Anda di halaman 1dari 42

List of active Indian Navy ships

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Naval Ensign of the Indian Navy.


List of active Indian Navy ships is a list of ships in active service with the Indian
Navy. In service ships are taken from the official Indian Navy website. [1] The Indian
Navy is one of the largest navies in the world, [2] and as of 2014 possesses two
aircraft carriers, one amphibious transport dock, 9 Landing ship tanks, 9 destroyers,
15 frigates, one nuclear-powered attack submarine, 14 conventionally-powered
attack submarines, 25 corvettes, 7 mine countermeasure vessels, 10 large offshore
patrol vessels, 4 fleet tankers and various auxiliary vessels and small patrol boats.
For ships no longer in service see List of ships of the Indian Navy and for future
ships of Indian navy see Future ships of the Indian Navy
Besides the following navy ships, the Indian Coast Guard operates around 90 - 100
armed patrol ships of various sizes.
Contents

1 Submarine fleet
o

1.1 Nuclear-powered submarines

1.2 Conventionally-powered submarines

2 Surface fleet
o

2.1 Aircraft carriers

2.2 Amphibious warfare ships

2.3 Destroyers and frigates

2.4 Corvettes

2.5 Mine countermeasure vessels

2.6 Patrol vessels

3 Auxiliary fleet
o

3.1 Replenishment ships

3.2 Support ships

3.3 Research and survey vessels

3.4 Training vessels

3.5 Tugboats

3.6 Miscellaneous

4 See also

5 Notes

6 References

7 External links

Submarine fleet
Nuclear-powered submarines
Class Picture

Boat
Origin
s

Type

Displacem
Note
ent[a]

Nuclear-powered submarines (1 in Service)


Chakr
a
(Akula
II)class

INS
Attack
Chakr
submari
a
a
ne (SSN)
(S71)

Ballistic
Missile
submari
ne
(SSBN)

Arihan
t-class

INS
Ariha
nt
(S73)

Russi 12,770
tonnes

Under a 10
year lease
from Russia
since 2012.

6,000
India tonnes,
surfaced

Undergoing
sea trials,
expected to
be
commission
ed by
2014-2015.

Conventionally-powered submarines
Class

Picture

Type

Boats

Origin

Conventionally-powered submarines (14 in Service)

Displace
Note
ment[a]

Sindhugh
osh-class

INS
Sindhugh
osh (S55)
INS
Sindhudh
vaj (S56)
INS
Sindhuraj
(S57)
INS
Sindhuvir
(S58)
INS
Sindhurat
Sovie
na (S59)
Attack
t Union 3,076
INS
submar
Sindhuke
Russi tonnes
ine
sari (S60) a
INS
Sindhukirt
i (S61)
INS
Sindhuvij
ay (S62)
INS
Sindhurak
shak
(S63)
INS
Sindhush
astra
(S65)

S63
Sindhurak
shak
exploded
and sank
on the 14
August
2013.
Officials
say it is
"highly
unlikely"
she will
return to
active
service,[3]
but the
final
decision
will be
made only
after the
boat is refloated
and
inspected.
[4][5]

S61
Sindhukirt
i is
currently
under refit and is
scheduled
to re-join
the fleet
on 31
March
2015.[6]

Shishum
ar-class

INS
Shishuma
r (S44)
INS
Attack Shankush
Germ 1,850
submar (S45)
tonnes
any
ine
INS Shalki
(S46)
INS
Shankul
(S47)

To be
armed
with
Harpoon
Block-II
anti-ship
missiles[7]

Surface fleet
Aircraft carriers
Class Picture

Type Ships

Origin

Displace
Note
ment

Aircraft carriers (2 in service)

Centa
urclass

Aircra
Unit
ft
INS Viraat
28,700
ed
carrie (R22)
tonnes
Kingdom
r

STOVL
carrier.
Scheduled to
be
decommissio
ned by 2018
and replaced
by INS
Vikrant.[8]

Modifie
d Kievclass

Aircra
INS
ft
Russ 45,400
Vikramadi
carrie
tonnes
ia
tya (R33)
r

STOBAR
carrier.

Amphibious warfare ships


Note: In addition, the Indian Navy maintains a number of smaller landing craft that
operate from and in conjunction with these vessels below. They serve to transport
troops and equipment from ship to shore during an amphibious operation.
Class

Picture

Type

Amphibious warfare ships (1 in Service)

Ships Origin

Displace
ment

Note

Austinclass

Amphibio
us
transport
dock
(LPD)

INS
Jalash
Unite 16,590
wa
d States tonnes
(L41)

Landing ships (9 in Service)

Shardu
l-class

INS
Shardu
l (L16)
Landing INS
ship tank Kesari
(LST)
(L15)
INS
Airavat
(L24)

India

5,600
tonnes[10]

Magarclass

INS
Magar
Landing
(L20)
ship tank
INS
(LST)
Gharial
(L23)

India

5,655
tonnes[11]

Under
terms of
sale,
Jalashwa
cannot
be used
during a
war or
offensive
operation
, unless
such
action is
granted
by the
United
States
Pentagon
.[9]

INS
Cheeta
h (L18)
INS
Mahish
Landing
(L19)
ship tank
INS
d
(LST)
Guldar
(L21)
INS
Kumbh
ir (L22)

Kumbh
ir-class

Two
larger
ships in
the
center as
seen in
picture.

Polan 1,100
tonnes

Large Landing Craft Utility (6 in Service)

Landing
Craft
Utility
(LCU)

LCT
Mk.3

INS
LCU 33
(L33)
INS
LCU 35
(L35)
INS
LCU 36
(L36)
INS
LCU 37
(L37)
INS
LCU 38
(L38)
INS
LCU 39
(L39)

Outer two
640 tonnes ships as
India [13]
seen in
picture.

[12]

Destroyers and frigates


Class

Picture

Type

Ships

Origin

Displace
Note
ment

Destroyers and frigates (24 in service)


Kolkataclass

Stealth INS
Guided Kolkata
missile (D63)
destro
yer

Indi 7,500
tonnes
[15]

[14]

Two more
ships INS
Kochi and
INS
Chennai to
be
commissio

ned.

Delhiclass

Rajputclass

Shivalikclass

Talwarclass

INS Delhi
(D61)
Guided INS
missile Mysore
destro (D60)
a
yer
INS
Mumbai
(D62)

Indi 6,700
tonnes

INS
Rajput
(D51)
INS Rana
(D52)
Sovi
Guided INS Ranjit
et
missile (D53)
4,974
Union
destro INS
tonnes
Indi
yer
Ranvir
a
(D54)
INS
Ranvijay
(D55)
INS
Shivalik
(F47)
MultiINS
role
Satpura
stealth
a
(F48)
frigate
INS
Sahyadri
(F49)
Multirole
stealth
frigate

Indi 6,200
tonnes

INS
Rus 4,035
Talwar
tonnes
sia
(F40)
INS
Trishul
(F43)
INS Tabar
(F44)
INS Teg
(F45)
INS
Tarkash

Built, in
the Soviet
Union, to
Indian
design
modificatio
ns of the
Soviet
Kashin
class
destroyers
design.

(F50)
INS
Trikand
(F51)

Brahmapu
tra-class

INS
Brahmap
utra (F31)
Guided
INS
missile
Betwa
a
frigate
(F39)
INS Beas
(F37)

Indi 3,850
tonnes

Godavariclass

INS
Godavari
(F20)
Guided INS
missile Ganga
a
frigate (F22)
INS
Gomati
(F21)

Indi 3,850
tonnes

Corvettes
Class

Picture

Type

Ships Origin

Displace
ment

Note

Corvettes (25 in Service)

Kamort
a-class

Koraclass

Stealth INS
ASW Kamor
Corvet ta
te
(P28)

Corvet INS
te
Kora
(P61)
INS
Kirch
(P62)
INS
Kulish
(P63)

3,500
India tonnes
[17]

India 1,350
tonnes

[16]

Three more
ships INS
Kadmatt,
INS Kiltan,
INS
Kavaratti to
be
commission
ed.

INS
Karmu
k (P64)

Khukriclass

Veerclass

INS
Khukri
(P49)
INS
Kuthar
Corvet (P46)
te
INS
Kirpan
(P44)
INS
Khanja
r (P47)

India

1,350
tonnes

Corvet INS
India 455 tonnes Customized
te
Veer
Indian
Sovi
(light) (K40) et Union
variant of
INS
the Soviet
Nirbhi
Tarantul
k (K41)
class.
INS
Nipat
(K42)
INS
Nishan
k (K43)
INS
Nirgha
t (K44)
INS
Vibhuti
(K45)
INS
Vipul
(K46)
INS
Vinash
(K47)
INS
Vidyut
(K48)
INS
Nasha
k (K83)
INS

Prabal
(K92)
INS
Pralay
a (K91)
INS
Abhay
(P33)
INS
Customized
Ajay
Indian
Corvet
India
(P34)
variants of
te
Sovi 485 tonnes
INS
the Soviet
(light)
et Union
Aksha
Pauk class
y (P35)
corvettes.
INS
Agray
(P36)

Abhayclass

Mine countermeasure vessels


Class

Picture

Type

Ships

Origin

Displace
ment

Mine countermeasure vessels (7 in Service)

Pondicher
ry-class

INS
Alleppey
(M65)
INS
Karwar
(M67)
INS
Cannan
ore
(M68)
Minesweep INS
Sovi
891 tonnes
er
Cuddalo et Union
re (M69)
INS
Kakinad
a (M70)
INS
Kozhiko
de (M71)
INS
Konkan
(M72)

Not
e

Patrol vessels
Class

Picture

Type

Ships

Origin

Displace
ment

Note

Patrol vessels (47 in Service)

Saryuclass

INS
Saryu
(P54)
INS
Offsho Sunayn
re
a (P57)
patrol INS
a
vessel Sumedh
a (P58)
INS
Sumitra
(P59)

Indi 2,215
tonnes

Can be
armed to
frigate
standard in
case of a
war.[18]

Sukanyaclass

INS
Sukany
a (P50)
INS
Subhadr
a (P51)
INS
Sout
Offsho Suvarna
re
(P52)
h Korea 1,890
patrol INS
Indi tonnes
vessel Savitri a
(P53)
INS
Sharada
(P55)
INS
Sujata
(P56)

Can be
armed to
frigate
standard in
case of a
war.[18]

Car
Nicobarclass

Patrol INS Car


boat Nicobar a
(T69)
INS
Chetlat
(T70)
INS
Kora
Divh
(T71)

Indi 325 tonnes

INS
Cheriya
m (T72)
INS
Cankara
so (T73)
INS
Kondul
(T74)
INS
Kalpeni
(T75)
INS
Kabra
(T76)
INS
Koswari
(T77)
INS
Karuva
(T78)

Bangara
m-class

INS
Bangar
am
(T65)
INS
Bitra
Patrol (T66)
boat INS
a
Batti
Malv
(T67)
INS
Baratan
g (T68)

Trinkatclass

INS
Trinkat
Patrol (T61)
boat INS
Tarasa
(T63)

Indi

Indi
a

260 tonnes

260 tonnes

Super
Dvoraclass

T80
T81
T82
Patrol
T83
boat
T84
T85
T86

Solas
Marine
fast
intercept
or boat

at least
Patrol
Sri
4 in
boat
Lanka
service

Immedia
te
Support
Vessels
(ISV)

Patrol 10 in
boat service a

Israe
l

60 tonnes

60 tonnes

Total 80 on
order.[19][20]

Total 23
ordered.[21]

Indi

[22]

Auxiliary fleet
Replenishment ships
Class Picture

Type

Ships Origin

Displacem
Note
ent

Replenishment ships (4 in Service)

Deepa
k-class

INS
Deep
ak
Replenishm (A50)
ent oiler
INS
Shakt
i
(A57)

Italy

Jyoticlass

INS
Replenishm
Jyoti
ent oiler
a
(A58)

Russi 35,900
tonnes

27,500
tonnes

INS
Replenishm
Adity
ent oiler &
a
Repair ship
(A59)

Adityaclass

India

24,612
tonnes

Support ships
Class

Picture

Type

Ships

Origin

Displace
ment

Note

19,000

[23][24][25]

Support ships (6 in Service)


INS
Troopshi Nicobar
p
INS
Andamans

Nicobarclass

Not
listed
on
official
Indian
Navy
websit
e.

INS
Hospital
Lakshadw
ship
eep

Torpedo
INS INS Arecover
73 (TLRV) a
y vessel

Astravahi
ni-Class

Indi

Diving INS
support Nireeksha
vessel k (A15)

110 tonnes

2,160
tonnes

Research and survey vessels


Class

Picture

Type

Ships

Research and survey vessels (10 in Service)

Origin

Displace
Note
ment

Sagardhw
ani

Resear INS
ch
Sagardhw
a
vessel ani (A74)

Indi 2,050
tonnes

Sandhaya
k-class

INS
Nirupak
(J14)
INS
Investigat
or (J15)
INS
Jamuna
(J16)
INS Sutlej
(J17)
Survey
INS
vessel
a
Sandhaya
k (J18)
INS
Nirdeshak
(J19)
INS
Darshak
(J20)
INS
Sarveksh
ak (J22)

Indi 1,800
tonnes

Makarclass

Survey INS Makar


vessel (J31)
a

Indi 500
tonnes

New
catamara
n design.
Five more
ships are
under
various
stage of
constructi
on.

Training vessels
Clas
Picture
s

Type

Ships

Origin

Displace
ment

Note

Training vessels (4 in Service)

Trainin
INS Tir
g
(A86)
vessel

INS
Varuna
Trainin INS
g
Tarangi
vessel ni (A75) a
(sail) INS
Sudarsh
ini (A77)

Trainin INSV
g boat Mhadei
a
(sail) (A76)

Indi 3,200
tonnes

Indi

500 tonnes

Has been
used for solo,
unassisted,
Indi
23 tonnes non-stop
circumnavigat
ion under sail
two times.[26]

Tugboats
Class

Picture

Type Ships Origin

Displace
ment

Note

Tug boats (19 in Service)

Gajclass
tugboat

Ocean
INS
-going
Matang
tugbo
a
a (A53)
at

Indi 1,334
tonnes

The first ship


of the class,
INS Gaj (A51)
was
decommissio
ned in 1996.

Ocean
-going INS Gaj
tugbo (2002)
at

560 tonnes

Bhimclass

INS
Bhim
Tugbo INS
at
Balshil
INS
Ajral

Not listed on
official Indian
373 tonnes
Navy
website.

Madan
Singhclass

INS
Madan
Singh
Tugbo
INS
at
Shamb
hu
Singh

Not listed on
official Indian
382 tonnes
Navy
website.

Balram
-class

INS
Balram
Tugbo
INS
at
Bajran
g

Not listed on
official Indian
216 tonnes
Navy
website.

Bahadu
r-class

INS
Tugbo
Bahad
at
ur

Not listed on
official Indian
100 tonnes
Navy
website.

Anandclass

Tugbo INS
at
Anand

Not listed on
official Indian
100 tonnes
Navy
website.

B.C.
Duttclass

INS B.
C. Dutt
Tugbo
INS
at
Tarafda
r

Not listed on
official Indian
355 tonnes
Navy
website.

Nakulclass

INS
Tugbo Nakul
at
INS
Arjun

Not listed on
official Indian
373 tonnes
Navy
website.

Argaclass

INS
Arga
Tugbo INS
at
Bali
INS
Anup

Not listed on
official Indian
239 tonnes
Navy
website.

Tugbo INS
at
Sarthi

Indi
a

25 tonnes

[27]

Miscellaneous
Class

Pictur
Type
e

Ships

Origin

Displacem
Note
ent

Miscellaneous (24 in Service)


Ambikaclass

High sulphur
diesel oiler

INS Ambika

1,000
tonnes

Not listed on
official Indian
Navy
website.

Not listed on
official Indian
India 671 tonnes
Navy
website.

Fuel carrier
(barge)

INS Poshak

Fuel carrier
(barge)

INS Purak
INS Puran

HooghlyClass

Fuel carrier
(barge)

INS
INS
INS
INS

Vipul-Class

INS Pamba
Water carrier INS Pulakesin(barge)
1
INS Ambuda

Not listed on
official Indian
598 tonnes
Navy
website.

Small
ferryboat

175 tonnes Not listed on


official Indian
Navy

ModestClass

GSL-class

INS
INS
INS
INS

???
???
???
???

Manohar
Modak
Mangal
Madhur

Not listed on
official Indian
731 tonnes
Navy
website.
1,700
tonnes

Not listed on
official Indian
Navy
website.

INS
Manorama
INS Manjula
Manoramclass

Small
ferryboat

INS Manoram
INS Vihar

Shalimarclass

Small
ferryboat

INS Neelam

Sullage
(barge)

INS
INS
INS
INS

Corporatedclass

SB-II
SB-II
SB-V
SB-VII

website.
Not listed on
official Indian
578 tonnes
Navy
website.
India 218 tonnes
Not listed on
official Indian
220 tonnes
Navy
website.

Future of the Indian Navy


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Future ships of the Indian Navy)

Naval Ensign of India


Western fleet of Indian navy, showing some of the latest additions to the fleet
The Indian Navy has been focusing on developing indigenous platforms, systems, sensors and
weapons as part of the nation's modernisation and expansion of its maritime forces. As of 2014
the Indian Navy has 41 vessels of various types under construction including; an aircraft carrier,
destroyers, frigates, corvettes, and nuclear-powered submarines. In 2013 a senior naval official,
Rear Admiral Atul Kumar Jain, outlined the Indian Navy's intention to build 200 ships navy over
a 10 year period.[1] according to Chief of Naval Staff Admiral RK Dhowan, India has
transformed from a buyer's navy to a builder's navy .[2] All 41 ships under construction are being
produced in indigenous Indian ships yards, both publicly and privately owned.[3] However some
projects have suffered from long delays and cost overruns.[4]
Increasing People's Liberation Army Navy interest in the Indian Ocean region[5] has led the
Indian Navy to invest more in anti submarine ships, such as the Kamorta-class corvette, long
range maritime reconnaissance aircraft, and ships such as the Saryu-class patrol vessel[6] and
unmanned aerial vehicles such as the IAI Heron-1.[7] However the lack of a strong submarine
fleet have diminished its capabilities to some extent.[8]

Contents

1 Submarines
o 1.1 Conventional
o 1.2 Nuclear-powered

2 Aircraft carriers

3 Landing helicopter docks

4 Destroyers

5 Frigates

6 Corvettes

7 Mine-countermeasures

8 Replenishment ships

9 Survey vessel

10 See also

11 References

Submarines
Conventional

Class

Picture

Type

No.o
f Origi displaceme
ship n
nt
s

status

Note

Scorpne
-class
submarin
e
Scorpene Tunku

project75i
Not Available
(Code
Name)

project got
delayed
for 4
years.first
ship will
Attack
Under
6
2,000
be in
submarin
India
constructi
ships
tonnes
service by
e
on
2016,all 6
ships will
be in
service by
2022[9]
on 25
October
2014
Defence
Acquisitio
n Council
of India
Attack
cleared
6
submarin
India 2000 tonnes planned the
ships
e
purchase
of 6
submarine
s worth
53,000cro
re from
local ships
yards [10]

Nuclear-powered

Class

Picture

Arihantclass
submarin
e
Ins Arihant
Arihant Not available
follow-

Type

No.o
f Origi displaceme
ship n
nt
s

status

Note

first ship
of Arihant
Ballistic
Under
class will
missile 3
India 6000 tonnes constructi join the
submari ships
on
fleet
ne
within
2015[11]
Ballistic 3
India 7000 tonnes ?
missile ships
(est)

it will be
an

on
submarin
e

submari
ne

Attack
Nuclear 6
India ?
submari ships
ne

Not Available

Planned

improved
version of
Arihantclass
submarine
and will
house
twice more
K Missile
family
all 6 ships
will be
constructe
d in the
shipbuildin
g centre
(SBC) at
Vizag.The
expertise
gained in
the
constructio
n of the
Arihant
class
SSBNs
will help
the SSN
project[12]

Aircraft carriers
Class

Picture

INS
Vikran
t
(2013)

INS

Vikrant class aircraft carrier


CGI
Not Available

No.o
f Origi displaceme
Type
ship n
nt
s

status

Note

sea trails will


start on 2016
Aircra
Under
and ins vikrant
1
40,000tonne
ft
India
constructi will join
ship
s
carrier
on
Eastern Naval
Command on
2018[13]
Aircra 1

India 65,000

final stage INS Vishal

ft
ship
carrier

Vishal

tonnes

might be
nuclearpowered with
CATOBAR
system to
launch aircraft
and will
of design operate HAL
AMCA,HAL
Tejas,Unmann
ed combat
aerial vehicle
Airborne early
warning and
control

Landing helicopter docks


Class

Picture

Indian Navy
Multi-Role
Support
Vessel
programme

Type

No.of
Origin displacement status
ships

Note

Only Indian private


shipyards partnered
with a international
Multi Role
shipyard can
Landing 4
Not yet 21000-27000
participate in the
planned
helicopter Ships selected tonnes
programme . The
dock
Indian navy is yet to
select a ship which
meets its
specification[14]

Destroyers
Class

Picture

Kolkata
-class
destroy
er

Type
Stealth
ship,
Guided
missile
destroy
er

Kolkata-class destroyer port

No.o
f Origi displaceme
status
ship n
nt
s
3
India 7500
1 ship (
ship
tonnes
INS
s
Kolkata
(D63) )
entered
into active
service
and 2 are

Note
other two ships
INS Kochi and
INS Chennai
will enter in
service within
2016[15]

Under
Constructi
on

view CGI

Stealth
ship,
4
Guided
8000
Ship India
missile
tonnes
s
destroy
er

Project
15B
(Code
Name)
P15A

project 15b
ships will have
much more
improved
stealth
features,hyperso
nic cruise
Under
missiles
Constructi BrahMos-II
on
,subsonic cruise
missiles
Nirbhay and a
bigger 126mm
gun. All ships
will be
delivered within
2022

Frigates
Class

Picture

Project
17Aclass
frigate
Project 17A class CGI

Type

No.of
displacemen
Origin
status
ships
t

Note

all 7 Ships
will be in
service by
2022 . 4
ships will
be made in
MultiMazagon
7
Planne
Role
India 6000 tonnes
Dock and
ships
d
Frigate
rest 3 will
be made in
Garden
Reach
Shipbuilder
s&
Engineers

Corvettes
Class

Picture

Type

No.o Origi displaceme


f
n
nt

status

Note

ships
long
range
1 ship is
sam and
active , 3
towed
are Under
Antiarray
4+8
Constructio
submarin
India 3400 tonnes
sonar
ships
n and
e warfare
currentl
additional
y not
8 ships are
installed
planned.
in the
ship.[16]

Kamorta
-class
corvette
INS Kamorta (3)

Mine-countermeasures
Class

Picture

Type

No.of
Origin displacement status
ships

GSL/kangam
Not
24
South
Mine Counter
minehunter
850 tonnes
Available
Ships Korea
Measure Vessels

Note

project kept on
Planned hold due to
investigation

Replenishment ships
Class Picture

Type

No.of
Origin displacement status
ships

Not
Replenishment 5
india
Available oiler
Ships

Note

Defence minister Arun


Jaitley cleared purchase
of 5 ships at a cost of
40,000 tonnes planned 9000 crore .all indian
private and public sector
shipyards are allowed to
participate.

Survey vessel
Class

Picture

Type

No.o
Origi displacemen
f
n
t
ships

status

Note

Makarclass
survey
catamara
n

Surve
6
y
india 500 tonnes
Ships
vessel

1
completed
and 5 are
under
Under
constructio
n

ins makar,first ship in its class.

ship is
also
capable
of
limited
search
and
rescue
mission

List of submarines of the Indian Navy


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Submarines of the Indian Navy)
This is a list of submarines of the Indian Navy, grouped by class, and ordered by pennant
numbers within the class.[1]

Contents

1 Commissioned submarines

2 Under construction

3 Decommissioned submarines

4 See also

5 Notes

6 References

7 External links

Commissioned submarines
Class

Picture

Displaceme
Note
nt[a]
Nuclear-powered submarines (1 in Service)
Type

Boats

Origin

Chakra
(Akula II)class

Sindhugho
sh-class

Shishumarclass

Attack
submari INS Chakra
ne
(S71)
(SSN)

Russia

12,770
tonnes

Conventionally-powered submarines (14 in Service)


INS
Sindhughos
h (S55)
INS
Sindhudhva
j (S56)
INS
Sindhuraj
(S57)
INS
Sindhuvir
(S58)
INS
Sindhuratn
Attack
a (S59)
Soviet
submari
3,076 tonnes
INS
Union
ne
Sindhukesa
ri (S60)
INS
Sindhukirti
(S61)
INS
Sindhuvijay
(S62)
INS
Sindhuraks
hak (S63)
INS
Sindhushas
tra (S65)
Attack INS
Germa 1,850 tonnes
submari Shishumar ny
ne
(S44)
INS
Shankush
(S45)
INS Shalki
(S46)

Under a 10
year lease
from Russia
since 2012.

S63
Sindhuraks
hak
exploded
and sank on
the 14
August
2013.
Officials
say it is
"highly
unlikely"
she will
return to
active
service,[2]
although
she was
salvaged in
June 2014.
[3]

S61
Sindhukirti
is currently
written off
[4]

To be
upgraded to
prolong
service life.
[5]

INS
Shankul
(S47)

Under construction
Class

Arihant
-class

Kalvari
-class

Picture

Type

Boats

Origin

Displacement[
a]

Nuclear-powered submarines (4 under construction)


INS
Arihant
Ballistic
INS
missile
Aridhama
India 6,000 tonnes
submarin
n
e (SSBN)
INS ????
INS ????
Diesel-electric submarines (6 under construction)

INS
Kalvari [6]
INS
Khanderi

Attack
submarin [7]
e
e
INS ????
INS ????
INS ????
INS ????

Decommissioned submarines

Franc
1,565 tonnes
India

Note

Lead vessel
Arihant
currently
undergoing
sea-trials

Lead vessel
Kalvari
currently
building;
scheduled to
be launched
in early 2015
and to be
commissione
d on Navy
Day, 2016.
Five other
vessels
expected to
be delivered
and
commissione
d from 20172022.

INS Chakra (S71), a leased Soviet Charlie class nuclear submarine.

INS Kursura Museum ship

Charlie class
o Chakra (S71), K-43 leased between 19871991

Kalvari class
o Kursura (S20)
o Karanj (S21)
o Khanderi (S22)
o Kalvari (S23)

Vela class
o Vela (S40)
o Vagir (S41)
o Vagli (S42)

o Vagsheer (S43)

Indian Coast Guard


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Indian Coast Guard
<bold>Bharatiya Tatrakshak</bold>

Indian Coast Guard crest

Active
Country
Type
Size
Part of
Headquarters
Motto
Anniversaries
Website

1978Present
India
Coast Guard
Active duty: 10,440 personnel
Ministry of Defence
Indian Armed Forces
New Delhi
(Sanskrit: We Protect)
Coast Guard Day: 1 February
indiancoastguard.nic.in

Commanders
Director
General
Additional
Director
General

Vice Admiral Anurag Gopalan


Thaplial, AVSM
ADG Rajendra Singh, PTM, TM

Insignia

Ensign

Aircraft flown
HAL Chetak

Helicopter

HAL Dhruv
Dornier Do 228

Patrol

The Indian Coast Guard (Hindi: , Bhratya Tataraks


aka)
(ICG) is the fourth

branch of the armed force of India. Its mission is the protection of India's maritime interests and
enforcement of maritime law, with jurisdiction over the territorial waters of India, including its
contiguous zone and exclusive economic zone.
ICG was formally established on 18 August 1978 as an armed force of the Union (aka BSF,
ITBP, CISF) by the Coast Guard Act, 1978. It operates under the Ministry of Defence.[1]
The Coast Guard works in close cooperation with the Indian Navy, Department of Fisheries,
Department of Revenue (Customs) and the Central and State police forces.

Contents

1 Mission

2 History

3 Personnel
o 3.1 Coast Guard officers

3.1.1 General Duty officers

3.1.2 Pilot officers

3.1.3 Technical officers

3.1.4 Law officers

o 3.2 Enrolled persons


o 3.3 Training

4 Organization
o 4.1 Establishments

o 4.2 Equipment

4.2.1 Surface vessels

4.2.2 Aircraft inventory

5 Planning and improvement

6 See also

7 References

8 External links

Mission

Coast Guard Office in Kochi, Kerala

Coast Guard helicopter at Chowpatty, Mumbai


The Indian Coast Guard's motto is (Vayam Rakshamah), which translates from
Sanskrit as We Protect.
Missions of Indian Coast Guard:[2]

Safety and protection of artificial islands, offshore terminals and other installations

Protection and assistance to fishermen and Mariners at sea

Preservation and Protection of marine ecology and environment including pollution


control

Assistance to the Department of Customs and other authorities in anti-smuggling


operations

Law enforcement in territorial as well as international waters

Scientific data collection and support

National Defence during hostilities (under the operational control of Indian Navy)

Additional responsibilities of the Indian Coast Guard:[3]

Offshore Security Coordination Committee (OSCC) - The director general of Indian


Coast Guard is the chairman of OSCC constituted by the Ministry of Petroleum and
Natural Gas (MoPNG).

National Maritime Search and Rescue Coordinating Authority (NMSARCA) - Director


general of the Indian Coast Guard is the NMSARCA for executing/coordinating search
and rescue (SAR) missions

Lead Intelligence Agency (LIA) - For coastal and sea borders

Coastal Security - Director general of the Indian Coast Guard is the Commander coastal
command and is responsible for overall coordination between central and state agencies
in all matters relating to coastal security

History

A coast guard ship at the Naval Dockyard (Bombay)


The establishment of the Indian Coast Guard was first proposed by the Indian Navy to provide
non-military maritime services to the nation.[4] In the 1960s, sea-borne smuggling of goods was
threatening India's domestic economy. The Indian Customs Department frequently called upon
the Indian Navy for assistance with patrol and interception in the anti-smuggling effort.

The Nagchaudhuri Committee was constituted with participation from the Indian Navy and the
Indian Air Force to study the problem. In August 1971, the committee identified the requirement
to patrol India's vast coastline, set up a registry of offshore fishing vessels in order to identify
illegal activity, and establish a capable and well-equipped force to intercept vessels engaged in
illegal activities. The committee also looked at the number and nature of the equipment,
infrastructure and personnel required to provide those services.[4]
By 1973, India had started a program to acquire the equipment and started deputing personnel
from the Indian Navy for these anti-smuggling and law enforcement tasks, under the provisions
of the Maintenance of Internal Security Act. The Indian Navy sensed that the law enforcement
nature of these duties diverged from its core mission as a military service. Admiral Sourendra
Nath Kohli, then Chief of Naval Staff, hence made a recommendation to the Defense Secretary
outlining the need for a separate maritime service to undertake those duties and offering the
Navy's assistance in its establishment. On 31 August 1974, the Defense Secretary submitted a
note to the Cabinet Secretary proposing cabinet action on Admiral Kohli's recommendation.
As a result, in September 1974, the Indian cabinet set up the Rustamji Committee, under the
chairmanship of Khusro Faramurz Rustamji, with participation from the Navy, the Air Force and
the Department of Revenue to examine gaps in security and law enforcement between the roles
of the Indian Navy and the central and state police forces. The discovery of oil off Bombay High
further emphasised the need for a maritime law enforcement and protection service. The
committee submitted its recommendation for the establishment of the Indian Coast Guard
under the Ministry of Defense on 31 July 1975. Bureaucratic wrangling followed, with the
Cabinet Secretary making a recommendation to place the service under the Ministry of Home
Affairs. Then prime minister Indira Gandhi overruled the Cabinet Secretary and decided to
accept the original recommendation of the Rustamji Committee to place the service under the
Ministry of Defense.[4]
An interim Indian Coast Guard came into being on 1 February 1977, equipped with two small
corvettes and five patrol boats transferred from the Navy. The duties and functions of the service
were formally defined in the Coast Guard Act, which was passed by India's parliament on 18
August 1978 and came into immediate effect.
Vice Admiral V.A. Kamath of the Indian Navy was appointed the founding director general.
Prime Minister Morarji Desai inspected the Guard of Honour at the service's inauguration. Vice
Admiral Kamath proposed a five-year plan to develop the ICG into a potent force by 1984, but
the full potential of this plan was not immediately realised due to an economic resource crunch.[4]
One of the historic operational successes of the ICG occurred in October 1999, with the
recapture at high seas of a Panamanian-registered Japanese cargo ship, MV Alondra Rainbow,
hijacked off Indonesia. Her crew was rescued off Phuket, Thailand. The ship had been repainted
as MV Mega Rama, and was spotted off Kochi, heading towards Pakistan. She was chased by
ICGS Tarabai and INS Prahar (K98) of the Indian Navy, and apprehended.[5] It was the first
successful prosecution of armed pirates in over a century.

The Indian Coast Guard conducts exercises with the other coast guards of the world. In May
2005, the ICG agreed to establish liaison links with Pakistan's Maritime Security Agency
(PMSA). In 2006, the Indian Coast Guard conducted exercises with its Japanese and Korean
counterparts.
After the 2008 Mumbai attacks, the Indian government initiated a program to expand the ICG
force, assets and infrastructure. The force is expected to be tripled between 2010 and 2019 in
manpower, vessels and aircraft.[6][7]

Personnel
Coast Guard officers
The officers in the Coast Guard have the same rank structure as the Central Armed Police Forces.
The director general Coast Guard is usually a vice admiral rank officer on deputation from the
Indian Navy.[8][9]

Officers are appointed in the Coast Guard in one of four branches, as either General Duty officer,
Pilot officer, Technical officer or Law officers. Lady Officers have two branches i.e. General
Duty officer OR Pilot officer and serve on shore establishments/Air Stations/Headquarters. They
are not deployed on board Indian Coast Guard ships.[10]
General Duty officers

ICG offshore patrol vessel ICGS Vishwast visiting Kobe, Japan


The command of ships at sea can only be exercised by officers of the General Duty (GD) branch.
The key functions of a General Duty officer would be to operate weapons, sensors and different
kinds of equipment on board a ship. The safety of the ship and the men would be GD officers
responsibility.[11] All the District Commanders (COMDIS) and Commander of Coast Guard
Region (COMCG) appointments are exercised by a GD Officer of the Indian Coast Guard. GD
officers are graduates in Science or Engineering.
Pilot officers

Pilot officers are also part of GD branch. A Pilot officer gets an opportunity to work at shore Air
Stations along the Indian coasts and also embark ships. ICG operates fixed wing aircraft for
surveillance of the exclusive economic zone. In addition, helicopters are embarked on Coast
Guard Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV) to provide local surveillance and perform search and
rescue mission at sea.[11] Pilot officers are graduates in Science or Engineering.
Technical officers
Technical officers are responsible for operation of advanced technology and sensor systems on
board Coast Guard vessels and aircraft, as well as on shore installations. They also command the
maintenance wings of the force. Technical officers are graduates in Engineering.
Law officers
Law officers act as legal advisers to their respective commanders. They represent the Indian
Coast Guard in legal actions filed by or against the organisation. They also perform the duties of
trial law officers in Coast Guard courts, convened to try delinquent Coast Guard personnel. The
Directorate of Law at Coast Guard Headquarters is headed by a Deputy Inspector General.

Enrolled persons
Enrolled persons in the Coast Guard serve as either a yantrik (technician) or navik (sailor).[10]
Yantriks are responsible for operating and maintaining mechanical, electrical or aeronautical
equipment and systems on board the Coast Guard vessels and aircraft.
Naviks may further serve in the General Duty or Domestic branches. The General Duty naviks
serve as sailors, weapons systems operators, communication specialists, divers, etc. or in specific
maritime or aviation support roles. Domestic branch naviks serve in roles such as stewards,
cooks, etc. on board Coast Guard vessels.
All personnel are trained in operation of weapons systems in cases of emergency.

Training
Currently, Officers of Indian Coast Guard undergo Basic Military Training at the Indian Naval
Academy, Ezhimala along with their counterparts of Indian Navy. This helps in the mutual
interchange of Officers among these two sister services. While the Indian Coast Guard Academy
is under construction in Azhikkal, Kannur district, Kerala.[12] The Sailors of Indian Coast Guard
gets trained along with Indian Naval Sailors at the Indian Naval training establishment INS
Chilka. All the training undertaken by Indian Coast Guard Officers and Sailors are the same as
those under taken by Indian Naval Officers and Sailors.

Organization

Indian Armed Forces

Triservices Crest.
Military Manpower
Active troops

1,325,000 (3rd)

Reserve forces

1,155,000 (7th)

Paramilitary forces
and CAPF

1,293,300 (4th)
Components

Indian Army
Indian Air Force
Indian Navy
Indian Coast Guard
Paramilitary forces of India
Central Armed Police Forces
Strategic Nuclear Command
History

Military history of India


Ranks
Air Force ranks and insignia
Army ranks and insignia
Naval ranks and insignia

The Indian Coast Guard organization is headed by the Director General (DG ICG) who is located
at Coast Guard Headquarters (CGHQ), New Delhi. At CGHQ, he is assisted by four deputy
director generals of the rank of inspector general, and other senior officers heading various staff
divisions.
The current Director General (DG ICG) is Vice Admiral Anurag G Thapliyal, AVSM.[13]
Indian Coast Guard has recently got its first three-star rank officer Shree Rajendra Singh
Additional director general, PTM, TM, who has the distinction of being the first regular direct
entry officer of the Indian Coast Guard to be promoted to the rank of ADG on 11 Jan 2013.
Additional director general of Indian coast guard is equivalent to vice admiral of Indian Navy.[14]
The ICG as of now is headed by a naval officer of the rank of Vice Admiral on deputation to the
Coast Guard as a direct entry Coast Guard Officer is yet to reach the age/service to become
equivalent to Vice Admiral as it is the youngest of all the all Armed Forces started in the 1970s.
Two of the director generals (the 12th and 16th), Director General of Indian Coast Guard
Rameshwar Singh DG, PTM and Director General of Indian Coast Guard Dr. Prabhakaran Paleri
DG, PTM, TM, were career Coast Guard officers, in the sense that they were Indian Navy
officers on permanent secondment to the Indian Coast Guard.[15] DG Rameshwar Singh had spent
twenty years in the Indian Navy, before he was seconded permanently to the Indian Coast Guard.
His tenure lasted for six months, between March 2001, and September 2001. Dr. Prabhakaran
Paleri,DG was commissioned in the Indian Navy in 1969, and permanently seconded to the
Coast Guard in 1981.[16] His tenure lasted for five months, from February 2006 to August 2006.
[17]

The Indian Coast Guard operates five regions. Each region is headed by an officer of the rank of
inspector general.
Coast Guard regions
Western Region (W)

Regional HQ
location
Mumbai

Regional commander
IG Surinder Pal Singh Basra, YSM,
PTM, TM

Eastern Region (E)


North East Region (NE)
Andaman & Nicobar Region
(A&N)
North West Region (NW)

Chennai
Kolkata

IG Satya Prakash Sharma, PTM, TM


IG VSR Murthy, PTM, TM

Port Blair

IG K Natarajan, PTM, TM

Gandhinagar

IG Kuldip Singh Sheoran, TM

Each of the regions is further divided into multiple districts, typically covering a coastal state or
a union territory.

Establishments
By the end of 2012, the Indian Coast Guard is on track to operate:[18]

42 Coast Guard Stations

5 Coast Guard Air Stations

10 Coast Guard Air Enclaves

Equipment
Surface vessels
Ships belonging to the Indian Coast Guard are prefixed ICGS, abbreviation for Indian Coast
Guard Ship.
Ship Class

Type

Origin

In Service: 93 ships
Pollution
Samudra class Control
India
Vessel(PCV)
Advanced
Samar class
Offshore Patrol India
Vessel
Offshore Patrol
Vishwast class
India
Vessel
Offshore Patrol
Vikram class
Vessel

Displacement

In
Notes
service

3300 tons

2005 tons

1800 tons

1220 tons

Aadesh Class

Fast Patrol
Vessels (FPV)

India CSL

290 tons

Rajshree class

Inshore patrol
vessel

India

275 tons

[19]

2 Decommissioned
20 ordered, 8
launched, 4
commissioned[20]
1 more under
construction.

Rani Abbaka
class
Sarojini Naidu
Class
Priyadarshini
Class
Tarabai Class
Rajhans Class

Inshore patrol
India
275 tons
vessel
Extra Fast Patrol
India
270 tons
Vessel (XFPV)
Inshore Patrol
215 tons
Vessels
Inshore Patrol
India/Singapore 236 tons
Vessels
Seaward
203 tons
Defence Boat
Inshore Patrol
India/Japan
181 tons
Vessels
Patrol Boat
USSR
80 tons

3 more under
construction.

7
8
6
2

3 decommissioned

7 decommissioned

Pulicat Class
ABG fast
Interceptor Boat India/Australia 75 tons
interceptor crafts
Bharati class
Fast Patrol
India
65 tons
interceptor boat Vessels (FPV)

5 decommissioned

Total 15 ordered.

AMPL Class

44 tons

1 transferred to
Mauritius

32 tons

Jijabai Class

Interceptor Boat India/UK

Swallow Craft Inshore Patrol


South Korea
Class
Craft
Mandovi Marine
Patrol craft
India
Class
Timblo Class
Interceptor Craft India
Bristol Class
Interceptor Craft
Vadyar Class
Interceptor Craft
Air Cushion
Griffon/Grse
Vehicle
UK
Class
(Hovercraft)
Under Construction/Order: 156 ships [21]
Advanced
Samar class
Offshore Patrol India
Vessel
Advanced
GSL Class
Offshore Patrol India
Vessel
Pollution
Samudra class Control
India
Vessel(PCV)

13

10 tons

5 status unknown

7 tons
5.5 tons
2.4 tons

10
4
8

N.A.

10

2230 tons

2400 tons

3300 tons

Aadesh Class

Fast Patrol
Vessels (FPV)

India CSL

290 tons

16

Rajshree class

Inshore patrol
vessel

India

275 tons

2 Keel laid

20 ordered, 8
launched, 4
commissioned[20]
8 ordered, 7
commissioned

Rani Abbaka
class
HSL class
Griffon Class

Inshore patrol
vessel
Inshore patrol
vessel
Air Cushion
Vehicle
(Hovercraft)
Air Cushion
Vehicle
(Hovercraft)

L&T fast
Interceptor Boat
interceptor crafts
Bharati class
Fast Patrol
interceptor boat Vessels (FPV)
Pipavav Class
Fast Patrol
Fast Patrol
Vessel (FPV)
Vessels
Pipavav Class
Training Vessel
Training Vessel
Timblo class
Patrol craft
patrol craft

India

India

UK

N.A.

UK

N.A.

India

90 tons

India

65 tons

14

India

1
15 tons

12 ordered, 5
commissioned

As per Griffon's
website, status
unknown,
36+18 ordered, 9
34+18
commissioned
15 ordered, 1
14
commissioned

India

India

5 ordered, 2
commissioned

30

Aircraft inventory
Main article: List of active Indian military aircraft
The Coast Guard operates a fleet of 38 Dornier Do 228 maritime surveillance aircraft, 9 HAL
Dhruv and 19 HAL Chetak utility helicopters.
Aircraft Photo

Dornier
Do 228

Origin
Role
Fixed-wing aircraft (38)

Version Number Comment

Maritime
India
surveillance, Do 22838
Germany search and 101
rescue

By 31 July
2013.[22]

Helicopters (27)
HAL
Dhruv

India

Utility
helicopter

16 more
ordered on 24
July 2014.[23]

HAL
Chetak

India
France

Utility
helicopter

18