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FINAL TRAINING REPORT

ALLIED NIPPON LIMITED


ANSHUMAN KUMAR
2011ME20767

Mechanical Engineering Department, IIT Delhi

Practical Training

Summer 2014

FORM A. Personal Information

1. Student particulars
Name Anshuman Kumar
Address Anupam House, B96 , Pocket 6

E-mail

NSG Sehkari Awas Samiti


Greater Noida, Gautam Budh Nagar
UP
anshumankumar.iitd@gmail.com

Blog

Entry no.
Program
Course
Tel (H)
Tel (M)
Tel
(other)
PIN

2011ME20767
BTech
P&I
7838634465
9868202415

Tel
Tel (M)
Email
FAX
PIN

+91 120 4539600

201308

2. About the organization


Name
Allied Nippon Limited
CEO name Mr NC Agarwal
Address
A 12, Site IV, Industrial Area

Blog

Sahibabad 201 010


District Ghaziabad
UP (India)
-

anl@alliednippon.com
+91-120 2896685
201010

3. Training program (weekwise)


Start date
Week no.

1
2
3
4

18-5-2015

From
18-5-2015
25-5-2015
01-5-2015
08-6-2015

Weekly off Sat, Sun

To
22-5-2015
29-5-2015
05-5-2015
13-6-2015

Working timings

11:00 AM to 7:00 PM 5 day working

Training assignment particulars


Introduction to plant operation, grinding, coating and packaging
Week with R&D department
Project related work
Project related work

4. Executive whom you report to


Name
Mr Sunil Tyagi
Designation AGM Operation
Address
A 12, Site IV, Industrial Area

Sahibabad 201 010


District Ghaziabad

Tel (W)
Tel (M)
Tel
(other)
FAX
Tel
(other)

+91 9899608874
-

PIN

122001

UP (India)
E-mail

suniltyagi@alliednippon.com

CONTENTS
- ABOUT ALLIED NIPPON LIMITED
- OBSERVATIONAL TRAINING OVERVIEW
- THE PRODUCTION LINE
- PLANT ASSESSMENT
o KEY STRENGTHS
o KEY PROBLEMS
- FINAL PROJECT
o PROJECT BACKGROUND & DESCRIPTION
o PROJECT SCOPE
o HIGH LEVEL REQUIREMENTS
o DELIVERABLES
o AFFECTED PARTIES
o METHODOLOGY
- SUMMARY & TEST RESULTS

ABOUT ALLIED NIPPON LIMITED

Allied Nippon Limited is a privately held company which was established as the result of a technical
collaboration with JBI for Brake Lining back in 1982. The consecutive years saw the setting up of a
manufacturing unit for Brake Lining, Brake shoes, Clutch facing and Brake blocks. The company has
been growing and evolving in the three decades that followed. A JV was signed with JBI somewhere
in the 1990s while the companys R&D center was approved by the Department of Scientific and
Industrial Research under Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of Indi in 1999.
More recently, the company has also ventured into production of Railway Brake Blocks in technical
collaboration with NABTESCO, Japan which led to commencement of the supply an indigenously
produced Railway Brake Blocks to Indian Railways.
2004 was an important year for allied Nippon as it saw the start of the production of commercial
vehicle disc brake pads. The company also established a new production line and ancillary facilities
for manufacture of Brake pads for Japanese OEM. In 2008, ANL became the first ever Indian company
to open a brake pad manufacturing plant at China.
Fast forward to the present day and we find that the company has established itself as a key player
in the selected business arena. Allied Nippons supremacy in this area is evident by their continued
commitment to the largest automotive companies and their respective OEMs as well as the presence
and wide acceptance of our own brand in the international market. Allied Nippon takes lead over
others with its development of new technologies through extensive research and trials. Accredited
by internationally recognized bodies, they meet global standards in production, quality and
technology. Beside safety, environmental protection is another important area for the company,
attended to as a priority.

OBSERVATIONAL TRAINING OVERVIEW

An entire week of my training was devoted to observational training.


This included guided tours of the various plant areas as well as independent observational
assignments. During this initial phase I was instructed to dedicate one or two days to each of the
major sub-plants and stations along the production line, namely:

Main mixer
Biscuit Mold
Back plate Cutting
Main Press
Slot grinder
Curing Ovens
Coating
Packaging Facility

THE PRODUCTION LINE

The brake pads manufactured at the plant follow a sequential process that starts at the mixers where
the main mixs ingredients are mixed together in pre-established proportions. The R&D wing supplies
the appropriate gravimetric numbers according to the product for which the mix is being made. The
major component in most of the brake pads that are aimed at national and international customers
have steel wool as a major component. In some brake pads however, especially those supplied to
local markets include asbestos as the major ingredient.
For commercials vehicles the process also include another major component known as the back-plate.
The plate is designed according to the specifications provided by the automobile manufacturers and
involves processes like blanking, punching, deburring and powder coating.
The brake pads are then subsequently manufactured by molding the mix into preforms. These are
essentially blocks of the mixture kept at a minimal pressure enough to ensure some rigidity. These
are then loaded into a hydraulic press which operates at a pressure of 2000 ppsi.
Once they have been given the time in the press as prescribed by the R&D department, the brake
pads are transferred to a curing oven where they stay for around 8 16 hours depending upon the
mix volume.
The pads, now rigid and ready to be ground are fed into a conveyor belt which runs them under a
grinding wheel. This process introduces a slot into the brake pad. This is done primarily for five
purposes:
i)
ii)
iii)
iv)
v)

The slot facilitates removal of the dust that is produced due to brake wear
In some models, it serves as a set for the wear detection lead
It allows the heat to escape better ( increased surface area )
Provides allowance for expansion
Prevents partial failure

These brake pads are then forwarded to product specific packaging lines. Some of these pads are
powder coated with a disc cleaning agent which facilitates suitable mating of the brake pad with the
disc.

PLANT ASSESSMENT

Key Strengths

5.1.1 KAIZEN
The word Kaizen is a Japanese word which means good change. All around the plant, I was made
aware of numerous examples of Kaizen implementation where the management and the workers had
come together to implement small changes in the fixtures/work methodology/ emergency protocol
to make the functioning of the plant smoother. To me the most elegant solutions were those
implemented to facilitate efficient collection of grinding dust. Most of these are seen in the form of
minute changes to the dust collection network which flows through the entire plant and is latched to
all machines involved with the grinding process. This dust is then used again in the mixture and makes
for a significant part of the mold mixture. The company seems to have been highly influenced, as far
as the developmental and improvement strategy goes, by its technical collaborators and is making
plant level efforts to implement their suggestions and methodology.
5.1.2 5 s
5S is the name of a workplace organization method that uses a list of five Japanese words:
seiri, seiton, seiso, seiketsu, and shitsuke. Transliterated or translated into English, they all start with
the letter "S". There are five primary 5S phases: They can be translated as Sort, Systematize, Shine,
Standardize and Self-Discipline. The method describes how to organize a work space for efficiency
and effectiveness by identifying and storing the items used, maintaining the area and items, and
sustaining the new order. The decision-making process usually comes from a dialogue about
standardization, which builds understanding among employees of how they should do the work. The
managements emphasis on the implementation of this system was quite impressive and this has in
turn led to a variety of short term benefits.
5.1.3 Worker Motivation

The ANL plant in its entirety has a number of mechanisms in its framework which promote labour
cooperation and enthusiasm. A dedicated Fairness Committee, an Open door policy, worker
counselling services and incentives for quality of work are among the few things that I found
particularly positive for worker morale. The managers are responsible for nominating at least one
worker everyday as the Star Worker of the Day who if selected on the plant level, is suitably
rewarded.
The management lays special emphasis on reduction of disputes. I also witnessed a very convivial
relationship between some of the permanent workers and the manager. Tea time breaks are often a
time where the entire team, including workers and managers alike sit together and discuss each
others small issues.

Key Problems
5.1.3 Excess Movement
The layout of the plant struck me as a fairly inefficient one. The production line curves in and
around rooms at multiple floors and buildings. A lot of the material flow that happens right now is
highly inefficient as special personnel have been employed for that sole purpose. The management
however is aware of the situation and upon raising the issue, the reasons were very obvious. Fact is
that the current plant area is 300% of what it was twenty years ago and each time a new piece of
land was acquired around the old plant, the system became more and more complicated. Plans of
bringing the entire plant under one roof are currently under consideration and will hopefully be
implemented soon.

FINAL PROJECT

6.1

PROJECT BACKGROUND AND DESCRIPTION

As an intern in the plant, it took me a fair deal of time to understand the ongoing production and
planning processes. The problem statement that I've identified is a simple one.
The brake pads being manufactured at Allied Nippon are all exposed to certain quality tests which
ensure their proper functioning under a majority of all possible usage scenarios. These include:
1.) Hardness-50 to 100 HRR
2.) Specific Gravity-2.65 to 3.10
3.) Mold thickness must be .5mm more than standard thickness prescribed for that part
A new initiative by the R&D branch shows that these properties are achieved satisfactorily when the
press operates between certain pressure ranges.
This initiative explores the possibility of making pressure (and not compression distance achieved)
the operating parameter for all the operating presses as this could possibly ensure a better quality
as well as drastically reduce the machining tolerance required.

6.2

PROJECT SCOPE

Objective: To achieve higher cost efficiency in brake pad production by manipulating pressure and
time in press of various brake pad variants instead of the compression stroke and hence saving on
the volume of mix required to create a suitable tolerance.

6.3

HIGH-LEVEL REQUIREMENTS

It was established that the new set of process parameters should ensure the following:

Quality: The products produced must conform to the pre-established quality standards:
Hardness-50 to 100 HRR
Specific Gravity-2.65 to 3.10
Mold thickness must be .5mm more than standard thickness prescribed for that part
The pressure applied should be within the operating range of the existing presses.
Overall cost effectiveness
Low investment if possible

6.4

DELIVERABLES

The project aims to deliver tweaks in the way production processes associated with brake pads at
ANL are parametrized so as to achieve:

Reduced instances of defected product instances


Direct material cost reduction
Shift of variable pressure from temperature and pressure to just time

6.5 AFFECTED PARTIES

Press Operators

Shop floor Management

Quality Control Department

Downstream Process Chain stakeholder e.g. Grinding, curing, packaging etc.

Downstream supply Chain Stakeholders e.g. Suppliers of various ingredients, Customers of


Allied Nippon Limited etc.

6.6

METHODOLOGY

In order to better understand the problem and ensure that my suggestion were in coherence with
what is required to solve the problem the opinion of all stakeholders was considered. All members
of the management team were interviewed and opinion was sought from workers as well. It was
evident that changing the pressure and press temperature were activities that involve heavy setup
time as sometimes the dies needed to be given time in order to stabilize at the new temperature.
However, time inside the press was something that required no setup at all and could be readily
altered. After a preliminary analysis of the problem, some important aspects of the issue were
realized. A very basic barrier to the implementation of the new system was that changing the
parameters of the process would require some R&D work on the material parts and this would
essentially have to be started from scratch.
As is evident, a large volume of destructive testing would be required in order to establish the
required empirical correlations between the mix volume and the time in press. The operators
however felt that this one time investment would allow them to operate at a better efficiency and
by all means if a system based on this principle was put in place, it would make their life much
easier. It all comes down to proving the cost effectiveness of the solution.

SUMMARY & TEST RESULTS

Keeping in mind the pros and cons of the above mentioned ideas, and with the advice of my
internship coordinator, iterations were carried out at parameters calculated by the R&D
department for selected products representative of various product families.
The savings achieved have been tabulated below.

SAVING IN MIX BY FINE TUNING IN CV MOLDING 20/04/15


(R&D) MIX
WEIGHT
(grm.)

(AFTER) MIX
WEIGHT (grm.)

PART NO.
PRODUCE
IN APRIL

SAVING
IN MAIN
MIX IN
KG

SAVING
IN
UNDER
LAYER
IN KG

MAIN
MIX

U/L M4

MAIN
MIX

U/L M4

DIFF IN
MAIN MIX

DIFF
IN U/L

ACV-014

1120

210

1080

170

40

40

1840

73.6

73.6

ACV-016

700

100

680

100

20

320

6.4

ACV-017

900

170

880

170

20

280

5.6

ACV-029

1150

210

1080

170

70

40

280

19.6

11.2

ACV-032

470

70

1656

33.12

630

100

70
100

20

ACV-038-I

450
550

80

800

64

ACV-043

760

150

730

150

30

3080

92.4

ACV047

800

150

800

150

2640

ACV048

790

150

770

150

20

640

12.8

ACV050

660

110

660

100

680

ACV-055

1070

190

1040

170

30

20

3940

118.2

78.8

ACV-058

1200

210

1170

200

30

10

8680

260.4

86.8

ACV-059

830

150

800

150

30

640

19.2

ACV-060

770

120

710

120

60

1200

72

ACV-061

750

150

720

150

30

2960

88.8

ACV-062

900

170

900

170

7640

ACV-063

1090

190

1000

180

90

10

1600

144

16

ACV-065

760

150

720

150

40

3200

128

ACV-066

950

170

920

170

30

640

19.2

ACV-075(o)

630

100

600

100

30

1250

37.5

ACV-077

750

150

720

150

30

2920

87.6

ACV-078

1000

210

1000

200

10

3400

34

ACV-080

1120

200

280

16.8

1000

170

200
170

60

ACV-081

1060
930
MAIN
MIX
RATE /
KG

70

19.6

DM06

NAO503M

ULM4

280
WEIGHT IN
KG

2319.02

744.4

115

111

85

VALUE IN Rs

266687

TOTAL VALUE IN Rs

63274
329961