality/value
The framework advanced in this article constitutes a novel tool that highlights the areas in which
LPOs and EMSs should channel their efforts, in order to develop a potent relationship between them,
which underpins the development of EMSs supply capabilities.

Distribution channel management: power


considerations

Author(s):
I.F. Wilkinson
Citation:
I.F. Wilkinson, (1996) "Distribution channel management: power considerations", International Journal
of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, Vol. 26 Iss: 5, pp.31 - 41
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09600039610757692
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Acknowledgements:
This article was first published in International Journal of Physical Distribution, Vol. 4 No. 1, 1973, pp.
415.
Abstract:
Deals with the nature and importance of power relations between firms in distribution channels.
Discusses the role of power in channel systems and considers factors which affect the use of power
and those which determine the results of such use. Summarizes several implications from the analysis
of interfirms management.

Alienation in the distribution channel: Conceptualization, measurement, and initial theory testing
Author(s):
John F. Gaski (Mendoza College of Business, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, USA)
Nina M. Ray (College of Business and Economics, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho, USA)
Citation:
John F. Gaski, Nina M. Ray, (2004) "Alienation in the distribution channel: Conceptualization,
measurement, and initial theory testing", International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics
Management, Vol. 34 Iss: 2, pp.158 - 200
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09600030410526941
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Acknowledgements:
An abbreviated version of this research appeared in The authors thank Shelby Hunt, Jim Wilcox, and
Roy Howell (Texas Tech University), John Burnett (University of Denver), Ravi Singh Achrol (West
Virginia University), Scott Maxwell (University of Notre Dame), and David Cole (Vanderbilt University)
for their various forms of assistance. Qi Lin and Hang Li of the Office of Information Technology,
University of Notre Dame, merit special recognition for technical work. Funding support was provided
by a grant from the Institute for the Study of Business Markets, Penn State University. Industrial
Marketing Management, Vol. 30, No. 2 (2001), pp. 20725. Reprinted with permission from Elsevier
Science.
Abstract:
Of all the social phenomena that have been investigated in the distribution channel context including
power, conflict, dependence, role performance, and opportunism one that has escaped attention until
now is alienation. Borrowing from traditional behavioral science and consumer behavior, the following
monograph defines the concept of distributor alienation and elaborates a method for its measurement.
After surviving a validation regimen, the measure is applied within the confines of a test of a theoretical

model. The results may provide a preliminary framework for a future structure of channel alienation
theory.

Strategically employing natural channels in an era of global marketing


Author(s):
David A. Griffith (PhD Candidate and Teaching Fellow, at the Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA.)
John K. Ryans (Bridgestone Professor of International Business and Professor of Marketing, at the
Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA.)
Citation:
David A. Griffith, John K. Ryans, (1995) "Strategically employing natural channels in an era of global
marketing", Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, Vol. 1 Iss: 4, pp.52 - 69
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/EUM0000000003892
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Abstract:
Explores the natural channel phenomena, i.e. the local or national channel which has evolved to serve
producer and consumer alike. Further, provides a descriptive construct which identifies the forces (or
elements) which influence channel design. Contends that a thorough understanding (and use) of the
natural channelwould enable a firm to enhance its strategic competitiveness. Proposes a series of
strategic managerial considerations which refocus channel design attention on the
natural channel concept.

Distribution Channel Relationships in Diverse Cultures


Author(s):
Sudhir H. Kale
Roger P. McIntyre
Citation:
Sudhir H. Kale, Roger P. McIntyre, (1991) "Distribution Channel Relationships in Diverse
Cultures",International Marketing Review, Vol. 8 Iss: 3
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02651339110004069
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Abstract:
One of the main functions of culture is division of labour among various actors in society. Since the
global environment is characterised by diverse and deeprooted cultural norms and value systems, the
nature of this division of labour across cultures should exhibit systematic
differences. Channels of distribution are primarily designed to facilitate division of labour,
and channel relationships should therefore reflect the underlying cultural tenets of society. Using
Hofstedes schemata to classify various national cultures, a series of propositions is generated on
how distribution channel relationships will vary across countries based on their positions on Hofstedes
four dimensions of culture.

Building Relationships in Distribution Channels


Author(s):
John L. Gattorna
Citation:
John L. Gattorna, (1991) "Building Relationships in Distribution Channels", International Journal of
Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, Vol. 21 Iss: 8, pp.36 - 39
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/EUM0000000000403
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Abstract:
Strategic partnering is a method of developing a relationship between two members of
a distribution channelbased on the growth of understanding, trust and shared information. It does not
rely on personal relationships between individuals but is initiated at the highest management levels
and becomes a part of the corporate structures concerned. The resulting development of integrated
marketing plans, joint strategies and tactics allows the partner organisations to develop and maintain
strategic fit between their capabilities and goals and their changing market opportunities. Electronic
data interchange technology confers direct benefits through lower transaction costs, faster response
times and more costeffective service to customers.

Selecting channels of distribution: a multistage process


Author(s):
Bruce Mallen (Faculty of Commerce, Sir George Williams University, Montreal, Canada)
Citation:
Bruce Mallen, (1996) "Selecting channels of distribution: a multistage process", International Journal
of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, Vol. 26 Iss: 5, pp.5 - 21
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09600039610757674
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Acknowledgements:
This article was first published in International Journal of Physical Distribution, Vol. 1 No. 1, 1970, pp.
506.
Abstract:
Explores the options available to a distributor in terms of the suitability of a channel of distribution with
regard to the companys product market characteristics. Presents guidelines for the construction of
a channelselection procedure.

Conflict and Satisfaction in an


Industrial Channel of Distribution
Author(s):
James R. Brown
Robert F. Lusch
Laurie P. Smith
Citation:
James R. Brown, Robert F. Lusch, Laurie P. Smith, (1991) "Conflict and Satisfaction in an Industrial
Channel of Distribution", International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, Vol. 21
Iss: 6, pp.15 - 26
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/EUM0000000000390
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Abstract:
A conceptual model was developed of distribution channel members manifest conflicts and their
satisfaction. From this model, hypotheses are generated, aimed at untangling the causal relationship
between these two constructs. Both a metaanalysis of previous research and this first longitudinal
study of distribution channelbehaviour in the aircraft industry in North America
of distribution channel behaviour uncovered a negative, contemporaneous relationship between
satisfaction and conflict. Empirical study in the channel for an industrial product found the effect
of channel member satisfaction over time to be mediated by the extent of manifest conflict. The impact
of manifest conflict was found to be mediated by the degree of channel member satisfaction. In other
words, channel member satisfaction and manifest conflict within the channel were both antecedents
and consequences of each other.
Keywords:
Aircraft industry, Canada, Industrial marketing, Research, USA, Distribution channels
Type:
Research paper
Publisher:
MCB UP Ltd

A typology of distribution channel systems:


a contextual approach
Author(s):
Keysuk Kim (Baruch College, City University of New York, New York, USA)
Gary L. Frazier (School of Business Administration, University of Southern California, Los Angeles,
USA)
Citation:
Keysuk Kim, Gary L. Frazier, (1996) "A typology of distribution channel systems: a contextual
approach",International Marketing Review, Vol. 13 Iss: 1, pp.19 - 32
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02651339610111326
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Acknowledgements:
The authors thank Jean Boddewyn, the editor, and two anonymous reviewers for providing valuable
comments on the previous versions of the manuscript.
Abstract:
The channels literature lacks a classification scheme for channel systems which can provide insights
to their development and management. Consideration of the channel context is essential in marketing
products or services in foreign markets. Develops a new taxonomy of channel systems based on
three channel contextual factors environmental uncertainty, valueadded in the downstream channel,
and replaceability of suppliers and discusses each cell in terms of the level of interfirm commitment.
The new taxonomy shows that the behavioural process varies with the channel context and high
commitment between channel members is appropriate only in certain channel contexts.
Keywords:
Channel management, Classification, Development, Marketing
Type:
Conceptual paperLiterature review
Publisher:
MCB UP Ltd