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M. S.

RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY


BANGALORE-54
(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)

SYLLABUS
(For the Academic year 2014 - 2015)

V and VI Semester B. E.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

M.S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE 560 054


DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

1. History of the Institute:


M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology was started in 1962 by the late Dr. M.S. Ramaiah, our
Founder Chairman who was a renowned visionary, philanthropist, and a pioneer in creating several
landmark infrastructure projects in India. Noticing the shortage of talented engineering
professionals required to build a modern India, Dr. M.S. Ramaiah envisioned MSRIT as an institute
of excellence imparting quality and affordable education. Part of Gokula Education Foundation,
MSRIT has grown over the years with significant contributions from various professionals in
different capacities, ably led by Dr. M.S. Ramaiah himself, whose personal commitment has seen
the institution through its formative years. Today, MSRIT stands tall as one of Indias finest names
in Engineering Education and has produced around 35,000 engineering professionals who occupy
responsible positions across the globe.
2. History of the Department:
Instituted in 1978, the Department was the first to offer a course in Chemical Engineering by a selffinancing engineering institution in Bangalore and the fifth in MSRIT. Since its inception the
department has moved steadily towards the fulfillment of its mission and is emerging as a
significant player in the academic landscape of Chemical Engineering education in our country. The
Department is certified thrice in succession by the National Board for Accreditation and is also ISO
9001:2008 certified for imparting quality education. Over 1900 students have graduated in 32
batches. The Department has secured majority of the university ranks. The expertise of the faculty
covers a wide range of disciplines and they are engaged in cutting edge technological research. The
average experience of faculty in the department is more than twenty years and they are alumni of
IISc, IIT and NITs. Enriching insights by eminent dignitaries from the practicing world is arranged
under the activities of Society of Chemical Engineers a body comprising of chemical engineering
community of the institute. The department is approved as Research Center by VTU for higher
qualifications like M.Sc. Engg. (by Research) and Ph.D. degrees. Research Projects from DRDO,
AICTE and VTU has been successfully completed. The Annual Technical Symposium organized
by the department for students RASAYAN encompasses a plethora of events such as Paper
presentations, Poster presentations, M.S. Ramaiah Memorial Technical Quiz etc to challenge the
young minds. The Bangalore Regional Centre of the Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers is
functioning from this department for more than a decade. The countrys most prestigious event in
Chemical Engineering Indian Chemical Engineering Congress - CHEMCON-2011 was organized
here. The event invited the top chemical engineers of the nation to our institute. A joint session
with Canadian Universities in the area of Energy and Environment was also a part of this event. The
department offers excellent infrastructure and students have won various prestigious awards,
international internships and high accolades for innovative projects.

3. Faculty List:
Sl.
Name of the Faculty
No.
1
G. A. Shareef
2
Dr. Archna
3
V.Venkatesham
4
S. Swaminathan
5
Ravi Sadasivan
6
K.A. Badarinarayana
7
Dr.G. M. Madhu
8
Dr. Brijesh
9
Rajeswari M. Kulkarni
10
Ramasivakiran Reddy
11
Koteswara Rao Jammula
12
V. Shravanthi

Qualification

Designation

M.Tech., (Ph.D.)
M.E, Ph.D.
M. E., (Ph.D.)
M. E.
M.Sc.(Engg.), (Ph.D.)
M.Tech.
M.E., Ph.D.
M.Tech., Ph.D.
M.Tech., (Ph.D.)
M.Tech. (Ph.D.)
M.Tech., (Ph.D.)
M.Tech., (Ph.D.)

Professor and Head


Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor

4. Vision & Mission of the Institute:


The Vision of MSRIT : To evolve into an autonomous institution of international standing for
imparting quality technical education
The Mission of the institute in pursuance of its Vision: MSRIT shall deliver global quality
technical education by nurturing a conducive learning environment for a better tomorrow through
continuous improvement and customization
5. Quality Policy:
We at M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore Strive to deliver comprehensive,
continually enhanced, global quality technical and management education through an established
Quality Management system complemented by the synergistic interaction of the stake holders
concerned.We also strive to communicate this policy to all persons at all levels so that this policy
becomes a working reality with in the organization.
6. Vision & Mission of the Department:
Vision:
To be a leading chemical engineering centre for quality technical education and progressive
research at global level
Mission:
1. To provide a state of art environment and a rigorous academic program that train students to
excel in fundamental science, chemical and allied engineering fields.
2. To offer programme that inculcate creative thinking and lifelong learning contributing to the
advancements of chemical sciences and its application.
3. To foster principles of sustainability and promote environmentally benign technologies for the
benefit of society.
3

7. Process of deriving the Vision & Mission of the Department:

8. Process of Deriving the PEOs of the Programme:

9. PEOs of the programme offered:


The B.E. Chemical Engineering Program at M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology aims to provide a
strong foundation of scientific and technical knowledge in a state of art learning ambience. It equips the

graduates with problem solving abilities, teamwork, and communication skills necessary throughout
their careers. They are consistent with the following Educational Objectives:
1. To provide a strong foundation and understanding of the fundamental principles of mathematics,
science, and engineering enabling graduates to pursue their careers as practicing chemical engineers in
Chemical and Allied Engineering Industries.
2.

To produce graduates who are prepared to pursue their post graduation and Research in the fields of
Chemical Engineering and Petrochemicals, Material Science, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology,
Environmental Engineering, any emerging allied areas and Business.

3. To produce graduates who posses skills with contemporary grounding in professional responsibility,
ethics, global and societal impact of engineering decisions to assume professional leadership roles and
administrative positions.
4.

To provide students with opportunities to participate in various multidisciplinary teams and to develop
and practice written and oral communication skills.
10. Process of deriving POs:
The Programme outcomes are defined by taking feedback from faculty, alumni, Industry, professional
bodies, guidelines suggested by regulatory bodies (UGC, AICTE, VTU) and graduate attributes
suggested by National Board of Accreditation. The established PEOs are in line with programme
educational objectives. The following Figure indicates the information flow.

11. POs of the programme offered:


The Chemical Engineering Graduates of MSRIT are expected to have the following abilities/ qualities.
5

a. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and Engineering fundamentals.


b. An ability to design and conduct experiments, and to analyze and interpret experimental results
with working knowledge of chemical process safety.
c. An ability to design systems, components, or processes to meet specified objectives within all the
realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,
manufacturability, and sustainability in chemical engineering.
d. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex chemical engineering problems.
e. An ability to use techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering
practice.
f. An ability to understand the professional, societal and ethical responsibility.
g. An ability to work as a member of multidisciplinary teams, and have an understanding of team
leadership.
h. To have good written and oral communication skills.
i. An ability to understand the impact of engineering solution in a global, economic and societal
context.
j. An ability to have motivation and engage in lifelong learning.
k. An ability to have knowledge of recent happenings/contemporary issues.
l. To have the knowledge of project management and finance requirements and able to write project
proposals.

12. Mapping of PEOs & POs:


Programme
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4

a
x

b
x
x

x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i
x
x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x
x

x
x

l
x
x
x
x

13. Curriculum breakdown structure:

14. BOS composition as per VTU Guidelines:

SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION V SEMESTER B.E. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (2014-15)


Teaching hours/week
Sl
No

Subject
Code

Title of the Subject

Credits
(L:T:P)

Teaching
Dept.

Marks

End Exam
(Hrs)

CIE

SEE

Total

CH501

Chemical Reaction Engineering -I

3:1:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH502

Mass Transfer-I

3:1:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH503

Plant Utilities and Energy Audit

3:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH504

Industrial Pollution Control and Safety

3:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH505

Chemical Process Industries

3:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH506

Computational Methods in Chemical


Engineering

1:1:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CHPE01x

*Elective A

3:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CHL504

Pollution Control Laboratory

0:0:2

CH

03

50

50

100

CHL506

Computational Methods Laboratory

0:0:2

CH

03

50

50

100

19

26

*Elective Group A
CHPE011 Petroleum Technology
CHPE012 Green Technology
CHPE013 Cheminformatics
CHPE014 Hazard Analysis and Risk Management
CHPE015 Process Instrumentation and Data Analysis

SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION VI SEMESTER B.E. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (2014-15)


Teaching hours/week
Sl
No

Subject
Code

Title of the Subject

Credits
(L:T:P)

Teaching
Dept.

Marks

End Exam
(Hrs)
CIE

SEE

Total

AL601

Intellectual Property Rights

2:0:0

AL

03

50

50

100

CH601

Chemical Reaction Engineering-II

3:1:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH602

Mass Transfer-II

3:1:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH603

Biochemical Engineering

3:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CHPE02x

*Elective-B

3:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CH604

Process Equipment Design and


Drawing

1:1:2

CH

04

50

50

100

CHL601

Chemical Reaction Engineering


Laboratory

0:0:2

CH

03

50

50

100

CHL602

Mass Transfer Laboratory

0:0:2

CH

03

50

50

100

16

24

*Elective Group B
CHPE021
Natural Gas Engineering and Transportation
CHPE022
Non-Conventional Energy Sources and Technology
CHPE023
Composite Materials
CHPE024
Advanced Thermodynamics
CHPE025
Operations Research

Legend: CH-Chemical Engineering, AL-Any Department, L-Lecture, T-Tutorial, P-Practical, CIE-Continuous Internal Evaluation, SEESemester End Examination.

V Semester
CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING-I
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CH501
3:1:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 70
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Chemical Process Calculations, Engineering Chemistry


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The student will
1. Study design of various types of reactors for the application to chemical industry.
2. Learns the fundamentals related to homogeneous chemical reactions and their kinetics.
3. Learn methods to design ideal reactors.
4. Study to compare the reactor performance and systems of multiple reactors.
5. Study thermal characteristics of reactors and design.
6. Learn reaction kinetics principles through the laboratory exercises.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Scope of Chemical Reaction Engineering. Classification of reactions. Rate
equation and rate of reaction. Factors affecting rate of reaction. Chemical kinetics and
Thermodynamics/Equilibrium. Temperature dependency of rate constant from Arrhenius,
Collision and Transition state theories. Molecularity and order of reaction.
Non-elementary reactions: Difference between elementary and non-elementary reactions.
Kinetic models and mechanisms for non-elementary reactions.
Unit II
Homogeneous reactions: Interpretation of batch reactor data. Constant Volume batch
reactor. Analysis of total pressure data in a constant volume system. Integral method of
Analysis of data. Irreversible, zero, first, second, and nth order reactions (Uni-molecular and
bimolecular type).
Reversible first order reactions, series and parallel reactions,
Autocatalytic reactions. (For both constant and variable volume reactions). Differential
method. Overall orders from half-life method.
Unit III
Design of ideal reactors: Concept of ideality. Development of design expressions for batch,
tubular, and stirred tank reactors for both constant and variable-volume reactions. Evaluation
of rate equations from data obtained in these reactors. Comparison of ideal reactors: General
graphical comparison.
Multiple Reactor Systems: Plug flow and/or Mixed flow
reactors in Series, parallel and series parallel. Reactors of different types and sizes in series.
Unit IV
Recycle reactors: Introduction and qualitative treatment for single reactions only.
Design of reactors for multiple reactions: Design of Batch reactor, Plug and Mixed flow
reactors for Parallel, Series and Series-Parallel reactions (Only irreversible reactions must
be considered).

10

Thermal characteristics of reactors: Review of Calculations of heats of reactions and


equilibrium constant with temperature dependency. General graphical design procedure for
non-isothermal reactors. Optimum temperature Progression.
Design of adiabatic reactors: Conversion in reactors operated under adiabatic and non
adiabatic conditions. Design of such reactors solving material and energy balance equations
simultaneously (For single/ simple reactions only).
Unit V
Basics of Non Ideal flow: Importance & interpretation of RTD, C, E & F curves & Statistical
interpretation. Dispersion model. Tanks in series model. Conversion in non- ideal flow
reactors for simple systems.
Text Books:
1. Levenspeil, O., Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2001.
2. Fogler, H. S., Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall,
2001.
Reference Book:
1. Smith, J.M., Chemical Engineering Kinetics, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill, 1984.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion students will be able to
1. Explain types of reactions and the effect of various parameters on the reactions.
2. Explain the fundamentals of homogeneous chemical reactions and their kinetics.
3. Design expressions for batch, tubular and stirred tank reactors and evaluate rate equations.
4. Compare the reactors and systems of multiple reactors.
5. Find thermal characteristics of reactors and its usage in design procedure.
6. Apply the knowledge of chemical kinetics and design to chemical reaction systems.

11

MASS TRANSFER-I
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CH502
3:1:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 70
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Learn the concepts of transfer of mass in chemical systems and equilibrium.
2. Study and analyze the diffusion of fluids and theories of interface mass transfer.
3. Study the concepts of stages and stage-wise contact operations.
4. Study the operations of humidification, drying, crystallization and adsorption.
5. Design the equipments for humidification, drying, crystallization and adsorption
operations.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Types of diffusion in fluids. Types of diffusion in solid. Measurement and
calculations of diffusivities.
Eddy diffusion: Mass transfer coefficients and their correlations. Theories of mass Transfer.
Interphase mass transfer , problems on mass transfer resistance. Jd factor, Analogies in mass,
heat and momentum transfer processes.
Unit II
Equilibrium diffusion between phases: Material balance for co-current, cross-current and
counter-current operations. Concept of stages, efficiencies, cascades operation, continuous
contacting equipment, NTU and HTU concepts.
Humidification: General theory. Psychrometric chart. Concepts in humidification,
dehumidification. Cooling towers, Design of cooling towers and related equipments.

Unit III
Drying: Drying Equilibria. Drying rate curves. Mechanism of drying. Calculation of batch
and continuous drying. Equipments for drying. Design of continuous rotary dryer.

Unit IV
Crystallization: Factors governing nucleation and crystal growth rates. Controlled growth of
crystals. Yield calculations and energy balance. Different types of crystallizer equipments.
Fractional crystallization.
Unit V
Adsorption: Theories of adsorption. Isotherms, Industrial adsorbents. Stagewise operations,
Adsorptions calculations and equipments.
Ion exchange: Process & equipment.

12

Text Books:
1. Treybal, R.E., Mass Transfer Operations, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill, 1981.
2. Ananthraman, K.M. Begum, M.S., Mass Transfer Theory and Practice, PHI New Delhi,
2011.
Reference Books:
1. Coulson JM, Richardson JF and Sinnott RK, Chemical Engineering Vol I, II, IV and V,
4th Edition, Pergmen Press, 1998.
2. Badger & Banchero, Introduction to Chemical Engineering, TMH, 6th Reprint, 1998.
3. Geankoplis, C. J., Transport Processes and Unit Operation, Prentice Hall(I), 2000.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Explain the concept of Stages, Transfer Units and efficiency stages.
2. Analyze diffusion of fluids and related mass transfer theories.
3. .Explain principles of mass transfer operations humidification, drying, crystallization and
adsorption.
4. Perform material and energy balance calculations in mass transfer operations
humidification, drying, crystallization and adsorption.
5. Design the equipments for humidification, drying, crystallization and adsorption
operations.

13

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

PLANT UTILITIES AND ENERGY AUDIT


CH503
3:0:0
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Learn about the various utilities used in the process industries.
2. Learn to evaluate the utility requirements in process industries.
3. Design utility transportation systems.
4. Learn about various methods and instruments used for such purposes.
5. Perform energy audits in plants.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Different utilities. Role of utilities in process plant operations and criteria for
selection and estimation of suitable utilities.
Water: Water resources. Process water, Cooling water, drinking water and boiler feed water
Quality Standards. Water treatment processes for drinking, process and boiler feed. Storage
and handling of water. Types and selection of pumps, piping and accessories. Water pre
treatment , reuse and recycling.
Unit II
Steam and Power: Steam generation in chemical plants. Types of boilers and waste heat
boilers. Fuels-types, emissions and global warming, green fuels. Calorific value. Proximate
and ultimate analysis. HHV, LHV and related calculations. Cogeneration power plants. CHPs
and Boiler performance. Related Calculations. Economy of steam generation with different
fuels, related calculation. Steam storage and handling-piping and accessories.
Unit III
Air: Compressed air, blower air, fan air. Types of compressor and vacuum pumps and
selection. Power requirements, performance and related calculations. Booster and receivers.
Quality of compressed air for instruments and processes. Compressed air distribution systempiping and accessories.
Air-water vapour system: humidification/ dehumidification and
evaporative cooling-related calculations.
Unit IV
Refrigeration: Different refrigeration systems and their characteristics. Air-conditioning
systems. Coefficient of performance. Power requirements and refrigeration effect- related
calculations for each type of refrigeration system. Refrigerant properties and selection. Some
commonly used refrigerants and secondary refrigerants. Air-conditioning.
Insulation: Insulation Materials and Selection- Economics of insulation. Insulating factors.
Properties & Classification. Cold insulation and cryogenic insulation.

14

Unit V
Energy Audit: Energy scenario, Energy audit need, types of energy audit Preliminary audit,
detailed audit, Steps in audit, bench marking, energy performance, energy audit instruments.

Text / Reference Books:


1. Fair, G.M., Geyer, J.C. and Okun, D. A., Water and Waste Water Engineering, Vol 2,
Wiley, 1966.
2. Narayan and Viswanathan, Chemical and Electrochemical Energy Systems, University
Press, 1998.
3. Perry, Chemical Engineers Handbook, 8th Edition, McGraw Hill.
4. Sinnot, R.K., Coulson and Richardsons Chemical Engineering- Vol 6, Pergamon, 1996.
5. Abbi, Handbook of Energy Audit, Environmental Management, TERI Press, 2002.
Course Outcomes: On completion of course, students are expected to
1. Perform calculation to evaluate the utility requirement for processes.
2. Have knowledge of equipment used for generating/providing and transporting the
common utilities and their selection based on performance.
3. Perform calculations of energy consumptions and thus perform an audit.

15

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION CONTROL AND SAFETY


CH504
3:0:0
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Environmental Studies


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: There are inherent limitation of treating and burying waste. A problem
solved in one part of the environment may become a new problem in another part. We must
curtail pollution closer to its point of origin so that it is not transferred from place to place.
The course deals with making students:
1. Aware of importance of environment and the dependence of mankind on it.
2. To study the types of pollutions and their sources.
3. To study methods of sampling and analyzing pollutants through laboratory and submit the
report.
4. To study and design methods of treatment of water, air and land pollutions.
5. To learn the sources and abatement of noise pollution.
6. Students are to learn to design for prevention and control of air pollution.
7. Students are to be enabled to analyze the Solid Waste treatment and processing.
8. Students to be enabled to formulate treatment strategies for waste water, air & solid waste
to be within the ambit of legal implications and environmental regulations.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Importance of environment for mankind. Biosphere and layers of atmosphere.
Hydrological cycle and nutrient cycles. Types of pollution. Damages from environmental
pollution. Need of environmental legislations and environmental Acts in India. Functions of
central and state pollution control boards. Global warming, Kyoto protocol, Role of
environmental groups like Green Peace.
Sources, sampling and analysis of wastewater: Water resources. Origin of wastewater.
Evaluation, classification and characterization of wastewater. Physical and chemical
characteristics. BOD, COD and their importance. Types of water pollutants and their effects.
Sampling, and methods of analysis.
Unit II
Wastewater treatment: Preliminary, primary, secondary and tertiary treatments of
wastewater. Sludge treatment and disposal. Modern treatment methods. Recovery of
materials from process effluents.
Applications to Industries: Norms and standards of treated water. Origin, characters, and
treatment methods of typical industries petroleum refinery, pulp and paper, fertilizer,
distillery, and textile processing.
Unit III
Air pollution aspects: Nature of air pollution. Classification of air pollutants. Sources of air
pollutants. Air quality criteria and standards. Plume behaviour and dispersion of air
pollutants. Effects of air pollution on health, vegetation, and materials.
Air pollution treatment: Sampling of pollutants. Methods of estimation of air pollutants.
Automobile pollution. Control methods for particulates and gaseous pollutants. Pollution
16

from chemical industries. Origin, control methods, and equipment used in typical industries
Thermal power plants, metallurgical industries, and cement industries. Carbon credits.
Unit IV
Solid waste treatment: Origin. Classification and microbiology. Properties and their
variation. Engineered systems for solid waste management generation, onsite handling,
storage, collection, transfer and transport, composting, sanitary land filling.
Unit V
Noise control: Sources and definitions. Determination of noise levels. Noise control criteria
and noise exposure index. Administrative and engineering controls. Acoustic absorptive
materials.
Safety: Introduction to Process Safety- Intrinsic & Extrinsic Safety. The Hazards- Toxicity,
Flammability, Fire, Explosions. Sources of ignition, Pressure.
Safety devices: Pressure relief valves. Ruptures discs. Blow down systems. Flare systems.
Flame arrestors. Deflagration arrestors and explosion suppression. Personal safety devices.
Process safety analysis: HAZAN and HAZOP comparison. Sequence of operability study.
Risk analysis and estimation. Safety check list. Computer based quantitative risk analysis.
ISO and OSHAS.
Text Books:
1. Rao, C.S., Environmental Pollution Control Engineering, New Age International, Reprint
2002.
2. Mahajan, S.P., Pollution Control in Process Industries, Tata McGraw Hill, 1999.
Reference Books:
1. Perkins, H.C., Air Pollution, McGraw Hill,1974.
2. Hagerty. D.J., Solid Waste Management, Van Nostrand Reinhold,1973.
Metcalf and Eddy, Waste Water Engineering, Treatment, Disposal & Reuse, Tata McGraw
Hill, 4th Edition, 2003.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course, the student
1. Understands the nutrient and hydrological cycles.
2. Become well versed with characterization of pollutions in water, air, and soil.
3. Knows about the various acts enacted by the State and Pollution Control Boards.
4. Will be able to sample and analyze the pollutants in the laboratory.
5. Will be able to design the treatment systems for effluents from various industry.
6. Will be able to design for prevention and control of air pollution.
7. Are enabled to analyze the Solid Waste treatment and processing.
8. Are familiarized with noise pollution; they can formulate treatment strategies for waste
water, air & solid waste to be within the ambit of legal implications and environmental
regulations.
9. Will be able to analyze risks and understand functioning of safety devices.

17

CHEMICAL PROCESS INDUSTRIES


Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CH505
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study the process industries such as organic, inorganic, natural, synthetic, metallurgical
industries.
2. Learn to write flow chart symbols and flow charts for typical chemical processes.
3. Understand the use of various unit process and unit operations involved in various
process industries and also learn in writing line/ pipe line diagrams.
4. Learn to generate process flow diagrams for a given set of operations.
Course Content:
Unit I
Sulfur: Elemental Sulfur mining, Sulfur from ores, Oxides of Sulfur (SO2, SO3).
Industrial Gases: CO2, H2, O2, N2, Water gas and Shift gas.
Acids: Sulfuric, Nitric, Hydrochloric, phosphoric acid.
Unit II
Chlor-Alkali Industries: Sodium chloride, Soda ash, Caustic soda, Chlorine, Bleaching
powder.
Fertilizers: Ammonia, Urea, Ammonium chloride, Ammonium nitrate, Ammonium
phosphate, Ammonium sulfate, DAP, Biofertilizers.

Unit III
Phosphorous Industries: Manufacture of white and Red Phosphorus, Pentoxide, Phosphatic
Fertilizers, Super Phosphate and Triple Super Phosphate.
Fermentation Industries: Production of alcohol, acetic acid and citric, penicillin.
Unit IV
Petroleum Industries: Constituents of crude petroleum refining and processing. Production
of Ethylene, Propylene.
Unit V
Polymers and Rubber: Polymerization, PVC, LDPE, Polyproylene, cross linked polymers,
natural rubber, synthetic rubber and rubber compounding.
Miscellaneous Industries: Paints, Pigments, Vanishes, Enamel, Lacquers - White Lead and
Zinc oxide, Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), Silicon carbide (SiC), Glass, Cement (Types,
manufacture of portland cement, slag cement).

18

Text Books:
1. Shreves, Chemical Process Industries, McGraw Hill, 4th Edition.
2. Rao Gopal & Sittig Marshall, Dryden Outlines of Chemical Technology for 21st
Century, 3rd Edition, EWP.
Reference Book:
1. Bose, P.K., Chemical Engineering Technology, Vol. 1,2, Books and Allied (Pvt) Ltd,
2011.
2. Desikan and Sivakumar , Unit Processes in Organic Chemical Industries (Eds.), CEDC,
IITM, 1982.

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be :


1. Identify various unit processes and unit operations in process industries.
2. Write flow diagrams and pipe line diagrams.
3. Explain the material requirements, chemical reactions and operations carried out in
production of chemical.
4. Explain the various processes in chloro-alkali, fertilizers, phosphorous, fermentation,
petroleum, polymers and other industries.

19

COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


Sub Code:
CH506
Credit:
1:1:0
Contact Hours: 42
CIE:
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks
Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics IV, Fundamentals of Computing
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Develop knowledge and computational skills required for Chemical Engineers
2. Study the various numerical methods employed in solving mathematical equations.
3. Learn to write step-wise procedures (Algorithms) of solving problems of importance in
chemical engineering
4. Learn to write programs in C for solving above problems
5. Learn executing all above programs in the laboratory using C or MATLAB.
6. Perform data analysis and regression.
7. Study the computational techniques used in the design of equipments and processes.
Course Content:
Unit I
Review of C programming
Simultaneous linear algebraic equation: Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel, Jordan iterative methods
(material balances etc).
Non-linear algebraic equation: Newton-Raphson Method, Secant method, Method of False
Position (Molar Volume of non-ideal gases, Settling velocity, Heat loss from pipes, Vapor
pressure estimation etc).
Interpolation: Newton-Gregory Forward and Backward Interpolation, Lagranges
Interpolation formula, (Estimation of thermo-physical properties). (Algorithm
and
C
Program)
Unit II
Numerical Integration: Trapezoidal Rule and Simpsons 1/3 rule and 3/8 rule. (Rayleighs
equation, Average heat capacity estimation).
Ordinary differential equations: Euler and Modified Euler method, Runge-Kutta method of
Fourth order, (Rate equations, Solution of Boundary Value problems).
Curve fitting by the method of Least Squares linear.(Heat capacity vs Temperature, f vs Nre,
Arrhenius equation, settling velocity vs Diameter of particle etc). (Algorithm and C Program)
Unit III
P X,Y and T X, Y evaluation for binary mixtures: Calculation of Bubble Pressure and
Bubble Point. Dew Pressure and Dew point for Ideal Binary and multi-component system.
Flash Vaporization for multi-component system. (Algorithm and C Program).
Unit IV
Design: Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (Modules for estimation of temperature, LMTD, pipe
side, annulus side calculations, overall heat transfer coefficient estimation, area and number
of hairpins calculations, pressure drop calculation).
20

Batch Reactor, PFR, CSTR (Calculations based on performance equation). (Algorithm and C
Program).
Unit V
MATLAB: Introduction, Array, Matrix algebra, Polynomials, Integral and Differential
Equations, Two and Three dimensional plots.
Text Books:
1. Rajaraman, V., Computer Oriented Numerical Methods, Prentice Hall of India.
2. Mickley, Sherwood, and Reed, Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering, Tata
McGraw Hill.
Reference Books:
1. Grewal, S., Numerical methods of Engineering and Science, Khanna Publishers.
2. Glyn James, Advanced Modern Engineering Mathematics, PearsonEducation,-3rd
Edition.
3. Rudrapratap, Getting Started with MATLAB- A Quick Introduction for Scientists and
Engineers, Oxford Press, 2009.

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Explain various numerical methods used in mathematics.
2. Apply these techniques in solving Chemical Engineering problems.
3. Develop step-wise procedure (Algorithms) for solving chemical engineering models.
4. Write C programs for numerical methods
5. Execute them in laboratory and use C or MATLAB for other problems also.
6. Perform data analysis and regression.
7. Apply these methods in the design of chemical engineering equipment and processes.

21

PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHPE011
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study about the petroleum industries in the country and abroad and the operations that is
carried out in them.
2. Learn about the classification and compositions of crudes.
3. Study the important products (Gasoline, Diesel, Kerosene and lube oil), properties and
test methods for crudes.
4. Study the various crude processing methods such as reforming, cracking etc.
5. Learn the crude pretreatment methods and operations involved in it.
6. Study about the various impurities present in the crude and method of their treatment to
produce useful products like LPG, LNG, Gasoline, lube etc.
Course Content:
Unit I
Indian Petroleum industry: Prospects & Future. Major companies. World production,
Markets, Offshore and onshore, Oil well technology.
Composition of crude: Classification. Evaluation of petroleum. UOP-k factor. TBP analysis.
EFV analysis. Average boiling point. ASTM curves. Thermal properties of petroleum
fractions.
Product properties and test methods: Gas. Various types of gas and LPG. Reid vapor
pressure analysis. Gasoline and naptha. Octane No. Oxidation stability.
Additives for gasoline. Kerosene. Characterization for flash point or fire point, volatility,
burning qualities etc, Diesel, octane testing, viscosity etc. Grades of diesels e.g. HSD, LDO.
Diesel additives. Lube oils : Types, tests-carbon residue and viscosity index
Unit II
Crude pretreatment: Pumping of crude oils. Dehydration of crude by chemical, gravity,
centrifugal, electrical de-salter and comparision of each. Heating of crude- heater, different
types of pipe still heaters including box type, cylindrical etc. Crude distillation, arrangement
of towers for various types of reflux. Design aspects for atmospheric and vacuum column.
Atmospheric distillation distillation unit: internals and operational.
Unit III
Treatment techniques: Types of impurities present and various desulfurisation processes.
Production and treatment of LPG. LNG technology. Sweetening operations for gases
including merox, ethanolamine, copper chloride, stertford etc. Catalytic de sulphonisation.
Treatment of kerosene, De-aromatisation and merox. Treatment of diesel, naptha:
desulpurisation by hydrogen and catalysts. Treatment of lubes: sulphuric acid, clay treatment,
solvent treatment-phenol, furfural.
Unit IV
Thermal Processes: Thermal cracking reactions- theory of thermal cracking. Properties of
cracked materials and factors influencing the properties of cracked materials. Visbreaking,
dubbs two coil cracking process.
22

Catalytic cracking: Comparison of thermal and catalytic cracking. Carbonium ion


chemistry. Feedback requirements. Cracking conditions. Commercial cracking analysis.
Various catalytic cracking processes. Fixed bed crackers. Moving bed crackers. Fluid
catalytic cracking-flexi cracking-ortho-flow reactor. Theory of coking: various types of
coking processes. Delayed coking, fluid coking, contact coking, flexi coking. Naptha
cracking, naptha cracking for ethylene as feed selection and gas yield. Hydro cracking.
Theory of hydro cracking. Catalysts for hydro cracking.
Unit V
Catalytic reforming: Theory of reforming. Factors influencing, reforming, reforming
catalysts, feedstock requirements. Platforming, isoplus hondriforming, refiningforming,
power forming and flexiforming.
Text Books:
1. Nelson, Petroleum Refinery Engineering, 4th Edition, McGraw Hill, 1964.
2. Bhaskara Rao, Modern Petroleum Refining Processes, 3rd Edition, Oxford and IBH,
1997.
Reference Books:
1. Desikan and Sivakumar, Unit Processes in Organic Chemical Industries (Eds.), CEDC,
IITM, 1982.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Classify the crude and understand the composition.
2. Analyze the properties of crude and the methods of testing.
3. Explain process and operations of oil exploration, off shore and onshore oil exploration
methods. Introduction to desalting of the crudes is also be dealt during the course.
4. Explain crude pretreatment methods and operations involved in it.
5. Explain various impurities present in the crude and method of their treatment to produce
useful products like LPG, LNG, Gasoline, lube etc.
6. Explain various crude processing methods such as reforming, cracking etc in petroleum
processing industries.

23

GREEN TECHNOLOGY
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHPE012
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Chemistry


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Learn the tools of green technology and zero waste systems.
2. Learn environmental laws and carbon credit.
3. Learn Life Cycle Assessment methods and tools
4. Learn methods for pollution prevention.
5. Learn to design for environment
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Green chemistry and technology for sustainable development, Environmental
laws, carbon credits, environmental management system standards- ISO 14000 series.
Unit II
Green Chemistry: Principles of Green Chemistry, Atom efficiency, Energy conservation,
Waste minimization, Substitution.
Unit III
Life-Cycle Assessment: History, Process, Methodology, Streamlining and Application.

Pollution prevention planning:


Environmental Audits.

Unit IV
Structure of the pollution prevention process,

Unit V
Design for the environment and improvement in manufacturing operations, case studies.
Text Books:
1. Anastas P.T., Warner J.C., Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. Oxford Science
Publications, Oxford, 1998.
2. Paul L. Bishop, Pollution Prevention: Fundamentals and Practice, McGraw Hill,2000.
Reference Books:
1. Mike Lancaster, Green Chemistry- An Introductory Text, Royal Society of Chemistry
Publishing, 2010
2. Boyle, Godfrey, Bob Everett, Janet Ramage, Energy Systems and Sustainability: Power
for a Sustainable Future, Oxford University Press, 2004.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the student will be able to
1. Understand environment laws, carbon credits, ISO 14000 series
2. Explain the importance of green technology in sustainable development.
3. Explain tools of green technology and life cycle assessment.
4. Understand pollution prevention planning and environment friendly design

24

CHEMINFORMATICS
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHPE013
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: Cheminformatics (or Chemoinformatics) is a field of research that
combines methods from computer science and chemistry with the aim of solving chemical
engineering problems efficiently. The course will provide the necessary theoretical
background to solve such problems. The students will learn how to apply the methods in
order to study complex interactions in chemical and bio chemical systems and to discover
new emerging properties arising from the systemic viewpoint.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Cheminformatics, History and Evolution of cheminformatics, Use of
cheminformatics, Prospects of cheminformatics, Molecular Modeling and Structure
Elucidation.
Unit II
Representation of Molecules and Chemical Reactions, Nomenclature; Different types of
Notations; SMILES Coding; Matrix Representations; Structure of Molfiles and Sdfiles;
Libraries and toolkits; Different electronic effects; Reaction classification, Properties
estimation using ASPEN v8 suite.
Unit III
Database Design & their Management, Database Concepts. Structured Query Language.
Design of Chemical Databases, Data Abstraction; Data Models; Instances & Schemes; E-R
Model - Entity and entity sets; Relations and relationship sets; E-R diagrams; Reducing E-R
Diagrams to tables; Network Data Model: Basic concepts; Hierarchical Data Model: Basic
Concepts; Metadatabases; Indexing and Hashing; Basic concepts; Text Databases;
Introduction to Distributed Database Processing, Data Security. Intefacing programs with
databases; Structure databases; Reaction Databases; Literature Databases; Medline;GenBank;
PIR; CAS Registry; National Cancer Institute (NCI) Database.
Unit IV
Searching Chemical Structure, Full structure search; sub structure search; basic ideas;
similarity search; Three dimensional search methods; Basics of Computation of Physical and
Chemical Data and structure descriptors; Data visualization and Non-linear Mapping.
Unit V
Chemo-informatics Applications, Prediction of Properties of Compounds; Linear Free Energy
Relations; Quantitative Structure-Property Relations; Descriptor Analysis; Model Building;
Modeling Toxicity; Structure-Spectra correlations; Prediction of NMR, IR and Mass spectra;
Computer Assisted Structure elucidations; Computer Assisted Synthesis Design, Introduction
to drug design; Target Identification and Validation; Lead Finding and Optimization;
Analysis of HTS data; Virtual Screening; Design of Combinatorial Libraries; Ligand-Based

25

and Structure Based Drug design; Application of Cheminformatics in Drug Design,


Applications of chemoinformatics in chemical engineering.
Text Books:
1. Johann Gasteiger and Thomas Engel (2003), Chemoinformatics, Wiley VCH Verlag
GmbH & Co, USA.
2. Andrew R Leach and Valerie J Gillet (2007)Introduction to Chemoinformatics,
Springer

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the student will be able to
1.
Apply and explain methods, models, and algorithmic ideas covered in the course,
2.
Formulate the above in precise language and notation,
3.
Implement algorithms and data structures from the course,
4.
Describe the implementation and experimental work done in clear and precise
language, and in a structured fashion.

26

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

HAZARD ANALYSIS AND RISK MANAGEMENT


CHPE014
3:0:0
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The student will
1. Have awareness of different hazards in process industries
2. Learn classification of hazards and their identifications
3. Learn precautions in chemical storage and handling
4. Learn risk analysis techniques and quantify them
5. Learn emergency management plans
Course Content:
Unit I
Plant Hazards: Fire hazards., Chemical hazards, Toxic hazards, Explosion hazards, Electrical
hazards, Mechanical hazards, Radiation hazards, Noise hazards. Control, precautions &
prevention, Safety measures in plant.
Unit II
Fire hazards, Chemical hazards, Toxic hazards, Explosion hazards, Electrical hazards,
Mechanical hazards, Radiation hazards, Noise hazards, Control, precautions & prevention,
Safety measures in plant.
Unit III
Storage & Transportation of chemicals: Characteristics of chemical with special reference to
safe storage & handling of chemicals, Layout of storage, Various modes of transport and
Safety precautions in transportation of different types of chemicals.
Unit IV
Risk Analysis Techniques: Hazard & Operability (HAZOP) studies, Hazard Analysis
(HAZAN), Fault Tree Analysis, Consequence Analysis.
Unit V
Onsite and Offsite emergency management plans. Human Error Analysis. Accident Error
Analysis. Economics of Risk Management.
Text Book:
1.K. V. Raghavan and AA. Khan, Methodologies in Hazard Identification and Risk
Assessment, Manual by CLRI, 1990.
2. V. C. Marshal, Major Chemical Hazards, Ellis Horwood Ltd., Chichester, 1987.
3. Sam Mannan, Lees, Loss Prevention in the Process Industries, Hazard Identification,
Assessment and Control, 4th Edition, Butterworth Heineman, 2012.
Course Outcomes: The student should be able to
1. Classify and identify hazards in chemical industries
2. Take precautions in chemical storage and handling
3. Perform fault tree and event tree risk analysis and quantify them
4. Suggest and make others in the plant about emergency management plans

27

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

PROCESS INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA ANALYSIS


CHPE015
3:0:0
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The student will study
1.
Characteristics of measuring instruments
2.
Measurement instruments and working of temperature, thermal conductivity,
pressure, flow rate, liquid level, density and electrical conductivity
3.
Analysis of the data obtained graphically and numerically
4.
Optimization of data using factorial method
Course Content:
Unit I
Measurement quality. Characteristics of instruments. Measurement methods for temperature,
thermal conductivity, and viscosity.
Unit II
Measurement methods for pressure, flow rate, and liquid level.
Unit III
Measurement methods for vapour pressure, density, and electrical conductivity.
Unit IV
Role of experiments in engineering and technology. Data collection and interpretation
requirements Graphical and numerical data processing; Variable-screening techniques.
Unit V
Introduction to design of experiments, Factorial method.
Text Books:
1.
Ray, M.S., Engineering Experimentation: Ideas, Techniques, Presentation, McGraw Hill
Book Co. Inc., New York, 1988.
2.
Eckmen, D. P., Process Instrumentation, CBS Publishers and Distributors, 2006.
Reference Books:
1. Gibbings, J.C., The Systematic Experiment, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K,
1986.
2. Austin E. Frisbane, Industrial Instrumentation Fundamentals, McGraw Hill Co. Inc, NY,
1983.
3. H.S. Mickely, T.K. Sherwood & C.E. Reed, Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering,
3rd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 1999.

Course Outcomes: The student will be able to


1.
Decide which instrument to be used for measuring a particular physical properties
2.
Understand principle and working of temperature, thermal conductivity, pressure,
flow rate, liquid level, density and electrical conductivity
3.
Analyze of the data obtained graphically and numerically and perform regression
analysis
4.
Statistically optimize the data using factorial method
28

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

POLLUTION CONTROL LABORATORY


CHL504
0:0:2
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
List of experiments:
1. Determination of pH, alkalinity of samples.
2. Determination of turbidity of sample using Nephelo turbidometer.
3. Determination of dissolved, suspended and volatile solids.
4. Optimum coagulant dosage using Jar test.
5. Settleable and suspended particulate matter in air using high volume sampler.
6. Determine of chloride, iodide, nitrate ions in water samples using Ion selective electrode.
7. Determination of BOD.
8. Determination of COD.
9. Dissolved oxygen determination using DO meter.
10. Estimation of Copper in mining leachate
11. MPN count.
12. Determination concentration of Sodium, Potassium, Calcium in the given sample.
13. To treat a given phenol effluent and determine the content of phenol pre and post
treatment.
14. Determination of concentration of COx, SOx, NOx in air sample.
15. Analysis using FTIR
16. Determination of Cyclone separator efficiency.
Note: Minimum 10 experiments are to be conducted.

29

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

COMPUTATIONAL METHODS LABORATORY


CHL506
0:0:2
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics IV, Fundamentals of Computing


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
List of programmes:
1. Non-linear algebraic equation
2. Problems on general material balance
3. Ordinary Differential Equation- R-K Method
4. Numerical Integration- Simpsons 1/3 Rule
5. Curve Fitting-Least Square
6. Calculation of Bubble Point and Dew Point for Ideal multi-component system
7. P-xy and T-x,y data generation from the given vapor pressure data
8. Flash Vaporization for multi-component system
9. Design of Batch Reactor/ PFR/ CSTR
10. Double pipe heat exchanger (Area, Length and Pressure drop)
11. Data handling and regression using MS-Excel
12. MATLAB Matrices/ Polynomials/ Integral/ Differential/ Plots
Note: Minimum 10 programs to be carried out.

30

VI Semester
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

AL601
2:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 28
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will learn
1. IPR, its forms and role.
2. Patents: Indian and Global scenario.
3. Procedure for obtaining patent.
4. Trade marks and laws.
5. Copy Right, its requirements, and infringement.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction to IPR: Globalization, Knowledge era, History of IPR.
Different forms of IPR Copy Rights, Trade Marks, Industrial designs, Patents and Trade
secrets; Role of IPR in Research and Development.
Design: Designs that can be registered, Procedures of registration.
Unit II
Patents: patent as an intellectual property, Brief history of patents-Indian and global
scenario, Principles underlying Patent law.
Ideas: Generation and review of ideas, process and Product Patents.
Unit III
Procedure for Obtaining Patent: Patent Contents Patent Drafting: Filing requirements.
Case Studies on Patents: Related to chemical and allied industries
Unit IV
Trade Marks: Nature, Essentials, Protection, Trade Marks (contd.) Service marks and
Laws.
Case Studies on Trade marks: Related to chemical and allied industries.
Unit V
Copy Right: Characteristics and Requirements; Neighboring rights, Ownership;
Infringement of Copy right.
Case Studies on Copy Rights: Related to chemical and allied industries.

31

Text Book:
1. Wadehra, B.L., Law relating to Patents, Trademarks, Copyright, Designs and
Geographical Indications, 2nd Edition, Universal Law publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., 2002.
Reference Books:
1. Prabudha Ganguli, Intellectual Property Rights, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd.,
2001.
2. Manish Arora, Guide to Patents Law, 4th Edition, Universal Law publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd.,
2007.
Course Outcomes: On completion of this course, the student will be able to
1. Understand the role of IPR and its importance.
2. Understand Indian and global scenario of patents.
3. Search for patents and know the procedure to obtain it.
4. Understand the nature and protection of trade marks.
5. Understand the requirements and infringement of Copyright.

32

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING-II


CH601
3:1:0
Contact Hours: 70
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Chemical Reaction Engineering-I


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Learn heterogeneous reaction systems.
2. Study the design and analyze performance of non-ideal reactors.
3. Study catalytic systems and its deactivation studies for students to handle such process
systems.
4. Study kinetic of catalytic reactions and studies on reactors used for them.
5. Learn the performance of various types of reactors through laboratory experiment.
Course Content:
Unit I
Fluid-fluid reactions: kinetics- the rate equation. Fluid-particle reactions: kinetics- selection
of a model, shrinking core model for spherical particles of unchanging size, rate of reaction
for shrinking spherical particles, extensions, determination of rate controlling .
Unit II
Fluid particle reactor design for non catalytic heterogeneous reactions. Introduction to
catalysis. steps in a catalytic reactions, Adsorption on solid surfaces, Physical properties of
catalysts, Classification and Preparation of catalyst,Estimation methods for catalytic
properties., Promoters, inhibitors and accelerators.
Unit III
Mechanism of catalysis, Rate controlling steps and their derivation for finding rates.
Deactivating catalysts- mechanisms of catalyst deactivation, the rate and performance
equations.
Unit IV
Solid catalyzed reactions: Spectrum of kinetic regimes. Rate equation for surface kinetics.
Pore diffusion resistance combined with surface kinetics. Porous catalyst particles. Heat
effects during reaction. Performance equations for reactors containing porous catalyst
particles. Experimental methods for finding rates.
Unit V
Packed bed catalytic reactor and reactors with suspended solid catalyst. Fluidized reactors of
various type. Quanlitative design of fluidized bed reactor. Kinetics of trickle bed and slurry
reactors.
Text Books:
1. Levenspiel, O., Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Edition, John Wiley &Sons.
2. Smith, J.M., Chemical Engineering Kinetics, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill.
Reference Books:
1. Foggler, H.S., Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall.
2. Carberry, J.J., Chemical & Catalytic Reaction Engineering, McGraw Hill.
3. Denbigh and Turner, Chemical Reactor Theory- An Introduction, 2nd Edition, ELBS.
33

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students can


1. Explain heterogeneous reaction systems both catalytic and non-catalytic.
2. Design the non-ideal reactors for heterogeneous systems.
3. Prepare the catalysts of required properties and performance
4. Apply these catalysts and able to design the system for required purpose.
5. Operate and maintain various types of reactors by conducting laboratory experiments.

34

MASS TRANSFER-II
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CH602
3:1:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 70
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Mass Transfer-I, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study of the stage wise mass transfer operations.
2. Study principles of various stage wise contact processes like absorption, distillation,
extraction and leaching.
3. Study Design aspects of the equipments utilized for above mentioned operations.
4. Course to impart practical knowledge of separation processes, conduct experiments and
submit the report.
5. Be able to operate and debug any problems emanating in equipments used in industries
for the above operations.
Course Content:
Unit I
Absorption: Absorption. Solvent selection for absorption. Material balance and concept of
driving force and minimum solvent rates. Multistage absorption columns. Design of Plate
columns. Absorption and desorption factors. Construction details. HETP and HTU concepts.
Liquid phase hold up and pressure drop in absorption towers. Operating line and minimum
solvent flow rates. Design of packed towers (process design-height and diameter). Multicomponent absorption. Absorption with chemical reaction.
Unit II
Distillation: Introduction. Vapour liquid equilibria (T-x,y, P-x,y. H-x,y and x-y diagrams for
binary mixtures). Relative volatility. Prediction of VLE from vapour pressure data using
Raoults law. VLE for multi-component systems. Non-ideal systems. Azeotropes. Immiscible
systems. Steam distillation. Flash and simple distillation.
Unit III
Multistage distillation. Multi-stage rectification column. Design using McCabe Thiele
method for binary mixtures. Ponchon-Savarit method. Efficienciesoverall, local, and
Murphree plate efficiencies. Multicomponent distillation. Vacuum, molecular, extractive and
azeotropic distillations.
Unit IV
Liquid-liquid extraction: Ternary equilibrium. Solvent selection. Single stage. Multistagecross-current, counter-current extraction. Equipment for liquid-liquid extraction.
Unit V
Leaching operation: Equipment for leaching. Preparation of solids for leaching. Equilibrium
diagrams. Calculation of single stage and multi-stage leaching operation.

Text Books:
1. Treybal, R.E., Mass Transfer Operations, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill, 1981.
2. Ananthraman, Sheriffa Begum, K.M., Mass Transfer Theory and Practice, PHI New
Delhi, 2011.
35

Reference Books:
1. Coulson, J.M., Richardson, J.F. and Sinnott, R.K. , Chemical Engineering Vol I, II, IV
and V, 4th Edition, Pergmen Press, 1998.
2. Badger & Banchero, Introduction to Chemical Engineering, TMH, 6th Reprint, 1998.
3. Foust, A., Principals of Unit Operation, 2nd Edition, John Wiley, 1994.
4. Geankoplis, C. J, Transport Processes and Unit Operation, Prentice Hall(I), 2000.

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students can


1. Have complete insight of stage wise contact processes absorption; distillation, extraction
and leaching that are used in separation processes in industries.
2. Explain the underlying principles and apply them for related separation processes in
industries.
3. Suggest and design equipment for various mass transfer operations mentioned above.
4. Apply these separation processes for specific purposes by using the experience obtained
while conducting experiments in laboratory.
5. Can operate, design and debug any problems emanating in equipment used in industries
for the above operations.

36

BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CH603
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study introduction to the application of chemical engineering principles in biochemical
systems.
2. Be enabled to understand the biological systems and kinetics of enzymatic reactions.
3. Learn the kinetics of growth of microorganisms, hence be able to control the process.
4. Be able to design equipments for handing biological processes.
5. Study Operations utilized in the purification of biological products enable them to
recommend, install and easily learn to operate the equipments.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Bioprocess engineering and technology. Role of a Chemical engineer in
bioprocess industry. An introduction to basic biological sciences. Microbiology: Structure of
cells: Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. Classification of micro-organisms. Taxonomy, Whitakers
5-kingdom concept. Characteristics and control of microorganisms. Environmental and
Industrial microbiology.
Biochemistry: Chemicals of Life: Lipids, Sugars, Polysaccharides, Amino acids and
proteins, Vitamins, Biopolymers, Nucleic Acids: RNA, DNA and their derivatives (Structure,
Biological function and Importance for life only to be studied).
Unit II
Enzymes and Proteins: Detailed structure of proteins and enzymes: Primary, Secondary,
Tertiary and quaternary. Functions. Production and purification of Enzymes (Methods only).
Nomenclature and Classification of enzymes. Mechanism and Kinetics using various models.
Kinetics of Enzyme action: MichaelisMenten rate equation. Derivation with Equilibrium
and Pseudo- (quasi-) steady state approximations. Experimental determination of rate
parameters: Batch and continuous flow experiments.

Unit III
Enzyme Inhibition: Effect of Inhibitors (Competitive, noncompetitive, uncompetitive,
substrate and product inhibitions), Temperature and pH on the rates enzyme catalyzed
reactions.
Unit IV
Fermentation Technology: Ideal reactors: A review of Batch and Continuous flow reactors
for bio kinetic measurements. Microbiological reactors: Operation and maintenance of
typical aseptic aerobic fermentation processes. Formulation of medium: Sources of nutrients.
Alternate bioreactor configurations. Introduction to sterilization of bioprocess equipment.
Design of batch & continuous sterilization equipment.

37

Unit V
Growth Kinetics of Microorganisms: Transient growth kinetics (Different phases of batch
cultivation). Quantification of growth kinetics: Substrate limited growth, Models with growth
inhibitors, Logistic equation, Filamentous cell growth model. Continuous culture: Optimum
Dilution rate, Critical Dilution rate in Ideal Chemostat. Introduction to Fed-batch reactors.
Strategies and Steps involved in product purification.
Text Book:
1. Bailey and Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill,
1976.
2. Shuler, M. L. and Kargi, F., Bioprocess Engineering, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002.
Reference Books:
1. Pelczer, Microbiology Concept and Application, 5th Edition, McGraw Hill, 2001 Reprint.
2. Stanbury and Whittaker, Principles of Fermentation Technology, II Edition.

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students can


1. Explain the basics of microbiology and role of Chemical Engineers in bioprocess
industries.
2. Perform kinetic studies of enzymatic reactions and also the effect of inhibitors and have
control over these processes and design such systems to handle them.
3. Explain in details about the fermentation technology, operation and maintenance of
equipment in these industries.
4. Explain the kinetics of microbial growth and control of bioreactors.
5. Explain operations utilized in the purification of biological products are also studied by
the students. This will enable them to recommend, install and easily learn to operate the
equipment.

38

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

NATURAL GAS ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION


CHPE021
3:0:0
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Petroleum Technology, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study natural gas processing and methods used in improvement of quality of product.
The methods to be addressed are distillation, extraction, hydration and dehydration,
purification, LNG etc, and transportation.
2. Study the governing properties and principles of chemical engineering methodology.
3. Study the latest developments in petroleum and gas processing technology & industry
and the need of chemical engineers for an insight to design of such equipment.
4. Learn to apply the knowledge of chemical engineering and design the gas processing
systems and its transportation.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Overview of the gas industry and gas processing, Field operations and inlet
receiving.
Gas Compression: Methods of gas compression, thermodynamic considerations.
Unit II
Fundamentals of vapor-liquid equilibria and distillation, Gas hydrates, Gas dehydration.

Unit III
Cryogenic extraction of natural gas liquids (NGL). Minor component (nitrogen, helium,
mercury, and BTEX) recovery or removal. Acid Gas (hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide)
removal.
Unit IV
Sweetening and dehydration of condensate and natural gas liquids (NGL).
Sulfur recovers with the Claus process, Tail gas cleanup.
Unit V
Acid gas injection. Liquefied natural gas (LNG), production, storage, transportation, and
regasification.
Text Books:
1. Katz, D. L. and Lee, R.L., Natural Gas Engineering, McGraw Hill, 1990.
Reference Books:
1. Kidnay, A.J., Parnish, W.R., Dekker, Fundamentals of Natural Gas Processing, McGraw
Hill.
2. Mokhatab, S., Handbook of Natural Gas Transmission and Processing.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Explain the principles of gas compression, handling and transportation.
39

2. Explain Various methods and equipment used for gas handling and transportation are
learnt.
3. Explain Gas treatment processes and impurity removal methods will make the student
employable in these industries.
4. Apply the knowledge of chemical engineering and design to the gas processing and
transportation.
5. Explain about LNG production and processing.

40

NON-CONVENTIONAL ENERGY SOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY


Sub Code:
CHPE022
Credit:
3:0:0
Contact Hours: 42
CIE:
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks
Pre-requisites: Nil
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study the non-conventional sources of energy which has higher priority with reference to
national needs. It deals with the different non-conventional energy systems such as solar
energy, wind energy, energy from biomass and biogas, geothermal energy, energy from
oceans, chemical energy sources, etc.
2. Study fundamentals of non-conventional energy technology and develops to allow the
student to expand his knowledge progressively.
3. Study and present seminar on latest technology like fuel cell etc and submit the report on
the same.
4. Learn technologies of Wind energy, energy from biological sources and ocean.
5. Students to be motivated in designing new technologies for non-conventional energy
sources.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction to conventional & non-conventional energy sources: Conventional energy
sources; non-conventional energy sources; advantages; limitations. Classification of fuels.
Calorific value. Characteristics of good fuels. Comparison between solid, liquid and gaseous
fuels.
Solar Energy: Solar radiation and its measurement solar constant, solar radiation at earths
surface, solar radiation geometry, solar radiation measurement. Introduction to solar energy.
Applications solar water heating, space heating, space cooling, solar thermal electric
conversion. Agriculture and industrial process heating, solar distillation, solar pumping, solar
cooking.
Unit II
Energy from biomass (bio energy): Introduction. Biomass conversion Technologies. Wet
processes. Dry processes. Biogas generation. Factors affecting biodigestion or generation of
gas. Classification of biogas plants. Advantages and disadvantages of floating drum plant.
Advantages and disadvantages of fixed dome type plant. Types of biogas plants (KVIC
model & Janata model). Selection of site for biogas plant.
Unit III
Bio Energy (Thermal Conversion): Methods of obtaining energy from biomass. Thermal
gasification of biomass. Classification of biomass gasifiers. Chemistry of gasification
process. Applications of the gasifiers.
Unit IV
Wind Energy: Introduction. Basic components of WECS (wind energy conversion system).
Classification of WECS. Types of wind machines- horizontal axis machines, vertical axis
machines. Applications of wind energy.
Energy from the oceans: Introduction. Ocean thermal electric conversion (OTEC). Methods
of ocean thermal electric power generation. Open cycle OTEC system. Closed or Anderson

41

OTEC cycle, hybrid cycle. Application of energy from oceans.


Unit V
Fuel Cells Basics: Fuel Cells, Difference between batteries and fuel cells. Components of
fuel cells. Principle of working of fuel cells. Performance characteristics and efficiency of
fuel cells, Fuel cell stack, Fuel cell power plant.
Fuel cell types: Alkaline fuel cells. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Phosphoric acid fuel cells.
Molten carbonate fuel cells. Solid oxide fuel cells. Types of solid acid fuel acid fuel cells.
Applications. Problems with fuel cells.
Text Books:
1. Rai, G.D., Non-Conventional Energy Sources, Khanna Publications, 4th Edition, Second
Reprint, 1997.
2. Sukhatme, S.P., Solar Energy, Second Edition, 3rd Reprint, Tata McGraw Hill, New
Delhi, 1998.
Reference Books:
1. Jain, P.C., Jain, M., Engineering Chemistry, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, 10th Edition, 3rd
Reprint, 1995.
2. Rai, G.D., Solar Energy Utilization, 4th Edition, Khanna Publications.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Apply the knowledge of chemical engineering in developing techniques to develop
alternative sources of energy.
2. Explain the energy needs of our country are increasing significantly in foreseeable future.
3. Know latest technology like fuel cell etc.
4. Identify and suggest non-conventional energy technologies a step in conserving depleting
energy resources.
5. Explain technologies of Wind energy, energy from biological sources and ocean.
6. Capable of designing new technologies for non-conventional energy sources.

42

COMPOSITE MATERIALS
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHPE023
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Material Science


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Learn advanced and future materials examples ceramic, super conductivity and property
studies.
2. Learn techniques of preparation of composite material and characterization.
3. Learn processing techniques( mechanical/ physical ) for composite materials.
4. Understand the fabrication methods in polymer composites processing.
5. Study application, fabrication and design aspects of reinforced polymer composites.
6. Study newer areas of polymer applications and development for better methods for
sustained growth.
Course Content:
Unit I
Synthesis And Fabrication: Advanced and future materials with emphasis on Ceramic,
Semi-conducting and Super-conducting materials with superior structural, optical and
electrical properties.
Techniques for preparation of ultra-pure, ultra-fine powders: of oxides, nitrides, carbides etc.,
with very well defined characteristics and superior properties.
Unit II
Processing Techniques: such as sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, tape-casting,
sol-gel processing for the formation of monolithic ceramics. Composites (ceramic, ceramic
metal, as well as metal matrix). SiO2. Glasses from above powders.

Unit III
Processing Techniques based on reaction methods: such as Chemical vapour deposition
(CVD), vapour phase epitaxy, plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD),
chemical vapour infiltration (CVI). Self propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) for the
preparation of monolithic ceramics, composites, coating, thin films, whiskers and fibres and
semi conducting materials such as Si and Gallium Arsenide.
Unit IV
Synthesis and processing of mixed ceramic oxides with high temperature super conducting
properties
Reinforcement, additives, fillers for polymer composite, master batch & compounding.
Unit V
Polymer composite. Fibre reinforced composites. Stress Strain modulus relationship Nano
composites.

43

Characteristics & applications in marine, aerospace, building & computer industry.


Manufacturing methods, hand layouts, filament winding, pultrusion, SMC, DMC.
Text Books:
1. Kingrey, W.D., Introduction to Ceramics, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 1976.
2. Chawla, K.K., Advanced Composites, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 1993.
Reference Books:
1. James T. Schockel Ford, Introduction to Material Science for Engineering, McMillan
Publications.
2. Van Vlack, L.H., Material Science and Engineering, Dorling Kindersley Pvt Ltd, 2006.
3. Nicholas, P., Paul N., Chermisinoff, A., Fibre Reinforced Plastic Deskbook, Arbor
science publishing Inc, 1978.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Explain the various types of composites and important properties sought for definite
application.
2. Explain preparation techniques of carbides, nitrides etc. and characterization of the same.
3. Explain mechanical / physical techniques of sintering monolithic, ceramics, metals etc.
4. Explain techniques like CVD, PECVD, CVI, SHS for composite preparation including
nano materials.
5. Fabricate and design aspects of reinforced polymer composites.
6. Motivated to think newer areas of polymer applications and development for better
methods for sustained growth.

44

ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHPE024
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study second law, Maxwell relations and relation for entropy changes.
2. Learn concept of fugacity, fugacity coefficient, partial molar properties
3. Study equilibrium in multiphase systems Gibbs phase rule and criteria for reaction
equilibria.
4. Learn thermodynamic probability, degeneracy of energy levels and partition functions.
5. Understand thermo-electric phenomena and entropy production.
Course Content:
Unit 1
Availability, Irreversibility and Second-Law Efficiency for a closed System and
steady state,
Control
Volume. Availability
Analysis of
Simple Cycles.
Thermodynamic Potentials, Maxwell relations, Generalised relation for changes in Entropy,
Internal Energy and Enthalpy, Generalised Relations for Cp and Cv Clausius
Claypeyron Equation, Joule-Thomson Coefficient, Bridgman Tables for thermodynamic
relations.
Unit II
Different Equations of State, Fugacity, Compressibility, Principle of Corresponding States,
Use of generalized charts for enthalpy and entropy departure, fugacity coefficient, Lee-Kesler
generalized three parameter tables. Fundamental property relations for systems of variable
composition, partial molar prosperities, Real gas mixtures, Ideal solution of real gases and
liquids, Equilibrium in multi phase systems, Gibbs phase rule for non-reactive components.

Unit III
Thermo chemistry, first Law analysis of reacting systems, Adiabatic Flame temperature,
Entropy change of reacting systems, Second Law analysis of reacting systems, Criterion for
reaction equilibrium composition.
Unit IV
Microstates and Macrostates, Thermodynamic probability, Degeneracy of energy levels,
Maxwell-Boltzman, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein Statistics, Microscopic Interpretation
of heat and work, Evaluation of entropy, Partition function, Calculation of the
Microscopic properties from partition functions. Collision Theory and Transport
properties.
Unit V
Conjugate Fluxes and Forces, Entropy Production, Onsager's Reciprocity relations,
thermo-electric phenomena and formulations. Thermodynamics of High-Gas flow.

45

Text Books:
1. Kenneth Wark Jr., Advanced Thermodynamics for Engineers, McGraw-Hill Inc., 2001.
2. Sonntag, R.E., and Vann Wylen, G., Introduction to Thermodynamics, Classical and
Statistical, third Edition, John Wiley and Sons, 1991.
References
1. Bejan, A., Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics, John Wiley and Sons, 1998.
2. Holman, J.P., Thermodynamics, Fourth Edition, McGraw-Hill Inc., 1998.
3. Smith, J.M and Van Ness., H.C., Introduction to chemical Engineering
Thermodynamics, Fourth Edition, McGraw-Hill Inc., 1987.
4. Sears, F.W. and Salinger G.I., Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory and Statistical
Thermodynamics, third Edition, Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi, 1993.
5. De Hoft, R.T. Thermodynamics in Materials Science, McGraw-Hill Inc., 1993.
6. Rao, Y.V.C., Postulational and Statistical thermodynamics, Allied Publisher Limited,
New Delhi, 1994.

46

OPERATIONS RESEARCH
Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHPE025
3:0:0
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics I and II


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Get introduced to the methods of Operations Research
2. Learn mathematical procedures for programming search techniques for operations.
3. Understand to relate course material to realistic examples.
4. Understand important tools of project management.
5. Study network activities in a project, identify crucial activities and have control over the
project.
6. Learn to maintain correct inventory and reduce the cost.
7. Learn resource management techniques which will make students to handle projects
effectively.
Course Content:
Unit I
Introduction: Definition. Scope of Operations Research (OR). Approach and limitations of
O.R. Models. Characteristics and phases of O.R.
Linear Programming Problems: Mathematical formulation of L.P. Problems. Graphical
solution method.
The Simplex Method: 1 & 2 slack, surplus and artificial variables. Dual simplex method.
Degeneracy and procedure for resolving degenerate cases.
Unit II
Assignment problems: Balanced and Unbalanced assignment problems. Maximization
assignment problems. Travelling salesman problems.
Transportation Problem: Basic feasible solutions by different methods. Finding optimal
solution. MODI method. Degeneracy. Unbalanced transportation problems. Maximization
Problems.
Unit III
Sequencing: Johnsons algorithm. n jobs - 2 machines, n jobs -3 machines, and n jobs-n
machines without passing sequence. 2 jobs-n machines. Graphical solutions.
Deterministic Models: Inventory, EOQ Models. With and without shortages. Ordering cost.
Carrying cost.
Unit IV
PERT-CPM Techniques: Network construction. Determining critical path. Variance and
probability of completing the project. Calculation of different floats. Project duration.
Crashing of simple networks.
Unit V
Replacement model: Replacement of items which fails completely-individual replacement,
group replacement. Replacement of items where maintenance cost increases with time and
47

the value of money changes with time.


Text Books:
1. Srinath, L. S., Introduction to Pert and CPM, 3rd Edition, East West, 1998.
2. Kantiswaroop, Gupta, P. K. and Manmohan, Operation Research, 9th Edition, S Chand &
Co., 1999.
Reference books:
1. Sharma, S. D., Operation Research, 8th Edition, Kedarnath & Co, 2003.

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Develop the problems for mathematical analysis.
2. Identify problems and constraints in a problem.
3. Assign activities on priority base and optimize time.
4. Minimize time or cost for transportation.
5. Network activities in a project, identify crucial activities and have control over the
project.
6. Maintain correct inventory and reduce the cost.
7. Poses management techniques, will make students handle projects effectively.

48

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

PROCESS EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND DRAWING


CH604
1:1:2
Contact Hours: 84
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Chemical Process Calculations, Process Equipment Drawing, Process Heat


Transfer, Mass Transfer-I and II
Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
Course Objectives: The students will
1. Study design safe process and design appropriate equipment like reactors, mass transfer
heat transfer equipment, pipelines storage tanks etc.
2. Study relevant codes for design of chemical plant equipment as per the standard
procedures specified by design code books.
3. Learn the fabrication techniques and testing methods.
4. Learn design and engineering skills directly applied in design, installation and
commissioning of equipments.
Course Content:
Detailed chemical engineering process and mechanical design of the equipments:
Pressure vessel - Jacketed vessel, Double pipe Heat exchanger, Shell & Tube Heat
exchanger, Condensers Horizontal and vertical, Evaporator Single effect, Distillation
Column, Packed Bed Absorption Column, Rotary Dryer.
Standard Code books to be used. The detailed dimensional drawings shall include
sectional front view, Full Top/side view depending on equipment and major component
drawing with dimensioning and Part Template.

Reference Books:
1. Joshi, M.V., Process Equipment Design, Macmillan India,1991.
2. Brownell, L.E. and Young, E.H., Process Equipment Design - Vessel Design, John Wiley
and Sons, Inc.1959.
3. Ludwig, E.E., Applied Process Design for Chemical and Petrochemical Plants, Vol. 1 and
2, 3rd Ed., Gulf Publishing Co. 1997.
4. Indian Standards Institution, Code for Unfired Pressure Vessels, IS 2825.
5. Bhattacharya, B.C, Introduction to Chemical Equipment Design, CBS Publications,1985.
6. Perrys Chemical Engineers Handbook.
Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Design process and design equipment by choosing appropriate material of construction by
following applicable design codes.
2. Capable of translating the design to fabrication drawings for plant erection.
3. Explain the correct fabrication techniques and testing methods.
4. Possess engineering skills directly applied in design, installation and commissioning of
equipments.

49

Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING LABORATORY


CHL601
0:0:2
Contact Hours: 42
50 Marks
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Chemical Reaction Engineering


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
List of experiments suggested:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Batch Reactor
Isothermal plug flow reactor
Mixed flow reactor
Semi batch reactor
Heterogeneous catalytic Reactor
CSTRs in Series
Adiabatic Reactor
Packed bed Reactor
RTD Studies in Tubular Reactor
Effect of temperature on Rate of reaction
Bio Chemical Reaction (Batch)
Enzyme catalyzed reactions in batch reactor
RTD Studies in mixed flow reactor
Sono-chemical reactor
Photochemical reactor

Note: Minimum of 10 experiments to be conducted.

50

MASS TRANSFER LABORATORY


Sub Code:
Credit:
CIE:

CHL602
0:0:2
50 Marks

Contact Hours: 42
SEE:
50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Mass Transfer


Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department
List of experiments suggested:
1. Diffusion of organic vapour in air
2. Simple Distillation
3. Packed column/ plate column distillation
4. Steam distillation
5. Solid liquid leaching
6. Surface evaporation
7. Tray dryer
8. Adsorption studies
9. Liquid-liquid/Vapour liquid equilibrium
10. Liquid extraction (cross current: 1 and 2 or 3 stage)
11. Hold up studies in packed columns
12. Rotary/ vacuum dryers
13. Wetted wall column
14. Cooling tower
15. Solid dissolution
Note: Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

51