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Some Notes on plotinvs [Some Notes on Plotinus]

Author(s): J. H. Sleeman
Source: The Classical Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 3/4 (Jul. - Oct., 1926), pp. 152-154
Published by: Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Classical Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/635774
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SOME NOTES ON PLOTINVS.


EnneadI. 4. 3: Plotinus is arguing that happiness is fullness and completeness
of life, and continues, according to the MSS. (Volkmann's edition, p. 66, 1. 2o), o~Tm

v 068 EJ~aKT-ovTb dyaObv VrrapXOL,


ov8' ctXo 7T VJroKEl/EVOv aX.kaXOEv yEvdyLEov
Marc A and Miiller) Iv dyaOJ Erat. Mr. MacKenna
J,
r-apEtc acrb (or better
a-d
translates the last
'a life
no
substance called in from
yap

phrase by
needing
foreign
a foreign realm to establish it in good'; Ficinus by 'neque aliud quicquam aliunde
adueniens efficiet ut subiectum collocetur in bono.' Ficinus is undoubtedly right.
'b lrOKEtLiEVov means ' the subject,' which a few lines above (p. 66, 1. 4) has been
identified with the AoytK4\ (w. The passage should be corrected by writing
on
for rb VrOKE'L(EVOV.
dependent
7t
1rOKELVIVp,

Enn. I. 4. 8:

T0

yEvo6tEVov,
aLvo Kai El' 7~ ~V80V

Uoa' ~Xy dlwv


rwoX'

v
E$OOEV7rvOV7ros V

(p. 72, 1. 6).

i
O3OV

0
L#(;

oXXOv

vka/ArYjpt is marred
O7YYobeautiful
This
by
image

the absence of a verb. Kirchhoff and his successors, offended by KatL,


cast it out; but
it should rather be treasured as the relic of a lost original, K-aLra.
Enn. I. 8. 6:

4OTE KaL KaTa 7Tb


o' EV8073T0LXr/Et EVaV7'OV KTL 7b KaT OvOUlaV
7T K(7
owrlav avTroL (Kirchhoff for a)rqs) hvavirov (p. io6, 1. 17). Kirchhoff did not complete

the cure of this passage. A further change of one letter is required. For the
o'E80o
extremely awkward KaTa before Trb

read Ka04, ' as.

Enn. I. 8. 8: Matter makes everything its own that comes to it, Go-rep cv
a3.
I
VE
KVVELOV
EtvaL
KVvbS Kal trV
p
toEP 7pO(TE Cqk0EV,
Ka Xv/uO 7rVT7Esvrp Tro 8E6a/LVOv EKE&VOV (p. io8, 1. 20). For the last fourwords

rpock Vii

TO'C1

EV

KET

Kirchhoff suggests and Miller prints JrEp 7b86Ea[LEvov


'KEVO; Br6hier conjectures
for
We
and
should doubtless alter
translation.
an
impossible
wo-rEp
gives
nr'tp,
to
:
the
in
all
'
food
becomes
the
taken
juices belonging to that
o~p
...
nbrip

particular recipient.' A grammatical difficulty still remains. We must apparently


IroEd' to govern 7b d r(EEXONv
EtLVat(see the context),
supply something like 9`
/,)KE7L
ivir
and then understand 7b ELo-'E'EXv
with a'tLa
K.T.X.

yLVEroat

KVVb

Enn. II. 3. I2: Man is produced from the reason-principle of man, JXX''/3XkAa
7b (Volkmann r7) I~oyap r, arp-, aXXa ,rps 7b P3X7Lov
1-ore ) 4(~,kEXrooaotos
L 8' O7E 7rpb Tb XELpOV(oTVV7'ETEV(p. 143, 1. IO). This mustmean,as
Eo'7
0roUaKtL,
Mr.
MacKenna sees, that external circumstances, like the father, help or harm. But
the sense required is that the child is like the father, though external circumstances
may sometimes make him worse or better. Read therefore J/xotoyyap 7 rrarpt, and
compare III. i. 5, 7rot yo^v yovEGo-v b1/o0ot(p. 221, 1. 2), in a similar context.
Enn. II. 3. 14: Among influences producing physical strength Plotinus mentions
Ka
(p. '45, 1. II).
yovELdSEv b WporTov, E 7ra
7rS pa 7rv 7drovoV XE o7 OpLdVL Ki
EL
and Volkmann, following
for Eo-XEread rapE'oXE rt.y, Plotinus more
Vitringa,
Mailler

probably wrote

&

'if the locality was favourable, the climatic conditions

and the soil would Eo-xc:


help.'
(p. 146, 11.6 and 9).

Cp. XedpovE'GXEand

d-vtL7rpwl

E-XrIKoo7Sjust below

Enn. III. I. 6 : All creatures are produced by their own kinds, horse by horse,

man by man; o-rrw8?crvvepybs KLr


WIV7P
Opa701)
rbo7r1 0os yvo
LvoLV
o(ToVYXWPOTra
(p. 222, 1. 12): 'though the motion of the universe must co-operate, while allowing

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J. H. SLEEMAN

153

the chief influence to the objects produced.' This is nonsense; while Mr. MacKenna's
translation, ' a very powerful influence upon the thing brought into being,' assigns a
For
wrong meaning to o-vyXopoi3o-a
ytvop~vots, therefore, read 70oZ
-oEs
b -roXd.
yELvatEvogs, 'the parents.' Cp. III. 8. 4 (p. 335, 1. 3)
7ELva[VOWV (with v.1.
~-v
Ficinus
and
was
on the right track
2
1.
III.
29)
5.
270,
(p.
qj
YEtva/Lvhy.
ytvoptvwv)
with his 'concedens tamen genitoribus genitisque quam plurimum.' Similarly in
Twv yELvaLLvEV
III. I. 5 (p. 221, 1. 2), where the context is much the same,
" Tv
r-ap 7should be read for rrapa
Vitringa, yov'wv Volkmann).
p
yvotv&ov
(7Evvqoduvrowv

Enn. III. 2. 17: In describing the drama of the universe Plotinus points out
that the success of the performance depends upon each actor being set in his proper
place and speaking the words appropriate to it, even though his part be only to
'curse in darkness and Tartarus.' He continues (p. 249, 1. I7): KaL r SXkov70o70
0 o 1K t'OosEUE'fKaGTO,
E' T7V ?06YYOV Tv
aXX'
E13S
Kab6v
a'Va 'TOvEi'Epdo"LEVOS
lav
(TVVTEvXO
T
V Kl
what is the
But
pLovarV
ov;v, EXT770
Ka XEP&tKa

is a stone'? Plotinus, it
acLTEXETPaV.
point of saying ' this universe is good, not if the individual
is true, likes to contrast spiritual things with stones as examples of inanimate or
6 o8~v 80o;S AlOo LbEpo0LVOL
extended objects, e.g. III. I. 5 (p. 220, 1. 24),
t7'['v
VI.
6
1.
2.
(p. 306, 12), q xt0o3 (sc. 4
clvaL ;
q'vxlI); VI. 5- 11 (p. 395, 1. 27),
KaTaAE-EtL
EKELVOdKy
the contrast is entirely out of
.
.
S
Here,
however,
o'

Eo-TLV a Vlos.
-j
place. The meaning wanted is that the universal concert is good, 'not if each
performer is a supreme artist, but if each one contributes to the ensemblehis own life's

utterance, however imperfect.' We need not look far for a supreme artist whose
A change of one letter gives us
name might easily have been corrupted into
AOo. of him in Neo-Platonic literature,
Alvo3. Cp. Pausanias IX. 29. 6, and for a mention
Iamblichus, Vit. Pythag. 139.
T(l
Enn. III. 6. 13: craparrXo-Ttovtverar OOV KL&7E1
ELS KaTO77TpOV
El&oa
EVOp'TO
But
his
successors
alter
Kirchhoff
and
to
1.
keep EvopTro
(p. 301, I).
'vop-ro
Evop&rat.
and insert El, which is badly needed, before Els. Just below, in III. 6. 14, 86E rb
",XXo
pav xrapXov(p. 301, 1. 31), rj is clearly wrong, and Volkmann excises it. For
Ei,~ls

rd read rT,the need of which seems to be acutely felt by the translators.

Enn. III. 8. 8: vov^, which is an original unity become a plurality, I$dE[LAEV


EOEX27-L701170 3EV7Ep0V
yap E7EVETo

'V A;
cLV 7)
WT /3EXTLOV
cLVrtol7Eava EXELVEOEXO)V,

(p. 341, 1. 9). cs makes no sense. Kirchhoff, followed by the other editors, for ';
wrote Ed
1Kal, which gives the meaning, but is palaeographically an improbable
alteration. Why should we not write ? There would still remain point in ai~r,.
Had there been no unfolding of voV3, it might indeed have been better for vovs itself,

which would not have been degraded into a secondary; but the world below voVi
would never have existed at all. Just below, in the phrase PflEXT
OEV, XEIpwO
Eis

,EV
(p. 341, 1. 14), we should read Els & if it is desirable to make Plotinus write

grammatically.

"

27)LV
Enn. III. 8. 9: 7rp av Sro-crL^cva 7'7rwsO
olv7"
Tr, Ev
fpTo
oEv
(p. 342,
)L/OLup
1. 18). Kirchhoff and the rest alter wrpbs av to
wrp% s &. But how did the v come to
exist? It represents an original El, which indeed is needed to complete the
construction of the sentence. Reading rphs1 El, we get, 'if in reply to this question

we must indicate how it is possible (sc. to grasp the One), we shall answer "by what
is like it in ourselves."' For another case of the disappearance of El see VI. 8. 2
(p. 480, 1. 9), where I feel sure that Era

should be read.
oLyo-O-o'
Enn. IV. 4. 28: Plotinus has argued in IV. 4. 20 that the causes of desire are
KaL

<EL>

rTE

(p. 67, 1. 5), i.e. sensation and the next grade of soul or pseudo-soul, called

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o-Ios

SOME NOTES

154

ON PLOTINVS

which gives 'the vestige' of true soul to the body. Turning in IV. 4. 28 to the
consideration of bT OvLoEL~8, he asks whether it belongs to c-LtarTr7- oTovpwO~eVvr,
or
'
to a particular part of it, and also El &XXov roV70T70o 8vro;TSTo 'XVO~
7TOI
r vXLKbV
J al0T7TLKOV(p. 76, 1. 9), ' whether that
V
EvraLVaV rL oTro 0 Ov/Ads,o'KET7rapI 0VUtLLKOU~

which bestows the soul-trace is different, so that here we have this one distinct
before
thing, OvL6s,no longer deriving from the passionate or perceptive faculty.'
ivraiOa is excised by Miiller and Volkmann, but it doubtless conceals (v, a
The
'philosophical imperfect.' The real difficulty, however, lies in wrapi OVZLLKOD.
does not come from Tb OvtLKO6V
seems quite pointless
suggestion that perhaps Ovyud,
here. 6 Otvp 70To
in I. I. 5 (P. 43, 1. 11) does not help us, as the context there
Ov1L~LKO,
is different. For OvIULKOv
we must substitute UVTLKOD, which brings the passage into

accord with c. 20 and the whole course of Plotinus' argument. For he does indeed

hold that

Ov~s

is derived from

7Ob4VTCKdV.

See p. 76, 1. 31, EL raVrtd r~ psOV OVK EK

(wherehe is referringto argumentswhich


/vTLKOV Ka' yEVVqTLKOV
at firstsight militateagainsthis thesis); p. 77,1. 26, wrap&
70Tol
probablymeans ' both kinds of anger,'thoughFicinus
alb y
yvreOaL(where &rou
rendersby ' tam irascendiquam concupiscendifomes'); and p. 78, 1. 5, T S~ a
sc.
70Wo UTLKOVWpuiLqOpat,

Av aMyot
Tbv OvLbv

OcL
K.T.A.
/L7XELV6VI.LV K7irEp TO'
OVt3EL
0avctEalV
&vApaIL
E"XOVTa
*CVTKOZV

In the same chapter (p. 77, 1.5) occurs a very puzzling passage,('Tav) rcd TE

T
s
07lp'a
pog

T dopyg E
Kp-pdCoEL
oSEViojCJXOov
CAXXA
rpb~ b 8OK17qEV
XV/L'UVaOCaGL
Ficinus renders by ' item bruta ultra corporum compositiones ex eo duntaxat, Xwo-r.
quod

aliquis laesurus appareat, prorumpunt in iram.'

This implies

rpbh TransKpr EOur,

which may be what Plotinus wrote, though it involves the awkwardness of taking
I am
and the accusative.
XO'yo-first with the genitive and then with rp6Os
l
inclined to believe, however, that Plotinus wrote rpbs Tas Wpcpd$E ooV8EVb3 Xov,

TaSgpyg y

'animals are not enraged at the doings of anyone else, but at the prospect of danger
to themselves,' whereas human beings feel anger also vrip 6v av Kat (TEpd0 rTL TWv
79
(sc. r7X()
OXo3 7rp v 0Ov Tapa
a 7TbrpOOKOV~O (p. 76, 1. 27).
rpoGV/KvrovV
KaLt

J. H.

THE

ROYAL

HOLLOWAY

SLEEMAN.

COLLEGE.

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