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VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 1-1 (6/07) File Under Introduction Index of Bulletins

VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 1-1 (6/07) File Under Introduction

Index of Bulletins

Title

Form No.

Bulletin No.

Date

TAB 1 Introduction Index ……………………………………

SELD7003

VIMS 1-1

6/07

Bulletin Filing Instructions ……………

SELD7004

VIMS 1-2

5/06

Introduction …………………………….

SELD7005

VIMS 1-3

5/06

TAB 2 System and Implementation VIMS Features and Benefits ……………

SELD7006

VIMS 2-1

7/06

Effective Application by the Customer …

SELD7007

VIMS 2-2

5/06

Implementation Plan Development …….

SELD7010

VIMS 2-3

5/06

TAB 3 Training VIMS Training …………………………

TAB 4 Applications

SELD7011

VIMS 3-1

7/06

VIMS Frequently Asked Questions…….

AEXC0680

1/07

VIMS and Maintenance Management ….

SELD7019

VIMS 4-1

5/06

Troubleshooting with VIMS ……………

SELD7015

VIMS 4-2

5/06

Evaluating Operator Techniques………

SELD7017

VIMS 4-3

5/06

VIMS Data Application Guide………….

SELD7025

VIMS 4-4

5/06

TAB 5 Machine Signature Tests Off-Highway Truck Signature Test -

 
 

777

- 793 ……………………………

SELD7014

VIMS 5-1

6/06

Off-Highway Truck Signature Test -

 
 

797

…………………………………. SELD7026

VIMS 5-2

6/06

Wheel Loader Signature Test - 994AKIT & 994D ………………….

SELD7023

VIMS 5-3

5/06

Wheel Loader Signature Test - 992G ………………………………

SELD7027

VIMS 5-4

5/06

TAB 6 Appendix Getting Help and Reference Material …

SELD7008

VIMS 6-1

5/06

SELD7003-03

©2007 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 1-2 (5/06) File Under Introduction Bulletin Filing Instructions

VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 1-2 (5/06) File Under Introduction

Bulletin Filing Instructions

Periodically you will receive additional information about VIMS in the form of VIMS Bulletins. These bulletins should be filed in numeric sequence in this binder under the correct category. The bulletin number is located in the upper right-hand corner of each bulletin, as follows:

Bulletin No. 1-2

The first number is the category of the bulletin and indicates which TAB the bulletin should be filed under. Categories for the various tabs are:

TAB 1 - Introduction

TAB 2 - System and Implementation

TAB 3 - Training

TAB 4 - Applications

TAB 5 - Machine Signature Tests

TAB 6 - Appendix

The second number indicates the bulletin sequence in that particular category. Bulletin 1-2 should be filed as the second bulletin under TAB 1.

Bulletins are dated for replacement purposes. For instance, if the information in Bulletin No. 1-2 (5/06) becomes obsolete, it will be replaced by a new bulletin with a later date listed at

SELD7004-02

the top right-hand corner of the front page of the bulletin as in the following example:

Bulletin No. VIMS 1-2 (5/06)

Replaces VIMS 1-2 (5/96)

Information supplementing a bulletin already in existence will use a point number (for example, Bulletin 1-4.1 (5/06). This will allow the supplementary bulletin to be filed next to the original bulletin even though there may already be a Bulletin 1-5, Bulletin 1-6, etc.

You will periodically receive an updated index that will include any new bulletins issued since the last update.

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 1-3 (5/06) File Under Introduction Introduction Purpose of

VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 1-3 (5/06) File Under Introduction

Introduction

Purpose of Guide

Identify customary information and training resources that are available. Address the technical aspects of VIMS, its uses and its support. Address new issues concerning the dealer's involvement in day-to-day maintenance and production management that are not likely to be addressed in the traditional training materials. Direct attention to VIMS implementation and application factors that require special planning.

training materials. Direct attention to VIMS implementation and application factors that require special planning.
training materials. Direct attention to VIMS implementation and application factors that require special planning.

TAB I - Introduction

This section contains an index of bulletins found in the guide with a list of reference documentation, bulletin filing instructions and this introductory bulletin.

TAB 2 - System and Implementation

An overview of VIMS features and benefits is presented first. Next, information on areas of special planning on which the dealer should focus to ensure that the customer receives maximum benefit from VIMS is provided. Lastly, issues that must be addressed by dealers in order to sell,

SELD7005-02

prepare the customer to use and customize VIMS, and to support specific customer needs.

TAB 3 - Training

This section identifies training resources for effective day-to-day use of VIMS.

TAB 4 – Applications

This section details the integration of VIMS with maintenance management practices, the use of VIMS data for troubleshooting problems, and provides the latest information available on using VIMS data.

TAB 5 - Machine Signature Tests

This section defines model specific machine signature tests to be run at start- up and at prescribed intervals thereafter. These tests enable the user to determine machine-operating parameters at start-up and for later trend analysis in determining operating performance.

TAB 6 - Appendix

This section contains valuable supplementary information and worldwide communication paths for supporting VIMS.

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS ™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 2-1 (7/06) File Under System and Implementation

VIMS APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 2-1 (7/06) File Under System and Implementation

VIMS Features and Benefits

Intended Audience:

Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Project Manager located at customer job site Dealer Shop and Field Service personnel

Product Support personnel Dealer Project Manager located at customer job site Dealer Shop and Field Service
Product Support personnel Dealer Project Manager located at customer job site Dealer Shop and Field Service
Product Support personnel Dealer Project Manager located at customer job site Dealer Shop and Field Service

Introduction

Caterpillar VIMS provides operators, maintenance and engineering with vital machine health and production information on Cat 992 and 994 Wheel Loaders, 777D, 785, 789, 793 and 797 Off Highway Trucks.

VIMS Product Description

Caterpillar VIMS is an advanced diagnostic and equipment management tool designed to lower machine operating costs. By continuously monitoring a wide range of vital machine functions, this high-tech electronic monitoring system improves machine availability, machine component life and productivity while reducing both repair costs and the risk of catastrophic failure.

VIMS is designed to work on Cat wheel loaders and haul trucks in the rugged, high-utilization mining environment. By integrating numerous machine sensors into each machine design, VIMS monitors over 250 machine functions and machine health statistics around the clock. VIMS accomplishes this by sensing out-of-spec conditions that are displayed for the operator in an in-cab message center. Depending on the severity of the problem, VIMS sends warning messages to the operator and recommends an appropriate course of action.

Not only does VIMS provide important machine and system data, it also stores a large of amount of data about the machine for efficient system monitoring. This helps service personnel quickly review a history of past and potential problems to expedite the maintenance and troubleshooting process.

By providing operators, maintenance and engineering with vital machine health and production information, VIMS can help lower machine operating costs, improve equipment utilization, and ultimately help customers achieve the lowest cost-per-ton.

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In addition to providing on-line information to the operator during an event, VIMS documents events and stores vital machine data that can be used by maintenance or engineers to analyze and forecast problems. VIMS categorizes and stores information into seven different categories: event list, event recorder, data logger, trends, cumulatives, histograms, and payload information. This data can be accessed through the message center, transmitted via optional radio, or downloaded for detailed analysis. VIMS software creates useful reports and charts to help supervisors and managers understand equipment utilization and performance.

Key Features

• Monitors key pressures, temperatures, fluid levels, speeds and operating conditions.

• Analyzes and stores information from the machine's engine, power train, hydraulics, steering and brakes.

• Records and presents prognostic data to optimize scheduling of maintenance and repair.

• Displays information for the operator and service technician.

• Uses a three-level warning system for early indication of potential problems.

• Includes a data logger for troubleshooting, performance testing and trending.

• Features an event recorder to automatically capture detailed information and determine the cause of significant problems

• Downloads data to an off-board computer for additional analysis and reports.

Key Benefits

• Improved Operator Information

• Faster Service Diagnostics

• Off-board Computer Analysis of Information

• Improved Information Access

• Real-Time Access to Data

• Self-Diagnostic

• Preventative Maintenance Analysis

• Saves Time

• Compatible with Telemetry Equipment

Recorded Data

Event

The event list is a record of all of the events/diagnostics that have occurred on the machine. The event list will retain the last 500 machine and system events in chronological order. The list of events/diagnostics can be retrieved using the VIMSpc off-board software. The event list report provides the date, time and service meter reading when the event began, event duration, operator ID, parameter ID, parameter value at limit, warning category and number of times operator acknowledged the event.

Data Logger

The Data Logger is used to capture real- time machine data similar to the event recorder, but is initiated by the operator or service technician. When the system is running, data is collected from all of the VIMS parameters at a sampling rate of once per second. Up to 30 minutes of data can be stored, which can be retrieved from the machine using a laptop computer.

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VIMSpc software can be used to graph and analyze the data. Parameters such as engine rpm, brake pressures, cylinder pressures, and gear information help show how the machine was performing. Machine data recorded by the data logger is useful when troubleshooting intermittent machine problems.

Snap Shots

VIMS includes an on-board event recorder, similar to a flight data recorder that stores machine/sensor data following an event. The system activated event recorder creates a snapshot of data from five minutes prior to the event to one minute afterwards. VIMS automatically links an event record to serious diagnostic events for analysis. This feature is useful for collecting data, troubleshooting and diagnosing unpredictable problems.

Prognostics

VIMS automatically collects data that can be useful in understanding machine use. Trends show minimum, maximum and average values for specific parameters over time. Cumulatives show number of occurrences of specific events over the life of the machine. Histograms show the percentage of time a parameter's value is in a specified range and documents the history of a parameter over the life of the machine.

Examples of prognostics included:

• Trends - maximum or average brake temperature per hour.

• Cumulatives - total engine revolutions, total fuel consumed, or total time in first gear forward.

• Histograms - average/maximum engine rpm, fuel rate, machine speed, oil pressure and payload distribution.

Payload

The VIMS payload system provides productivity data to enhance truck loading tool effectiveness while improving fleet production. The loader payload system records loader identification, date, time, bucket payload, weight, number of passes, material, and truck identification. The truck payload system utilizes strut pressure technology for accurate payload measurement. The truck system stores up to 2400 payload cycles, cycle times, distance, time, and date of each payload cycle. External lights on the sides of Cat trucks signal the loading tool operator when the truck is full. Optional payload displays can also be fitted that allows loading tool operators to view total tonnage loaded.

Additional VIMS Features

Road Analysis Control (RAC)

RAC is an onboard information technology product designed to measure and benchmark haul road quality. Integrated with VIMS, RAC measures component loading and impact shock, communicates that data to the operator, and to the mine office in real time via a radio network. For trucks equipped with GPS technology, coordinates can be identified and broadcast to support equipment, and maintenance vehicles via radio. Through VIMSpc, RAC provides data and reports, which enable mine managers to quantify, monitor and manage haul road severity to increase truck life and reduce cost per ton of material moved.

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Maximum Payload Speed Manager (MPSM)

MPSM compares the actual payload weight on the machine to an overload setting. When VIMS has determined that the machine is overloaded, limiting the shift range of the transmission slows the machine down and the engine speed is reduced at the limited gear. The payload weight is monitored as the machine shifts to second gear. The MPSM will activate the overload events when the weight of the payload exceeds the set limit regardless of the location of the truck. This behavior will remain active until the payload is dumped and the weight of the payload is cleared.

Ton Kilometer Per Hour/Ton Mile Per Hour (TKPH/TMPH)

TKPH is a measure used by tire manufacturers to “rate” the ability of their tires to carry a load over a period of time. If the TKPH value for a particular tire is exceeded, the tire overheats causing reverse vulcanization that can lead to tire separation. The Caterpillar TKPH Monitor resides within the onboard VIMS. This feature constantly monitors the real time TKPH value and report/instructs the operator if the value has been exceeded. This functionality only exists on machines with version 4.0 hardware and is utilizing version 10.5 or newer of the onboard software. The feature was designed with the adjustability for different applications, manufacturers and customer requests.

Machine (Onboard) System

The VIMS machine system is fully integrated and comprised of modular electronics that have the ability to collect

data, perform analysis, and store and display information. These electronic modules communicate with each other to control and synchronize machine systems, to monitor vital machine statistics and alert the operator of abnormal machine conditions.

The machine system consists of:

• VIMS Main Module

• Gauge Cluster Module

• Message Center Module

• Keypad

• Warning Lamps

• Action Alarms

• Sensors and Switches

• Control System Modules and Sensors (i.e. Engine, Transmission, Brakes, etc.)

The primary function of the VIMS portion of the machine system is to:

collect data, monitor machine events, store information, interface with operator and maintenance, interface with the office system, and initialize the system at start-up. Data from the machine system is transmitted through the Cat Data Link. Each module has two communication paths that allow VIMS to continue operating even if one link becomes inoperable.

Machine System Features:

• The Onboard VIMS Module resides on the Cat Datalink, which is tied to all other machine ECM’s.

• Monitors over 250 machine functions and machine health statistics around the clock.

• Provides Active Events and Payload information out to a dispatch system. (Minestar)

• Provides an Operator Interface, which has 3 levels of warnings

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when a condition has exceeded the specified limit. Depending upon the warning, the system can also provide a recommendation to the operator.

Data Storage

• System and Maintenance Events ---- timestamps occurrence, worst-case value and duration of the event.

• Snap Shots ---- captures all parameters 5 minutes prior to and 1 minute after a critical event.

• Data Logger ---- captures 30 minutes of all parameters. (Manually activated)

• Histograms ---- average/maximum engine rpm, fuel rate, machine speed, oil pressure and payload distribution.

• Trends ---- maximum brake temperature per hour, or average air filter restriction per hour.

• Cumulatives ---- total engine revolutions, total fuel consumed, or total time in first gear forward.

• Payload ---- cycle times, tons, distance traveled, fuel used per cycle.

Off-Board System

VIMSpc

VIMSpc is a single machine software solution supplied with each new machine and available for all VIMS equipped machines. VIMSpc software is an advanced diagnostic and machine management tool designed to assist in the evaluation and management of

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machine health, performance, and productivity. Events stored in VIMS provide service personnel with a broad overview of operator and machine performance. Checked at regular intervals, VIMS information enables service personnel to quickly view a history of past and potential problems, expediting maintenance and troubleshooting. Faster more efficient diagnostics mean less repair time and increased machine availability - reducing overall cost and keeping the machine productive.

VIMS Supervisor

The VIMS Supervisor Software provides custom fleet production and maintenance reports by extracting data from the VIMSpc database. The user-friendly architecture provides the functionality to filter and sort Event, Payload, and Trend data in order to create dynamic reports that target the needs of the customer.

Office System Features:

• User-friendly browser style interface.

• All functionalities are provided on one screen thus eliminating the need for menus to navigate.

Office System Benefits:

• The VIMSpc database is utilized to provide data for customized reporting.

• Single Machine or Fleet reporting capability.

• Application Management.

• Provides to the tools to manage the 10/10/20 Payload Policy.

• Maintenance and Production analysis.

• Advanced report sorting capability.

• Windows based application.

• Customizable with Dealer Logo.

Value

For the Operator

VIMS establishes a two-way communication between the operator and the machine. Real-time machine information allows the operator to make informed decisions that directly affect their safety, machine availability and ultimately the productivity of the mine.

VIMS coaches the operator to improve machine performance and productivity. VIMS informs the operator when an event occurs, and has the intelligence to determine the severity of the event. VIMS recommends an appropriate course of action, taking the guesswork out of knowing when to change the operation of the machine or shut it down. This information keeps the operator productive while reducing the risk of catastrophic failure.

VIMS also provides real-time payload information to truck and loading tool operators to help maximize productivity. Access to payload data eliminates under loading, which reduces productivity, and overloading, which produces slower cycle times and increases wear on tires, rims and other machine components.

For Maintenance

VIMS stores events for future analysis. This information gives maintenance personnel a broad overview of operator and machine performance, allowing them to expedite the maintenance and troubleshooting process. VIMS

communicates to maintenance technicians the data necessary to maximize component life, reduce catastrophic failures, minimize unscheduled downtime and improve a mine's asset management.

The Event Recorder provides historical data before and after an event, which can be used to diagnose and prevent future failures. Event records provide maintenance personnel with vital information that allows a machine's repair needs to be reviewed prior to scheduled Preventative Maintenance, significantly reducing downtime.

The VIMS Data Logger is a maintenance technician’s built-in diagnostic tool kit. The Data Logger works while the machine stays productive and saves man-hours that would have otherwise been spent tracking and diagnosing a problem.

The Data Logger is also a powerful tool for monitoring haul road and underfoot conditions. Rack and pitch information can be used to justify haul road maintenance, maximizing production and machine availability.

VIMS software communicates important machine data and trends. By analyzing trends and identifying problems before failure, maintenance personnel can more accurately plan machine maintenance and resources. VIMS software also gives maintenance greater control over fleet management, improving overall machine availability and productivity.

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For Production

VIMS is more than a communications device between operator and machine. By integrating the machine systems with the office systems, production managers have access to reports that can be used as the basis for more intelligent analysis and more informed decision-making. VIMS reports can identify areas for improvement in repair planning, operator training, site planning, machine health, and personnel performance.

By studying payload data, a production manager can determine equipment usage, future machine requirements, personnel performance and productivity levels. Payload information can also be

used as an accounting tool, an indicator of cycle time efficiency and truck overloading or under loading.

The Data Logger records important data, such as cycle times, speed, strut pressures and braking trends, which can help production managers plan for haul road maintenance. Improvements to haul roads can ultimately improve component life, reduce tire costs, and increase fleet productivity.

Ultimately, VIMS reports give production managers the information they need to run a mine more efficiently and achieve the lowest cost per ton.

Truck Costs Vs Application

 

Wheel Gp/Diff

Tire

Engine

Production

Fuel

Cost/Hr

Cost/Hr

Cost/Hr

Cost/Hr

Payload

Increase

Significant

Increase

Very

Insignificant

Change

 

Insignificant

Change

Significant

Increase

Slight Increase

Haul Road

Resistance

Very

Significant

May or May Not Be Significant

May or May Not Be Significant

Significant

Decrease

Significant

Decrease

Increase

Increase

Haul Road

Very

May or May Not Be Significant

     

Grade

Significant

No Change

No Change

No Change

Increase

Increase

 

May or May Not Be Significant

Very

 

Significant

Decrease

Insignificant

Change

Haul Road

Degradation

Significant

Increase

No Change

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SELD7006-02

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS ™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 2-2 (5/06) File Under System and Implementation

VIMS APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 2-2 (5/06) File Under System and Implementation

Effective Application by the Customer

Intended audience:

Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Service personnel

Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Service personnel
Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Service personnel
Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Service personnel

Introduction

This bulletin enables dealers and their customers to benefit from use of the Caterpillar VIMS by describing some of the issues that should be addressed to ensure that VIMS capability is effectively presented and utilized.

VIMS is much more than an advanced vehicle monitoring system. For the customer to receive maximum benefit, the dealer must know what VIMS is and what VIMS isn't, clearly present this to the customer, and then assist in the integration of VIMS into the customer's existing management systems (production and maintenance).

VIMS Capability

Large machinery owners have tremendous capital invested in their equipment. To protect their investment, they need to manage and improve the owning and operating costs of their machines.

VIMS is an advanced machine management and diagnostic tool

designed to help the customer evaluate and manage machine health and performance.

VIMS monitors the machine's key vital signs and provides warning and action messages to the operator using a display in the cab. VIMS also saves a record of this information so that a service technician can recall it later to diagnose any reported problems. This information is also available by downloading into a laptop computer. VIMS will give early warning of problems for improved scheduling of downtime and faster diagnosis of problems. Effective use of this capability will result in increased machine availability and improved equipment management.

In addition to machine vital signs, VIMS also maintains payload data in a manner consistent with current Truck Payload Monitoring System (TPMS) methodologies. This data can be viewed onboard or downloaded and analyzed later off board.

For a more detailed description of VIMS capability and application of this capability, see the VIMS Bulletins filed under:

1. TAB 3 Training

2. TAB 4 Applications

3. TAB 5 Machine Signature Tests.

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VIMS Limitations

Because VIMS is comprehensive and provides a considerable amount of information to both maintenance management and production, it is easy to characterize VIMS as able to provide any information, reports, or data the customer could need or want. This oversimplification should be avoided to prevent false customer expectations.

Additionally, there is a tendency among software users (VIMS is both hardware and software) to expect that minor changes or modifications to suit a particular need, can be accommodated with little trouble or cost. VIMS is a complex and sophisticated product. Changes to VIMS hardware or software will be complex, costly to make and, if custom versions proliferate, difficult to support and update. The impact of potential changes to VIMS should not be underestimated.

By being aware what VIMS is capable of, and by being specific about its features, customer expectations will better match the system capabilities.

Special Planning

To help ensure the customer receives maximum benefit from the VIMS system, it is recommended that the dealer do some special planning to cover specific customer needs. These needs can be outlined chronologically as:

1. Point of sale - Computer and training requirements

2. Before delivery - Initial training plan development

3. At delivery - Implementation training

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4. After initial usage – Additional training needs

5. After six months usage - Fine-tuning.

Many of these common needs are discussed in more detail in VIMS Bulletin 2-3, lmplementation Plan Development.

As the implementation plan is developed, reference should be made to the material filed under the following sections:

1. TAB 3 Training

2. TAB 4 Applications

3. TAB 5 Machine Signature Tests.

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS ™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 2-3 (5/06) File Under System and Implementation

VIMS APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 2-3 (5/06) File Under System and Implementation

Implementation Plan Development

Intended audience:

Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Mining Machines personnel

Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Mining Machines personnel
Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Mining Machines personnel
Dealer Sales personnel Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Training personnel Dealer Mining Machines personnel

Introduction

This bulletin enables dealers to develop a timely VIMS implementation plan for customers. It discusses some of the important issues that should be addressed from the point of sale through the first one or two thousand hours of machine usage.

It is important that the customer derive maximum benefit from VIMS. To help ensure that this will occur, the dealer should develop an implementation plan specific for each customer. Each customer's background and needs will be somewhat different, and thus it is imperative that the dealer has a good knowledge of the customer’s production and maintenance management routines and procedures. This understanding will enable the dealer to formulate an implementation plan that will directly address customer needs.

Development of this plan should appropriately begin at the point of sale and should identify training and other product support needs from delivery up

through the first one or two thousand hours of machine usage.

Point of Sale Issues

Computer Hardware and Operating System

The VIMSpc (off-board software) requires a PC platform and Windows environment for data collection and manipulation. Whoever (the customer, the dealer or both) is going to be working with VIMS needs adequate computer hardware.

Data collection requires a portable PC with the VIMS software installed. This computer will be used to download data from the machine, merge data files and copy files to disks for others who will be working with the downloaded data. It may also be used for data analysis such as graphing data logger or event recorder (snap shot) information.

Data manipulation requires a PC (either portable or desktop) with Windows, a mouse, printer, and VIMSpc software. Data manipulation requires time, processing speed, and adequate hard drive capacity. These should be factors used in determining if this perhaps should be a dedicated computer.

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If not currently available, the customer should be encouraged to procure computer hardware and software that will be suitable for use with the VIMS equipped machines. The computer system should to be available and in running condition by the time the VIMS equipped machines are delivered.

It may even be beneficial for the dealer to include computer hardware, software, and basic computer training in the machine sales proposal. By using this approach, the dealer can help ensure that adequate computer capability is available in a timely manner for use with the VIMS machines.

Software Training

The user of VIMS software needs a thorough understanding and/or training on Windows, the use of the mouse for navigation, and training on the VIMS software itself.

For those downloading data from the machine, knowledge must include file manipulation techniques (copy, move, rename, delete, etc.) and the relationship of the root directory and subdirectories. It is also important to understand what takes place (how the various files are handled) when VIMS is downloaded from the machine to the PC and the onboard system is reset.

Circumstances will dictate if the sales proposal should include computer hardware, software, and software training as part of the package. Regardless of whether this is included in the sales proposal or not, the customer should understand the need to have software training prior to delivery of the VIMS machines.

Management Training Requirements

A machine, or a fleet, with VIMS must

be supported with training on several levels. Dealers and districts are accustomed to training for operators, maintenance (servicing) people, and mechanics. VIMS requires that the customer's management level people also be trained -- at least on what information VIMS can provide and in what form it will reach them. It is important to recognize that working with and/or training customer supervision and management people may be a new experience and require training resources beyond what have been normal in the past. Being aware of this at the time of a sales proposal will make for a more complete offering.

Data Access & Usage

A question may arise about who owns

VIMS data (the customer or the dealer)

and what they can be allowed to do with it. This question needs to be examined, and an understanding reached, as early

as possible.

VIMS data can be generally put into one

of two categories -- production data and

machine or system data. The machine and system data is used to identify problems or faults. This early identification allows problems or potential problems to be corrected with little impact on downtime or cost. Customers generally have no problem

allowing the dealer or Caterpillar access

to this data.

Production data can be another story. Some customers may be sensitive about

protecting the confidentiality of this data

or the information that can be learned

from it. Should this be the case, the

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dealer may have to develop methods or procedures that will ensure protection of the customer's interests.

In some situations, VIMS data may

reveal problems with the application or operator technique. When this occurs, care must be exercised to approach the situation in a positive and constructive way. Apprehension over VIMS becoming a "spy" can be overcome with good communication and a thoughtful approach.

Every effort should be made by the dealer to emphasize to the customer the value of sharing this production data in the interest of improving overall fleet performance, availability, and operational costs. The customer needs to understand that even production data that is not currently logged by VIMS may also be of value by enabling a more complete analysis of a customer's fleet.

A closely related issue is establishing

who (which individual) will connect the laptop PC to the machine to download the data and reset the onboard system. Experience has shown that it is best to have only one person designated to do the downloading. It will generally be necessary, however, to have at least one person per shift who can download data and reset the on-board system. If more than one person downloads data, close coordination and good communication must take place between those involved.

Support Requirements

It is not possible to anticipate every

possible sales support requirement or contractual agreement that might arise. However, it should be recognized that VIMS would require additional training for those involved in after sales support including data collection, review, and analysis. It should also be recognized

that VIMS offers considerable potential as a contract management tool.

The purpose of developing an implementation plan is to assist the customer in deriving maximum value from VIMS early in the use of the machine(s). If the customer effectively integrates VIMS capability with good fleet management practices, the cost for a dealer to provide a support agreement should be reduced. VIMS record of the machine's key vital signs and warning messages can be used by maintenance personnel for improved scheduling of downtime and faster diagnosis of problems.

Before Delivery – Training Plan Development

Internal Training

The introduction of VIMS equipped machines into a new territory is going to result in some new training requirements as well as modifications to existing efforts. The dealer's training instructor and operator trainer are going to have to plan and allow time for their own training. They also need to be aware of new methods and techniques that should be utilized when they begin working with the customer.

Even the most capable and experienced of mechanics are going to have to be trained on things unique to VIMS usage. If a mechanic is going to be involved in downloading and initially analyzing the VIMS data, the need for training on the computer hardware and software will have to be provided before the work associated with machine delivery crowds everything else off the schedule.

Prior to machine delivery, the role of dealer management, specifically

3

involvement in VIMS support or analysis, should be established and factored into the training plan. Logic and efficiency dictates combining training classes as much as possible. Conducting combined VIMS classes for internal and customer people should be considered.

Customer Training

Much of the information gathered in the sales negotiation process will provide the basis for training plan development. One of the issues that needs to be addressed is the extent to which machine operators, maintenance mechanics, and supervisors will be involved with VIMS.

For example, depending on the customer's philosophy and normal practices, the operator may be expected to either:

Operate correctly and monitor the warning system; Or, be actively involved in helping solve problems (such as query the system through the keypad) when a warning occurs.

Or, be actively involved in helping solve problems (such as query the system through the keypad)

The training requirements for these two options are different. The same applies to mechanics and supervisors if they are to be involved with VIMS.

Another issue is whether the VIMS equipped machines are new to the customer or the work location. If the machines are new to the customer's people, training related to VIMS may be delayed until after the machine and machine systems have been covered.

The availability of a simulator will have a great impact on the training effort. As the number of people to be trained increases, the suitability of using an actual machine decreases.

Parts Support Planning -- VIMS Unique Parts and Tools

Because of the importance of VIMS in providing key production and maintenance data, certain parts and tools should be ordered and on hand when VIMS units are put into service.

At Delivery -- Implementation Training

Operator Training

VIMS as a Warning and Communication System

In general, the first priority for operator training is to cover the material necessary to get the machine safely into production, and as soon as possible. The training plan should have identified the timing and extent of VIMS training that will be added to the customary operator training.

As a minimum requirement, all operators, supervisors, and dispatchers should be trained on VIMS warning features and capabilities. They will need to recognize the difference between machine event and system event warnings. For machine events, the operators will need to recognize and understand the three warning levels and be instructed on how to react to information on the communication panel. How the customer expects the operator to report the different level warnings needs to be covered.

VIMS as a Problem Management Tool

Depending upon the customer's expectations for operator involvement in problem identification, it may be necessary to instruct him on the use of the keypad. Typically the keypad would

4

be used for turning on the data logger or event recorder or for viewing the data or fault codes after an event is displayed.

Maintenance Personnel Training

Problem Identification

The anticipated level of maintenance personnel involvement with the machines and with VIMS will determine the scope of training. It is likely that maintenance personnel will need training on how to scroll through the event list by using the keypad.

Preventative Maintenance Planning

Many operations expect to review the VIMS data a few days before the machine is scheduled for PM. This is done to help in planning the parts and manpower resources that will be needed when the machine is in the shop for PM.

Management Training

Once the machine begins to generate real information (perhaps even before it gets into full production), management's interest in training will increase dramatically. Hopefully, the training plan will have anticipated the needs and resources available to meet them.

Initial Data Usage

Verify Proper Operation

As soon as the machine is assembled and operational, verify that the most current source and configuration codes are installed. Also, use VIMS to verify proper operation of machine systems and of the wiring, sensors, and electronic controls.

5

Note:

Refer to VlMS Bulletins filed under TAB 5 (Machine Signature Tests) for specific information on how to set up, run, and analyze signature tests.

Develop Machine Signature Data

By conducting some standardized tests, it is possible to establish and record a machine signature. At some future date, the tests can be repeated, perhaps every 2000 smu, and the data compared with the original run. This should identify degradation in system performance that might otherwise be undetectable -- until it is too late.

Some machine specific standardized tests have been documented to assist in recording a machine signature. More tests and associated analysis techniques will be written as their value is demonstrated. These additional tests will then be documented in either updated VIMS Bulletins or new application VIMS Bulletins.

Stationary Tests

Stationary tests (with the machine running but not moving) should be relatively easy to duplicate at some future date. The test conditions should be carefully documented so the tests can be alike as possible. Record the ambient temperature, the lubricant and the fuel specifications.

The VIMS Bulletin for the specific machine describes recommended stationary vehicle tests that should be run. Analysis methods are also discussed that can be used to ensure that the machine is operating at a normal performance level.

Review Training Effectiveness

As the machine logs its first one or two thousand hours of usage, keep track of the problems and situations that come up that indicate the need for additional training. Factor these situations into future training plans as well.

SELD7010-02

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 3-1 (7/06) File Under Training VIMS Training For

VIMS™ APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 3-1 (7/06) File Under Training

VIMS Training

For basic VIMS related training, please use the VIMS Training CD media

[SERV7041].

For advanced VIMS related training, please contact your Regional Mining Representative for details on available training.

For all VIMS inquires please work through the Dealer Solution Network or contact the VIMS Product Support Hotline at 1-800-290-1808 within the U.S. or 1-309-675-6229 outside U.S.

For general knowledge, retrofit options, and marketing type information; please refer to the following media:

VIMS General Product Brochure:

AEXC0681

VIMS Frequently Asked Questions (included within this guide):

AEXC0680

VIMS Guardian Info Sheet:

AEXC0659

VIMS 777D Info Sheet:

AEXC0658

VIMS Communicator Info Sheet:

AEXC0692

VIMS 4.0 Upgrade 68K to ABL:

AEXC0693

VIMS Case Study – Mining Operations, Western Australia:

AEXC0694

VIMS Case Study – Koolyanobbing Mine Rail Facility:

AEXC0684

VIMS Case Study – Foundation Coal West:

AEXC0683

VIMS Resource Kit:

AEXC0682

SELD7011-02

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

Q

VIMS

&

A

SYSTEM

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q VIMS ™ & A SYSTEM FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

OVERVIEW

What is the VIMS system?

It is an integrated system that monitors, records and reports all aspects of machine performance and health. It provides critical information to operators, production and operations staffs and maintenance teams. This information can be used to enhance safety, productivity and availability while lowering cost per ton.

productivity and availability while lowering cost per ton. How does the system work? The electronic sensors
productivity and availability while lowering cost per ton. How does the system work? The electronic sensors
productivity and availability while lowering cost per ton. How does the system work? The electronic sensors

How does the system work?

The electronic sensors and control systems on Cat equipment generate hundreds of signals while a machine works, each an indication of the product’s performance and health. The VIMS system captures that data and makes it available for operators, production staff and maintenance teams. The main module on the machine stores all data collected. From there, it can be sent to an in-cab display to notify the operator about current conditions. The data can also be transmitted wirelessly or downloaded to a PC and then analyzed and used to make production and maintenance decisions.

D E F G H C B P I Q A R J K L
D
E
F
G
H
C
B
P
I
Q
A
R
J
K
L
M
N
O
A VIMS Main Module
H Message Center
O
Service Lamp
B Engine Control Module
I VIMS Service Tool and Software
P Road Analysis Control
C Sensors
J
Cat ET ™ Service Tool
Q Trans/Chassis Control
D Wireless Connection Port
K
Action Alarm
R Integrated Braking Control
E Keypad
L
Service Keyswitch
F Speedo/Tach
M Action Lamp
G Quad Gauge
N Payload Management Lamps

two

Which Cat ® machines are equipped with the VIMS system?

It is standard on the following machines:

• 785, 789, 793 and 797 off-highway trucks

• 992 and 994 wheel loaders

• 854 wheel dozer

It can be purchased as a retrofit solution for the 777D off-highway truck and as an attachment for the 773F, 775F and 777F. The VIMS Guardian system, a similar product, is available for D9T, D10R, D10T and D11R track-type tractors.

What types of messages does the operator receive?

The VIMS system features an exclusive in-cab display where the operator receives informational and instructional messages.

Category 1 Category 2 Category 3
Category 1
Category 2
Category 3

In a Category 1 event, the operator receives an alert indication

and information about the situation but is not instructed to take any corrective action.

In a Category 2 event, the operator receives an alert

indication/action alarm light along with a brief message that describes the problem and provides simple instructions to follow.

A Category 3 event can lead to catastrophic failure or unsafe

working conditions; so the operator receives an alert indication/action alarm light and horn along with information and instructions to shut the machine down safely.

With the VIMS system coaching the operator in this manner, the machine can run more safely, productively and economically throughout its life cycle.

OVERVIEW

How is the VIMS system different from competitive systems?

It is the only system of its kind that is fully integrated with all powertrain components and critical machine operations. It captures data from every sensor and control system on the machine, stores it in one place and makes it available for the operator as well as the production and maintenance teams. Other systems monitor specific components (engine, electrical control module, wheel motors) individually. Without integration, it is not possible to provide a single, efficient in-cab display where the operator gets immediate feedback about current conditions and potential problems. Integration also means managers have access to a more complete and accurate picture of total machine performance and health to guide decision making.

three

Can I get this technology for my 777D?

Yes. Many users have asked for a common monitoring system like those offered on the larger off-highway trucks. That is why the VIMS system is now available as a retrofit solution for the 777D. When you buy the retrofit product, your 777D truck’s electronic monitoring system will be replaced and your payload management system will be upgraded. The retrofit product offers many advantages, including Second Gear Reweigh, Payload Speed Manager and Ton Kilometer/Mile Hour (TKPH/TMPH), and also other VIMS system features (Payload, Event List, Event Recorder, Trends, Histograms, Cumulatives, Data Logger).

What is the difference between the VIMS system and the VIMS Guardian product?

The VIMS Guardian product was developed by the makers of the VIMS system, and, while it does not include the payload monitoring component or operator display, it incorporates all other VIMS system features (Event List, Event Recorder, Trends, Histograms, Cumulatives, Data Logger). The VIMS Guardian product is available for Cat D9T, D10R, D10T and D11R track-type tractors.

Integrated Cat VIMS™ System

The VIMS Guardian product is available for Cat D9T, D10R, D10T and D11R track-type tractors. Integrated
The VIMS Guardian product is available for Cat D9T, D10R, D10T and D11R track-type tractors. Integrated

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW four With so much information available through the system, how do I know where to

four

With so much information available through the system, how do I know where to focus my attention?

The volume of information may seem overwhelming. That is why many users rely on their Cat Dealers to analyze and interpret the data. These users believe that Cat Dealers, working directly with experts from Caterpillar, have the knowledge, resources and experience to complete a more timely, thorough analysis and offer more effective recommendations.

Some users choose to interpret their own data. If you plan to do that, it is often best to start by collecting and analyzing a small amount of data and then building over time. For example, many major problems can be predicted and prevented simply by tracking fuel consumption and trending air filter restriction and exhaust temperatures. A sudden change in any of these numbers often signals a problem or situation that requires action.

What is the difference between VIDS and the VIMS System?

VIDS is a much simpler version of the VIMS System without much of the diagnostic and prognostic capability. VIDS-equipped machines monitor about 10 sensors (depending on the machine). Its message center allows the technician/operator to view only active events and a chronological list of logged events. VIMS is a much more sophisticated system. It allows downloading of events and other diagnostic/prognostic information that enables in-depth management of machine serviceability and production.

What is the difference between the VIMS System and Product Link?

Product Link is a single, specialized Electronic Control Module that collects basic information generated by the machine’s other ECMs (engine, transmission, chassis, etc.), such as events and SMU. Product Link also includes a built-in GPS connection which allows the customer to determine a machine’s precise location at any time. As the ECM data is collected, Product Link sends the information back to a central database via a satellite link. There, the customer can view the data through Cat Equipment Manager software. Because VIMS System-equipped machines generate much more robust information than Product Link, Product Link is not commonly used on machines with VIMS. For additional information on Product Link, refer to TEKQ0281.

Product Link is not commonly used on machines with VIMS. For additional information on Product Link,

PRODUCTION & MAINTENANCE

Is the VIMS system more useful to production or maintenance managers?

Both groups benefit equally. Production and operations people use the system to enhance safety, increase equipment utilization, eliminate work flow inefficiencies and boost productivity. Maintenance and service teams like the VIMS product because it helps them identify developing problems, plan maintenance at the optimal time and schedule repairs before failure. If a failure does occur, VIMS system data can help reduce diagnostic time. In many operations, this technology serves as an area of common ground between production and maintenance staffs—a source of critical business information that helps them work together toward the shared goal of achieving the highest possible production at the lowest total cost from their Cat equipment.

at the lowest total cost from their Cat equipment. five What types of information are available
at the lowest total cost from their Cat equipment. five What types of information are available
at the lowest total cost from their Cat equipment. five What types of information are available

five

at the lowest total cost from their Cat equipment. five What types of information are available
at the lowest total cost from their Cat equipment. five What types of information are available

What types of information are available for production and maintenance staff?

The following kinds of data are captured onboard and can be downloaded for analysis and use by production and maintenance people.

Payload captures productivity and fleet utilization information, such as tons moved, total cycle time, load time, wait time, travel time, fuel usage and more.

Event List records events and abnormalities that occur during operation. It puts each event into context, identifying when it occurred, how long it lasted, which component or system was affected, which operator was involved and how serious (Category 1, 2 or 3) the situation was.

Event Recorder activates automatically when a predefined event occurs. It takes a “snapshot” of the situation, capturing detailed data five minutes before and one minute after the event.

Data Logger receives input from each available parameter, once per second for up to 30 minutes, providing a useful record for predicting, preventing and troubleshooting problems.

Trends display minimum, maximum and average values for specific parameters or systems, providing insight into how conditions change over time. The Trends feature is considered by many to be the highest value tool in the VIMS offering. About 50% of the value of this system can be realized by using Trends regularly.

Cumulative files provide counts or totals, such as number of engine revolutions, time in gear and so on.

Histograms present data in a bar-graph format for quick visual analysis.

PRODUCTION

How can this system help prevent truck payloads that exceed the 10/10/20 payload control policy?

The Caterpillar 10/10/20 policy:

• Only 10% of a truck’s loads should exceed 110% of the target payload.

• No load should exceed 120% of the target payload.

• The mean of the payload distribution curve (average load) should not exceed the target payload.

In accordance with the Cat 10/10/20 policy, the VIMS system tracks payload data and displays total tons in real time to the operator. If overloaded, the system can warn the operator that an overload condition exists and suggest corrective action. If the overload is severe enough and the Maximum Payload Speed Manager function is enabled, the VIMS system will automatically limit truck speed.

90 percent of loads should fall into this rangethe VIMS system will automatically limit truck speed. No more than 10 percent of loads should

No more than 10 percent of loads should exceed target payload by 10 percenttruck speed. 90 percent of loads should fall into this range No loads should exceed the

No loads should exceed the target payload by 20 percent 90% 10% 80 85 90
No loads should exceed the
target payload by 20 percent
90%
10%
80
85
90
95
100 105
110
115
120
Number of Loads
PRODUCTIVITY
DURABILITY
SAFETY

% OF TARGET PAYLOAD

How can the payload data be used to optimize production?

The VIMS system can provide a Payload Summary for each machine or for an entire fleet. A detailed Payload Report that allows production staff to view each segment of the cycle is also available. With specific information about time distribution and tons moved, production managers can identify and correct inefficiencies in work flow and reduce the incidence of overloading. The end result is a more efficient and more profitable operation.

six

is a more efficient and more profitable operation. six What production-related events are available to manage

What production-related events are available to manage daily operations?

Using the in-cab display, the system informs the operator of abnormal conditions that could impede operations. These include the following:

Brake events may indicate an improper haul road profile or improper operator techniques.

Operator-related events indicate improper operating techniques and training needs.

Payload overload events warn of exceeding payload policy.

TKPH/TMPH events warn of tire overheating.

Road Analysis Control (RAC) events (if equipped) identify poor haul road conditions or potential maintenance issues.

With timely, accurate information about these types of events, the production staff is in a stronger position to identify and eliminate critical problems that could impact production and cost objectives.

How do I get RAC (Road Analysis Control)?

RAC is available as a factory-installed option on new Cat equipment, or you can order and install a RAC kit from your local dealer. The kit includes an additional ECM and wiring harness. RAC is available for all VIMS System-equipped Cat 773 through 797 OHTs. (Refer to TELQ 4461 for details.) Once installed, RAC monitors strut-pressure data and turns it into information that can alert the operator to poor haul road conditions. If it measures conditions that are severe, RAC can instruct the operator to slow down or avoid the area.

MAINTENANCE

MAINTENANCE seven How can I use this technology to enable a more cost-effective/efficient scheduled maintenance? The

seven

How can I use this technology to enable a more cost-effective/efficient scheduled maintenance?

The daily practice of downloading and analyzing VIMS system data prior to the PM is critical to an effective and efficient scheduled maintenance program. The VIMS system PM planner allows you to recognize key events and critical trends and proactively correct developing problems. By identifying potential problems prior to the PM, you can do a better job scheduling the three Ps: parts, people and plans.

How does the proactive use of VIMS system information during PM translate into value?

Several sites have used Trend information to identify developing problems and resolve them during PM. The following are examples:

• High exhaust temperature trends led to the discovery of bad fuel injectors.

• Low engine coolant temperature trends helped detect stuck thermostats.

• Shift-time trend information helped identify an improperly adjusted transmission.

By correcting these problems during a scheduled PM, the users saved time and money and avoided hours of costly, unscheduled downtime.

What is a VIMS system “snapshot”? How do I use it?

The system constantly monitors all available parameters and records vital machine information. When a predefined catastrophic or safety-related event occurs, the system takes a “snapshot” of the situation, capturing six minutes of data (five minutes before and one minute after the event). A “snapshot” can also be manually triggered or configured to record any VIMS system event. This data can be downloaded and analyzed to help identify the root cause of the event.

Does the VIMS product have engine shutdown capabilities?

Yes, but only on certain models (777D, 785, 789, 793 and 797 off-highway trucks) and only under certain conditions: predefined critical events are active, the parking brake is engaged and ground speed is zero. A shutdown is triggered by five critical events: low engine oil pressure, low engine oil level, high coolant temperature, low coolant level and high aftercooler temperature. The purpose of the shutdown is to protect the truck when a machine is parked and the operator is not present.

THE VIMS SYSTEM IN ACTION

Can you provide actual examples of how this technology delivers value?

actual examples of how this technology delivers value? Prevents unnecessary downtime and repairs. A Caterpillar

Prevents unnecessary downtime and repairs.

A Caterpillar 793C mining truck was operating at the Twin Creeks

mine site near Winnemucca, Nevada. During routine operation, the operator inadvertently steered the front left wheel of the truck into

a berm just off the haul road. The truck then began a slow roll and

eventually came to rest on its side. Throughout the rollover, and even while the truck lay on its side, the engine continued to run until other mine personnel came to the rescue of both the operator and the 793C. After ensuring that the operator was unhurt, the next order of business was to shut off the engine. When maintenance technicians arrived on the scene, their key concern for the 793C was damage done due to oil starvation of moving parts while the machine lay on its side. Through the use of the VIMS product, technicians were able to retrieve lubricant flow information from all major systems. In this case, the data informed the technicians that the key engine and transmission components had received sufficient oil throughout the ordeal and were not damaged. Technicians removed the engine oil pan and inspected one of the main bearings. Sure enough, the VIMS system data was accurate; the key engine and transmission components had not been cut off from their oil supplies and were in fine condition.

Other than minor body damage (bent fenders and mirrors), the 793C had survived the rollover just fine and was put back into operation after only one day of downtime. Had the VIMS system data not been available, technicians would have had to take apart and inspect many of the powertrain components, a costly and time- consuming procedure. The production staff estimates that the data saved more than 84,000 tons of lost production and $124,000 in inspection and repair costs.

AEXC0680

© 2007 Caterpillar

All Rights Reserved

Printed in the U.S.A. CAT, CATERPILLAR, their respective logos, “Caterpillar Yellow”, VIMS and the POWER EDGE trade dress, as well as corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.

Extends tire life, reduces tire costs. Up to 80% of all tire failures are caused by punctures, cuts and excessive heat. Although it is difficult to prevent punctures and cuts, heat-related failures caused by load and speed can be reduced with the VIMS system feature called TKPH/TMPH. VIMS warns the operator to reduce speed when tires overheat. Enabling this feature, truck speed can be automatically limited until the tires return to a safe operating limit, at which point the operator is instructed to resume travel speed. Pat Romano, maintenance superintendent at Saraji Mine in Central Queensland, Australia, says, “Since implementing TKPH, we reduced tire costs by eliminating heat-related tire failures.”

Reduces overloading; improves safety, productivity and life. Jason Airay, operations superintendent at Newcrest Mining’s Telfer Project in Western Australia, says they have completely eliminated payloads over 120% of target, as defined by the 10/10/20 payload policy, by enabling Maximum Payload Speed Manager. Coupled with Second Gear Reweigh that improves payload accuracy, this feature instructs the operator to dump the load whenever it exceeds the predefined limit. According to Airay, the mine is “100% confident that all operators are working within the design limits of the trucks.” As a result, steering and braking safety is “never compromised,” and the value of their assets can be fully realized.

Reduces maintenance costs. A large mine in Wyoming was changing air filters on its trucks every 500 hours when it began using the VIMS system to monitor filter restrictions over time. The Trends reports indicated that, based on past experience, it would be safe to extend the change interval. Now the company replaces filters when VIMS system data shows an increased restriction of airflow. It is recovering the full value that was designed into Cat filters and saving more than $7,000 per truck per year in parts costs.

Reduces repair costs. At a deep-pit mine in South Africa, the engine on a large haul truck was overheating, which could cause premature failure. VIMS system data indicated that coolant and aftercooler temperatures were rising; so the cooling system was checked and the radiator was found to be 10% plugged. The radiator was replaced for $23,000, whereas a replacement engine would have cost more than $200,000.

be 10% plugged. The radiator was replaced for $23,000, whereas a replacement engine would have cost
VIMS ™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 4-1 (5/06) File Under Applications VIMS and

VIMS APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 4-1 (5/06) File Under Applications

VIMS and Maintenance Management

Intended audience:

Dealer Product Support personnel

Dealer Field Service personnel

Customer Maintenance personnel

Maintenance Management

Good basic maintenance practices and disciplines are the cornerstones of an effective maintenance management system. Many customers are looking for a simple, mechanical solution for managing the maintenance requirements for their equipment. In many cases, computerized systems help customers who have good manual record keeping systems to more easily manage their preventive maintenance programs, inspections, scheduling, and record keeping activities. Customers who do not have a manual maintenance management system are not ready for the computer until procedures, forms, and the disciplines for good basic maintenance practices are in place.

All the elements of maintenance system must work together to effectively control costs and availability. The customer must adhere to the following basic maintenance management practices before implementing a computerized system:

Perform the manufacturers recommended routine maintenance

(PM) - oil and filter changes, lubrication, adjustments, etc. Utilize scheduled fluid sampling to monitor fluid condition, contamination and wear rate in a component or system. Utilize a series of routine inspections designed to identify problems before the problems create major downtime and repair expense. Provide training to enhance the skills of the people responsible for maintaining and repairing machines. Schedule to ensure that routine preventive maintenance procedures and inspections are performed on time. Keep records of historical information for use in making machine performance decisions. Follow up on needed repairs in a timely manner to minimize catastrophic damage and to prevent extensive downtime.

Follow up on needed repairs in a timely manner to minimize catastrophic damage and to prevent
Follow up on needed repairs in a timely manner to minimize catastrophic damage and to prevent
Follow up on needed repairs in a timely manner to minimize catastrophic damage and to prevent
Follow up on needed repairs in a timely manner to minimize catastrophic damage and to prevent
Follow up on needed repairs in a timely manner to minimize catastrophic damage and to prevent

When assessing the needs of a customer's maintenance program, consider the following:

Overall maintenance program Individual machine maintenance requirements Scheduling methods Maintenance resources such as personnel levels, shop and lubrication equipment, and training provided

methods Maintenance resources such as personnel levels, shop and lubrication equipment, and training provided
methods Maintenance resources such as personnel levels, shop and lubrication equipment, and training provided
methods Maintenance resources such as personnel levels, shop and lubrication equipment, and training provided

SELD7019-02

Backlog system Record keeping procedures Maintenance and repair histories Whether the maintenance program is based on a repair before failure philosophy For an effective maintenance program, the preventive maintenance procedures and inspections (individual machine requirements) must be consistently performed at a defined frequency.

procedures and inspections (individual machine requirements) must be consistently performed at a defined frequency.
procedures and inspections (individual machine requirements) must be consistently performed at a defined frequency.
procedures and inspections (individual machine requirements) must be consistently performed at a defined frequency.
procedures and inspections (individual machine requirements) must be consistently performed at a defined frequency.

Equipment Management

Equipment management decisions often seem to be a tradeoff between the cost of downtime and cost of repair. Scheduling downtime to perform routine maintenance and inspections will significantly reduce lost production by identifying potential problems early so that repairs can be planned and scheduled before a catastrophic failure occurs. Scheduling downtime and repair costs need to be balanced. Needed repairs must be scheduled before they become expensive and unscheduled. Through the use of performance and condition monitoring techniques, repair indicators can be identified in the early stages of a potential problem. Maintenance and production management, working together, should schedule needed repairs before failure. Adopting a planned repair approach will result in optimum availability and lower repair costs.

Some of the tools and methods for detecting repair indicators in the early stages of the development of a problem include:

Pre-shift inspections

In seat checks

Operation/operator comments

Scheduled fluid sampling (S·O·S SM Services) Filter inspections Magnetic plug inspections Inspections at PM time Diagnostic inspections

(S·O·S S M Services) Filter inspections Magnetic plug inspections Inspections at PM time Diagnostic inspections
(S·O·S S M Services) Filter inspections Magnetic plug inspections Inspections at PM time Diagnostic inspections
(S·O·S S M Services) Filter inspections Magnetic plug inspections Inspections at PM time Diagnostic inspections
(S·O·S S M Services) Filter inspections Magnetic plug inspections Inspections at PM time Diagnostic inspections

Early detection of problem indicators enables planning for optimum management of component repairs. VIMS is an onboard monitoring system that will significantly enhance the ability to detect problems early. The VIMS provides machine and system event warnings information that will help the maintenance planner or supervisor to identify areas that, if not corrected, may contribute to future downtime and costly repairs. Machine and system events from a VIMS equipped machined will provide enough details to identify the source of a problem. With some preplanning, parts can be acquired ahead of time to minimize downtime.

On the next page is a chart that lists some of the activities required for effective equipment management. The contribution of VIMS to these activities is shown in the right hand column.

Machine signature data, trends, cumulatives, and histograms data are very useful for trending machine performance. Use this information to help determine the ideal time to recondition a major power train component.

The VIMS can be used to record and analyze vital system performance data. When compared to earlier data from the same machine or to other similar machines, the information will help to identify component wear characteristics and problems that may have gone

2

undetected by more conventional inspections.

VIMS is a powerful tool. When used in conjunction with good basic

maintenance practices, VIMS will enable the customer to effectively manage his equipment maintenance program in a cost effective manner.

VlMS and Equipment Management

EQUIPMENT MANAGEMENT ACTIVITY

VIMS CONTRIBUTION

CONDITION MONITORING

Inspections/Safety

 

Operator Input

VIMS Events

Daily

VIMS Events

Weekly

VIMS Events

PM Inspections

VIMS Events

Diagnostic Inspections

VIMS Events, Event Recorder, Data Logger, Trend Data, Machine Signature Data, Cumulatives, and Histograms

SCHEDULING

VIMS Data Download

 

Backlog Items

VIMS Events

Planned Component Replacement (PCR)

Machine Signature Data, Trend Data, Cumulatives, Productivity Data, and Fleet History

RECORD KEEPING

Maintenance History

Productivity Data, Trend Data, Histograms, Cumulatives, and Machine Signature Data

Operations/Production

Productivity Data

TRAINING/SAFETY

Operator

VIMS Events and Cumulatives

Service Technician

All VIMS Data - Event Recorder and Data Logger Primary

PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS

Productivity Data - Ton/Hr., Ton/Gal, Gal/Hr.

Productivity, Utilization

3

SELD7019-02

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS ™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 4-2 (5/06) File Under Applications Troubleshooting with

VIMS APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 4-2 (5/06) File Under Applications

Troubleshooting with VIMS

Intended audience:

Dealer Product Support personnel

Dealer Service Manager

Dealer Project Manager located at

the customer's job site Dealer Field Service personnel

Several features in VIMS make it an excellent troubleshooting tool: the event list, the event recorder, and the Data Logger. The information obtained by utilizing these features facilitates problem identification and subsequent troubleshooting.

Event List

The event list is a record of events (what happened and when) that occurred on the machine. This list provides a comprehensive view of machine and operator exception based conditions to the customer, service technician, and management.

The event list provides data events and system event problems. Data events record when a machine parameter (such as a temperature, pressure, or flow) has fallen outside of specified limits. Data events are a problem indicator and often identify a condition that might otherwise escape detection -perhaps until a failure occurred. The advanced capabilities of the VIMS allow the system to distinguish between actual problems with the machine or its components and

conditions caused by inappropriate operation (abuse). The VIMS will distinguish between the types of problems and maintain a count of occurrences in memory.

System events record when system faults occur in other electronic modules on the machine, or when the VlMS system itself has developed a fault in one of its electronic devices (such as a hydraulic temperature sensor being used to monitor a machine system). These events are detected through VIMS self- diagnostic capabilities. The event list identifies the specific parameter that has fallen outside of specifications. For example, the event list might read "Torque Converter Oil Temperature High". The event list identifies, with codes, the area of the system (called a module), the component, and the nature of the system faults (open circuit, ground, voltage low, etc.). Because the event list provides specific information, in addition to a general warning (such as a light or horn) that some unspecified problem has occurred, it greatly enhances the mechanic's ability to troubleshoot the problem.

There are two ways to read the event list. One way is by using the keypad to bring the event list, one item at a time, to the display panel. When the event list is brought to the display panel, only a simple summary about the event can be read. The second way is to download the

SELD7015-02

VIMS memory on the machine to a personal computer and review the event list either on the computer screen or on a printed report. With this second method, additional details about the event (such as date, time, and duration) can be read. The VIMSpc software enables the event list to be viewed and analyzed in detail in a variety of customized formats. Refer to the VIMSpc User Manual located on the VIMSpc installation disk or refer to the Help screen within VIMSpc.

Event Recorder

The event recorder is a six minute long snap shot recording of all the VIMS data channels - currently about 52 channels. Data is read and recorded once per second for the six-minute span for requested events - typically category 3. The data can only be read and analyzed after downloading to a personal computer on which the VIMSpc software has been installed.

The event recorder can be activated three different ways: via the keypad, via personal computer attached to the communication port, and automatically by certain pre-selected machine events. When automatically turned on by pre- selected events, the event recorder captures data from the five-minute period before the triggering event to one minute after the event.

By capturing data from the period before the event, and because the event recorder captures data from all data channels, troubleshooting is made much faster and easier. When a problem occurs, it is informative to know how the machine was being operated or what was happening simultaneously on other machine systems.

Data Logger

The data logger is a recording of all data channels as is the event recorder; however, the data logger is activated on command from the keypad, via telemetry, or the personal computer, and is capable of recording 30 minutes of 1 sample/second data for all parameters. The data logger can be used for troubleshooting when it is necessary to run the machine under special test conditions to help determine the cause of

a problem.

Here is an example of using data from the data logger to successfully diagnose

a problem on a 793 truck: the VIMS data

(event list) revealed several brake overheating events. To analyze the problem, the event recorder was activated and the truck operated in the same manner and with the same haul characteristics as when the problem occurred. Later, when the data could be analyzed, it was discovered that when the brakes overheated, the operator was not applying the brakes, the machine was downshifting (because it was going up a grade), and engine RPM was high (an indication of adequate oil flow). All of this extra data helped the mechanic identify the problem as a stuck brake slack adjuster.

The data logger can also be used to

capture and record the data that provides

a signature of components under

operating conditions. By comparing later data logger data (or graphs made from the data) to the signature data, it is possible to identify changes in the critical factors (such as oil pressures or flow rates) that signal problems or indicate that the component or system is approaching the end of its life. Machine specific signature tests are described in Tab 5 - Machine Signature Tests, in the VIMS Application Guide.

2

The large volume of data in the event recorders and data logger requires downloading to an off-board computer for analysis. Using the VIMSpc software, the information can be presented in a graphical or tabular form.

As experience is gained, information on data logger signature comparisons and other uses of VIMS as a troubleshooting tool will be published.

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©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS ™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 4-3 (5/06) File Under Applications Evaluating Operator

VIMS APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 4-3 (5/06) File Under Applications

Evaluating Operator Techniques

The examples used in this bulletin refer to the use of VIMS on off-highway trucks.

Operator Evaluation Data

Using VIMS data to evaluate operator techniques or practices, and to determine training effectiveness are two important uses of VIMS generated information. VIMS data can be used to detect problems that develop as a result of operators reacting to job conditions and adopting methods or techniques that are counterproductive or potentially damaging to machine systems or components.

Occasionally something the operator does (or does not do) will trigger a machine event warning. A typical scenario is one where the operator leaves the truck in gear while waiting at the loading tool. This may cause the torque converter temperature to increase to the point where it triggers a machine event warning on VIMS. By reviewing the event list (where the overheating condition is captured) and comparing it to the load cycle data from the payload data in VIMS, it is possible to determine precisely when the overheating occurred. With this information, it can be determined that the overheating problem was caused by machine operation characteristics rather than by some fault

in the torque converter or its cooling system. This information could then be used to train the operator in the correct machine operation.

There may be other instances when the mode of operation is detrimental to either the machine or productivity but does not trigger an event recording. Two problem analysis methods are recommended: 1) analysis of VIMS payload and cycle time data, and 2) activation of the data logger while the truck is performing its routine haul cycles. Payload and cycle time analysis can be use to evaluate payload consistency and operator effectiveness. An evaluation of cycle times can help identify inefficient operation techniques between two or more operators. Additional operator training or coaching can be provided to improve inefficient techniques that are found.

Activation of the data logger during a routine haul cycle is equivalent to having someone ride with the operator to observe his technique; however, it is unobtrusive and less likely to cause the operator to change his normal routine which might make the cause of the inefficiency more difficult to find.

Field experience using VIMS data has been successful in identifying the following machine operation problems:

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Incorrect use of the Automatic Retarder Control (ARC) - turning the ARC off and on needlessly. This shows up as a "retarder off/on" record or as high brake temperatures. High speed sharp cornering is detectable as high strut pressure in one of the front struts. Excessive transmission shifts (hunting) as a result of the operator placing the shift selector in too high a gear.

Excessive transmission shifts (hunting) as a result of the operator placing the shift selector in too
Excessive transmission shifts (hunting) as a result of the operator placing the shift selector in too

As shown here, VIMS data can be used in a variety of ways to evaluate and improve productivity and machine operation techniques. VIMS has considerable potential to expand its usefulness well beyond that of a simple warning system. Memory capability and the power of VIMSpc software provide management with powerful new tools to effectively manage mining operations.

SELD7017-02

©2006 Caterpillar Inc. Printed in U.S.A. (4/08)

VIMS ™ APPLICATION GUIDE VIMS BULLETIN Bulletin No. 4-4 (5/06) File Under Applications VIMS Data

VIMS APPLICATION GUIDE

VIMS BULLETIN

Bulletin No. 4-4 (5/06) File Under Applications

VIMS Data Application Guide

Intended audience:

Dealer Product Support personnel Dealer Project Manager located at customer job site Dealer Shop and Field Service personnel Customer Maintenance personnel

Introduction

This application guide is intended to help VIMS users take full advantage of the extensive amount of data collected by VIMS on Caterpillar Mining machines.

Benefits

Analysis of VIMS data can be beneficial for Production and Operations Departments to help:

1. Illustrate poor Payload management practices

a. Overloading and conformance with Caterpillar’s 10/10/20 Payload Rule

b. Under loading, payload variation and poor load placement

2. Identify Operator training needs

a. Loading techniques

b. Machine operation; use of

retarder, gear selection, engine over speed

3. Identify changes in haul road design to improve productivity

4. Identify the need for improvements to haul road maintenance practices

Analysis of VIMS data can also be used by Maintenance Departments to help:

1. More quickly identify and troubleshoot machine/component problems

2. Identify longer term degradation of components and systems

3. Identify the need for tune-ups to optimize component performance and service life

4. Confirm that service activities have been successful:

a. Tune-ups and minor component adjustments

b. Ensure correct performance of

newly installed components

5. Allow components to be changed on condition rather than at fixed intervals

The PM Planner is a worksheet for documenting the current condition of equipment and is used for comparisons against the information provided in this data application guide. The intent of the PM Planner is to ensure that equipment is operating within the intended specifications. A worksheet is attached to the end of this data application guide and is available on the Cat Miner website.

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Structure of Guide

This guide has been divided into two sections:

1. VIMS for Maintenance

2. VIMS for Operations

VIMS for Maintenance is further defined by system and component with an emphasis on how to apply the various VIMS operations that have been proven useful in the field.

Software Applications

The guide makes reference to several software programs:

VIMSpc used for downloading data from machines and some basic analysis tasks VIMS Supervisor used for more advanced data analysis

Both are available through the Caterpillar Literature System and are mandatory to achieve the benefits outlined in this document.

Table of Contents

VIMS for Maintenance …………………………………………………………………

4

Engine (all VIMS machines)

4

Exhaust Temperatures

4

Air Filter Restriction

4

Engine Coolant Temperature

5

Aftercooler Coolant Temperature

6

Boost Pressure

6

Engine Oil Pressure

6

Powertrain (OHT)

7

Torque Converter and Transmission

7

Differential Oil Temperature

9

Powertrain (Wheel Loader)

9

Torque Converter Outlet Oil Temperature

9

Machine Systems (OHT)

10

Suspension Cylinders

10

Brake Oil Temperature

10

Machine Systems (Wheel Loaders & Hydraulic Excavators)

10

Hydraulic Oil Temperature in WTL & HEX

11

Hydraulic Pump Drive Oil Temperatures in WTL & HEX

11

Pilot Pump Pressure (Swing Brake/Pilot Pump – 5230 only)

11

VIMS Event List (all VIMS machines)

12

Machine System Events

12

VIMS for Operations ………….………………………………………………………

13

Payload Data Management

13

Basic Asset Utilization

13

Production Efficiency and Productivity

14

Payload Management

15

Use of Payload Filters

16

Haul Road Design and Maintenance

17

Operator Assessment and Training

18

VIMS Event List - Operator Induced Events

18

3

VIMS for Maintenance

Engine (all VIMS machines)

Exhaust Temperatures

Trend the difference between cylinder banks (RH minus LH) using VIMSpc/ VIMS Supervisor to confirm the condition of injectors and valves as the engine ages over time.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 2–4 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

ºC (36 ºF). Action Trigger #1: > +/- 20 ºC (36 ºF).

Action Required:

T stays within 20

Run multi-cylinder

cutout test looking for poor injectors. Perform Valve

clearance adjustment at next PM. Action Trigger #2: > +/- 50 ºC (90 ºF).

Action Required:

Run multi-cylinder

cutout test looking for a ‘dead’ fuel injector. Check for a guttered or cordal valve failure.

Trend each bank (LH and RH) separately using VIMSpc/VIMS Supervisor. Look for increases or decreases that may indicate a dropping off of performance in:

Fuel Injectors (leakage, blockages in nozzle, poor spray patterns, poor timing, etc.). Turbochargers (wheel rubbing due to bearing wear that slows turbo, lowers Boost pressure).

Also useful for problem solving: low power complaints, engine overheating, and acceleration response time.

Air Filter Restriction (102/102A)

Trend Air Filter Restriction using VIMSpc/VIMS Supervisor.

A new air filter typically runs a

restriction of about 3–3.5 kPa (0.5 psi) with the engine derating due to excessive intake restriction at 7 kPa (1 psi). If site conditions permit, through excellent control of dust in the mine, it may be possible to change the air filter on condition (i.e. when it reaches 6–6.5 kPa) rather than changing/cleaning it at a predetermined hour interval.

Recommended Analysis Period:

Several days before PM service is due using 1000 hours of data.

Expected Values:

Restriction < 5.0

kPa (0.75 psi, 20 in. Water).

Action Trigger:

Restriction > 5.0

kPa (0.75 psi, 20 in. Water) or such that filter cannot wait until next PM.

Action Required:

Check all three

pressure sensors involved in these readings.

Individual pressure readings at engine idle/off should be similar, i.e. close to atmospheric absolute pressure (100 kPa [14 psi] at sea level, 60 kPa [9 psi] at 4000 meters above sea level). In addition, verify pressure drop at high idle versus differential pressure indicators (pneumatic). Failure in any sensor could cause false indications to change air filters.

If sensors show no problems, replace/clean air cleaner elements.

Knowledge of air filter life history for

your particular site conditions will need

to be developed to determine whether air

4

filter extensions are possible on the site. If air filters will run only one PM service and are expected to plug to the point of engine derate before the next PM service is due then they cannot be extended unless efficient changing of air filters in the field is planned for and achieved. If however they will run successfully to at least the next PM service, plan to resample several days prior to this PM and assess whether they can be further extended. Repeat this analysis until a point is reached where they will not reach the next PM without engine derating.

If air filters are cleaned and reused systematically, plan a strategy to continuously test the quality of the air filters after cleaning. For example:

Verify maximum number of filter cleaning using random sampling. Make a small hole in a used filter (for example using a nail) and send it to the cleaner. If the filter is cleaned and returned for machine installation, the cleaning process needs to be revised. Check dimensions of filters after being cleaned: length, internal and external diameters. Compare with new ones and run other tests to verify adequate sealing as necessary.

Engine Coolant Temperature

(117)

Review Engine Coolant Temperature Histograms using VIMSpc. Look for Coolant Temperatures outside the accepted range, which may indicate an overheating or overcooling problem. Overheating may be caused by blockage or plugging of the radiator, low coolant level. Overcooling is typically caused by thermostats that stick partially open.

5

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 2–4 weeks using 2 months/1000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

Coolant

Temperature between 80 and 100

ºC (176 – 212 ºF).

Action Trigger #1:

Coolant

Temperature Histogram events < 80 ºC (176 ºF).

Action Required:

Verify machine

application. Consider that long

periods of downhill machine loaded in cold weather applications may cause overcooling and may necessitate use of shutters, covers or an

active fan control. If applicable, verify correct actuation of active fan control (hydraulic clutch, hydraulic motor, Flexxaire Fan control, etc.). Check thermostats to ensure they are all closing completely. Replace if necessary as a set. CAT recommends changing thermostats every 6000 hours or yearly.

Action Trigger #2:

Coolant

Temperature Histogram Events > 100 ºC (212 ºF).

Action Required:

If CAT ELC is

used, check coolant color (light red, not dark) and smell (sweet, not like ammonia), change if necessary. Check for solid black particles (combustion residuals) in the coolant.

Search for “low coolant flow” events. Verify pump flow and sensor operation.

Check for cylinder head cracks or head gasket problems.

Check radiator is not plugged with mud or debris.

If okay, check fan belts and tensioner for correct operation.

Caterpillar recommends changing thermostats every 12 months or 6,000 hours.

It is also recommended that coolant temperature sensors be checked periodically by comparing against ambient temperatures if the machine has been down for several days.

Aftercooler Coolant Temperature (101)

Review Aftercooler Coolant Temperature Trend using VIMSpc or VIMS Supervisor. Look for increasing Aftercooler Temperature trend that may indicate core is being coated by oil that is leaking from a turbocharger bearing, or may be caused by plugging of the SCAC core.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4–6 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

Aftercooler

Temperature Trend should

remain constant.

Action Trigger:

Aftercooler

Temperature rises above

maximum specified value.

Action Required:

Assess core

condition and change-out if required.

Boost Pressure (108)

Trend Turbo Boost using VIMSpc/VIMS Supervisor. Look for decreasing boost pressure as turbo bearings wear and wheels drag. Look for problems in waste-gate performance (sticking valve, etc.) where applicable.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every

4 weeks using 4 months/3,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

Boost Pressure

should remain constant.

Action Trigger #1: Boost Pressure falls below 24 psi for 793 ATY/4GZ and 797. Boost Pressure falls below 30 psi for 1HL and 4AR.

Action Required:

pressure. Perform a pressure test of fuel galleries in the engine. Assess injector condition.

Check fuel

Assess bearing/wheel condition and change-out if required.

Action Trigger #2: Boost rises above maximum specified value.

Action Required:

Check electrical

resistance of waste-gate control valve solenoid. Check seat and ball valve at control valve for wear. Check air leaks at waste- gate air supply. Check air pressure at supply line 50-52 psi (340-360 kPa).

Engine Oil Pressure

Trend Engine Oil Pressure (gauge) using VIMSpc/VIMS Supervisor. Look for decreasing Engine Oil Pressure as pump wears. Look for problems in oil pump performance (sticking valve, etc.) where applicable. Use S·O·S SM Services analysis to look for degradation in the oil that may indicate fuel dilution or viscosity breakdown.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every

4 weeks using 4 months/3,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

High Engine Oil

Pressure should remain constant. Low Engine Oil Pressure should remain constant.

6

Action Trigger:

High Engine Oil

Pressure < 47 psi for 793 ATY/4GZ and 797.

Low Engine Oil Pressure < 30 psi for 793 ATY/4GZ and 797. High Engine Oil Pressure < 45 psi for 1HL and 4AR. Low Engine Oil Pressure < 23 psi for 1HL and 4AR.

Action Required:

Compare iron trend

at the S·O·S SM Services analysis history and assess pump condition and change-out if required.

Use in conjunction with S·O·S Services analysis of engine oil to identify changes in conditions that may indicate oil quality issues, changes in machine application (i.e. changing fuel rates), changes in new oil spec or quality, reduction in combustion efficiency due to turbo/fuel injector issues (i.e. high soot, increased heat/oil oxidation).

Powertrain (OHT)

Torque Converter and Transmission

Trend Torque Converter Lock-up Clutch Slip (TC LUC) (130B) & Transmission clutch engagement (slip) times (132) using VIMSpc/VIMS Supervisor. Look for increasing slip times as springs wear in the control valve, decreased pump flow and pressures change.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expected values:

Compare against

expected slip-time values tabulated below. Also compare like machines at your site to establish local ‘bogeys.’

7

Action Trigger:

Slip time > 0.9 s for

793 ATY/4GZ, 1HL and 4AR. Slip time > 0.8 s for 797.

Action Required:

At low hours,

readjust valve timing to achieve desired slip time. At high hours replace springs in the TC LUC control valve (Replace spring in the TC control valve if greater than 6000 hours old and slip times are increasing. This is typically not required in Transmission control valve stations due to lower cycle operation.).

Once an adjustment has been made, confirm TC LUC or Transmission clutch slip time is back in acceptable range by reviewing Trend data several days after the adjustment. Readjust if necessary to achieve desired time. This process should also be used to confirm the correct operation of newly installed rebuilt components. Collect several days of data then download and Trend to ensure slip times are as expected.

Also review TC LUC & Transmission slip time Histogram using VIMSpc against expected values.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expect Values:

Ensure 90% of

values are occurring < maximum acceptable value.

Action Trigger:

Analysis shows >

10% of values are > maximum

acceptable value.

Action Required:

At low hours,

readjust valve timing to achieve desired slip time. At high hours replace springs in the TC LUC control valve. (Replace spring if greater than 6000 hours old and slip times are increasing).

It is recommended that site-specific slip time values be used wherever possible to allow closer monitoring of slip times for the Torque Converter, and all Transmission Gear slip times. By using the Fleet Trend function in VIMS Supervisor when components are in optimum condition a set of expected values can be developed that allows closer tolerances than published factory ranges.

Once these values have been established it is possible to adjust the Histogram Exception Criteria table in VIMSpc to reflect tighter site-specific values. To do so open VIMSpc, Report then Exception Criteria Set-up. It is then possible to adjust the Upper & Lower Boundary limits to better match site-specific machine performance.

For instance, instead of allowing a maximum slip time of 1.2 seconds for a 3 – 4 shift on a 793C 4AR truck as set by the factory configuration, the Maximum Boundary limit can be moved in to about 1.0 seconds. This allows the

detection of excessive slip times much earlier than waiting for the clutch to reach a point where > 10% are greater than 1.2 seconds. Especially since a healthy transmission makes the 3 - 4 shift in the 0.6 – 0.8 second range. By reviewing the data on a regular basis (as outlined above) excessive slip times are detected and adjustments can be made to bring clutch performance back to an optimum level.

This process can be use to fine tune all Torque Converter & Transmission slip time parameters, while changes can also be made to Target values to further tighten detection criteria.

Once this process has been completed for each VIMS machine on site it is possible to use the Histogram Standard Report Summary to list all Histogram parameters in one table and to quickly determine (via the Total High column) which parameters are exceeding optimum values. Appropriate action can then be planned and undertaken.

Powertrain component Slip Time Trending – Typical Times (seconds)

Parameter

 

785

789

793

797

TC LUC Upshift

1.1

– 1.25

1.25

– 1.35

1.3

– 1.5

-

TC LUC Downshift

1.1

– 1.5

1.55

– 1.65

1.5

– 2.2

-

Trans 1 – 2 Upshift

 

-

 

-

 

-

0.525 – 0.7

Trans 2 – 3 Upshift

0.625 – 0.7

0.625

– 0.725

0.7

– 0.825

0.525 – 0.65

Trans 3 – 2 Downshift

0.5

– 0.7

0.575

– 0.775

0.5

– 0.8

-

Trans 3 - 4 Upshift

0.55 – 0.65

0.65

– 0.75

0.6

– 0.725

0.625 – 0.775

Trans 4 - 5 Upshift

0.6

– 0.75

0.625 – 0.75

0.75 – 0.85

0.7 – 0.85

Trans 5 - 6 Upshift

0.575 – 0.65

0.65 – 0.775

0.675 - 0.75

0.7 – 0.8

8

Differential Oil Temperature

Review Differential Oil Temperature Trend using VIMSpc or VIMS Supervisor. Look for an increasing oil temperature trend that may indicate the machine is being used on longer haul cycles, or if a cooler is fitted, may indicate cooler function or effect is reducing through core plugging or actuation problems.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4–6 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

Differential Oil

Temperature Trend should remain constant but may vary slightly due to changes in

ambient temperature conditions.

Action Trigger:

Differential

Temperature rises above

maximum recommended value or significantly above typical operating value.

Action Required:

Assess core

condition of cooler (if fitted) or possible changes to machine application (particularly longer hauls and higher haul speeds).

Check differential oil level. Verify specifications of oil used.

High temperatures can be caused by final drives as well. Remove magnetic plugs of both final drives and differential and check for debris. Take an oil sample and check oil physical conditions (color and smell).

It is advisable to use label thermometers (P/N 8T-2822) on final drives and differential for easy field temperature follow-up. Stick the decal on a clean area of the component.

Powertrain (Wheel Loader)

Torque Converter Outlet Oil Temperature

Trend Torque Converter Oil Outlet Temperature using VIMSpc or VIMS Supervisor. Look for an increasing oil temperature trend that may indicate the machine is being used more aggressively in the face. It may also indicate poor blasting or tightly knit material, a very tight loading area, increased travel on ramps or incorrect use of the left pedal (ICTC control).

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4–6 weeks using 3 months/2000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

TC Oil

Temperature Trends should remain constant but may vary slightly due to changes in

ambient temperature conditions.

TC Oil

Temperature rises above

maximum recommended value or significantly above typical operating temperature for the site.

Action Trigger:

Action Required:

Time spent in the

face is typically the cause of elevated oil temperatures, which may be due to poor operator technique, incorrect GET selection or poor material conditioning.

Verify TC inlet and outlet oil pressure settings. Verify impeller clutch pressure settings at different rimpull positions.

Assess cooler condition.

9

Machine Systems (OHT)

Suspension Cylinders

Trend Front and Rear Suspension Cylinder differential pressures (RH minus LH) traveling empty using VIMSpc or VIMS Supervisor.

Data is used for confirming that nitrogen and oil charge levels in each pair of suspension cylinders (Front Right/Left and Rear Right/Left) are in an acceptable condition.

Correct Oil/Nitrogen charge condition is required to ensure correct operation of the suspension system in maintained which minimizes stresses into the mainframe of the machine. It also ensures a comfortable ride for the operator and maintains Payload Monitor accuracy within acceptable levels.

Recommended Analysis Period:

Several days before PM service using 1000 hours of data.

Expected Values:

P stays within +/-

375 kPa (55 psi) across each axle group. Field information suggests

typical operating pressures of:

Front axle is in a range - 200 kPa +/- 375 kPa (-30 +/- 55 psi); Rear axle is in a range 0 +/- 375 kPa (0 +/- 55 psi).

Action Trigger:

> +/- 375 kPa (50

psi) across the front or rear axle groups.

Action Required:

Check empty

suspension cylinder height (amount of chrome rod showing) and if this is below expected / published values drop the oil and nitrogen charge from the cylinder and recharge.

Verify that cylinder rods have adequate grease lubrication.

Brake Oil Temperature

Trend Front and Rear Brake Oil Temperature Differential Temperatures (RH minus LH) traveling using VIMSpc or VIMS Supervisor.

Data is used for confirming that brakes are not dragging or being held in an operating position such that additional heat or energy is being added to the brake pack. This may lead to reduced brake pack life and/or poor machine performance.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

T stays within +/-

2 ºC (4 ºF) across each axle group.

Action Trigger:

> +/- 2 ºC (4 ºF)

across the front or rear axle groups.

Action Required:

Check for a

dragging brake that may be caused by poor slack adjuster operation (check for residual pressure in the brakes).

Analyze machine overload and engine over speed events.

Look for friction material at hydraulic screens. Take a hydraulic oil sample. Check color and smell of hydraulic fluid.

Machine Systems (Wheel Loaders & Hydraulic Excavators)

10

Hydraulic Oil Temperature in WTL & HEX

Trend Hydraulic Oil Temperature using VIMSpc or VIMS Supervisor. Look for an increasing oil temperature trend that may indicate the machine is being used more aggressively in the face. It may also indicate poor blasting or tightly knit material, poor cooler performance through core plugging or excessive pump/motor leakage.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4–6 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

Hydraulic Oil

Temperature Trend should remain constant but may vary slightly due to changes in

ambient temperature conditions.

Action Trigger:

Hydraulic Oil

Temperature rises above maximum recommended value or significantly above typical

operating temperature for the site.

Action Required:

Assess cooler or

pump/motor condition and machine application.

Verify oil condition using S·O·S Services analysis. Take an additional oil sample and verify oil condition (color, smell and metallic particles).

Change pump case line return filter. Cut it and inspection filter element for metallic particles from the pump.

Verify hydraulic stand-by and relief system pressures.

It is advisable to stick label thermometers on the following components:

Hydraulic pumps: P/N 8T-2824. Potential cause of overheating:

wear, internal leaks. Control valves: P/N 8T-2821. Potential cause of overheating:

internal leaks. Cylinders: P/N 8T-2823. Potential cause of failure:

internal leaks.

Hydraulic Pump Drive Oil Temperatures in WTL & HEX

Trend Hydraulic Pump Drive Oil temperatures using VIMSpc or VIMS Supervisor. Look for increasing oil temperature trends that may indicate the machine is being used more aggressively.

Recommended Analysis Period: Every 4–6 weeks using 3 months/2,000 hours of operating data.

Expected Values:

Pump Drive Oil

Temperature Trends should remain constant but may vary slightly due to changes in

ambient temperature conditions.

Action Trigger:

Pump Drive Oil

Temperature rises above

maximum recommended value.

Action Required:

Assess pump

leakage, machine application and correct operator technique.

Check pump drive oil level. Verify S·O·S analysis history. Take an oil sample and check for metallic particles in the oil.

Pilot Pump Pressure (Swing Brake/Pilot Pump –