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TEENS CLUB

Lina Alvarado Jantus

ENGLISH 2 Me d io

STUDENTS TEXTBOOK

Medio

PEFC/29-31-75

9 789568 694418

EDICIN ESPECIAL PARA EL MINISTERIO DE EDUCACIN


PROHIBIDA SU COMERCIALIZACIN

EDICIN ESPECIAL PARA EL MINISTERIO DE EDUCACIN - PROHIBIDA SU COMERCIALIZACIN

ET
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O K
BO OO
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English

STUDENTS TEXTBOOK

STUDENTS TEXTBOOK

English

Medio

TEENS CLUB
Lina Alvarado Jantus

Teacher of English
Instituto Profesional Chileno-Britnico

This book belongs to:


Name:
Class:
School:

Te lo ha hecho llegar gratuitamente el Ministerio de Educacin a travs del establecimiento educacional en el que estudias.
Es para tu uso personal tanto en tu colegio como en tu casa; cudalo para que te sirva durante todo el ao.
Si te cambias de colegio lo debes llevar contigo y al finalizar el ao, guardarlo en tu casa.

DISCOVER YOUR BOOK


STUDENT LIFE

UNIT
STUDENT LIFE
In this unit you will:
read a piece of literature
read an e-mail
listen to a dialog about activities in the past
You will learn how to:
Reading
scan a text to validate predictions
infer meaning of words from the context
localize specific information

Listening
identify general information
discriminate between correct and
incorrect information
identify specific information
Language
use the structure used to / didnt use to, to
express past habits
talk about things that were happening in
the past.

Speaking
ask and answer questions about past habits
talk about school life in the past
Writing
complete a summary of a story.
write an e-mail about student life
You will also:
develop respect and admiration for older people
show respect and acceptance of other
peoples opinions

GETTING READY
1 Look at the pictures on the next page and answer these questions.
a. What can you see?
b. What are the differences and similarities between the people and the places?

2 Share your observations in Exercise 1 with your classmates.


3 In pairs, write a list of words related to the name of the unit in your notebook. Then, talk with
your partner about your favorite things about student life. Explain why you like them.

GETTING READY
Some interesting pictures to
provide a setting and some simple
exercises to activate your previous
knowledge. You can also examine
the objectives of the unit here.

STUDENT LIFE

BEFORE YOU START

READING

STUDENT LIFE

10

LISTENING
5

LESSON 1

The school that was our school before the railroad came and overthrew it was a particular
sort of place. It was a school of some celebrity in its neighborhood , but nobody could
say why.

OUR SCHOOL

1 Write the correct phrase under each picture (1 6).


Field trip

English class
Lunch in the school cafeteria

Summer camp

The mice were the occasion of some most ingenious engineering, in the construction of
their houses and instruments of performance.

13 Listen to the recording again. Compare the information with


your ideas in Exercise 3.

13 Copy this chart into your notebook. Listen to the recording


again and check () or cross () each activity.

The boys used to train the mice much better than the masters trained the boys. I recall
one white mouse, who used to live in the cover of a Latin dictionary, who ran up ladders,
drew Roman chariots, shouldered muskets, turned wheels. He had the misfortune to
mistake his way in a triumphal procession to the Capitol, when he fell into a deep inkwell,
and was dyed black and drowned.
2

a. We have English classes on Mondays and Thursdays.


b. I did maths in the after-school program.
c. In summer, well be free for over ten weeks.
d. My classmates and I are going on a field trip next week.
Which of these sentences refers to
i. past events?
ii. future events?
iii. everyday events?
iv. fixed plans?

Activity

The usher at our school, who we considered to know everything as opposed to the Chief,
who we considered to know nothing, was a bony, gentle-faced, clerical-looking young
man in rusty black.

Watch TV

We all liked him, for he had a good knowledge of boys. He was a writing master,
mathematical master, English master, mended the pens, and did all sorts of things.
He always used to call at parents houses to inquire after sick boys, because he had
gentlemanly manners. He was rather musical, and on some remote day he had bought an
old trombone and made the most extraordinary sounds when he sometimes tried to play
it of an evening. In the summer vacations he used to take pedestrian excursions with a
knapsack; and at Christmas time, he used to go to see his father at Chipping Norton.

Have a picnic

Adapted from: Dickens, C. (n.d.). Our School. Retrieved 02/08, 2013,


from http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/2519/

Listen to music
Read
Ride bikes
Play cards
Go out alone
Have boyfriends
Return home late from parties

13 Listen again. Number these sentences in the order you


hear them.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

purpose:
what is the author
doing in this excerpt?
what examples from
the text support your
answer?

Life was really different.


We were singing in the music room.
On weekends, I returned home.
I was afraid of the dark.
These are my classmates and me!
You could go to the cinema.
My parents were living out of the city.

11

UNIT 1

BEFORE YOU START


Short activities to activate previous knowledge
and to deal with the starting point for the
activities that will follow.

READING
The tasks will help you develop strategies to
improve your understanding of written texts.

YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION

UNIT CHECK
READING: COMPARING SCHOOLS

1 Collect two old pictures from your family, stick them on your notebook and answer the

19

LISTENING
The tasks will help you develop strategies to
improve your understanding of oral messages.

STUDENT LIFE

PROJECT
17

questions below. Then, complete the dialog with your own ideas and practice it with a partner.
Take turns.

Old school, modern school


History and Art

a. When were the pictures taken?


b. What were the people doing?

1 Form groups of four to do this project.

A: Look, I found some old photos.


B: Let me see!
A: They
B: Why
A: Because
B: Life was different then!
A: Absolutely!

?
.
?
.

mark77@yahoo.com

Hi, Mark!

Hi, Mark!
Thanks for your e-mail about your school life. My school is totally different
from yours, so Im going to tell you about it.

2 Whats wrong with this classroom? Identify all the elements that dont belong to our time. Then,
write the corresponding sentences in your notebook.
Example: Nowadays, we dont use

Play the piano

There was, besides, a serving man whose name was Phil. He mended whatever we broke,
and made whatever we wanted. He was general glazier, among
other things, and mended all the broken windows. One time,
Strategy
Spot
when we had the scarlet fever in the school, Phil nursed all the
Identify the authors
sick boys of his own accord, and was like a mother to them.

a/b/c/d
a/b/c/d
a/b/c/d
a/b/c/d

Spot

Listen with a purpose:


Examine each
question in this section
carefully. What do
you have to listen for?
Then, listen and find
the information you
need in each case.

Sleep at school

There was a fat master who used to come in a gig, and taught the more advanced
matters; and there was a little French master who used to come in the sunniest weather,
with a handleless umbrella.

2 Read these sentences (a d) and circle the correct answer.

Strategy

a. Childrens pastimes in the past.


b. Grannies old school.
c. Lauras student life.
d. Their family.

Our School was remarkable for white mice. We used to keep red-polls, linnets, and even
canaries, in desks, drawers, hat-boxes, and other strange refuges for birds; but white
mice were the favourite stock.

Fifteen-minute recess

Physical education class

13 Listen to the conversation between Laura and her


grandmother. What are they talking about?

. We use

I go to a High School very near my house, so I usually walk. The school


is over 200 years old and, in the past, it used to be a school only for boys
and very strict. Now there are a lot of girls and we get along very well with
them, but its still strict.

There are only twenty students in each class, so our teachers know us very
well. We work very hard and the school day is long. It starts at 8:30 and
ends at 3:30. We usually have a lot of homework, but we all help each
other and were good friends.
We wear a uniform, and I think it is a good idea because you dont have to
waste time thinking about clothes every day.
We do the same subjects as you; biology is my favorite; I love going
to the lab and doing experiments! Perhaps Ill become a biologist in the
future. Im afraid Im not good at mathematics. Last year, I had to do the
after-school remedial program. Fortunately, my grades are better now, but
I still dont like it.
We have lunch at school and we also have two fifteen-minute recesses in
the morning.

2 Choose one place along the country and search for

information about school life in the past and at present.


Use the Internet, encyclopedias and what you have
learned in the History class.

3 Include information about: the school system (past

and present), compulsory and elective subjects (past


and present), school resources (past and present) and
student life (past and present).

4 Use your findings and the contents of this unit to make

a comparative chart between school life in the past and


at present. Draw the chart on a poster.

5 Also, make a small scale diorama (a scene that


captures a moment in time) to illustrate your
written work.

6 Present your project to the rest of the class.

Checklist
Reflect upon your project and check () under the correct column.
Very well

After lunch, we usually do extracurricular activities; I like these better than


the rest of the classes. Last semester, we prepared a play and I acted as
a film producer. It was great and I really enjoyed it. I hope youll like the
photos of the presentation. Im sending them as soon as I can.

We followed the instructions carefully.

Write back soon!

We distributed the tasks evenly among the group members.

Alan

We participated actively.

Well

Not so well

We collected information from different sources.

We were respectful of each others ideas and opinions.

26

UNIT 1

YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION


These attractive and entertaining activities
will motivate you to study and put into
practice what you are learning.

28

UNIT 1

UNIT CHECK
A formal test at the end of the unit to evaluate
your progress and help you discover what you
need to revise.

31

PROJECT
This section gives you the opportunity to apply
what you have learned in the unit and to
integrate it with other school subjects.

FAST LEARNERS

TAKE ACTION!
Hands-on activities to consolidate the contents covered in
the unit.
READING

AND WRITING

A short section with extra practice focused on reading


comprehension and writing skills.

A short section with extra practice focused on listening and


speaking skills.
ORAL PRACTICE

Interesting bits of information on the topics


of the lesson.
SPOT

Section designed to motivate you with


different games.

Word

These short evaluation activities allow you to


analyze your performance. You complete the
tasks within a time limit and check your points.
Spot

Special glossary that helps you with the


key words in the text you are going to
read or listen to.

Useful Expressions Spot

Commonly used expressions that


students can use in dialogs and
conversations.

A
& DIN
W G
O B
RK O
BO OK
O LE
K T

SPOT

Key

RE

LIFE

LETS CHECK

Activities based on a listening text, aimed at


practicing oral skills, pronunciation, fluency
and intonation.

REAL

GAME

LISTENING AND SPEAKING

Strategy

Spot

Strategies that help you


comprehend and use the
language.

LETS READ!

Reading booklet connection

This icon indicates the connection of


an activity with complementary work
on the Reading Booklet.

WORKBOOK
Lina Alvarado Jantus

LETS READ!
Reading booklet

LETS READ!

Activities for faster students. They can


also be used with all students, if the
circumstances allow it.

A complementary booklet aimed at


encouraging your taste for reading
outside of the classroom, and
reinforcing your comprehension skills.

WORKBOOK

It includes a selection of activities


divided by unit, as a complement
for the contents covered in the
Students book.

PLAN OF THE BOOK


UNIT

UNIT

STUDENT LIFE
6 - 31

CHALLENGES
32 - 53

Getting Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
BEFORE YOU START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Lesson 1: Our School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Reading:
Read an extract from a short story . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Language Spot:
Talk about actions that used to happen . . . . . . 13
Listening and Speaking:
A dialog about past habits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Writing:
A paragraph about past habits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Lesson 2: Who had more fun? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Listening:
A conversation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Language Spot:
Talk about things that were happening
in the past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Oral Practice:
Describing peoples actions in a photo . . . . . . . 22
Reading and writing:
An extract of a short story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Take Action!:
A report about peoples activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
UNIT CHECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
PROJECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Getting Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BEFORE YOU START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 1: Extreme challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading:
Sports advertisements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Spot:
Talk about things you have done . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listening and Speaking:
Reporting ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writing:
Write a personal report about an
exciting experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 2: Swim your own race . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listening:
Listen to a radio interview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Spot:
Expressing desires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oral Practice:
A dialog expressing desires and hopes . . . . . . .
Reading and writing:
Read and write piece of news . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Take Action!:
A sports advertisement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UNIT CHECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROJECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

COMMUNICATIVE TASKS FILE ............................100

THEMATIC INDEX........................................................ 104

32
34
36
37
39
40

41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
50
53

UNIT

UNIT

ARTS AND
ENTERTAINMENT
54 - 77

Getting Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BEFORE YOU START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 1: Lets turn on the TV! . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading:
A TV guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Spot:
Use connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listening and Speaking:
A monolog about favorite TV program . . . . . . .
Writing:
A TV guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 2: Teens art work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listening:
A report about an artistic event . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Spot:
Report what other people said . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oral Practice:
Telling what other people said . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading and writing:
Ekphrastic poems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Take Action!:
A dialog about a free time activity . . . . . . . . . . . .
YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UNIT CHECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROJECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LANGUAGE REFERENCE ............ 105

54
56
58
59
61
62
63
64
65
67
68
69
71
72
74
77

HOW ABOUT
WORKING?
78 - 99

Getting Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BEFORE YOU START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 1: Breaking frontiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading:
Voluntary work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Spot:
Express obligation and necessity
(must / have to / need to) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listening and Speaking:
A dialog about a job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writing:
An application form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 2: Making a difference . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listening:
A radio advertisement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Spot:
Expressing possibilities (may / might) . . . . . . . .
Oral Practice:
Dialogs about possibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading and writing:
Poems about volunteering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Take Action!:
A job leaflet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UNIT CHECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROJECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VOCABULARY ................................ 108

78
80
82
82

84
86
86
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
96
99

BIBLIOGRAPHY.............................. 110

UNIT
STUDENT LIFE
In this unit you will:
read a piece of literature
read an e-mail
listen to a dialog about activities in the past
You will learn how to:
Reading
scan a text to validate predictions
infer meaning of words from the context
localize specific information

Listening
identify general information
discriminate between correct and
incorrect information
identify specific information
Language
use the structure used to / didnt use to, to
express past habits
talk about things that were happening in
the past.

Speaking
ask and answer questions about past habits
talk about school life in the past
Writing
complete a summary of a story.
write an e-mail about student life
You will also:
develop respect and admiration for older people
show respect and acceptance of other
peoples opinions

GETTING READY
1 Look at the pictures on the next page and answer these questions.
a. What can you see?
b. What are the differences and similarities between the people and the places?

2 Share your observations in Exercise 1 with your classmates.


3 In pairs, write a list of words related to the name of the unit in your notebook. Then, talk with
your partner about your favorite things about student life. Explain why you like them.

STUDENT LIFE

BEFORE YOU START


LESSON 1

OUR SCHOOL

1 Write the correct phrase under each picture (1 6).


Field trip

English class
Lunch in the school cafeteria

Fifteen-minute recess
Summer camp

Physical education class

2 Read these sentences (a d) and circle the correct answer.


a.
b.
c.
d.

We have English classes on Mondays and Thursdays.


I did maths in the after-school program.
In summer, well be free for over ten weeks.
My classmates and I are going on a field trip next week.
Which of these sentences refers to
i. past events?
ii. future events?
iii. everyday events?
iv. fixed plans?

UNIT 1

a/b/c/d
a/b/c/d
a/b/c/d
a/b/c/d

STUDENT LIFE

Before starting this unit, you need to know:


Talk about things in the present and in the past.
Talk about free time and everyday activities.

LESSON 2

WHO HAD MORE FUN?

1 Complete the dialogs with your own ideas and using the pictures as clues. Then, practice
them with your partner.

a. A: Grandma, do you like music?


B:
A: And when you were a teenager,
B: Well,

c. A: Hey,
B: When I was a child,
A:
B: Sure!

b. A: What
B: I remember that,

?
.

?
.
?

d. A: In your free time,


B:
A: Really?
B: When I
A: No way!

?
.
?
.

LESSON 1

OUR SCHOOL

READING
BEFORE READING

Strategy

Spot

Read the first sentence


of the text on Page 11
and answer:
in what way can a
school be particular?
how do you imagine
the school?

1 Look at the pictures. Where are the children? How can you tell?
2 Answer these questions in pairs. Then, share your comments with
your classmates.

a. What do you think school life was like in the past?


b. What subjects do you think they studied?
c. What differences do you think there are between schools then
and now?

3 Have a look at the text you are going to read. Where do you think it
was extracted from? Why do you think so?
a. A novel.
b. A play.

c. A report.
d. A short story.

4 What do you think the text will be about? Write two ideas in your
notebook and compare them with your partners.

5 Read the words in the Key Word Spot and match them with
these pictures. You can use a dictionary, if necessary.

Key Word Spot

mice
red-poll
ladder
usher
musket
inkwell
knapsack
gig

10

UNIT 1

STUDENT LIFE

READING

10

The school that was our school before the railroad came and overthrew it was a particular
sort of place. It was a school of some celebrity in its neighborhood , but nobody could
say why.
Our School was remarkable for white mice. We used to keep red-polls, linnets, and even
canaries, in desks, drawers, hat-boxes, and other strange refuges for birds; but white
mice were the favourite stock.
The mice were the occasion of some most ingenious engineering, in the construction of
their houses and instruments of performance.
The boys used to train the mice much better than the masters trained the boys. I recall
one white mouse, who used to live in the cover of a Latin dictionary, who ran up ladders,
drew Roman chariots, shouldered muskets, turned wheels. He had the misfortune to
mistake his way in a triumphal procession to the Capitol, when he fell into a deep inkwell,
and was dyed black and drowned.
The usher at our school, who we considered to know everything as opposed to the Chief,
who we considered to know nothing, was a bony, gentle-faced, clerical-looking young
man in rusty black.
We all liked him, for he had a good knowledge of boys. He was a writing master,
mathematical master, English master, mended the pens, and did all sorts of things.
He always used to call at parents houses to inquire after sick boys, because he had
gentlemanly manners. He was rather musical, and on some remote day he had bought an
old trombone and made the most extraordinary sounds when he sometimes tried to play
it of an evening. In the summer vacations he used to take pedestrian excursions with a
knapsack; and at Christmas time, he used to go to see his father at Chipping Norton.
There was a fat master who used to come in a gig, and taught the more advanced
matters; and there was a little French master who used to come in the sunniest weather,
with a handleless umbrella.
There was, besides, a serving man whose name was Phil. He mended whatever we broke,
and made whatever we wanted. He was general glazier, among
other things, and mended all the broken windows. One time,
Strategy
Spot
when we had the scarlet fever in the school, Phil nursed all the
Identify the authors
sick boys of his own accord, and was like a mother to them.
Adapted from: Dickens, C. (n.d.). Our School. Retrieved 02/08, 2013,
from http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/2519/

purpose:
what is the author
doing in this excerpt?
what examples from
the text support your
answer?

11

6 Read the text and check your predictions in Exercises 3 and 4. What
do you know about Charles Dickens? Do some research and share
with your friends.

7 Copy these questions in your notebook. Read the text carefully


again and answer them.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

What did students at this school use to keep?


What happened to the most famous white mouse?
Who did the students like most?
What did the usher use to do on vacations?
How did the French master use to get to school?
Who was Phil?

8 Ask your partner to retell the story. Make notes and check if he has
missed any points.

9 Read the text once more. Find the words in bold in the text in the
text (a e) and match them with their meanings (i v).

LETS READ!

Reading booklet connection

Page 4
Read the extract of a novel
about a famous school boy
and answer the questions.

a. Our school was remarkable for white mice.


b. I recall one white mouse, which used to live in the cover of a
Latin dictionary.
c. He always used to call at parents houses to inquire after
sick boys.
d. He used to take pedestrian excursions with a knapsack.
e. He was general glazier, among other things, and mended the
broken windows.
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

A person whose job is to fit glass into frames of windows


Ask about
Remember
Unusual
Walking and not traveling in a vehicle

10 Copy this diagram in your notebook and complete it with information


about the school described in the text and your own school.
School in the text
Strategy

Spot

Decide who was


the most important
character at the school
in the story. Support
your answer with
evidence from the
excerpt.

12

UNIT 1

My school

STUDENT LIFE

LANGUAGE SPOT
Used to

1. Revise these sentences from the text.


a. We used to keep red-polls, linnets, and even canaries.
b. The boys used to train the mice.
c. He fell into a deep inkwell.
d. Phil nursed all the sick boys.
2. Which of the sentences refer to
a. a particular situation in the past?
b. a past habit or routine?
3. Complete this general rule in your notebook.
When we want to talk about past habits, we use
infinitive of verbs.

+ the

4. Go back to the text. Find and copy more examples of the


structures you have just studied.

11 In your notebook, copy and complete these sentences about school


life in the past. Use used to or didnt use to.

a. In the 19th century, children from rich families


(not go) to school.
(have) private teachers at home.
b. They
c. In the past, students /not have/computers/school
d. For math lessons, children /use/ frames / colored wooden beads,
much like an abacus.
.
e. Children /study/
f. Paper was expensive, so children /have/ notebooks.
g. Students /write/ slates / slate pencils.

13

LETS CHECK
12 In your notebook, copy and complete this paragraph with used to
and didnt use to.

(10 pts, 2.5 pts each)

a. In the nineteenth century in Britain, families


b. At school, children
c. In the nineteenth century, girls
d. Nineteenth century students
0-4
Keep trying!

5-6
Good!

7-8
Very good!

9 - 10
Excellent!

LISTENING AND SPEAKING


13
Useful Expressions Spot

I used to ..., but now...


How about you?
When I was a child, I
used to ...
I think Ive changed
a lot.

14

UNIT 1

11 Listen to a dialog between two students and match columns A


and B. Then, act out the dialog using all the expressions in the box.

A
a. Do you think you have
changed since you
became a teenager?
b. Do you still do
the same kind of
activities?
c. What about sports? Do
you still play football?
d. When I was a child,
I used to listen to
Britney Spears

B
i. And now?
ii. Not at all! I used to stay at
home on weekends, but now I
prefer going out with my friends.
iii. No, I used to play football, but
now I play basketball. How
about you?
iv. Absolutely! I think Ive changed
a lot. To begin with, I used to
like cartoons, but I dont like
them anymore.

STUDENT LIFE

14 How have you and your partner changed since you became
teenagers?

a. Copy this chart in your notebook and complete it with information


about you and your partner.
In the past

Now

b. Use the information in the chart and the phrases given to write a
paragraph in your notebook.
When we were children, ...
Nowadays, we ...

15 With your partner, rewrite the dialog in Exercise 13, but now using
more information about yourself, such as preferences in clothes,
books, etc.

Strategy

Spot

Before you perform


your dialog, practice
saying your notes
aloud. Ask your
teacher to help you
with pronunciation.

16 Practice and role play the dialog in front of your classmates.

WRITING
17

12 Have a look at the text you are going to read and circle the
best answers for these questions. Then, read the text and check
your answers.
a. What type of text is it? How can you tell? Explain.
i. A short story.
ii. An advertisement.
iii. An e-mail.
b. What is the text about? What makes you think that? Explain.
i. Last vacation.
ii. A sports competition.
iii. School life.

Key Word Spot

attend
field trip
kid
ordinary

15

pame1890@yahoo.cl
Hi, Pamela!

Hi, Pamela!
Thanks for your e-mail. My school is totally ordinary and I dont think
its very different from a Chilean school, so why do you want to know
about it? Anyway, here it goes.
Im in 8th grade at Alice Deal Junior High, Washington D.C. In the
USA, kids start first grade at age six and finish in twelfth grade. From
seventh to ninth grade, you go to junior high school. We dont wear
uniforms but there is a dress code. That means students shouldnt
attend school in baggy, skateboarding pants, very short skirts, or
clothes with holes in them, and we cant dye our hair crazy colors!
Last year, my math grades were really bad, so I did math in the afterschool program. Now, my math is okay, but I still dont like it. My
favorite subject is physical education. What is your favorite one?
We do the same subjects as you, but we do Spanish instead of English,
of course! Thats because there are a lot of people in the U.S. who speak
Spanish at home. Some schools in Washington D.C. are totally bilingual
in Spanish and English because there are so many latino students. Their
families are mainly from Central American countries, such as Mexico
or El Salvador. There are also a lot of students from South American
countries, such as Colombia, Venezuela and even Chile!
One of the best things at my school is the field trips. Last week, we
went on a biology trip to Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens. Do you also do
that?
Hope you like the photos. Write back soon!
Dan

18 Read the text again and find the answers to these questions.
a. Where is Pamelas school?
b. Where does Dan live?
c. Does he wear a school uniform?

19 In your notebook, write two questions about the text.

16

UNIT 1

STUDENT LIFE
20 Organizing. You are going to write a short reply to Dans e-mail.
Before writing, consider the points in the list.
a. Characteristics of your school
b. Your favorite subjects
c. Extra-curricular activities you like
21 Drafting. Write a draft of your e-mail in your notebook. Follow
the model in Exercise 17 and make sure you use your notes in
Exercise 20.
22 Editing. With your partner, exchange your drafts and check for
mistakes using the Editing Checklist.
23 Writing. Write the final version of your e-mail on a sheet of paper.
After writing, if possible, send the e-mail to a friend.

FAST LEARNERS
24 Look at the picture of a classroom 200 years ago and say whats
wrong. In pairs, make an oral description using the expressions:
They didnt use to... / They used to ...

Editing checklist
Use this checklist to help you think
about your work.
Punctuation
Do your sentences begin with
capital letters and end with
periods?
Have you checked your work
for other punctuation marks,
such as question marks,
exclamation marks,
commas, etc.?
Sentences
Do all your sentences
make sense?
Can you add any words to
make them more interesting?
Spelling

Have you checked your


work for spelling mistakes,
using your dictionary?
Are there any words you are
not sure about?
Connectors
Have you used a variety of
connectors in the text, such
as and, or, or but?
Vocabulary
Use your dictionary to check
that the words you have used
are appropriate
in context.
When you have finished your work,
read it through and check for any
changes you need to make.

17

LESSON 2

WHO HAD MORE FUN?

LISTENING

BEFORE LISTENING
1 Look at the pictures. What were these people doing when the

pictures were taken? Write some questions about the pictures in


your notebook, and then, ask them to your partner.

Strategy

Spot

You will listen to a


conversation between
a teenager and her
grandmother. In your
experience, what
do grandparents
like to talk about?
In what way is this
conversation similar
or different to your
experience?
Key Word Spot

attend
dark
dorm

2 Share and compare your comments with your partner.


3 Do you know what your grandparents used to do when they were
teens? Look at the pictures again and choose the activities you
think they used to do.
Make notes of your ideas. You can ask your grandparents as
homework, and check your answers.
Example: I think my grandmother used to ride a bike.
My grandparents didnt use to go to clubs.

4 Look up the words in the Key Word Spot in a dictionary.

18

UNIT 1

STUDENT LIFE

LISTENING
5

13 Listen to the conversation between Laura and her


grandmother. What are they talking about?
a.
b.
c.
d.

Strategy

Childrens pastimes in the past.


Grannies old school.
Lauras student life.
Their family.

13 Listen to the recording again. Compare the information with


your ideas in Exercise 3.

13 Copy this chart into your notebook. Listen to the recording


again and check () or cross () each activity.
Activity

Spot

Listen with a purpose:


Examine each
question in this section
carefully. What do
you have to listen for?
Then, listen and find
the information you
need in each case.

Sleep at school
Play the piano
Watch TV
Listen to music
Read
Have a picnic
Ride bikes
Play cards
Go out alone
Have boyfriends
Return home late from parties

13 Listen again. Number these sentences in the order you


hear them.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

Life was really different.


We were singing in the music room.
On weekends, I returned home.
I was afraid of the dark.
These are my classmates and me!
You could go to the cinema.
My parents were living out of the city.

19

13 Listen again and identify who says these phrases, Laura or


her grandmother.
a. ...the piano behind us?
b. ...watch TV then?
c. A lot of things!
d. ...some old photos.

10

Strategy

Spot

13 Listen and answer these questions. You can work with


your partner.
a. How many days a week did Grannie use to stay at school?
b. Did Grannie attend a mixed school?
c. Was Grannies school a beautiful place? Why?
d. What did Grannie and her friends use to do at night?

Check how much you


have understood the
recording. Try reporting
the conversation to
your partner.

LETS READ!

Reading booklet connection

Page 3
Read the poem written by
a school girl and answer
the questions.

Useful Expressions Spot

In those days, my
grandparents ...
Nowadays, we ...
The only bad thing
was ...
Life was really different
then.

20

UNIT 1

11 Answer these questions in your group using the expressions in


the box.

a. How is it similar or different the way you and your grandparents


had fun? Explain.
b. What activities from the past would you like to do with your
friends now? Why?

STUDENT LIFE

LANGUAGE SPOT
The Past Continuous

1. Read these sentences from the recording.


a. What were you doing?
b. In those days my parents were living out of the city.
c. Our teacher took this photo while we were singing in the music
room.
2. Choose an alternative.
a. The sentences refer to a specific event in the past.
b. The sentences refer to a continued action in the past.
3. Copy and complete this general rule in your notebook.
We use the Past Continuous tense to express a
action that happened in the
. We use the Simple
Past tense to express a
action that happened in
the middle of the long action. We can join the two ideas with
.
when or
4. Think of this morning at home. Write a sentence indicating what
someone was doing when you left.

12 Use the visual clues to complete these sentences with the Past
Continuous form of the verbs in the boxes.
eat

dance

play

study

a. Sally
dinner
last night when someone
knocked on the door.

b. Fred called me when I


English.

c. The children
in the garden when their
father arrived home.

d. My mother took this photo


while we
at
my birthday party.

21

LETS CHECK
13 In your notebook, copy and complete these sentences, identifying
the one that happened first.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

(12 pts, 2 pts each)

He was driving very fast when...


He heard the good news while he...
They were travelling to the airport when...
She was relaxing in a yoga class when...
While they were having lunch,...
She injured her back while...

0-4
Keep trying!

5-6
Good!

7-8
Very good!

9 - 12
Excellent!

ORAL PRACTICE
14

14 Look at the picture and listen to this dialog between Charlie


and his father. Then, play again and practice the sentences, as
you listen.

Useful Expressions Spot

What were you doing?


I think we were ...
My best friend at school
was called...
I remember that we
always...

Charlie:
Father:
Charlie:
Father:

Who are the people in this photo?


They are my friends and me when we were students.
What were you doing?
We were dancing. I think it was my best friends
birthday party.
Charlie: Who was your best friend?
Father: My best friend at school was called Sam. We used to do
our homework together.
Charlie: Do you have any special memories of your school days?
Father: I remember that we always studied in his room while we
were listening to music.

15 In pairs, practice the dialog in Exercise 14, taking turns to be


Charlie and his father. Use the expressions in the box above to
help you.

22

UNIT 1

STUDENT LIFE

READING AND WRITING


16 Have a look at the picture that illustrates the story and answer the
questions below. Then, discuss your answers with your partner.

a. Have you read any other stories by this author? Look up his
most famous work on the Internet and share the information with
your classmates.
b. When do you think it happened?
c. Who is the narrator of the story?
d. Look up the words in the Key Word Spot.

Key Word Spot

Enlightened
Clutch
Lean (v.)
Brake
Steering-wheel
Slam (v.)
Hedge

17 Read the story. Check, complete, and correct your notes.

A drive in the motor car (Extract)

15

By Roald Dahl
One amazing morning, our whole family got ready to
go for our first drive in the first motor-car we had ever
owned. The driver was my 21-year-old sister.
She had received two full half-hour lessons in
driving, and in that enlightened year of 1925, this was
considered sufficient. Nobody had to take a driving-test.
As we all climbed into the car, our excitement was so
intense we could hardly bear it.
Up front, there were three bodies in all: the driver
behind the wheel, my brother (aged eighteen) and one of
my sisters (aged twelve). In the back seat, there were four
more of us: my mother (aged forty), two small sisters
(aged eight and five), and myself (aged nine).
We were all trembling with fear and joy as the driver
let out the clutch and the great long black automobile
leaned forward and moved.
Are you sure you know how to do it? we shouted.
Do you know where the brakes are?
Be quiet! snapped the ancient sister. Ive got to concentrate!
Fortunately, there were very few vehicles on the roads in those days. Occasionally, you
met a small truck or a delivery-van and now and again a private car, but the danger of
colliding with anything else was fairly remote.
Soon we were entering a countryside of green fields with not a soul in sight. The
driver was clutching the steering-wheel and we all watched the speedometer needle
moving up to twenty, then twenty-five, then thirty. We were probably doing about
thirty-five miles an hour when we came suddenly to a sharp bend in the road. My
sister shouted Help! and slammed on the brakes and swung the wheel wildly round.
The wheels locked and we went crashing into the hedge.
Adapted from: Dahl, R. (1984). Boy Tales of Childhood. New York: Penguin Young
Readers (p. 99).

23

18 In your notebook, write three questions about the text.


19 What do you think happened next? Discuss your ideas with your
partner and write three or four sentences in your notebook.

20 Answer these questions.


a. What do you think happened after the crash?
b. What would happen in a similar accident these times?
c. What kind of distractions can you encounter when driving?

21

16 Read what really happened and check. How is the end of the
story similar or different to your version?

Nobody was hurt very much except me. Flying glass cut
my nose, now it was hanging on only by a small thread of
skin. My mother took a handkerchief from her purse. She
put the nose back into place and held it here.
My sister managed to straighten the vehicle and get it
pointed in the right direction.
Proceeding at no more than four miles an hour all the
way, we finally made it to Dr. Dunbars house.
He cant go round without a nose for the rest of his life!
the doctor said, I shall sew it on again.

24

UNIT 1

STUDENT LIFE

TAKE ACTION!
Do you remember?
a. Have a look at the pictures (1 4) and answer the questions.

1. Where were you on New Years Eve 2012?


What were you doing when the clock
struck 12?

2. What were you doing at the beginning of


this lesson, when the teacher walked in?

Your photo

3. What were you doing last night when it was


time for dinner?

4. What were you doing

b. Ask your partner the same questions and take notes. Ask each other extra questions if you
find out more. Then, complete these sentences with the information you collected.
i. When the clock struck 12:00 on New Years Eve 2012, I
.
she
, he / she
ii. Last night, when
, when the teacher
iii. At
and I
.
iv. When picture 4 was taken, my partner

and he /
and I
, my partner

c. Use the paragraph as help to report your findings to your classmates. Check with your teacher.

2-9

For extra practice of Unit 1, complete the activities in the Workbook.

25

YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION


1 Collect two old pictures from your family, stick them on your notebook and answer the

questions below. Then, complete the dialog with your own ideas and practice it with a partner.
Take turns.
a. When were the pictures taken?
b. What were the people doing?
A: Look, I found some old photos.
B: Let me see!
A: They
B: Why
A: Because
B: Life was different then!
A: Absolutely!

?
.
?
.

2 Whats wrong with this classroom? Identify all the elements that dont belong to our time. Then,
write the corresponding sentences in your notebook.
Example: Nowadays, we dont use

26

UNIT 1

. We use

STUDENT LIFE

3 Solve this puzzle about present and past pastimes and activities. Use your dictionary

if necessary. Then, choose your favorite activity from the puzzle and write a short paragraph
explaining why you like it.

1
2
3

7
8
9

4 With your partner, use the vocabulary and language of this unit to create a dialog (about 8

entries). Talk about your habits in the past and at present. Then, practice the dialog and roleplay it in front of the class.

27

UNIT CHECK
READING: COMPARING SCHOOLS

17

mark77@yahoo.com

Hi, Mark!

Hi, Mark!
Thanks for your e-mail about your school life. My school is totally different
from yours, so Im going to tell you about it.
I go to a High School very near my house, so I usually walk. The school
is over 200 years old and, in the past, it used to be a school only for boys
and very strict. Now there are a lot of girls and we get along very well with
them, but its still strict.
There are only twenty students in each class, so our teachers know us very
well. We work very hard and the school day is long. It starts at 8:30 and
ends at 3:30. We usually have a lot of homework, but we all help each
other and were good friends.
We wear a uniform, and I think it is a good idea because you dont have to
waste time thinking about clothes every day.
We do the same subjects as you; biology is my favorite; I love going
to the lab and doing experiments! Perhaps Ill become a biologist in the
future. Im afraid Im not good at mathematics. Last year, I had to do the
after-school remedial program. Fortunately, my grades are better now, but
I still dont like it.
We have lunch at school and we also have two fifteen-minute recesses in
the morning.
After lunch, we usually do extracurricular activities; I like these better than
the rest of the classes. Last semester, we prepared a play and I acted as
a film producer. It was great and I really enjoyed it. I hope youll like the
photos of the presentation. Im sending them as soon as I can.
Write back soon!
Alan

28

UNIT 1

STUDENT LIFE

1 Read the text and answer these questions. Then, invent two more of your own.

5 pts.

a. What kind of school does Alan attend?


b. How many students are there in each class?
c. At what time does Alan finish school?

2 Read the text again. Identify the incorrect bit of information in each sentence and
circle it with a color pencil.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

5 pts.

Alan and Marks schools are very similar.


He usually goes to school by bus.
After school, Alan and his friends always go swimming.
Alan likes maths a lot.
Last semester, Alan took part in a video project.

3 Write a short summary of the text, extracting the most relevant information.

5 pts.

LISTENING: GRANDPAS SCHOOL DAYS


4

18 Listen to the conversation between David and his grandfather and choose the
correct alternative.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

We bought / wore bright blue and yellow uniforms.


Saturday / Sunday morning classes were compulsory.
I learned to love music / physics and literature.
They hit us on the back of our hands with a rubber / ruler.
There were more than 14 / 40 children in my class.

18 Listen again. Which of these activities are mentioned in the conversation?


Check ().
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

5 pts.

5 pts.

Going to school on Saturdays.


Playing football at school.
Learning about music.
Doing experiments in the lab.
Going to school for the first time.

29

18 Listen to the recording once more and identify who said these phrases,
Grandpa (G) or Danny (D).
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

5 pts.

...bright blue and yellow.


...love music and literature.
...about the lessons.
...sent to the Principals office.
...are certainly very different now.

LANGUAGE
7 Complete these sentences with used to or didnt use to.

5 pts.

8 Use the prompts to write sentences about actions happening in the past, in

5 pts.

a. I
b. I
c. I
d. I
e. I

play the guitar, but I do now.


ride a bike, but I dont anymore.
collect stamps, but I dont anymore.
enjoy getting up early, but I do now.
know how to use a computer, but I do now.

your notebook.

a. Anna / have / a bath / telephone / ring.


b. Philip / change / money / his father / come into / the bank.
c. The children / play / football / begin / rain.
d. They / swim / the shark / attack.
e. My parents / walk / they / meet / me.

SPEAKING
9 Use the prompts in the boxes to talk with your partner about life 100 years ago.
Add your own ideas to the conversation.

attend mixed schools

chat with friends

use calculators

listen to music

use notebooks

5 pts.

play outside with friends

watch TV

WRITING
10 Take a look at Exercise 9, and write a short paragraph explaining how life and

teens habits have changed. Use the phrases given and your own ideas to write
the paragraph in your notebook.

5 pts.

A hundred years ago, teens used to ...


Nowadays, ...

0 - 12
Keep trying!

30

UNIT 1

13 - 25
Good!

26 - 38
Very good!

50
TOTAL

39 - 50
Excellent!

STUDENT LIFE

PROJECT
Old school, modern school
History and Art
1 Form groups of four to do this project.
2 Choose one place along the country and search for

information about school life in the past and at present.


Use the Internet, encyclopedias and what you have
learned in the History class.

3 Include information about: the school system (past

and present), compulsory and elective subjects (past


and present), school resources (past and present) and
student life (past and present).

4 Use your findings and the contents of this unit to make

a comparative chart between school life in the past and


at present. Draw the chart on a poster.

5 Also, make a small scale diorama (a scene that


captures a moment in time) to illustrate your
written work.

6 Present your project to the rest of the class.

Checklist
Reflect upon your project and check () under the correct column.
Very well

Well

Not so well

We followed the instructions carefully.


We collected information from different sources.
We distributed the tasks evenly among the group members.
We participated actively.
We were respectful of each others ideas and opinions.

31

UNIT
CHALLENGES
In this unit you will:
read a piece of news
read some sports advertisements
listen to a radio program
listen to personal reports
You will learn how to:
Reading
scan a text to validate predictions
distinguish general information
locate specific information

Listening
identify purpose of a text
identify speakers
relate speakers and speech
Language
Talk about actions completed in the present.
use wish to express desires and hopes
Speaking
ask and answer questions about experiences
and challenges

Writing
write a short personal report
write a paragraph about wishes and hopes for
the future
You will also:
develop respect and acceptance for disabled
people
develop respect and acceptance of other
peoples opinions

GETTING READY
1 Read the list and check () the things you have already done.

10 Things &to &do &before you &are 20


Travel &by &plane
&fly &a &kite
&go &camping with &friends
&go &to &a &concert
&learn English

&organize &a &surprise &party


&perform &in &a &play
&ride &a &horse
visit &an &exotic &place
write &a &poem

2 In pairs, make a list of future personal challenges. Then, classify them in order of importance
and present it in front of the class. Use the example given to express your wishes.
Example: Before Im 20, I wish ...

3 Look at the pictures on the next page. Do you think these people have met their

32

personal challenges? Explain why.

33

BEFORE YOU START


LESSON 1
1

EXTREME CHALLENGES

Fill in the blanks of the dialog with the correct form of the verbs between parentheses.
Use present and past tenses.
Kathy: What
(you / do) on the weekend, Mark?
(go) to the park with my best friend. He
(ride)
Mark: I usually
his bike and I
(ride) my skateboard.
(you / go) to the park?
Kathy: Cool! And what about last weekend?
(go) with some school friends, too. What about you, Kathy?
Mark: Yes, we
What
(you / do)?
(not / go) out because I
(study) for
Kathy: Last weekend, I
the History test on Monday.
(miss) an amazing bright weekend!
Mark: Oh! You

2 Choose from the adjectives in the boxes to define the experiences in the pictures. Then,
organize them in your notebook from weakest to strongest, and classify them in positive
and negative. Use dictionary if necessary.

34

amusing

boring

complicated

scary

interesting

terrifying

UNIT 2

exciting

funny

exhausting

dangerous

amazing

fantastic

CHALLENGES

Before starting this unit, you need to know:


Use vocabulary related to sports.
Talk about events in the past.
Talk about future events.

SWIM YOUR OWN RACE

LESSON 2

1 Fill in the blanks with the missing bits of this song. Use the phrases in the box.

Next Year Baby


Next Year,
Things
,
And start all over again
I
my socks
I
my shower
I
more books
I
with the news
I
how to cook
And
less money
on shoes
I
my bills on time
I
my mail away,
every day
And
my Gran
every Sunday

to you
I
How Ive felt all of these years
Next Year, Next Year, Next Year
I
you, how I feel
Well, resolutions
Baby they come and go
any of these
things?
The answers probably no
But if theres one thing, I must
do,
Despite my greatest fears
I
to you
How Ive felt all of these years
Next Year, Next Year, Next Year

Resolutions
Well Baby, will I do any of
these things?
The answers probably no
But if theres one thing, I must do,
Despite my greatest fears
Adapted from: Next year, by Jamie Cullum

will call
will change
will clean
will file
will I do
will keep up
will learn
will pay
will pull up
will read
will say (x2)
will spend
will tell

2 In your notebook, write a list of things you want to do in the future. Then, share it with your
partner. Are your ideas similar?
a.
b.
c.

35

LESSON 1

EXTREME CHALLENGES

READING

BEFORE READING
1 Match the words in column A with the ones in column B, to form
the names of the sports. Then, match them with the pictures.

A
Bungee
Ice
Wake
Hang
Mountain
Wingsuit

B
boarding
biking
flying
climbing
gliding
jumping

2 In pairs, describe the images to the rest of the class. What do these
sports have in common? Explain.

36

UNIT 2

CHALLENGES

3 What do you know / think about zorbing, free running, kite surfing,

wingsuit flying and paraskiing? Check () the sentences you think


are true.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

Free running is about running in the country.


Kite surfing is about flying kites on water.
Paraskiing combines two sports.
Zorbing is a totally different experience.
Wingsuit flying is the art of flying through the air.

4 Look at the photos next to the text on Page 38 and answer these
questions with your partner.

a. Which of these experiences would you like to try? Why?


b. What emotions do you think they can make you feel? Can you
explain why?

5 Have a quick look at the text and identify all the cognates. Look them
up in a dictionary, and confirm they mean the same in Spanish.

6 What does the title of the text mean? Use the dictionary to find the
meaning of the words.

READING

Strategy

Spot

Read the title of the


text again.
what type of
challenges do you
think the text will talk
about?
in what way can
these challenges be
extreme?

21

7 Read the text on Page 38 and check your predictions in


Exercises 3 and 4.

8 Read the text again and match the photos (1 - 5) and the
descriptions (I - V).

9 Read the text again and write the name of the sport (a - e)
corresponding to each description (I - V).
a. Zorbing
b. Wingsuit flying

c. Paraskiing
d. Kite surfing

Key Word Spot

bouncy
glide
roller coaster
steep
steer
strap
toggle

e. Free running

10 Read the dialog and practice it with your partner. Then, replace the
underlined words with your own ideas.
Alan:
Ben:
Alan:
Ben:
Alan:
Ben:

Ben, come and watch this!


What is that? A gigantic ball?
Its a new extreme sport. I think its called zorbing.
What is it about?
A person goes down a hill inside an enormous ball with water.
Cool! It must be so much fun!

37

EXTREME CHALLENGES
I.

Try the experience of running through the city,


climbing walls, crossing roofs, and jumping from building to building!
This new sport has become well known through videos on the Internet since
it started in Paris. People say they have never tried anything like it before.
This is not about exercise; its about finding a new approach to things and a
1
different way of looking at life!

II.

Do you like flying kites? Do you like surfing?


Then, try this new sport that started in France in the 1980s and has
recently become very popular worldwide!
You use a small surfboard and a large kite on 30-meter lines. The kite
pulls you through the water and you can steer with the lines. You can
just speed through the water or you can do jumps as high as a house.
Kirsty Jones, Womens U.K. Kite Surfing Champion, has been into it
for more than ten years. Ive never enjoyed myself so much, says
Kirsty.Try it! Its more fun than water-skiing behind a boat!

III.

Have you ever wanted to ski off a mountain and


fly? If you like skiing and paragliding, then this is the sport for you!
You ski straight down a hill with the parachute wing behind you, then
you let the parachute come up in the air behind you and whoosh!
Youre flying!

IV.

You think flying is impossible? Try to


fly through the air using a special jumpsuit called wingsuit!
Also called birdman suit or squirrel suit, you can use it from
any point with altitude enough to glide through the air, such as
skydiving aircrafts or base jumping points.
The flier opens the parachute at a planned altitude and unzips
the arm wings, if necessary, so they can reach up to the control
toggles and fly to a normal parachute landing.

V.

Imagine being inside a giant bouncy beach ball


rolling down a steep hill at 50 km an hour!
This sport, also called sphereing, started in New Zealand in the mid
1990s. Whats it like? Its like bungee jumping, its like floating, its
like going on a roller coaster, and its unlike anything youve ever
done before!
Two people are strapped into the two-meter sphere and pushed over
5
the top of a hill.
I didnt have a clue what was going on, says someone who has
just tried it. I saw colors passing by - blue sky, green grass, blue sky, green grass- and I
could hear myself laughing uncontrollably.
Have you ever wondered whats it like inside a washing machine? Well, then try hydrosphereing, where one person rolls down the hill in a sphere containing 30 liters of water!
Created by: Publishing team.

38

UNIT 2

CHALLENGES

11 Answer these questions in your group. Take notes and share your
ideas with the rest of the class.

a. Which of the sports in this lesson could be popular in Chile? Why?


b. What are the best places in Chile to practice each of them? Give
reasons / examples.

LANGUAGE SPOT
The Present Perfect

1. Revise these sentences from the text, paying special attention to


the parts in bold.
a. Its unlike anything youve ever done before!
b. This new sport has become well known through videos on the
Internet since it started in Paris.
c. Have you ever wondered what its like inside a washing machine?
d. Try this new sport that has recently become very popular
worldwide!
e. Kirsty Jones has been into it for more than ten years.

Strategy

Spot

In your group, vote


for the most extreme
sport. Support
your choice using
information from the
text.

LETS READ!

Reading booklet connection

Page 6
Read the biography
of Richard E. Byrd, an
adventurer, and answer
the questions.

2. Answer these questions.


a. What do these sentences refer to?
i. A specific time in the past.
ii. An indefinite time in the past.
b. What does the word since relate to?
i. A point in time in the past.
ii. A period in time in the past.
c. What does the word for relate to?
i. A point in time in the past.
ii. A period in time in the past.
3. Note the form of this tense.
I
have
done
Tania
has
visited
Subject + have / has + participle
Have
you
noticed
Has
Ben
driven
Have / has + subject + participle

that
them

before.
several times

the new rules?


up the mountain?

4. Complete this general rule.


.
We use the Present Perfect to refer to
We use
to express for how long something has lasted
(a period of time).
We use
to indicate when something started (a point
in time).
5. Read the texts again and find three more examples of the Present
Perfect. Underline the special words used to refer to time.

39

12 Put the verbs in brackets in the Present Perfect Tense and complete
the sentences with for or since. Write them in your notebook.

Strategy

a. I
(practice) snowboarding
I was a little child.
(be) into parachuting
more than
b. My sister
five years.
(play) in the football school team
c. My friends and I
we started school.
your best friend
(study) English ________
d.
six months?

Spot

Follow the model in the


dialog on Page 37
to talk about a sport
you like with your
partner. In your
notebook, take some
notes of your ideas
before you speak.

LISTENING AND SPEAKING


13 In pairs, complete these personal reports with words and phrases
from the boxes.

I.
Id always
it and now
Ive been into it
. After
I started, I began
and
I decided to try the really big waves.
Of course they can be
and you have to concentrate one
hundred percent, but its worth it for
the thrill you get
. Its
, like
,
and for those few seconds you totally
forget everything else in your life.

II.
I became hooked on this the
I tried it. I soon
. Since
realized I had
I began, Ive
and got a bit of prize money. Id
to anyone. Going
- plus the beauty of the
.
scenery - is just

14

40

UNIT 2

a magical feeling
dangerous
flying above the ocean
for more than five years
to look for bigger challenges
wanted to try
when youre riding them

a natural talent
down the mountain
fantastic
recommend it
very first time
won competitions

22 Listen to these people talking about their experiences and


check. Then listen again, repeat after each phrase, and try to imitate
the pronunciation. Then, read the reports aloud, with your partner.

CHALLENGES

LETS CHECK
15 Use the prompts to write sentences. Use the Present Perfect Tense
and since or for.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

(12 pts, 2 pts each)

Mary Jo / know / Philip / seven years.


Susan and Carl / be / in this school / last year.
Nick / play / in his band / 2012.
I / have / my cell phone / ten days.
She / live / in this town / she was 12.
He / want to / be a doctor / he was a child.

0-4
Keep trying!

5-6
Good!

7-9
Very good!

10 - 12
Excellent!

WRITING
16 Organizing. You are going to write a short paragraph about an
exciting/ extreme activity you have done recently. To plan your
writing, think about that experience and write some ideas in
your notebook.

17 Drafting. Write a draft of your paragraph in your notebook. Follow

the models in Exercise 12 and make sure you use the ideas in the
diagram.

18 Editing. Use the Editing Checklist to check your composition.

Identify your weaknesses and write a list of frequent mistakes in


your notebook.

19 Writing. In your notebook, write the final version of the paragraph


about your exciting experience.

FAST LEARNERS
20 Read your paragraph to a classmate, but do not mention the name
of the activity. Could he / she guess it?

41

LESSON 2

SWIM YOUR OWN RACE

LISTENING

BEFORE LISTENING

Strategy

Spot

You are going to listen


to an interview with
the athlete in the
pictures. Before you
listen, write a list of
questions that you
would like to ask her.

1 Have you ever wondered what it is like to compete at the Olympic


Games? What do you understand by Olympic spirit?

2 Class competition! With your partner, make a list of people that

competed at the London Olympic Games. Complete the chart and


compare results with your classmates. Go to www.olympic.org to
get some useful information.
Name

Sport

Country

Medal

Key Word Spot

disability
disease
spirit

3 Find the synonym of the words in the Key Word Spot in the boxes
below.

illness

incapacity

soul

4 Look at the photos of Natalie du Toit and answer these questions.


a. How is she feeling?
b. What has she done?
c. Make two questions about the pictures. Ask them to
your partner.

42

UNIT 2

CHALLENGES

LISTENING
5

23 Listen to the recording and check your ideas in Exercise 4.


Strategy

23 Listen again and choose the best answer for the question.
What is Natalie doing in this interview?
a.
b.
c.
d.

She is asking for advice.


She is complaining about something.
She is offering advice.
She is talking about dreams and personal challenges.

She lost her leg


She became the first athlete
I am a student
My message
My real love
You have to work
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.

on what you believe in.


and I do motivational speaking.
is about having dreams.
lies with genetics.
to qualify for both the Olympics and the Paralympics.
in a motorcycle accident.

23 Listen to the recording again. Choose the correct alternative to


complete the sentences.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

Listen to the recording


and check if any of
your questions were
asked in the interview.
Then, listen again
and take notes of the
interview questions.

23 Listen to the recording again. Match the two halves of


each sentence.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Spot

She lost her leg when she was seventeen / sixteen.


Do you fill / feel at a disadvantage?
I am also a student at UCT / UTC.
One day your swimming will be ours / over.
You have to walk / work on what you believe.

23 Listen once more and number these sentences in the order


you hear them.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Do you have further aspirations?


Do you have time for anything else?
I have a dog at home.
Its important to swim your own race.
Where do you go from here?
You have to believe in yourself.

43

10 Talk to your partner about the interview. Why do you think Natalie
represents the Olympic spirit?

11 Use the ideas you discussed in Exercise 10 to create a short dialog


with your partner. Use the example as a model.
Example:
A: Have you ever ?
B: Yes,... I think .
A: Absolutely! We should

LANGUAGE SPOT
Expressing desires

1. Read these sentences from the recording.


a. I wish to find cures to diseases.
b. The message I wish to bring across is: you have to have goals,
you have to have dreams.
2. What do these sentences express? Choose the correct alternative.
a. definite plans or intentions for the future.
b. hopes and desires for the future.
3. Copy and complete this general rule in your notebook.
+ verb to express
for the future.
We use
4. Revise the exercises you have done in this lesson and use the
information you have collected to complete these sentences in
your notebook.
.
a. Natalie wishes
b. Natalie hopes
.
Note: To express a desire from deep in our hearts we use the
verb hope.

12 In your notebook, copy and complete these sentences using wish.


a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

44

UNIT 2

I
She
Natalie
I
Natalie

the next competition.


a cure to diseases.
a normal life.
the President one day.
people with her message.

(win)
(find)
(have)
(meet)
(help)

CHALLENGES

ORAL PRACTICE
13

24 Listen and repeat the conversation.


Clare:
What will you do when you finish school?
Brandon: I am going to study at the university, and continue
playing with my band.
Clare:
Do you have further aspirations?
Brandon: Definitely! I hope to finish my studies, and maybe
become a famous musician. I wish to play in a
great concert.
Clare:
Whats your message?
Brandon: The message I wish to transmit is to work hard and to
believe in yourself.

Useful Expressions Spot

I am going to ...
I hope to ...
I wish to ...
The message I wish to
transmit is ...

LETS READ!

14 Write a dialog similar to the one in Exercise 13, but add more

personal information about your plans and aspirations. Then,


practice and role play it with a partner in front of the class. Use the
expressions in the box above.

Reading booklet connection

Page 7
Read the biography of
Andres Godoy, a onearmed guitarist and answer
the questions.

LETS CHECK
15 Talk about wishes. Complete the sentences with the correct form of
wish, and your own ideas.

a. I
b. My mother
c. I
d. Doctors
e. My brother
0-4
Keep trying!

(10 pts, 2 pts each)

.
.
.
.
.
5-6
Good!

7-8
Very good!

9 - 10
Excellent!

45

READING AND WRITING


16 Have a look at the text and answer these questions.
a. Where does Cristian Valenzuela come from?
i. Argentina.
iii. Peru.
ii. Chile.
iv. Uruguay.
b. What do Nathalie du Toit and Cristian Valenzuela have in common.

Cristin Valenzuela Wins Gold for Chile


Written by Daniel Boyle on
September 7, 2012.
LONDON, ENGLAND
Chilean runner Cristin
Valenzuela, together
with his guide Cristopher
Guajardo, made history
at the Paralympic Games,
winning Chiles first
ever medal. With a time
of 15:26.26, the Chilean
crossed the line first in the
5,000 meter race in the
T-11 category.
The Chilean runner lost his
vision at the age of twelve
and found hope through
running.
After finishing the race,
Valenzuela said, Im

totally moved. This is


something I have wanted
to do ever since I started
running. Valenzuela was
World Champion in 2011.
Apart from the glory
of being Chiles first
Paralympic medal winner,
Cristian Valenzuela won
the prize given by the
government to Olympic
and Paralympic athletes
upon receiving a medal.
The athlete will receive
monthly support from the
IND until the 2016 Games
in Rio de Janeiro.
It hasnt been easy, but I
never stopped dreaming,
says the Chilean competitor.
I wish to continue at the

25

top of the ranking and to


win more medals for my
country in the future.
Unfortunately the
Paralympic Games have
not been displayed on
the Chilean television
networks, and most people
were unable to see history
taking place.

Adapted from: Boyle, D. (2012, September 7) Cristian Valenzuela Wins Gold for Chile. Retrieved
February 18, 2013, from http://www.ilovechile.cl/2012/09/07/cristian-valenzuela-wins-gold-for-chile/66926

17 Find these sections in the text. Circle them following the color code.
a. Find these sections in the text. Circle them following the color code.
i. Headline ii. Reporter iii. Visuals iv. Quotations
b. Take a quick look at the text. What type of text do you think it is?
Why?
i. A piece of news. iii. An encyclopedia article.
ii. A web page.
iv. A short story.

46

UNIT 2

CHALLENGES

18 Organizing. You are going to write a short piece of news about

a remarkable situation that has happened recently. To plan your


writing, find information about any records set or remarkable
situations that have happened recently, related to sports. Surf
the web or look up information in newspapers or magazines and
answer these questions in your notebook:
a. Who did it?
b. What has he / she achieved?
c. What details can you add?

19 Drafting. In your notebook, write a draft of your piece of news.

Follow the example on Page 46 and make sure you use your notes
in Exercise 18. Remember:
a. Who did it?
b. What has he / she achieved?
c. What details can you add?

Editing checklist
Use this checklist to help you think
about your work.
When you have finished your work,
read it through and check for any
changes you need to make.
Punctuation
Do your sentences begin with
capital letters and end with
periods?
Have you checked your work
for other punctuation marks,
such as question marks,
exclamation marks, commas,
quotation marks, etc.?

20 Editing. Exchange your composition with your partner. Check for

Sentences

21 Writing. Write the final version of your piece of news in a sheet of

Can you add any words to


make them more interesting?

mistakes using the Editing Checklist.

paper. Ask your teacher to collect all the compositions and organize
as a class to put them together and make a class newspaper.

Do all your sentences make


sense?

Spelling
Have you checked your work
for spelling mistakes, using
your dictionary?
Vocabulary
Use your dictionary to check
that the words you have used
are appropriate in context.

TAKE ACTION!
- In your group, find information about a different or nonconventional free time activity and write an advertisement
following the model in Lesson 1.
- Include pictures and information about the kind of activity,
the place and the equipment needed. Use a dictionary to
look for suitable vocabulary, and make a checklist with
useful information, so as to keep your work well-organized.
- Include quotations, date, names, and visual elements.
- Be creative and encouraging!
- Display your work in the classroom. If its possible, record
the ad and play it in the class.
10-17

For extra practice of Unit 2, complete the activities in the Workbook.

47

YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION


1 Answer a. and b.
a. This is a magazine article about the history of Snowboarding. What elements can you find in
an article? Circle them.
b. Put the paragraphs in order, and then check with the recording.

THE INTRIGUING HISTORY OF SNOWBOARDING


By Keith Kingston

I.

Snowboarding has
increased in popularity in the
last decades. In the year 1994,
snowboarding was finally
declared an Olympic event,
much to the delight of fans.

II.

To say who actually


invented the sport of
snowboarding would be
impossible because people
have always loved to slide
down a snow-covered hill.

III.

There have been many


attempts at developing a
modern snowboard. In 1965,
the Snurfer (a word play
on snow and surfer) was
developed as a childs toy.

IV.

From the first


snowboards to the advanced
and specialized models
available today, snowboarders
have carried a bad boy image.

26

V.

Since its early


beginnings, snowboarding has
evolved into a fully recognized
sport, and large numbers
of people have turned to
snowboarding for adventure,
fun, and professional
recognition.

VI.

Soaring through the


snow on some kind of seat
VIII.
The various ways to
or board is nothing new. The
glide
through
snow have
ways to enjoy the snow are
became more sophisticated
numerous, and people have
using polished boards or skis.
developed ways to turn garbage
can lids and cardboard into
IX.
Olympic and world wide
snow boards to enjoy an
snowboarding events are today
afternoon outdoors.
among the most popular of
winter sports.

VII.

The Flying Yellow


Banana was developed
in 1977. The first national
snowboard race was held in
the area outside Woodstock
and was known as The Suicide
Six. The race consisted of a
steep downhill run called The
Face, in which the main goal
was mere survival.

Adapted from: Kingston, K. (2004, October 28). A Look at the Intriguing History of Snowboarding.
Retrieved February 19, 2013, from http://ezinearticles.com/?A-Look-at-the-Intriguing-History-ofSnowboarding&id=4928

48

UNIT 2

CHALLENGES

2 In pairs, think about a person you admire and you would like to interview. In your notebook,

write questions you want to ask him / her and find the information to answer them. Then, role
play the interview in front of your classmates. You can ask questions starting with who, what,
where, when, how, etc.

3 Write sentences to describe each picture. Look at the example in picture a. Make sure you use
connectors such as and, or, but, and since/for.

a. Barbara Riveros has competed at the


Olympic Games and has also won lots
of medals.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

49

UNIT CHECK
READING

27

Powerful teen breaks strongman records


He has played baseball and football in the
past and has lifted weights and competed
for two years.
I guess I found a sport Im good at, Pippa
said during a telephone interview, I like
weight lifting because its an oddball sport.
Im not a normal teenager. I would rather
train by picking up stones and tires than
go drinking with my friends.
Pippa trains three to four days in the gym,
watches what he eats and stays away
from steroids.
Max Pippa pulled a 12,000-pound truck
during the Lift for Hope Strongest Man
competition at the Kansas Expocenter
in Topeka.
Pippa, who was a 17-year-old competitor
in the Lift for Hope event, concentrated
as he had one thing on his mind: setting
a new North American Strongman Inc.
record in the teenage heavyweight division.
Pippa put on a weight belt and got down to
business. Before each heavy lift, he recited
the Lords Prayer.
On his first attempt, Pippa lifted 550
pounds. On his second lift, Pippa lifted 600
and on his last attempt, he lifted
630 pounds.

Im planning on doing
this for the rest of my
life, he said. I believe
Ive received a gift, and
if I dont develop it, it
will go away.
The Topekas
Strongest Man
competition raised
$2,161 for the
American Cancer
Societys Camp
Hope, a camp for
children who are
recovering
from or are
battling cancer.

Adapted from: Associated Press. (2008, February 17) Powerful teens break Strongman records.
Retrieved February 15, 2013, from http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2008/feb/17/powerful_teens_break_
strongman_records/

50

UNIT 2

CHALLENGES

1 Have a look at the text and identify the type of text. Choose the best alternative.
Give reasons for your choice.

1 pt.

a. A piece of news.
b. A short story.
c. An advertisement.

2 Copy the chart in your notebook and complete it with information from the text.
Sports Max has
practiced

Maxs training details

Maxs lifting record

5 pts.

Maxs plans for


the future

3 Read the text again. Identify the incorrect information in each sentence.
a. Max Pippa set his record at an Olympic competition.
b. He has competed since he was a child.
c. He enjoys going out and drinking with his friends.
d. The competition collected money for children with hepatitis.

5 pts.

LISTENING: HAVE YOU EVER SWUM WITH A REPTILE?


4

24 Listen to the recording and choose the correct answer for each question.
a. Whats the coachs name?
i. Harold Davies
ii. Harold Daniels
iii. Harold Davidson

3 pts.

b. What does he teach?


i. Diving
ii. Surfing
iii. Swimming
c. What kind of animal does he use?
i. An alligator
ii. A serpent
iii. A crocodile

51

5 pts.

28 Number the sentences in the order you hear them.


a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

How long is the crocodile, and how old are your pupils?
Today, were talking to Mr Harold Davies.
Its a baby crocodile.
And what do parents say?
I just put a crocodile in the pool with my pupils.

LANGUAGE
6 Complete these sentences with what these people have done, and use for or since.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

5 pts.

My father
(work) in that company
2005.
(live) in this city
ten years.
We
(be) in the pool
more than an hour.
My sister
(compete) in the Olympic Games
she was 16.
Natalie du Toit
(lift) weights
he was a small boy.
Mark Pippa

VOCABULARY
4 pts.

7 Match the words in column A with the definitions in column B.


A
a. Give up
b. Pass
c. Hang gliding
d. Race

B
i. To gain a required or adequate mark.
ii. An extreme sport.
iii. To abandon or renounce to something
iv. A contest.

SPEAKING
8 In pairs, ask and answer questions a - c Ask two extra questions to find out about
your partners achievements and experiences.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

5 pts.

Have you ever passed a test you didnt expect to?


Have you ever talked to a foreigner?
Have you ever experienced fear?
?
Have you ever
?
Have you ever

WRITING
9 Write five sentences about your partners achievements and experiences.

0 - 12
Keep trying!

52

UNIT 2

13 - 21
Good!

22 - 31
Very good!

5 pts.
38
TOTAL

32 - 38
Excellent!

CHALLENGES

PROJECT
Interview with a sportsperson
Physical Education and Drama
1 Form pairs to do this project.
2 Choose a famous sportsperson you like a lot and search for
information about him/her. Use the Internet, encyclopedias
and what you have learned in Physical Education.

3 Include information about: his/her nationality, the sport he/she


practices, interesting facts about his/her personal life, his/her
beginnings in sports, and some accomplishments.

4 Think of ten questions and use all the information you gathered
to create an interview for a radio program (about 20 entries).
Also, use the vocabulary and language of this unit to enhance
your work.

5 With your partner, decide who will play each role: the interviewer
and the famous sportsperson. Then, role-play the interview and
rehearse it several times.

6 Perform it in front of the class.

Checklist
Reflect upon your project and check () under the correct column.
Very well

Well

Not so well

We followed the instructions carefully.


We collected information from different sources.
We distributed the tasks evenly among the group members.
We participated actively.
We were respectful of each others ideas and opinions.

53

UNIT
ARTS AND
ENTERTAINMENT
In this unit you will:
read some art reviews
read a TV guide
listen to a contest program
listen to personal opinions
You will learn how to:
Reading
recognize the general content of a text
relate text with visuals
discriminate between facts and inferences

Listening
relate speakers with speeches
discriminate sounds
infer information from pattern of voice
Language
report other people's messages
connect ideas in a text.
Speaking
talk about entertainment
report what someone says

Writing
write a poem inspired by a work of art.
You will also:
reflect on the importance of art and
entertainment in our life
develop acceptance and respect for everyones
tastes and opinions

GETTING READY
1 Identify these art forms in the pictures on Page 55.
a. literature

b. drama

c. sculpture

d. painting

2 Write the name of a famous person related to each area in Exercise 1. Compare in your group.
3 In your notebook, complete this Word Map.
ARTS
Area

54

Area

Area

People

People

People

People

People

People

Works

Works

Works

Works

Works

Works

55

BEFORE YOU START


LETS TURN ON THE TV

LESSON 1

1 Read what these people say. What type of TV programs from the boxes would you
recommend to each of them?
cartoons

contest

movie

program

soap opera

news

chat show

I love
romances, beautiful
sceneries, a bit of humor,
and happy endings.

sports

weather forecast

Im
going to be ten next
week. My parents let me watch
TV in the afternoon, but not
in the evening.

I cant
stand watching
people kissing each other or
laughing at silly things. I love
physical activities and
outdoor adventures.

2 Put sentences in boxes A and C together to form full sentences. Use the connectors in
box B.

A
a. I like watching the news
b. My favorite program is on now
c. Brian doesn't like basketball
d. Mom doesn't feel well
e. Comedies
f. Brenda loves documentaries

56

UNIT 3

B
and
because
but
so

C
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.

I have to do my homework.
animal programs are really funny.
I'll turn down the T.V. a little bit.
she can learn and have fun at the same
time
v. he loves watching it on T.V.
vi. I like being informed.

Before starting this unit, you need to know:


Talk about past events and actions.
Use vocabulary related to TV programs.
n,
Use connectors to add and contrast informatio Reproducing what other
people said.
to give reasons, and express consequences.

LESSON 2

ARTS
ARTSAND
ANDENTERTAINMENT
ENTERTAINMENT

TEENS ART WORK

1 Fill in the blanks with the Past tense of the verbs in parenthesis.
Last Easter holidays, Jimmy and Paul
(go) camping in the mountains.
(spend) a wonderful time there.
They
(wake up) early in the morning
They
(go) for a walk. In the
and then they
(buy) everything they
village they
(need).
(play)
In the afternoon, they
(watch)
football,
(swim) in
the birds and
the river.
(not have) a TV set, so after
They
(talk) for a while and
dinner they
(go) to sleep. Suddenly,
then they
(hear) someone calling Hello!
Paul
(turn) around and he
Hello! He
(see) a strange creature.
(be) green and very small. He
It
(invite) them to go to his
spaceship.
(open) his eyes and said what
Paul
(be) only a dream!
a relief! It

2 Read these sentences and write the quotation marks ( ) only when needed.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Thinking back, she said, I didnt expect to win.


I dont agree, I replied.
Can I come in? he asked.
Just a moment! she shouted.
Youre right, he said.
Youre right, he said. It feels strange.

57

LESSON 1

LETS TURN ON THE TV

READING

BEFORE READING
1 Ask and answer these questions in pairs and then compare
answers in your group.

Strategy

a. Do you have a favorite TV show?


b. What's the most popular TV show in your family?
c. What changes would you make to TV programs? Why?

Spot

Scan the text on


Page 60.
what is it about?
what is its
communicative
purpose?

2 Classify the vocabulary below (i ix) into TV programs and TV people.


a. Which of these describe TV programs?
b. Which of these describe people on TV?
c. Write three sentences using the vocabulary below. Then, practice
them, reading them and correcting them with a partner.
i. a chat show
ii. a comedy
iii. a commentator

iv. a documentary
v. a drama series
vi. a game show

vii. a newsreader
viii. a presenter
ix. a soap opera

3 Match each picture with a name from Exercise 2.


1

4 Find the words that do not belong in this group. Explain why you
have chosen them.

58

UNIT 3

celebrity

channel

comedy

backyard

digital

kitchen

drama

episode

guide

narrator

opera

popular

presenter

furniture

satellite

series

spectator

show

farm

station

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

5 Look at the words in the Key Word Spot and find them in the text
on Page 60. Then, match them with their meaning (a g).
a.

audio file that can be downloaded by a subscriber from


the Internet
go away, leave, depart
pain, misfortune
television show that is based on a film or on another
television show
luxurious, elegant, expensive
unnatural, strange, mysterious
escape attempt

b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

READING

Key Word Spot

bailout
podcast
spin-off
uncanny
upscale
walk-off
woe

31

6 Have a quick look at the text on Page 60. What type of text is it?
Give reasons for your choice.

7 Copy this chart into your notebook. Read the text and find a name
for each type of program.
Type of program

Name of program

a. Chat show
b. Comedy
c. Detection / thriller
d. Documentary
e. Game show
f. News
g. Soap opera
h. Sports program

8 Read the text again. Identify the ideal program for these people.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Someone who dreams of entering the fashion business.


Someone who enjoys love and romantic affairs.
Someone who is interested in economic topics.
Someone who is interested in medical topics.
Someone who is interested in tourism.
Someone who is keen on supernatural experiences.

Strategy

Spot

As you read, stop to


think what the target
audience of each
channel is.

59

MONDAY
Channel
CBA
8:00 pm Opportunity Knocks
A game show in which family
members are asked trivia
questions about one another.

TV GUIDE
SBC

The FW
40510 -New
This week tension
mounts between Kelly
and Brenda. Besides, a
secret relationship is
revealed.

FX
Gamble or No
Gamble
Contestants compete
for cash inside sealed
briefcases in this
game show.

BCN
NCIS
The Biggest Loser:
A successful JAG spinoff
Families
about criminal cases
Previous episode was all
handled by the Naval
about looking back.
Criminal Investigative
Besides the standard
Service.
workouts and challenge,
this week really focuses
on the trainers saying
goodbye and making sure
they sent off their teams
with knowledge and
confidence to continue in
their progress at home.
This week on Earth
The Psychic - New!
Americas Next Super Bodies
9:00 pm Dancing with the VIPs
A scientist, who has News, science, and
Model
A celebrated psychic
This is it, folks!
turned-detective with a
Three have survived the an uncanny ability to debate advancing
Weve finally arrived at the
read clues in a victims sustainable life on a
Top Model challenges
finale of our show. Although powerful gift for
changing planet.
and shoots to date, but bodies, solves
your votes have already been observation investigates
murders in a series
on this weeks finale,
crimes for the California
tabulated, there are still 30
inspired by forensic
one of the girls is
judges points available. Each Bureau of Investigation.
anthropologist and
crowned the winner
couple will be performing one
novelist Kim Richards.
after a commercial
of their favorite routines.
challenge and windy
walk-off.
10:00 pm
Without a Trace
Inside the NHL
Arizona Highways Financial News
An FBI Missing Persons
Why do hockey players Each week viewers are Treasury assurances that
Unit in Manhattan races born early in the year
taken on a journey to the bailout is helping
the clock to solve cases by enjoy a big advantage? all parts of our state. stabilize markets arent
learning as much as
Max Gladstone
Theyll find adventure, enough for a program
possible about people who addresses the mystery in history, culture and all with few internal controls,
have disappeared.
a new book which he
the unique traits that though the minister
presents in this program. make Arizona so
defended the program.
special.
11:00 pm Pushing Daisies
Private Clinic
The Fox Report
Houzz
Harry Unmarried A man who is able to bring the A Brigs Anatomy spinoff Thomas Fox joins Bill
He has little patience New!
dead back to life uses his
focusing on neonatal
Simpson for his 100th
for his patients, but
Funny situations for a
power to solve murder cases. surgeon Addison Foxley
sports podcast. The lively misanthropic Geoffrey recently divorced man
Montgomery, who has left show hits on 2013, the Houzz is a brilliant
who tries to be single
Boston and moved to L.A., All Stars debacle and his diagnostician.
again after 15 years of
where she practices at the favorite teams and
marriage while he raises
upscale Seaside Wellness players during his
two kids with his
Clinic.
25-year reign.
controlling ex-wife.
Created by: Publishing team.

60

UNIT 3

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

9 Read the text once more. Are these statements facts (F) or

inferences (I)? After you finish, write one fact and one inference of
your own, related to the text.
Example:
Fact: Television is a popular means of communication (there is
evidence that supports it).
Inference: Sophie likes comedies, so I think she might like Harry
Unmarried (you infer based on previous knowledge).
a.

b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

In Opportunity Knocks, each contestant has to answer


questions about his / her family.
The audience can't vote for Dancing with the Vip anymore.
In Pushing Daisies, the protagonist can talk to the dead.
There are public divisions which offer support to important
TV series.
Private Clinic is a program that is derived from
another series.
It is the last episode of 40510 - New.

LANGUAGE SPOT
Connectors besides, though and although

1. Read these sentences from the text. Pay special attention to the
words in bold.
a. Even though your votes have already been tabulated, there are
still 30 judges points available.
b. Tension mounts between Kelly and Brenda. Besides, a secret
relationship is revealed.
c. Although he has little patience for patients, misanthropic
Geoffrey Houzz is a brilliant diagnostician.
d. Though assurances aren't enough for a program with few
internal controls, the minister defended it.
e. Besides the standard workouts and challenge, this week really
focuses on the trainers saying goodbye.
2. Which of the words in bold are used to:
a. include additional information?
b. show contrasting information?
3. Copy and complete this general rule in your notebook.
We can connect two consecutive and additional ideas in a
or
/
.
sentence by using
is used when we want to include
and
/
when we want to show
information.

LETS READ!

Reading booklet connection

Page 8
Read the extract of Brave
New World, a futuristic
novel, and answer the
questions.

Strategy

Spot

Choose three
programs and create
two questions about
them. Take turns to ask
the questions to your
partner and answer
them referring to parts
of the text.

4. Read the TV Guide again. Can you add some comments using
the connectors in this Language Spot?

61

10 Join these pairs of sentences using besides or although / though.


a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

They were very tired. They watched TV until late.


It was raining. I went to the park.
Yesterday, it was raining. Yesterday it was very cold.
I want to go to the party. I have to go to the dentist.
My mother wanted to watch the last episode of 40510. My father
watched the football game.
f. It was a hard day. I didnt feel well.

LISTENING AND SPEAKING


11

Strategy

I watch TV every day. Although I like different programs, my favorite


ones are cartoons, reality shows and soap operas. The only things I
dont watch are sports programs, and the news.
Theres a fantastic soap opera on at the moment. The situations are
just like in real life and besides the characters are really interesting.
I hate it when we are getting to the end of each episode; I cant wait
to the next one.

Spot

Read your paragraph


again and write some
questions about it.
With your partner, take
turns to ask and
answer your questions.

32 Read and listen to the recording.

12 Write a new paragraph, similar to the one in Exercise 11, about

yourself. It can also be about a web page, music, or anything you


like. You can add more information if you want. Then, share it with
your classmates.

LETS CHECK
13 Use words from this lesson to complete these sentences. Use a

dictionary to choose the correct form of the word you are going
to use.
(7 pts.)

a. Did you see the first episode of the new


on TV last
night? The story was interesting but very sad.
b. Jill Newman is a
on breakfast television. She
introduces the program and talks to guests.
about the history of India?
c. Did you watch the
d. Its a fantastic
. If you answer ten questions correctly,
you can win a million pounds.
e. Did you see Tom Cruise on TV last night? He was interviewed
.
by Jonathon Pross on his new
f. I think Jon Botson is a great
. He gets very excited
when he describes somebody scoring a goal.
g. It was a very funny
. I laughed a lot.
0-2
Keep trying!

62

UNIT 3

3-5
Good!

6
Very good!

7
Excellent!

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

WRITING
14 Organizing. You are going to write your ideal TV guide for a

Sunday afternoon. Work in pairs. To plan your writing, think about


the type of programs you would like to see on a Sunday afternoon.
Take notes.

art programs
news

chat shows
quizzes

sports

cooking

competitions
series

sitcoms

video clips

movies

soap operas

wild life

15 Drafting. In your notebook, write a draft of your TV guide. Use your


notes in Exercise 14 and use the TV guide on Page 60 as a model.

16 Editing. Exchange your TV guide with your partner. Check for


mistakes using the Editing Checklist.

17 Writing. Write the final version of your TV guide on a piece of

cardboard and display it on a visible place of your classroom. Have


a look at other groups work and discuss the following questions:
a. What do you think of television?
b. Are you selective about what you watch or are you a couch
potato?
c. What sort of programs do you enjoy watching? Why?
d. Do you think you and the people your age watch too much TV?
Why? Why not?

FAST LEARNERS
18 Play this game in a group of 5 students.
a. Sit in a circle.
b. Choose one of the sentences below and read it aloud. You can
also add your own sentences about shows on TV, radio,
Internet, etc.
c. The other players have to guess what kind of program is being
described. Ask questions such as is it
? Does it begin
? Does it end with
? so as to increase your
with
chance of guessing.
d. The winner is the player who guesses the most types of programs.
i. My favorite TV program makes me laugh a lot - I think it's
really funny.
ii. I saw my favorite program earlier and it said it's going to rain
tonight.
iii. If you don't watch my favorite program, how can you know
what's happening in the world?

Editing checklist
Use this checklist to help you think
about your work.
When you have finished your work,
read it through and check for any
changes you need to make.
Punctuation

Do your sentences begin


with capital letters and end
with periods?
Have you checked your
work for other punctuation
marks, such as question
marks, exclamation marks,
commas, etc.?
Sentences
Do all your sentences
make sense?
Can you add any words to
make them more
interesting?
Connectors
Have you used a variety of
connectors in the text, such as
and, or, but, or because?
Spelling
Have you checked your
work for spelling mistakes?
Vocabulary
Use your dictionary to check
that the words you have
used are appropriate
in context.

63

LESSON 2

TEENS ART WORK

LISTENING

BEFORE LISTENING
1 Which of the activities below do you like? Which ones don't you

like? Use the expressions in the boxes to talk about them with a
partner, choose one, and make a presentation about it for the rest
of the class. If you can, use the Internet to support your ideas.
I dont like

Attending
lectures on art

Going to
concerts

Looking at
paintings
on the web

Reading
a book

64

UNIT 3

I like

I prefer

as much as better than


less than more than

Going to
art galleries

Listening
to music

Painting
pictures

Taking
s
photograph

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

2 Number these types of pictures from 1 (the ones you like the most)

to 10 (the ones you dont like). Compare with your partner. Can you
explain your choices?
Abstract pictures
Black and white photographs
Color photographs
Pictures of animals
Pictures of babies
Pictures of flowers

Pictures of natural
disasters
Pictures of nature
Pictures of old people
Pictures of people
Pictures of teens
Pictures of war

3 Look at the photographs below. What type are they? Choose and
write a name from the box.
Art

Landscape

Photo-journalism

Strategy

Spot

You are going to listen


to some people talking
about a photography
exhibition. Before you
listen, make a list of
the ideas you think
people could express
about the photos in the
exhibition.

Studio

4 You are going to listen to what some people said about a photography
exhibition. Check () the statements you think will be true.

a.
b.
c.
d.

People enjoyed the exhibition.


People gave a good mark to the exhibition.
People liked abstract photos.
People liked the exhibition because it was teens work.

LISTENING
5

33 Listen to the recording and validate your predictions in


Exercise 4. Then, pay attention to the expressions in the box.

33 Listen to the recording again. Who said these sentences


(a e), the presenter, Sophie, or Brandon?
: The photos were very casual.
a.
: It was an exhibition of photographs taken
b.
by teenagers.
: The background was important.
c.
: Samanthas pictures were very different.
d.
: From one to five.
e.

Useful Expressions Spot

The main thing people


said was ...
They said that ...
They all said that

65

Strategy

Spot

Read the sentences in


Exercise 7 before you
listen to the recording.
what kind of
information is
missing?

33 Listen to the recording again and fill in the blanks in these


sentences with only ONE word.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

It was by
who live in the same area that they do.
.
People particularly liked the bottle cap and the
.
Sam said that he was inspired by his
.
People said it was an enjoyable
out of five.
They gave the exhibition

33 Listen again and answer these questions.


a. Were the photographers professional or amateur? Why?
b. Which picture was the favorite one?
c. Who is Tom? What inspired him?

Strategy

Spot

Work in pairs. Look at


the table in Exercise
10 and discuss what
piece of work you
would like to see in an
exhibition. Explain your
answers.

66

UNIT 3

33 Listen once more. Who took these pictures, Eli or Tom? Write
their names below each picture.

a.

b.

10 Copy the table in your notebook. Complete it writing any words or


phrases that describe each of the teens works.
Eli

Tom

Samantha

Antonio

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

LANGUAGE SPOT
Reported Speech

1. Read these sentences from the recording.


a. They said they liked that the photos were very casual.
b. People said the artist they found most interesting was Tom.
c. Antonio said that he used plain backgrounds to symbolize
freedom.
2. Choose the best answer to these questions.
a. What is the speaker referring to in the examples?
i. To what he / she says.
ii. To what someone else said.
3. Copy and complete this general rule in your notebook.
When we report what another person said, we use
speech, introducing the report with said /
.
Generally, when the original sentence is in Present Simple, it is
tense.
reported in the
4. Copy and complete this example chart. Highlight all the changes
you can see as a result of the use of Reported Speech.
Direct Speech

Reported Speech
A friend told me that it made him laugh.
My friend said it was good.
My mother told me it was about a scientist.

Susan: Its cold today.


Charles: I want to go to the cinema.
My mother: I dont feel well.

11 Report what these people said to you. Be careful with some extra
changes you have to include.

Example: Jim: My father has lunch at work.


Jim told me that his father had lunch at work.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Bill: Mary knows your cousin.


My brother: Im very hungry.
Sheila: Jim isnt married.
Bob: I like your sweater.
Connie: My mother doesnt like vegetables.
My sister: Diana and Tom are very good friends.

67

LETS CHECK
12 In your notebook, rewrite these sentences reporting what other

(10 pts, 2 pts each)

people said.

a. Sally: Im leaving in half an hour.


b. Tim: I want some orange juice.
c. Jack and Jill: We often go skating on Saturdays.
d. Dina: The children are very late.
e. Fred: I feel much better after that short break.
0-4
Keep trying!

5-6
Good!

7-8
Very good!

9 - 10
Excellent!

ORAL PRACTICE
13 Andrew and Reba are sharing impressions about a recent activity.
With your partner, complete their conversation using the words
and expressions in the boxes. Several possibilities are correct for
each blank.
action
horrible

actors
little

too long

Did they like the


movie?
They said it was ...
What about the ...?
Would they recommend
it?

14
15

UNIT 3

movie

excellent
recommend

very funny

fantastic
real

good

special effects

sweet and smart

Andrew: Did your friends like the


?
. Alan said that
Reba:
They told me it was
the
were
and that
they looked incredibly
.
?
Andrew: What about the
kid was very
Reba:
They said that the
, but the rest of the
werent
.
it?
Andrew: Would they
, but they said that it was
Reba:
If you like
for kids.

Useful Expressions Spot

68

boring

34 Listen to the recording and compare your answers.


34 In pairs, listen and practice the dialog, taking turns to do
Andrews and Rebas part. Use the expressions in the box to
help you.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

READING AND WRITING


16 Have you ever heard about ekphrastic poetry? Look up the meaning of
this concept on the Internet and explain it with your own words in the
lines below.
Ekphrastik poetry is
17

35 Read these three examples of ekphrastic poetry. Match them with


the famous works of art you think inspired them.

Classic Landscape (1931)


Charles Sheeler
The Collection of the Mr. and Mrs. Barney
Ebsworth Foundation.

a. Cezanne's Ports
Allen Ginsberg (1950)
In the foreground we see
time and life
swept in a race
toward the left hand side of
the picture
where shore meets shore.
But that meeting place
isn't represented;
it doesn't occur on the
canvas.
For the other side of the bay
is Heaven and Eternity,
with a bleak white haze over
its mountains.
And the immense water of
L'Estaque is a go-between
for minute rowboats

The Gulf of Marseille seen from Lestaque (1883)


Paul Cezanne
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City

b. Van Gogh's Bed


Jane Flanders (1985)

Vincents bedroom in Arles (1888)


Vincent Van Gogh
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

c. Classic Scene
William Carlos Williams

is orange,
like Cinderella's coach, like
the sun when he looked it
straight in the eye.

A power-house
in the shape of
a red brick chair
90 feet high

is narrow, he sleeps alone,


tossing
between two pillows, while it
carried him
bumpily to the ball.

on the seat of which


sit the figures
of two metal
stacks--aluminum--

is clumsy,
but friendly. A peasant
built the frame; and old wife
beat
the mattress till it rose like
meringue.
is empty,
morning light pours in
like wine, melody, fragrance,
the memory of happiness.

commanding an area
of squalid shacks
side by side-from one of which
buff smoke
streams while under
a grey sky
the other remains
passive today--

69

18 Read the poems carefully. In pairs, discuss how text and image
relate and the point of view of the poets. Explain the connection you
see to the rest of the class. Do you recognize any poetic
techniques (metaphor, personification, alliteration, etc.) in the
poems? Give examples.
19 Answer these questions as you analyze the poems.
a. Read the poem Cezannes ports.
i. What is the poet describing?
ii. Can we see the poets description in the painting? Why? Why
not?
b. Read the poem Van Goghs bed.
i. What does the poet say about the room? Write a list of its
characteristics in your notebook.
ii. What does the poet compare the room to?
c. Read the poem Classic Scene.
i. What does the writer do at the beginning of the poem?
ii. Underline the words that are directly related to what can be
seen in the painting.
d. Which poem did you like most? Explain to your class why you
liked it.
20 Organizing. You are going to write a poem inspired by an artwork.
Work in pairs. To plan your writing, follow these steps:
a. Choose one of the paintings on Page 71, or one you know well.
b. List the first words that come to mind when you look at the
artwork you chose.
c. Answer these questions in your notebook. Take ten minutes to
do it.
i. What is happening in this artwork? What story is being told?
ii. How would you describe the subject(s) in this painting?
iii. What is the mood of the artwork?
iv. How does this artwork connect with you?
v. How would you summarize its main idea?
d. Go back and make a list of any words or phrases you might want
to incorporate into a poem about the artwork. You can use
your dictionary.
e. In fifteen minutes, write a final version of your poem. You dont
have to follow any rules; it can simply be free verse.
21 Drafting. In your notebook, write a draft of your poem. Use your
notes in Exercise 20 and follow the models on Page 69. You dont
have to follow any rules; it can simply be free verse.

70

22 Editing. Exchange your poems with other groups. Compare your


poems with the models on Page 69 and check if they succeed to
express the feelings and impressions of the paintings.

UNIT 3

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Subway, ca. 1934 Lily Furedi


Department of the Interior, National Park Service

Chile entero II
Mario Carreo
Hospital del Trabajador de Rancagua

Leccin de pintura
Ximena Cristi
Museo de Arte Contemporneo, Santiago
23 Writing. Write the final version of your poem in a piece of paper.
Finally, get in groups of eight and discuss the following questions:
a. What similarities do you notice in the way the other students
interpreted the works of art they chose?
b. What differences can you see?

TAKE ACTION!
a. In pairs, write a dialog expressing opinions about a free time activity, using ideas from the
chart. Imitate the dialog in Exercise 13.
b. Practice your dialog and then role play it in front of your classmates.
Activity
Art exhibition
Concert
Football game
Handcrafts fair
Movie
Outdoor activity
Photo exhibition
Play
Sports tournament

18-25

Elements
Actors
Artists
Audience
Match
Musicians
Paintings
Performance
Photos
Players
Setting
Special effects
Topics
Weather

Impressions
Amazing
Awful
Excellent
Incredible
Not so good
Quite good
Really fantastic
Surprising
Terrible
Too long
Too short
Very funny
Very sad

For extra practice of Unit 3, complete the activities in the Workbook.

71

YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION


1 In your notebook, do some research and classify these art forms, indicating century, decades,
and at least one artist. You can organize the information in a time line, in your notebook.
a. Abstract painting
b. Action painting
c. Cubism
d. Folk art
e. Futurism

f. Minimalism
g. Naturalism
h. Pop art
i. Post modernism
j. Representational art

2 Match the names in Exercise 1 (a - j) with the pictures that represent them (1 - 10).

72

UNIT 3

10

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

3 Follow these instructions.


a. Choose a famous painting and draw your own version on a piece of paper. Make two copies.
b. Modify one of the copies, changing some aspects, and write a set of instructions to help
other people discover the genuine one.
c. Tell your partner the instructions and see if he / she can discover the real work of art.
36 Read this extract from a TV guide and find words or phrases in it to match the definitions (a - h).

7:00 pm

Pride and Prejudice


A repeat run for the peak-time
costume drama serial which topped
last summers viewing figures. In this
opening episode we meet The Bennet
family and the handsome Mr Darcy.
a.
b.

a series)

World at War
A new three-part
documentary series that
tells the story of the First
World War. It is narrated
by William Gates.

: The first program (in

: The time of day when


most people watch TV
: A group of three
c.
related programs that are broadcast over
a period of time
d.
: A description of a
match as it happens

8:00 pm

9:00 pm

Sports Special
Extended highlights of the
match between Real
Madrid and Arsenal, with
commentary by Barry
Motson

e.

: A long drama set in


the past that is broadcast in parts (in a
series of programs)
: A series of programs
f.
that are not being shown on television for
the first time
: The story is told
g.
h.
: Not the whole match,
but all the exciting action

37 Solve the mystery. Read the short text and discover who is talking. Find out who painted
this work of art, when, and where it is now.

A famous painting
Im old (about 500 years old, actually) but, according to many people, Im still beautiful. Im called a
work of art, a masterpiece, though theres something about me that people still dont really understand.
About a hundred years ago, I was stolen from my home in France (which, incidentally, was not the
country I was painted in), but fortunately I was returned within a couple of years. I certainly didnt
enjoy being moved around during that time, but I wasnt damaged, thankfully.
My creator was a man far ahead of his time; he was a scientist, an artist, an engineer, and even an
architect. Believe it or not, he once designed (and named) a prototype
for a form of air travel!
He was a very busy man indeed - in fact, it took him a long time to
create me, but it was all worth it in the end; Im famous now and
so is he.
Im known by two names, the first is my first name and the other is
my surname. You know me, dont you?

73

UNIT CHECK
READING

38

Traditional art forms

Morris Dancing
Morris dancing is a traditional type of folk dancing found in many villages
in Britain. The earliest records of Morris dancing date from the fifteenth
century. The name is quite interesting and one theory is that it comes from
the Latin word mores, which means a custom.
For some reason, Morris dancing seems to be very popular in the spring
and early summer.
Often the dancers are all men and they wear special costumes with bells
on. They carry sticks or handkerchiefs which they wave when dancing. They
are accompanied by folk
music, usually played on an accordion.
Dreamtime
a.
Dreamtime is a very important concept for the Aborigine people of Australi
The
origins.
their
and
life
of
It is the way the Aborigine explain the creation
them,
dreaming connects the Aborigine to their ancestors and to the land. For
their land, plants, and animals are incredibly important.
The
The dreaming can be shown through paintings, dance, and storytelling.
paintings often consist of lines, circles, and specific symbols that represent
animals and people.
. It is through the stories
The stories are usually about creation, but are more than just myths and legends
find food and water. People have
that the children learn about the traditions, how to behave, and where to
years.
of
ds
thousan
for
handed down these stories from generation to generation
Haiku
A haiku is a particular type of Japanese poem. Many experts say that the first
haiku
was written by Basho in the seventeenth century, but it may well date from
earlier.
The poems consist of three lines adding up to a total of seventeen syllable
s (or
sounds). The first and third lines have five syllables each and the second
line
seven. One thing that is very different from many forms of poems is that
the lines
do not need to rhyme.
Traditionally, haiku are about nature and include a kigo - a word associat
ed with one of the four seasons.

Limericks
English by
A limerick is a five-line poem with a strict form, originally popularized in
Edward Lear. The name derives from the Irish town of Limerick.
English
Variants of this form of poetry can be traced back to the fourteenth century
poems
other
and
s
Rhyme
y
Nurser
in
ks
history. Since then, people have used limeric
for children.

74

UNIT 3

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

1 Read the article and match the words (a - j) to the four forms of traditional art.

5 pts.

a. Australia
b. bells
c. Ireland
d. poetry
e. folk music
f. Japan
g. rhymes
h. spring
i. stories
j. symbols

2 Match the artforms in column A with their descriptions in column B.


A
a. Dreamtime
b. Limerick
c. Haiku
d. Morris Dancing

9 pts.

B
i. Its name derives from a town in Ireland.
ii. It's the way in which children learn about their traditions.
iii. It's is always accompanied by folk music.
iv. A poem that doesn't necessarily rhyme.

LISTENING: DID YOU LIKE THE MOVIE?


3

39 Listen to the recording and tick each speakers opinion of the movie.
Speaker

Very good

Good enough

6 pts.

Not good

1
2
3
4
5
6

39 Listen again and number the sentences in the order you hear them.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

6 pts.

The new cast is brilliant.


The songs are amazing.
It was too cheesy, too sentimental.
My little cousin asked me to go to see the third one.
Far too much romance.
Roy and Brad danced fabulously.

75

4 pts.

39 Listen once more and fill in the blanks in these sentences.


a. It was also
b. This movie is
c. Its a

to
, I just
movie and once

with the prom and


it.
, the songs are

.
.

LANGUAGE
6 Match the types of movies (a - e) and the comments (i - v).

5 pts.

a. A horror movie
b. A romantic comedy
c. A sci-fi movie
d. A thriller
e. An animated movie
i. An all-action movie with great stunts and a real cliffhanger of an ending.
ii. Set on a star cruiser in the distant future, this film has great special effects.
iii. A hilarious movie about two unlikely lovers, which will have you laughing
out loud.
iv. A fantastic computer-generated cartoon, with the voice of Eddie Murphy as
the donkey.
v. This new movie will scare you to death.

7 In your notebook, rewrite the ideas in this dialog into a paragraph, using Reported
Speech.

Sandra:
Sam:
Sandra:
Sam:
Sandra:

10 pts.

Did you enjoy the movie?


Im not sure.
I think the actress performance was fantastic.
Well, I didnt like it at all.
But the special effects were amazing!

SPEAKING
8 In pairs, talk about your favorite art form, such as music, movies, books, sculpture,
etc. Tell your partner about its genre and main details. Explain why you like it.

10 pts.

WRITING
9 Write a brief description of a particular art form that is exclusive of Chile. It can be
related to painting, music, dancing, poetry, etc. Follow the models on Page 74.

0 - 16
Keep trying!

76

UNIT 3

17 - 33
Good!

34 - 50
Very good!

10 pts.

65
TOTAL

51 - 65
Excellent!

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

PROJECT
A TV news program
Art and Drama
1 Choose a painting and a movie you like a lot

and search for information about them. Use the


Internet, encyclopedias and what you have
learned in the Art class.

2 Include information about: their names, a brief


description, their artist/director/actors, the
movement they belong to and peoples
opinion.

3 Use all the information you gathered and the contents of this unit to
create a TV news program about arts and entertainment. You will
play the role of a newsreader.

4 Rehearse the pieces of news several times and prepare a


television stage. Then, film your TV program.

5 Show it to your classmates.

Checklist
Reflect upon your project and check () under the correct column.
Very well

Well

Not so well

We followed the instructions carefully.


We collected information from different sources.
We distributed the tasks evenly among the group members.
We participated actively.
We were respectful of each others ideas and opinions.

77

UNIT
HOW ABOUT
WORKING?
In this unit you will:
read a leaflet
read two advertisements
listen to a radio advertisement
listen to a dialog about voluntary work
You will learn how to:
Reading
locate missing information in a text
discriminate between correct and incorrect
information

Listening
discriminate between correct and incorrect information
extract specific information from a recording
identify the sequence of information
Language
express obligation and necessity
use Modal Verbs to express future possibility
Speaking
exchange information about voluntary work
exchange information about future possibilities

Writing
write a letter of application
write a short poem or rhyme about
voluntary work
You will also:
assess and appreciate the role of
volunteer organizations around the world
value the importance of voluntary work
for people in need

GETTING READY
1 Look at the pictures on Page 79 and answer these questions.
a. What can you see in the photographs?
b. How old are the people in them?

c. What are the people doing?

2 Match the words in column A to the ones in column B, to form new expressions related to voluntary
work. Write them in your notebook. Then, use them to express your opinion about this topic.
A
another - great - a helping - rewarding community - understanding - earning - working

B
teams - local cultures - experience - opportunity
- perspective - hand - support - money

Example:
I think it is a rewarding experience to work with children because they are very spontaneous
and affectionate.

3 With your partner, complete this chart in your notebook with information on volunteer organizations
in Chile.

Name of organization

78

Type of work they do

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

79

BEFORE YOU START


LESSON 1

BREAKING FRONTIERS

1 Look at the signs and complete the short dialogs. Then, practice them with your partner.

b. A: Excuse me madam,

a. A: Mom, can I give some chocolate


to those monkeys?
B: No, dear! We

c. A: Excuse me sir, you


B:

.
!

B:

d. A: Lets
B: Alright! But

2 Write a recommendation for each situation.


a. You have a very difficult English test next week.
b. You have a terrible headache.
c. Its raining heavily and you have to go out.
d. You are not allowed to leave the classroom without permission.
e. You dont understand the math exercises very well.

80

UNIT 4

.
!

.
.
.
.
.

.
.

HOW ABOUT WORKING?


Before starting this unit, you need to know:
Express obligations, necessity and possibilities.
Talk about future events, using will.

LESSON 2

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

1 Have a look at the picture of a city of the future. Read the sentences, classify the events
according to their probability, and write VP (Very Possible) or NVP (Not Very Possible).

a.
b.
c.
d.

Robots will clean the streets.


There will be surveillance cameras everywhere.
People will travel by spaceships.
People will have vacations on the moon.

2 Do you think all people will speak the same language in the future? Explain.

81

LESSON 1

BREAKING FRONTIERS

READING

BEFORE READING
1 Answer the following questions.
a. What are you planning to do next summer?
b. Have you ever worked during your vacation?

2 Think about the ideal Summer Job. Make a list of its characteristics
and discuss it with your partner.

3 Have a look at Page 83. What kind of text is it? Can you
Strategy

Spot

Read the first


paragraph of the text
on Page 83. What is
the purpose of the
text? Discuss with your
partner.
Key Word Spot

abroad
developing
insurance
placement
support

explain why?

a. An advertisement.
b. A magazine article.
c. An encyclopedia entry.

4 Take a look at the title of the text and the image on Page 83. Can
you predict what the text is about? Explain.

5 Read the words in the Key Word Spot. Match them with their
meanings and synonyms (a e).
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

in a foreign country
aid, assistance
protection, cover
growing, progressing
posting, position

READING

42

6 Read the text quickly and check your predictions in Exercises 3 and 4.
7 Read the text again and fill in the blanks (a l) with a word from
the boxes. You can check with the recording.
airfare

application

contribution
pocket

82

UNIT 4

communities

contribute

host

locations

opportunity

projects

support

volunteer

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

Amigos de las Americas is a unique international


organization which brings together volunteers from
all over the world to work in developing countries.
We organize programs worldwide with a particular
emphasis on health, education, and community
.
(a.)
Our volunteers work in teams and have the
(b.)
to learn new skills and meet
new friends while making an important
in local communities.
(c.)
Amigos de las Americas provides International
Volunteer Abroad and Summer Volunteer Programs
in 23 countries across Latin America - recent
have included Brazil,
(d.)
Bolivia, Guatemala and El Salvador.
Our Volunteer Abroad (e.)
include both short-term (4 weeks) and long-term (6
months) placements in every country, which
volunteers can join throughout the year.
Our organization gives volunteers a rewarding travel
experience as they get to know the local cultures
and different ways of life across the world while
helping them to work with the local
. This is the reason why more
(f.)
and more people are choosing to volunteer
abroad every year, as it helps them gain another
perspective.

AMIGOS DE LAS AMERICAS


9611 14th Street
Washington, D.C. 20032

YOU
must be between 17 and 24.
can volunteer for four weeks
to six months.
1,400 dollars
have to (g.)
toward the cost.
family
stay with a local (h.)
during your time as a volunteer.
need to speak English.
WE
pay for your food, accommodation,
and return (i.) ________.
provide weekly (j.) ________ money.
organize medical insurance where
appropriate.
train you in the skills you need to
help the local community.
give you constant support during your
volunteer period.

HOW TO APPLY
Fill in an (k.)
form.
Write an accompanying letter saying what kind of
volunteer work you would like and where you would
like to work. Give information about your skills,
abilities, and interests and say why you think you
.
would be a successful (l.)
Apply at least six months in advance of the date
you want to volunteer.
Mail your letter and completed form to:

JOIN OUR INTERNATIONAL


VOLUNTEER
ABROAD PROGRAMS AND
CHANGE THE WAY
YOU SEE THE WORLD!

Strategy

Spot

Make inferences:
How do you think
Amigos de las
Amricas helps people
in developing
countries?

83

Strategy

Spot

Make connections:
what similar
organizations do you
know in your city/
country?

8 Copy this diagram in your notebook and complete it with


information from the text.

Amigos de las Americas

Age
required?

Kinds of
programs

Opportunities

English
required?

9 In your group, talk about the text you read. Answer these questions
and then share your reflections with another group.
a.
b.
c.
d.

Would you like to join an international work program?


Where would you like to go? Why?
What kind of work do you think you could do?
Which jobs do you think are the most necessary in a program
like this? Explain.

LANGUAGE SPOT
Obligation and necessity

1. Read these sentences from the text, paying special attention to


the words in bold.
a. You must be between 17 and 24.
b. You have to contribute 1,400 dollars toward the cost.
c. You need to speak English.
d. You must fill in an application form.
e. You have to apply at least six months in advance.
2. Answer these questions.
a. Which of the sentences expresses an obligation?
b. Which of the sentences expresses a necessity?
c. Which verbs are used for each purpose?
3. Copy and complete this general rule in your notebook.
and
by using certain verbs.
We can express
We use
to express
.
or
to express
.
We can use
4. Go back to the text on Page 83. Rewrite the instructions on how to
apply using the verbs in this Language Spot.

84

UNIT 4

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

10 Circle must / need to to complete these sentences. Can you identify


what each sentence expresses?

a. Pedestrians need to / must look both ways before they cross


the street.
b. Drivers need to / must stop for pedestrians at marked crossings.
c. You need to / must speak Chinese to apply for the post.
d. Students need to / must pass an exam to join the program.
e. Construction workers need to / must wear hard hats. Its the law.

11 Match the comments in A with the replies in B. Then, write the


complete exchanges in your notebook.
A
a. I have to speak English in
my job.
b. I think you need to have a
haircut.
c. John has hurt his back.
d. Julia has to get up at 5 a.m.
tomorrow.
e. The meeting starts in five
minutes.
f. We must try that new
restaurant in town.

B
i. He must go to the doctor.
ii. She must go to bed
early, then.
iii. We have to book a table in
advance, though.
iv. We must hurry.
v. Yes, I must get an
appointment with my
hairdresser.
vi. You need to take English
classes.

LETS READ!

Reading booklet connection

LETS CHECK
12 Fill in the blanks of the dialog with must or have to and need to.

(7 pts.)

Page 10
Read Abbies diary telling
about her voluntary work in
India and answer the
questions.

A: Hows school going?


work harder... I
pass
B: Just fine... I
the final exams if I want to enter college.
A: Really? Do your teachers give you a lot to study?
do tons of homework every day. We even
B: Yes, we
hand in assignments every Monday!
eat well and
A: Wow! It sounds like hard work! You
sleep enough hours during this term if you want to get good
have a lot of energy!
marks. Your body
focus on having healthy habits
B: Yes, youre right! I
and studying.
0-3
Keep trying!

4-5
Good!

6
Very good!

7
Excellent!

85

LISTENING AND SPEAKING


13

43 Listen to the recording and complete the dialog with phrases


from the boxes.
absolutely necessary

Strategy

Spot

kind of work

Read the dialog again


and take notes of the
steps to do voluntary
work. Take your time to
read your notes and
then explain the steps
to your partner.

this summer

A:
B:
A:
B:
A:
B:

A:
B:
A:
B:

Key Word Spot

voluntary work
application form
accompanying letter
skills, abilities and
interests

14

accompanying letter

application form

skills, abilities and interests


three months before

the reasons

voluntary work

What are you planning to do


?
Im going to do some
.
How interesting! Id like to do the same.
and write an
.
Then you have to fill in an
A letter? What must I say in it?
you would like to do
You must explain what
and where you would like to go. You must also include
,
and
information about your
you want to be a volunteer.
Do I need to speak English?
.
Yes, its
Oh! How exciting! I think Im going to work this summer.
Im sorry, you cant. You should apply at least
the date you want to start.

43 Listen to the recording again and practice the dialog with a partner.
Repeat each sentence after you hear them, practice, and then present
it to the rest of the class. You can correct your partner's pronunciation.
Pay special attention to the words in the Key Word Spot.

WRITING
15 Organizing. You are going to write an application letter to Amigos
de las Amricas. To plan your writing, fill this application form out
with your personal information.
APPLICATION FORM
(Please complete in black ink with BLOCK CAPITALS)
Other names:
Last name:
Married / Single
Male / Female
Age:
Address:
Nationality:
E-mail address:
Cellphone N:
Telephone N:
Fluent / Good / Basic
Languages:
Class:
Interests:
Two reasons we should select you:
Circle the location where you would like to work and say why:
Chile Honduras Malaysia
Bangladesh Burkina Faso

The Philipines

Please, turn over and complete the medical details.

86

UNIT 4

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

16 Drafting. Use the information in the application form to write a draft


of your application letter. In your notebook, copy the format and
phrases given in the letter.

Chile
November ... , 20 ...
Kirsten Tobey
Amigos &de &las Americas
9611, 14th Street
Washington, D.C. 20032
Dear Mrs. Tobey,
I would &like &to make ...
ber &because ...
I &believe I will &be &a &good &team mem
rmation &from you &and &to
I &look &forward &to &getting more &info
accepted.
&hearing &if my &application &has &been
Yours Sincerely,

17 Editing. Exchange your letter with your partner and use Use the
Editing Checklist to check for mistakes.

18 Writing. Write the final version of your application letter in your


notebook and send it to a friend or read it aloud in front of your
classmates.

FAST LEARNERS
19 Imagine you are the Director of a voluntary organization. In your

notebook, write a letter accepting or rejecting an application, giving


reasons for your decision.

20 In small groups, play the odd-one-out game. Choose vocabulary of

this unit and form groups of four words according to their similarities,
except for one word (the odd one!). Read them to your partners and
ask them to solve your exercise. Take turns.

Editing checklist
Use this checklist to help you think
about your work.
Punctuation

Do your sentences begin


with capital letters and end
with periods?
Have you checked your
work for other punctuation
marks, such as question
marks, exclamation marks,
commas, etc.?
Sentences
Do all your sentences
make sense?
Can you add any words to
make them more
interesting?
Connectors
Have you used a variety of
connectors in the text, such
as and, or, but or because?
Spelling
Have you checked your
work for spelling mistakes?
Are there any words you are
not sure about?
Vocabulary
Use your dictionary to check
that the words you have used
are appropriate
in context.
When you have finished your work,
read it through and check for any
changes you need to make.

87

LESSON 2
LISTENING

MAKING A DIFFERENCE
BEFORE LISTENING
1 Answer these questions in your group. Take notes in your notebook
and then compare answers with other groups.

a. Have you ever thought about doing some voluntary work? What
kind of work?
b. Look at the pictures. Have you ever done any of those activities?
Did you like it? Why? Why not?
c. What kinds of voluntary work can young people do in Chile?

2 Copy this chart in your notebook and complete it.


Strategy

Spot

You are going to listen


to a text about a
voluntary work
organization.
what do you think is
the speaker's
purpose?
What is his / her
intended audience?

88

UNIT 4

Positive Aspects of Doing


Voluntary Work

Negative Aspects of Doing


Voluntary Work

3 Share your list in your group. Exchange opinions, supporting


your choices.

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

4 Read the words in the Key Word Spot. Match them with their
definition or synonym (a c).

a. You get a personal retribution by doing it.


b. Assistance.
c. You dont get any money by doing it.

5 Read the dialog and practice it with your partner. Then, try to use

Key Word Spot

helping hand
non-profit-making
worth achieving

the words in bold in examples of your own.

A: You know, next year, Im going to give a helping hand to


the poor.
B: Really? Where are you going?
A: To the south. Im going to join a non-profit-making association.
B: Congratulations! I think voluntary work is worth achieving.

LISTENING
6

44 Write three personal questions about voluntary work, and then


listen to the recording. Did the text answer your questions? Check.

44 Listen again and check if the positive and negative aspects in


your list were mentioned in the recording.

44 Listen to the recording again. Number these sentences in the


order you hear them.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

Its too much effort.


So you only want graduates.
You cant tell me that one person is going to make
a difference.
Spend a year away from civilization?
Work and not get paid? You must be joking!

44 Discuss this questions with your partner.


a. Do you agree with the fact of working with no retribution? Why?
b. Do you think people can also have fun while doing voluntary
work? How?
c. Which organization would you help? Why? In your notebook,
write a short paragraph expressing the reasons for your choice.

89

10

44 Match the activities in the boxes with the corresponding


pictures (1 6). Then, listen once more and identify the ones that
are mentioned in the recording. Use four of these expressions to
create a dialog with your partner. Practice it and present it in front of
the class.
build houses

distribute medication

make a profit

teach people

lend a helping hand


visit a web site

LANGUAGE SPOT
Expressing possibility

1. Read these sentences from the recording. Pay special attention to


the words in bold.
a. VW gives a helping hand wherever people may need.
b. It may be distributing food and medication or teaching to read
and write.
c. You may have the chance to acquire skills you never dreamed of.
d. That might be true.
2. What do these sentences express? Circle an alternative.
a. A situation that will certainly happen in the future.
b. A situation that will probably happen in the future.
3. Copy and complete this general rule in your notebook.
and
are synonyms and are commonly
in the
.
used to express
Note: We use may when something is likely to happen and might
when something is rather less probable to happen.
4. Work with a partner and revise the recording you listened to. Write
two sentences about things that are likely to happen if you join VW.

90

UNIT 4

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

11 In your notebook, rewrite the sentences below using may or might.


Example:
Its very possible that Ill go to the cinema this evening.
I may go to the cinema this evening.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

Its possible that Ill see you tomorrow.


Its possible that Ann will forget to book the tickets.
Its very possible that it will snow today.
Its very possible that David will work till late today.
Its very possible that Mary will not be at home tomorrow.
Its possible that they will go away for the weekend.
It is possible that you are right.

ORAL PRACTICE
12

45 Work in pairs to complete these dialogs. Match columns A and


B, and then Use may / might and the clues in the boxes. Check
with the recording.
call a taxi

go camping

get a new car

A
a. Where are you going
on vacation?
b. What are you doing on
the weekend?
c. When will you see
Ann again?
d. How are you getting
home after the theater?
e. What are you doing with
the money you won?

go to the south

see her next week

B
i. I havent decided yet.

, but the
one I like is very expensive.
ii. I dont know.
but the weather forecast is
not good.
iii. I dont know
iv. I'm not sure.
it's unlikely.
v. Im not sure.

,
.
;
.

13 Listen and practice the dialogs in Exercise 12 with a partner.

Choose one and add six more entries to the dialog. Use the
contents of this unit and your own ideas to add exchanges to the
dialog. Then, practice it with your partner and present it to the class.

14 Think about the advertisement you listened to and answer these


questions in your group. Compare answers with other groups.
a. What aspects do you agree with? Why?
b. What aspects dont you agree with? Why not?

91

LETS CHECK
15 In pairs, think about possible solutions for the problem in each

dialog. Write them down using the contents of this unit. Then, roleplay the situations with your partner.
(8 pts, 2 pts each)

a. A: My neighbor asked me to take care of her cat, but Im scared


of cats! What can I do?
.
B: I think
b. A: I havent seen Kelly at school for the last two weeks. Im
worried!
B: We

b. A: I cant sleep at night. I dont know what to do!


B: Well, you

d. A: You know, I have a friend at school who always asks me for


money. The problem is that he never remembers to pay
me back...
.
B: Mmm... I think
0-2
Keep trying!

3-4
Good!

5-6
Very good!

7-8
Excellent!

READING AND WRITING


16

If I Can Stop By

If I can stop one heart


from breaking;
I shall not live in vain.
If I can ease one life the
aching,
or cool one pain,
or help one fainting robin
onto his nest again;
I shall not live in vain.
Emily Dickinson

92

46 Read these two poems about voluntary work. One of them is


an Acrostic Poem. Find out what an Acrostic poem is and decide
which poem belongs to that category.

To Our Volunteers

By Lisa Ellinwood

V is for the very special people that you are,


O is for the overwhelming support & compassion you offer,
L is for the little things you do that make such a difference in
someone's life.
U is for the unspoken words that sometimes mean just as much,
N is for the need you fill,
T is for the time you give of yourselves,
E is for the emotional support you give.
E is also for the endless energy you all seem to possess,
R is for the responsibility you have taken on and never once complained,
S is for the smiles you bring.
Taken from: Poems and Invocations on Volunteering (Words to Inspire). (n.d.)
Retrieved April 22, 2013, from http://www.energizeinc.com/reflect/poem.html

UNIT 4

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

17 Organizing. Acrostic is a fun poetic form that anyone can write. Work
in pairs. You are going to write an acrostic poem about voluntary work
or any topic related to it. To plan your writing, brainstorm a list of
words or phrases that describe or remind you of the topic word.
(Some of them may start with the letters in your topic word).

18 Drafting. Use the words you brainstormed to help you write a draft
of your acrostic poem. It should be about the topic word and each
line should begin with a letter from the word.

19 Editing. Review your poem and make any changes you want.
20 Writing. Write a final version of your poem and memorize it.

Organize a poetry recital and recite the poem to your classmates.

If possible, or if you prefer, you can visit http://www.readwritethink.org/files/


resources/interactives/acrostic/ and follow the instructions on the website.

FAST LEARNERS
In your notebook, create a diagram with information related to voluntary
work. Include names of organizations in Chile, vocabulary from the
lesson and website links. Make sure you also include the pros and cons
of the different options to do voluntary work.

TAKE ACTION!
Work in groups. You are going to create an advertisement like
the one in the recording, giving five good reasons why people
should consider voluntary work.
a. Brainstorm your own ideas to favor voluntary work and vote
for the top five.
b. Write a list of the reasons that support your ideas.
c. Write five sentences about your ideas in a and b.
d. Create an advertisement with the title Why people should
consider voluntary work. Present it on a nice piece of paper,
add some art work and display it in your classroom.
e. If possible, record the advertisement and make your
classmates listen to it next class. If not, read it aloud to your
classmates.

26-33

Summer Voluntary Jobs

Volunteers
ONE MORE STEP
TOWARD EQUITY

For extra practice of Unit 4, complete the activities in the Workbook.

93

YOUR ENGLISH IN ACTION


1 Complete this application form to an international volunteer organization.

APPLY NOW!

We need volunteers

Personal Information
__________________________________________________________________________________________
First Name
Last Name
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Email
Phone Number
Mobile Phone
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Address
City
Region
Country
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Nationality
Date of birth
Gender (Male / Female)
Educational Background
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Level
School
Average grade
English Level () Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Other languages (please state level) __________

Personal Experience
Previous volunteer work and experience: _________________________________________________________
Additional skills (leadership experience, oral and written communication skills, IT knowledge, etc.): __________
________________________________________________________________________________
Previous travel experience and other interests: ____________________________________________________
Program Preferences
Choose One:
Volunteer Program: Short-term, more flexibility, no specific requirements.
Internship Program: Longer term, more customized, possible course credit.
Preferred Location in Latin America: _________________________________________________________
If other, please specify: _______________________________________________________________________
Do you have any allergies, dietary requirements, phobias, or other important living considerations?
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Parent/ Guardian information
__________________________________________________________________________________________
First Name
Last Name
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Email
Phone Number
Mobile Phone
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Address
City
Region
Country
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Nationality
Date of birth
Gender (Male / Female)

94

UNIT 4

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

2 You are going to prepare a leaflet with your group.


a. Find information about three volunteer organizations that offer work for teens.
b. Write a short text like the one in Lesson 1 to explain the objectives of each organization.
c. Choose one of them and prepare a leaflet promoting the organization. Add pictures or some
other visual material.
d. Display your leaflet in your classroom. You can also write it on a computer and upload it on
the class blog, if possible.

3 In pairs, create a dialog (about 8 entries) using the contents of this unit. Include the type of

voluntary work you could do, its advantages, the experience required and skills needed. Write
the dialog in your notebook using the pictures to help you. Then, practice it and present it in
front of the class.

95

UNIT CHECK
READING: TEEN JOBS OFFERED

47

TEEN JOBS OFFERED


I.
Looking for great teen jobs? With over 25,000 jobs around the country, youve come
to the right place! You can search by city or state, or you can even search by zip code
for a job. Once you find the right job for you, you can easily apply online. And if this is
your first time searching for jobs for teenagers, you can check out our resource center
for great tools and tips on how to get what you need.
II.
If youre thinking a typical teen job is working at the local burger joint, youve only got
a small piece of the picture. Teen jobs can include the typical burger joint job but
they can also include great jobs - jobs that give you some real world experience and
teach you career skills that can last a lifetime. Check out just a few ideas below:
III.
Interested in teaching as a career? Then tutoring students could make a great teen job.
How about a healthcare career? If so, you should check out the local hospital for job
opportunities. Just the experience of being in a hospital job can go far.
IV.
If youre interested in having fun at your job, you should seek out employers that do
what you love. For example, do you love pets? Then you should go to the local zoo
and soon youll be surrounded by some of the most interesting and exotic animals in
the world.
V.
Help make the world a better place by volunteering your time to one of the great
National Organizations, or for local opportunities, check out those provided by our
partner Volunteer Match. Youll gain valuable experience, make friends, and the best
part - youll make a difference!
When searching for a teen job, its easy to go after the typical ones but theres so
much out there. Learn new skills, discover your passions and help people! Got any
more ideas to add to our lists?
GrooveJob.com has dozens of great teen jobs for you. Whether youre looking for a
seasonal job or if youre interested in an opportunity during your summer break, just
type in your zip code below to find a great job made for teens!
Adapted from: Jobs for teens. (n.d.) Retrieved April 24, 2012,
from: http://www.groovejob.com/jobs/teen-jobs/

96

UNIT 4

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

1 Have a quick look at the text. What type of text is it?

1 pt.

a. A letter of application.
b. An advertisement.
c. An article from the Internet.

2 Read the text again. Locate these headings (a e) in the corresponding


paragraphs (I V). You can check with the recording.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

5 pts.

Career Related Jobs


Fun Jobs
Jobs for Teens
So what really defines a typical teen job?
Volunteer Job Opportunities

3 Copy this concept map in your notebook and complete it with information from
the text.

5 pts.

Teen Jobs
Types of jobs

Advantages of teen Jobs

LISTENING - VOLUNTEER JOBS FOR STUDENTS AND TEENS


4

48 Listen to the recording. Match the beginnings in column A (a - d) with the


endings in column B (i - v).

A
a. Habitat for Humanity
b. All volunteer applications
c. If you are interested in
becoming a volunteer
d. For any further questions

i.
ii.
iii.
iv.

4 pts.

B
are carefully screened.
needs short term volunteers.
please download an application form.
please contact the Volunteer
Program Manager.

48 Listen again and answer the following questions.

5 pts.

a. What is Habitat for Humanity?


b. What are the steps in the selection process?
c. What does the organization provide, if you are selected?

97

LANGUAGE
6 Fill in the gaps with the correct words in brackets.
a. They (can / might)
be away for the weekend but Im not sure.
go to Sheffield.
b. It is probable that he (might / should)
be a cooler day tomorrow, probably.
c. It (might / may)
be right, but it is not very likely.
d. You (can / might)

7 Complete these sentences giving advice and recommendations, using the


appropriate words and the verbs from the boxes.
arrive

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

read

thank

wear

3 pts.

5 pts.

write

If you want to find a job, you


the newspaper ads.
late for an interview.
You
a good CV.
You
jeans when you go to a job interview.
You
the interviewer at the end of the interview.
You

SPEAKING
8 In pairs, role play a telephone conversation applying for a voluntary job. Include all
these ideas in your dialog: type of voluntary work, requirements, dates, money,
and extra details.

8 pts.

WRITING
9 Catalina Lpez wants to apply to an international volunteer organization. Read

the notes about her and then write her letter of application. Follow the model on
Page 87.
Age:

Address:

Program:
Project:
Languages:
Interests:
Skills:

17
Los Molinos 8953, Quinta Normal, Santiago, Chile.
Wants to work for 4 weeks in January/February
during summer vacation.
Would prefer to work on an educational project in
Latin America.
Spanish (first language) and English
(intermediate level)
Likes music and arts.
Gets along well with people, has previous
experience working in teams.
0 - 12
Keep trying!

98

UNIT 4

13 - 24
Good!

25 - 36
Very good!

8 pts.

44 pts.
TOTAL
37 - 44
Excellent!

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

PROJECT
Newspaper ads
Communication and Ethics
1 Form groups of three students.

2 Organize yourselves to design a newspaper page with job and


volunteering advertisements. Use the Internet, encyclopedias
and what you have learned in Communication classes.

3 Include: different types of job ads and one advertisement


promoting voluntary work along the country.

4 Write a rough copy using all the information you gathered, your
own ideas and the vocabulary and language of this unit.

5 Decide on the images you want to include and organize the

information following the format of the classified section in a


newspaper.

6 Edit everything and type it on a sheet of paper or make a poster.


7 Display your work in the classroom.

Checklist
Reflect upon your project and check () under the correct column.
Very well

Well

Not so well

We followed the instructions carefully.


We collected information from different sources.
We distributed the tasks evenly among the group members.
We participated actively.
We were respectful of each others ideas and opinions.

99

COMMUNICATIVE TASKS FILE


UNIT

STUDENT LIFE

1 In pairs, describe the pictures using the expressions in the boxes. Then, discuss the questions
below, expressing your opinions and explaining your ideas.

a. These pictures show student life in the past and nowadays. Compare the two pictures and
answer: What similarities and differences can you identify? How has student life changed in
the last fifty years?
b. How is your school life different from that of your grandparents? Which positive and
negative aspects can you mention?

In the first picture, you can see


While in the second picture,

I believe
In my opinion,
I dont think
Things were different then because
They used to

They didnt use to

100

UNIT

CHALLENGES

1 In small groups, describe the pictures using the expressions in the boxes. Then, discuss the
questions below, expressing your opinions and explaining your ideas.

a. These pictures show extreme sports. Compare them and answer: What is each sport about?
What special equipment do you need?
b. Which extreme sport would you like to try? Why? Where could you practice it? How would
you train?
The first picture shows
Id rather try

And the second picture shows

This sport is ... because ...

In my opinion, ...

The third picture shows ...


You are supposed to

101

UNIT

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

1 In pairs, describe the pictures using the expressions in the boxes. Then, discuss the questions
below, expressing your opinions and explaining your ideas.

a. These pictures show modern paintings. Compare them and answer: How can you describe
each painting? What movement do you think they belong to? How do they make you feel?
b. Which painting would you like to have? Why? What message did the artist try to transmit?
The first painting shows
What I think is that

102

While the second painting shows


It belongs to

The third painting shows ...

This painting makes me feel

As far as I know

HOW ABOUT WORKING?

UNIT

1 In small groups, describe the pictures using the expressions in the boxes. Then, discuss the
questions below, expressing your opinions and explaining your ideas.

a. Both pictures show some voluntary work. Compare the two pictures and answer: What
non-profit-making associations do you know in Chile? What type of voluntary work do
they do?
b. How would you lend a helping hand? Which type of voluntary work would you do? Why?
In the first picture, you

can see

While in the second picture


What I think is that

As far as Im concerned

I would lend a helping hand in


I strongly believe that ...

103

THEMATIC INDEX
TOPICS
Past and present student life

10

Past and present pastimes

18

Extreme sports

36

Remarkable sportspeople

42

A Chilean remarkable sportsperson

46

TV programs and shows

58

Teens artistic works

64

Ekphrastic poetry

69

Voluntary organizations

82

Voluntary work

88

Acrostic poetry

92

LANGUAGE

104

Past habits (used to)

13

The Past Continuous

21

The Present Perfect

39

Expressing desires

44

Connectors besides, though, although

61

Reported speech

67

Expressing obligation and necessity (must, have to, need)

84

May and might to express future possibility

90

LANGUAGE REFERENCE
1 Past Simple
Affirmative
I
You
He
She
It
We
You
They
I
You
He
...

played volleyball.
ate fruit salad.

used to ride a bike.

Negative
I
You
He
She
It
We
You
They
I
You
He
...

didnt watch TV.

didnt use to swim.

Interrogative

Did

I
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

get up late
yesterday?

Did

I
You
He
...

use to run?

Yes, ... did.


No, ... didnt.

Yes, ... did.


No, ... didnt.

2 Past Continuous
Affirmative

Negative

I was doing homework.


You
were running.
We
They

I wasnt watching TV.


You
We werent talking.
They

He
She
It

He
She
It

was sleeping.

wasnt playing.

Interrogative
Was
Were

Was

I
You
We
They

eating?

Yes, ... was/were.


No, ...wasnt/
werent.

He
She
It

Time expressions often used with the past


Usually at the end of a sentence: . ago, yesterday, yesterday morning / afternoon /
evening, last night / Monday / week / month / year, etc., in 1980, etc,.

3 Present Perfect
Affirmative

Interrogative

Negative
Were

Was

I
You
We
They

seen the film?

He
She
It

swum in a lake?

Yes, ... have.


No, ... havent.
Yes, ... has.
No, ... hasnt.

Time expressions often used with the present perfect


Usually after the auxiliary: just, still, already, never, ever.
Usually at the end of a sentence: yet, lately, recently, for (period of time), since (point in
time or clause).

105

4 Past Simple
Direct Speech
Simple Present
He said: "I am happy."
Present Continuous
He said: "I'm looking for my keys."

Simple Past
He said that he was happy.
Past Continuous
He said that he was looking for his keys.

Simple Past
He said: "I visited New York last year."
Present Perfect
He said: " I've lived here for a long time. "
Past Continuous
He said: "I was playing football when the accident
occurred."

Past Perfect Simple


He said that he had visited New York the previous year.

Future Simple
He said: "I will open the door."
Future Going to

Conditional would
He said that he would open the door.

He said: "I am going to travel to Europe next


summer vacations."
Can
He said: "I can do it."
May
He said: "May I go out?"
Must / Have to
He said: "She must apply for the job."

Past Perfect
He said that he had lived there for a long time.
Past Perfect Continuous He said that he
had been playing football when the
accident had occurred.

Future in the past


He said that he was going to travel to Europe
the following summer vacations.
Could
He said that he could do it.
Might
He wanted to know if he might go out.
Had to
He said that she had to apply for the job.

today

that day

now

then
the day before; the week/month/year
before; ... days/months/years before

yesterday; last week/month/year; ...


days/months/years ago
tonight; tomorrow; next week/month/year
here
this; these
I ; my; me
we; our; us

106

Reported Speech

that night; the next/following day; the following week/month/year


there
that; those
he/she; his/her; him/her
they; their; them

5 Modal Verbs
1. Obligation
We use:
can must for strong obligations imposed by the speaker: I must revise for the exams.
have / has to for strong obligations imposed by someone other than the speaker: Do we
have to fill in this form?
2. Necessity
We use:
need to for strong obligations or necessity imposed by the someone other than the
speaker: You need to have a passport to travel abroad.
neednt for lack of necessity in the present or the future: You neednt get up early on
Saturdays.
3. Possibility
We use:
may and might to say that something is possibly true now or in the future: They arent at
home - they may / might be on holidays.
may not and might not to say that something is possibly not true now or in the future: He
may not / might not want to come with us because he is very tired.

6 Linking Words

besides introduces additional information.


although, even though and though introduce contrastive information.

107

VOCABULARY
Unit 1:
Student Life

Unit 2:
Challenges

Attend: to go to and be present at (some place).


Brake: a device for slowing or stopping a moving vehicle.
Clutch: a mechanism for connecting and disconnecting an
engine and the transmission system in a vehicle.
Dark: the absence of life in a place.
Dorm: a large bedroom for a number of people in a school
or institution.
Enlightened: informed, educated and cultured.
Field trip: a visit to a place that is made by students to
learn about something.
Gig: a light two-wheeled carriage pulled by one horse.
Hedge: a fence or boundary formed by closely growing
bushes or shrubs.
Inkwell: a container for ink.
Kid: child.
Knapsack: a soldiers or hikers bag with shoulder straps
carried on the back.
Ladder: an often portable structure consisting of two long
sides crossed by parallel rungs, used to climb up and
down.
Lean (v): be in or move from a vertical to a sloping
position; incline.
Mice: plural form of mouse.
Misfortune: bad luck.
Musket: a light gun with a small barrel.
Ordinary: with no special or distinctive characteristics;
normal.
Railway: a track made of steel where trains run.

Bouncy: something that moves up and down.


Disability: a condition (such as an illness or an injury) that
damages or limits a person's physical or mental abilities.
Disease: a condition that prevents the body or mind from
working normally; an illness.
Glide: move in a smooth, quiet, continuous motion; fly
without power.
Moved: having strong feelings or emotions.
Roller-coaster: a track in an amusement park that goes
up and down and that people ride for fun and excitement.
Spirit: the typical quality, attitude or mood of a person or
group.
Steep: something that rises and falls quickly, not gradually.
Steer: to control the direction in which something moves.
Strap: fasten or secure something with a strip of flexible
material.
Toggle: a small piece of wood, plastic, metal, etc., that is
pushed through a loop or hole to fasten one part of
something to another part.

Expressions
Red-poll: a brown bird with a red forehead.
Slam (v): push or put something somewhere with great
force.
Steering-wheel: a wheel that a driver rotates in order to
make the vehicle go in a particular direction.
Usher: an assistant teacher.

108

Expressions
Not have a clue: have no idea about something or how to
do something.
Get across: manage to communicate an idea clearly.
Feel at disadvantage: feel in an unfavorable position
relative to someone or something else.
Make history: do something that is remembered
in history.

Unit 3:
Arts and Entertainment

Unit 2:
How about working?

Bailout: the act of saving or rescuing something


(such as a business) from money problems.
Podcast: a digital audio or video file or recording that
can be downloaded from a website to a media player
or computer.
Spin-off: a television program, movie, book, etc., that is
based on characters from another television program,
movie, book, etc.
Uncanny: strange or mysterious.
Upscale: relating to the people with a lot of money.
Walk-off: a competition between fashion models.

Abroad: in or to a foreign country.


Developing: (of a country, etc.) that wants to become
more advanced socially and economically.
Insurance: a contract in which a company promises to
pay for medical service.
Placement: the act of finding an appropriate place for
someone to live, work or learn.
Rewarding: giving you a good feeling that you have done
something valuable or important.
Support: assistance, help.

Expressions
Cant stand: unable to tolerate someone or something;
dislike.
A couple of (years, days, people): an indefinite small
number of.
Far ahead of: too advanced or modern to be
understood or appreciated.
In the end: finally.

Expressions
Bring together: to create a situation in which people meet
and do something together.
Look forward to: to anticipate with pleasure or
satisfaction.
Make a difference: having a significant effect on a person
or situation.

109

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Websters New Explorer Vocabulary Skill Builder. (2008). In
Merriam-Webster Dictionaries. Springfield: Merriam-Webster.
Williams, P. (2014). The English Tenses Practical Grammar
Guide. Brighton: English Lessons Brighton.
Oxford Phrasal Verbs Dictionary (2006). Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press.
Idioms are Fun (2003). Delhi: Wilco Publishing House.
Proverbs are Fun (2003). Delhi: Wilco Publishing House.

RECOMMENDED READERS
Escott, J. (2008). Hanna and the Hurricane. Penguin Readers
Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
Rabley, S. (2008). Between Two Worlds. Penguin Readers,
Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
Rabley, S (2008). Billy and the Queen. Penguin Readers
Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
Rabley, S (2008). Dinos Day in London. Penguin Readers
Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
Rabley, S (2008). The Fine Boy. Penguin Readers Harlow,
Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
Rabley, S (2008). Flying Home. Penguin Readers Harlow,
Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
Rabley, S (2008). The Pearl Girl. Penguin Readers Harlow,
Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
Smith, R. (2008). The Last Photo. Penguin Readers Harlow,
Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

WEB PAGES

Unit 1: Student Life

http://www.esl-lab.com/
http://www.esldesk.com/esl-links/index.htm
http://www.languagegames.org/la/crossword/english.asp
http://www.esl.about.com/cs/listening/
http://www.sikids.com
http://www.gobartimes.org
http://www.englishlistening.com
http://www.tolearnenglish.com
http://www.focusenglish.com/dialogues/conversation.html
http://www.isabelperez.com
http://www.antimoon.com/how/pronunc-soundsipa.htm
http://www.english-online.org.uk/games/gamezone2.htm
http://www.longlongtimeago.com/

Robinson, K. (2009). The Element: How finding your passion


changes everything. New York: Penguin Books.
Thomas, D. & Brown, J.S. (2011). A New Culture of Learning:
Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change.
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.
Collins, A. & Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking Education in the
Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in
America. New York: Teachers College Press.

Unit 2: Challenges
Vujicic, N. (2010). Life Without Limits: Inspiration for a
Ridiculously Good Life. Colorado Springs: WaterBrook Press.
Dean, M. (2001). Extreme sports. Harlow: Pearson Education
Limited.
Witfeld, J. Gerling, I.E. & Pach, A. (2011). The Ultimate Parkour
& Freerunning Book: Discover Your Possibilities! Maidenhead:
Meyer & Meyer sport Ltd.

ADDITIONAL AUDIOVISUAL RESOURCES


http://www.ted.com/

Unit 3: Arts and


Entertainment
Caprio, M. (2013). Smart-Ography: Simple Tips on the Art of
Iphone and Android Photography (Kindle Edition). Booktango.
Edwards, R. (1996). Painted Bodies: By Forty-Five Chilean
Artists. New York: Abbeville Press.
Palmer, R. (2008). Street Art Chile. London: Eight Books.

Unit 4: How about Working?


Halpern-Felsher, B. (2009). Adolescent Decision Making: An
Overview. The Prevention Researcher 16(2), 3-7. Retrieved
from file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Admin/
Mis%20documentos/Downloads/16-2-Halper-E.pdf
Fetter, B. (2012). Being Visual: Raising a Generation of
Innovative Thinkers. Elgin: Grape Lot Press.
Gay, K. (2004). Volunteering: The Ultimate Teen Guide.
Lanham: Scarecrow Press.

111

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Lina Alvarado Jantus


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