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“ Comparing Continuous Fluid Bed Dryers: Vibrating vs Static ” GEA Process Engineering
“ Comparing Continuous Fluid Bed Dryers: Vibrating vs Static ” GEA Process Engineering

Comparing Continuous Fluid Bed Dryers:

Vibrating vs Static

GEA Process Engineering

Presented by

Presented by Jim Schak , GEA Process Engineering Inc. North America (GPNA) Sales Manager for Chem

Jim Schak, GEA Process Engineering Inc. North America (GPNA) Sales Manager for Chem System Division of GPNA Instructor for University of Wisconsin “Drying Technology” Course Email: james.schak@gea.com Phone: 973-316-2499

Ananta Islam , GEA Process Engineering Inc. North America (GPNA) Sales Engineer for Chem System Division of GPNA Email: Ananta.Islam@gea.com Phone: 410-997-6621

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GEA Process Engineering

Comparing Continuous Fluid Bed Dryers: Vibrating vs Static

“ Comparing Continuous Fluid Bed Dryers: Vibrating vs Static ” 1. Webinar Outline: Introduction 2. Fluid

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Webinar Outline:

Introduction

  • 2. Fluid Bed Drying Principle

  • 3. Static Fluid Bed Design

  • 4. Advantages of Static Fluid Bed(SFB) Design

  • 5. Vibrating Fluid Bed Design

  • 6. Advantages of Vibrating Fluid Bed(VFB) Design

  • 7. Hybrid Static Fluid Bed Design

  • 8. Fluid bed with Integral Bag Collector

  • 9. Closed Cycle Drying

    • 10. Fluid Bed as a Second Stage Dryer

    • 11. Design Table comparison(SFB/VFB) for air flow, energy, capacity, bed area and retention time.

    • 12. Summary

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“ Comparing Continuous Fluid Bed Dryers: Vibrating vs Static ” 1. Webinar Outline: Introduction 2. Fluid

GEA Process Engineering

Introduction:

Introduction: There are two types of continuous fluid bed dryer: Vibrating or Static. • Overlapping applications

There are two types of continuous fluid bed dryer: Vibrating or Static.

Overlapping applications for both types, It is important to understand the capabilities and shortcomings of each.

SFB is first choice.

Introduction: There are two types of continuous fluid bed dryer: Vibrating or Static. • Overlapping applications
Introduction: There are two types of continuous fluid bed dryer: Vibrating or Static. • Overlapping applications

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Introduction: There are two types of continuous fluid bed dryer: Vibrating or Static. • Overlapping applications

GEA Process Engineering

Fluid Bed Drying Principle

Fluid Bed Drying Principle 5 GEA Process Engineering
Fluid Bed Drying Principle 5 GEA Process Engineering
Fluid Bed Drying Principle 5 GEA Process Engineering
Fluid Bed Drying Principle 5 GEA Process Engineering
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GEA Process Engineering

Advantages of a Static Fluid Bed(SFB) Design:

Advantages of a Static Fluid Bed(SFB) Design: * Bed depth is usually in 5 to 10+

* Bed depth is usually in 5 to 10+ times the bed depth of a VFB * A backmix zone allows the handling of a wide range of feed moistures. * The SFB does not need to be vibrated and has less moving parts than VFB. * There are no flex connections required that may limit operating temperatures. * Internal heat panel design reduces the amount of air exhausted. * Special directional air plate aids in directing the flow of product. * In a closed cycle SFB dryer the heat panels minimizes the amount of heat and cooling required.

Video Clip

Advantages of a Static Fluid Bed(SFB) Design: * Bed depth is usually in 5 to 10+
Advantages of a Static Fluid Bed(SFB) Design: * Bed depth is usually in 5 to 10+
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Static Fluid-bed Dryer System

Static Fluid-bed Dryer System 7 GEA Process Engineering
Static Fluid-bed Dryer System 7 GEA Process Engineering
Static Fluid-bed Dryer System 7 GEA Process Engineering

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Static Fluid-bed Dryer System 7 GEA Process Engineering

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Static Fluid-bed Dryers w/ Internal Heat Panels

Static Fluid-bed Dryers w/ Internal Heat Panels Heating Coils to add Heat without using more Air
Static Fluid-bed Dryers w/ Internal Heat Panels Heating Coils to add Heat without using more Air

Heating Coils to add Heat without using more Air

High Heat and mass transfer due to wet material always in contact with the drying medium

Static Fluid-bed Dryers w/ Internal Heat Panels Heating Coils to add Heat without using more Air

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Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix Zones

Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix Zones • Can accept non-fluidizable feed • Can only dry
Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix Zones • Can accept non-fluidizable feed • Can only dry

Can accept non-fluidizable feed

Can only dry off surface moisture

Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix Zones • Can accept non-fluidizable feed • Can only dry

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Glass Fluid Bed Bench Top Test Unit

Glass Fluid Bed Bench Top Test Unit 10 GEA Process Engineering
Glass Fluid Bed Bench Top Test Unit 10 GEA Process Engineering

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Glass Fluid Bed Bench Top Test Unit 10 GEA Process Engineering

GEA Process Engineering

Calculating Retention Time in a Fluid Bed Dryer

Calculating Retention Time in a Fluid Bed Dryer Feed Rate: 3 cu.meters/min Retention Time = Volume

Feed Rate: 3 cu.meters/min

Retention Time = Volume of bed/Flow Rate Example: 6 cu.meters / 3 cu.meters/min =

2 minutes

Calculating Retention Time in a Fluid Bed Dryer Feed Rate: 3 cu.meters/min Retention Time = Volume

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Calculating Retention Time in a Fluid Bed Dryer Feed Rate: 3 cu.meters/min Retention Time = Volume

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GEA Process Engineering

Feed Distributor Special Feed Distributor Designs to spread the feed evenly in the backmix zone 12
Feed Distributor Special Feed Distributor Designs to spread the feed evenly in the backmix zone 12

Feed Distributor

Special Feed Distributor Designs to spread the feed evenly in the backmix zone

Feed Distributor Special Feed Distributor Designs to spread the feed evenly in the backmix zone 12

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Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Plug Flow Zone

Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Plug Flow Zone • Can only accept fluidizable feed. • Can dry
Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Plug Flow Zone • Can only accept fluidizable feed. • Can dry

Can only accept fluidizable feed.

Can dry interstitially bound moisture.

Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Plug Flow Zone • Can only accept fluidizable feed. • Can dry

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GEA Process Engineering

Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix & Plug Flow Zones

Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix & Plug Flow Zones • Combination of back-mix and plug
Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix & Plug Flow Zones • Combination of back-mix and plug

Combination of back-mix and plug flow fluid bed

Provided with or without heating panels.

Static Fluid Bed Dryer: Back Mix & Plug Flow Zones • Combination of back-mix and plug

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Static Fluid-Bed Dryers w/ Heat Panels

Static Fluid-Bed Dryers w/ Heat Panels 15 GEA Process Engineering
Static Fluid-Bed Dryers w/ Heat Panels 15 GEA Process Engineering
Static Fluid-Bed Dryers w/ Heat Panels 15 GEA Process Engineering
Static Fluid-Bed Dryers w/ Heat Panels 15 GEA Process Engineering

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VFB Advantages:

VFB Advantages: The VFB is a vibratory conveyor that has a holes in the pan to

The VFB is a vibratory conveyor that has a holes in the pan to allow air to bubble up through the holes and contact the wet feed solids.

Distribution of particle size – The VFB relies on the vibrating action to conveying the product, so the air velocity can be adjusted without greatly affecting the conveying action of the VFB.

Particle Shape - The vibrating action will minimize the air channeling(rat holing) effect of long L/D shapes

Small Particle Size – The VFB can handle a smaller particle size than a SFB since air flow is independent of transport.

Plug Flow Design – The vibrating action is a more positive force that aids in “first in first out” design ..

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Versatility

VFB Advantages: The VFB is a vibratory conveyor that has a holes in the pan to

VFB Flow Diagram & Commercial Size Unit

VFB Flow Diagram & Commercial Size Unit 17 GEA Process Engineering
VFB Flow Diagram & Commercial Size Unit 17 GEA Process Engineering

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Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic

Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering

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Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer Schematic 18 GEA Process Engineering

GEA Process Engineering

Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer (Quick Clean)

Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer (Quick Clean) 19 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer (Quick Clean) 19 GEA Process Engineering

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Vibrating Fluid Bed Dryer (Quick Clean) 19 GEA Process Engineering

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Vibrating Fluid Bed Technology

Vibrating Fluid Bed Technology Vibro-Fluidizer 1990 Air Distribution plate 20 GEA Process Engineering
Vibro-Fluidizer 1990
Vibro-Fluidizer
1990

Air Distribution plate

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Vibrating Fluid Bed Technology Vibro-Fluidizer 1990 Air Distribution plate 20 GEA Process Engineering
Vibrating Fluid Bed Technology Vibro-Fluidizer 1990 Air Distribution plate 20 GEA Process Engineering

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Rice Fluidization - With & Without Vibration

Rice Fluidization - With & Without Vibration 21 GEA Process Engineering
Rice Fluidization - With & Without Vibration 21 GEA Process Engineering

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Air Directional Plates

Air Directional Plates 22 GEA Process Engineering
Air Directional Plates 22 GEA Process Engineering

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Air Directional Plates 22 GEA Process Engineering

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Barrier Gas Design

Barrier Gas Design 23 GEA Process Engineering
Barrier Gas Design 23 GEA Process Engineering

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Barrier Gas Design 23 GEA Process Engineering

GEA Process Engineering

Advantages of Integrated Bag Filter Design

Advantages of Integrated Bag Filter Design GEA Process Engineering • Full thermal treatment of fines •
GEA Process Engineering
GEA Process Engineering

Full thermal treatment of fines

Compact design

Reduced pressure drop lower power consumption

Lower dust emission and no waste water compared to a wet scrubber

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Fluid Bed Dryer with an Integral Baghouse Design

Fluid Bed Dryer with an Integral Baghouse Design 25 GEA Process Engineering
Fluid Bed Dryer with an Integral Baghouse Design 25 GEA Process Engineering
Fluid Bed Dryer with an Integral Baghouse Design 25 GEA Process Engineering
Fluid Bed Dryer with an Integral Baghouse Design 25 GEA Process Engineering

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Closed Cycle Fluid Bed Dryer

Closed Cycle Fluid Bed Dryer “Whatever you put in, you have to take out” 26 GEA
Closed Cycle Fluid Bed Dryer “Whatever you put in, you have to take out” 26 GEA

“Whatever you put in, you have to take out”

Closed Cycle Fluid Bed Dryer “Whatever you put in, you have to take out” 26 GEA

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GEA Process Engineering

Using a Fluid Bed Dryer as a Secondary Dryer

Using a Fluid Bed Dryer as a Secondary Dryer Fines Recirculation Feed Tank: Cyclone Vibrating Fluid
Fines Recirculation Feed Tank: Cyclone Vibrating Fluid Bed
Fines Recirculation
Feed Tank:
Cyclone
Vibrating Fluid Bed

Exhaust Fan

Using a Fluid Bed Dryer as a Secondary Dryer Fines Recirculation Feed Tank: Cyclone Vibrating Fluid
Using a Fluid Bed Dryer as a Secondary Dryer Fines Recirculation Feed Tank: Cyclone Vibrating Fluid
Using a Fluid Bed Dryer as a Secondary Dryer Fines Recirculation Feed Tank: Cyclone Vibrating Fluid
Using a Fluid Bed Dryer as a Secondary Dryer Fines Recirculation Feed Tank: Cyclone Vibrating Fluid

Static Fluid Bed

Baghouse

Using a Fluid Bed Dryer as a Secondary Dryer Fines Recirculation Feed Tank: Cyclone Vibrating Fluid

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GEA Process Engineering

Spray Granulator Static Fluid Bed

Spray Granulator Static Fluid Bed Spray layers of coatings on a particle like onion peels 0.5-5

Spray layers of coatings on a particle like onion peels 0.5-5 mm pellets are achievable The larger the particle the higher the air flow the higher the evaporative rate

Spray Nozzles
Spray Nozzles
Spray Granulator Static Fluid Bed Spray layers of coatings on a particle like onion peels 0.5-5
.
.

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  • 28 GEA Process Engineering

Table 1

Table 1 The data shows how the design factors vary for a standard static fluid-bed dryer

The data shows how the design factors vary for a standard static fluid-bed dryer and vibrating fluid-bed dryer when drying wet organic salt crystals from 5 percent to 1 percent moisture at the same production rate.

Table 1 The data shows how the design factors vary for a standard static fluid-bed dryer

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Table 1 The data shows how the design factors vary for a standard static fluid-bed dryer

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Table 2

Table 2 The data in Table II shows how the design of a hybrid static fluid-bed

The data in Table II shows how the design of a hybrid static fluid-bed dryer with

conductive heat panels.

The data is based on drying polyvinyl chloride (PVC)

powder from about 26 percent to less than 2 percent moisture at the same

production rate.

Table 2 The data in Table II shows how the design of a hybrid static fluid-bed
Table 2 The data in Table II shows how the design of a hybrid static fluid-bed

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GEA Process Engineering

In Summary

In Summary • It seems to be clear that a SFB has many technical design advantages

It seems to be clear that a SFB has many technical design advantages over a VFB but its applications are very limited.

The versatility of the VFB gives a bigger window of operation.

Feasibility, laboratory, pilot plant testing and a good understanding of the design limitations will be important in the final determination of equipment selection and scaleup.

In Summary • It seems to be clear that a SFB has many technical design advantages

Thank You for Your Interest.

GEA Process Engineering

Question

Question Do you need a feed rotary airlock to minimize air inleakage? 32 GEA Process Engineering

Do you need a feed rotary airlock to minimize air inleakage?

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GEA Process Engineering

Answer

Answer • OK, I am glad that you brought this point up. First of all let

OK, I am glad that you brought this point up. First of all let me say that the feed entry point in a dryer is usually the most problematic area. Great attention should be made concerning the feed. If you can get a uniform consistent feed without large lumps into the dryer usually you are able to dry the material successfully. So Hopefully you have this consistent feed and now you want to make sure that you are not sucking in a lot of air which can rob you of heated drying air going through the burner. There are different ways to minimize air inleakage at the feed entry point. One is using a rotary air lock. Rotary airlocks can be a problem though. If the material is sticky or pasty, you can have some buildup issues in the pockets of the valve. You can go to a larger valve with smooth shallow pockets to try to avoid buildup, but in any case there is some air leakage in all rotary airlocks. When dealing with an abrasive material it is difficult not to have leakage.

Another is to balance the fans and zero point the inlet as mentioned above. Maybe the best way is to use a screw feeder and fill up the screw flights with material to create a seal to prevent air from passing back the screw flights. An intermeshing co-rotating twin screw with a wet material should be enough to achieve this air lock. This design has a positive conveying action that will promote the flow into the dryer. The multiple screw design has many discharge points so there is less plopping of the wet free which can translate to less fluctuations of the product moisture.

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Answer • OK, I am glad that you brought this point up. First of all let

GEA Process Engineering

Question

Question Why don’t we use a closed cycle dryer with no exhaust on every dryer? 34

Why don’t we use a closed cycle dryer with no exhaust on every dryer?

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GEA Process Engineering

Answer

Answer • OK There are some engineers that think that in 15-20 years from now that

OK There are some engineers that think that in 15-20 years from now that you will not be able to exhaust anything into the air, so why not start now. I do have one company that does not need a closed cycle system since he is using water, and wants to go to a closed cycle system. Maybe eventually we will have to go in that direction, but there is a high premium for going to a closed cycle system. Cooling BTUs are more expensive then heating btus. Refrigeration can get very expensive especially if you need to go to low air temperatures to condense out the solvent. It is sometimes tough enough to justify the money to build a plant on its own merits, putting on an additional cost could “break the bank”.

Answer • OK There are some engineers that think that in 15-20 years from now that

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GEA Process Engineering

Question

Question What is an underflow weir? 36 GEA Process Engineering

What is an underflow weir?

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GEA Process Engineering

Answer

Answer • Most fluid beds use an overflow weir especially at the end of the dryer.

Most fluid beds use an overflow weir especially at the end of the dryer. It

is basically a dam.

The weir is to aid in controlling the bed depth in the

dryer.

If you are dealing with a heat sensitive material like a food

product, you can buildup some of the large particles at the base of the weir and may degrade over a period of time. In these cases you can have a plate timed to rotate up off the bed to allow possible buildup of material to flow under it. This reduces the possibility of off spec material.

Answer • Most fluid beds use an overflow weir especially at the end of the dryer.

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GEA Process Engineering

Question

Question Do you need an air directional holes in a Vibrating fluid bed? 38 GEA Process

Do you need an air directional holes in a Vibrating fluid bed?

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GEA Process Engineering

Answer

Answer • OK, Do you need g ill type holes in a VFB? Not necessarily. In

OK, Do you need gill type holes in a VFB?

Not necessarily. In a SFB it

becomes more important but in the VFB, you do have the vibrating conveying action to promote the flow of the material, but you usually still have a residue of material in the dryer. The air directional gills due aid in the cleanout and does it faster. It may also help in getting difficult to flow feeds to convey at the feed entry point.

Answer • OK, Do you need g ill type holes in a VFB? Not necessarily. In

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GEA Process Engineering