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Venus

Step by Step Guide


Chapter 1
Layering-technique

Contents

Introduction

Aesthetic composite restorations:


General information

Aesthetic composite restorations:


Anterior teeth

Case
Case
Case
Case

studies anterior teeth


A
B
C

6
12
16

Aesthetic composite restorations:


Posterior tooth region

21

Case studies posterior teeth


Case D
Case E

22
27

Annex
Shade selection
Preparation
Adhesion
Polymerisation
Finishing and polishing

32
33
34
35
36

References

37

Venus indications
Venus shades
Venus product outline

38
38
39
3

Introduction

Heraeus Kulzer invests in research and development of dental


products since many years. Venus is the result of all experience
gained in the development of light-curing composites.
Excellent aesthetics are not simply a matter of chance or timeconsuming trial and error with Venus. The excellent handling
properties, Color Adaptive Matrix, and 2Layer shade system
of Venus produce excellent aesthetics easily, quickly and reliably.
All products from Heraeus Kulzer are developed in cooperation
with universities worldwide. Only this continuous scientic
discussion allows the perception of the necessities of dentists and
patients and the study of the right solutions to these growing
demands.

Out of this originates the formative proposal from Heraeus Kulzer


and the University of Brescia in Italy. Professor Antonio Cerutti,
responsible for the Department of Conservative Dentistry, and
his staff consented to build an informative document that allows
you to go step by step into the details of the restorative dentistry.
Aesthetics are nowadays a primary request from patients in all
dental specialities. To combine a result that is aesthetically
suitable to the patient with the necessary functionality and
longevity of a restoration, requires a deep knowledge of various
ambits: adhesion, stratication, colour, polymerisation, nishing
and polishing.
The Venus Step by Step Guide supplies in a simple, quick
and intuitive way all those concepts that will lead to appreciable
improvements in the clinical day-to-day work.
Thank you for your attention and loyalty,
Heraeus Kulzer

Aesthetic composite restorations:


General information

Preparation
The surface of the teeth, which will be treated, should be cleaned
with a uoride-free prophylaxis paste and the tartar removed,
if necessary. The colour should be selected on the still hydrated
teeth. All needed indications for this procedure will be provided in
a following chapter of this guide. For the moment, only the Venus
shade guide made of original material will be used for shade
selection.
Before starting the restoration, a rubber dam should be placed to
guarantee the work in a place free of humidity (the greatest enemy
of adhesive materials and composites), a greater concentration on
the operating eld, and the highest level of safety for the patient.
The restorations should recreate the portion of the dental tissue
lost due to decay, erosion or trauma. It is therefore very important
to remove the damaged or unsteady tissues (undermined enamel).
In the same way, in the case of previous llings, whether in
amalgam or composite, the old restoration has to be removed and
the remaining natural structure controlled.

Filling materials shrink during the polymerisation process due to


their material properties. Davidson introduced the C-factor concept. He dened it as the ratio between free and bonded surfaces
of a restoration: the greater the number of walls connected by an
increment of composite, the more stress accumulated on the
tooth; a class I will therefore be much more unfavourable than a
class II. To avoid such a problem, a micro-incremental technique
and particular measures will be introduced in this chapter of the
Venus Step by Step Guide.

Aesthetic composite restorations:


Anterior teeth

For anterior restorations it is suggested, when possible, to take


an impression and make a study model of the mouth situation.
A diagnostic wax-up, which enables the control before and after
the treatment and the discussion of the therapy with the patient,
should be prepared on this model. A silicone guide mask can
be prepared on the wax-up, which will be helpful for rebuilding
the palatal or lingual surfaces (Case A) and incisal edges.
After placing the rubber dam, it should be checked if the preparation of the incisal edges complies with the adhesion dictates.
Subsequently, the chosen adhesive system can be applied
according to manufacturers instructions. A later chapter of the
Venus Step by Step Guide will directly deal with the details of
the adhesion process.

The restoration should be then completed with a sequence of


enamel and incisal masses. During these last shaping the
transition lines and a portion of the surface texture should be
dened.
Each single layer of composite has to be cured by using a
polymerisation lamp (e.g. Translux Power Blue). In the chapter
concerning polymerisation further details of the available lamps
and operational protocols will be described.
Finally, after having removed the rubber dam, the occlusion test,
nishing and polishing follow.

The silicone guide mask should be positioned in the mouth and


its borders followed so as to stratify a thin, translucent layer
(shades T1, T2 or T3), which reproduces the palatal/lingual surface.
Being an extremely translucent mass, the thickness of the layer
has to be carefully controlled to avoid taking space away from
the dentine mass.
If the situation does not allow the approach with a silicone mask
(Case B), the rst layer has to be applied starting from the bottom
of the cavity. When the use of a dentine mass is needed, the
shaping should be conducted according to the precise anatomic
structure highlighted from the adjacent teeth.

Case studies anterior teeth


Case A

This young girl has two discolored restorations on


the central upper incisors. Our aim is to restore the
teeth using an anatomical stratication with
composite.

Colour deterioration in
old llings on the central
upper incisors.
The shade is selected.
A silicone guide mask
is fabricated based on
the diagnostic wax-up
to ensure the best
occlusal alignment.
The teeth are then
isolated with a rubber
dam.

Case studies anterior teeth | Case A

The old restorations are


removed.
The margins are prepared with a diamond
ball bur to produce a
microchamfer.
The adhesive system
is applied according
to the manufacturers
instructions.

The silicone guide


mask is put in position and checked for
accurate t in relation
to the adjacent teeth.
A clear matrix is
placed between the
teeth to optimise the
reconstruction of the
interproximal zones.

Case studies anterior teeth | Case A

The palatal layer is


modelled directly
against the silicone
guide mask using a
translucent composite
(e.g. T1) to mimic the
palatal enamel.
The composite
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

Opaque dentine (e.g.


OA2) is applied on top
of the palatal increment. This increment
will mimic the typical
incisal edge of the
upper incisors. If the
defect is large, more
increments will be
needed.
Each increment
is polymerised for
40 seconds.

Case studies anterior teeth | Case A

7
The interproximal wall
is reconstructed in
translucent composite
(in one or more increments) using the clear
matrix to help recreate
the characteristics of
the natural tooth.

Incisals are individualised and, if necessary,


effect colours are used
to recreate the amber
or bluish zone.

Each increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

Case studies anterior teeth | Case A

Desaturation begins
by applying layers of
enamel starting with
the deeper colours
(e.g. A3) in the middle
third and progressing
to lighter colours (e.g.
A1) in the incisal third.
It is very important
to sculpt the correct
shape during this
stage.
Each increment is
polymerised.

10

The last layer of


translucent material
(e.g. T1) is applied to
simulate the vestibular
enamel.
The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.
Once the restoration of
tooth 1.1 is completed,
tooth 2.1 is restored
using the same
methods.

Case studies anterior teeth | Case A

10

The supercial microgeography is recreated


using diamond burs.
The restorations are
polished with diamond
burs of decreasing size
and silicone polishers
on low speed micromotors.
After removing the
rubber dam, the functional and aesthetic
properties of the restorations are checked.

11

Case studies anterior teeth


Case B

Restorations of class III cavities in the lower


incisors are a challenge, as a number of increments of composite have to be applied in a
small space.

Class III caries lesion


in 3.1 and serious
discolouring of a previous restoration in 4.1.
The shade is selected.
The operative eld is
isolated with a rubber
dam.

12

Case studies anterior teeth | Case B

The old discoloured


restorations are
completely removed
using rotary and hand
instruments to expose
the healthy dental
tissue, and the
marginal nishing lines
(microchamfer) are
established.
The cavities are
rinsed.
The tissues are
conditioned with
an adhesive system
according to the
manufacturers
instructions.

The rst increment of


composite material is
opaque (e.g. OA2) to
mimic the base dentine
colour. This increment
must be the same
size and shape as the
original dentine tissue.
If the defect is very
wide, the composite
may have to be applied
in several increments.
Each individual
increment should be
polymerised for
40 seconds.

13

Case studies anterior teeth | Case B

The characteristic incisal edges are formed


and ssures applied
to the enamel. If effect
colours are to be used,
they are applied now.
Each increment is
polymerised.

Colour desaturation
is the next step with
enamel shades,
starting from darker
shades (e.g. A3) and
progressing to lighter
shade composites
(e.g. A1).
Each increment is
polymerised.
The last increment
consists of a translucent composite
(e.g. T1) to join the
middle third to the
interproximal zones;
it should be remembered that the incisal
edge of lower incisors
is typically translucent.
The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

14

Case studies anterior teeth | Case B

The restoration is
nished and polished.
Once the rubber dam
has been removed,
occlusal marking paper
is used to check that
the correct relationship
between reconstruction
and function has been
achieved.

15

Case studies anterior teeth


Case C

The two central incisors appear discoloured;


they had previously been restored with composite
after trauma. Our aim is to restore the aesthetics
of both teeth using direct restorations in composite.

Discoloration of the two


upper central incisors
with previous trauma and
composite restorations.
The shade is selected.
The operative eld is
isolated with a rubber
dam.

16

Case studies anterior teeth | Case C

Both teeth had


received endodontic
treatment in two earlier
sessions.
The old discoloured
restorations are
completely removed
with rotary instruments
to expose healthy
dental tissue and the
marginal nishing
(microchamfer)
is established.

The cavities are rinsed


and the adhesive
system applied according to the manufacturers instructions.
The post is cemented
inside the canal using
dual-cure cement
in accordance with
normal adhesive
dentistry practice.

On the most badly


damaged tooth (1.1)
the canal cavity is prepared for subsequent
cementing of a glass
bre post to increase
the area of adhesion.

17

Case studies anterior teeth | Case C

The rst increment


of opaque composite
(e.g. OA2) is applied,
to mimic the dentine
basal colour. If the
defect is very extensive, the composite
should be applied in
several increments.
Each increment
is polymerised for
40 seconds.

18

Supercial characterizations or ssures are


applied to the incisal
edge using effect
colours, if appropriate.
The restoration is
polymerised.

Case studies anterior teeth | Case C

Colour desaturation
is the next step with
enamel shades, starting with darker shades
(e.g. A3) and progressing to lighter shade
composites (e.g. A1).

The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

Each increment is
polymerised.

The palatal surface of


tooth 2.1 is restored
following the same
steps used to reconstruct 1.1.

The last increment


consists of translucent
composite (e.g. T1)
to join the middle third
to the interproximal
zones.

The interproximal
zones are nished using
hand instruments.

19

Case studies anterior teeth | Case C

The restoration is
nished and polished.
Once the rubber dam
has been removed,
occlusal marking paper
is used to check that
the correct relationship
between reconstruction
and function has been
achieved.

20

Aesthetic composite restorations:


Posterior tooth region

In the case of a restoration in posterior teeth, the rst thing to


do is to decide whether the situation requires a direct or indirect
solution. A simple rule says that a direct restoration should be
placed, when the loss of inter-cusped tissue is less than one third
of the tooth. When the lost of tissue lays between one third and
one half, there is the possibility to choose between direct and
indirect restorations. And when the loss is greater than one half
an indirect restoration is needed.

Once the new wall has been completed, the rebuilding of the
cavity can be conducted as if it were an occlusal lling (Case D).
First a layer of ow composite (e. g. Venus ow) is applied at the
bottom of the cavity and spread using a probe. The purpose
of this step is to create a uniform liner without air bubbles that
guarantees the best possible contact with the adhesive and acts as
a loading damper. The layer of ow composite should be extremely
thin to not compromise the restorations mechanical properties.

Modern adhesive techniques and composites enable an application beyond this rule (e.g. cusp build-up) as already observed in
several clinical cases.

Now the layering of dentine and enamel masses can be started.


To offset the contraction caused by polymerisation, the composite
is placed in angles, in other words, by starting to place small
increments in triangular shape; two walls will be in contact with
the polymerised composite and the natural tooth, while the third
will be free counteracting the unfavourable C-factor. In this way
the tensions on the tooth can be reduced as the contraction develops towards the centre of the mass.

In preparing a direct restoration rubber dam should be placed,


the compromised tissue removed and the cavity prepared as
mentioned. Once the adhesive system is applied, the real restoration can be started.
The missing mesial or distal surfaces should be restored rst in a
class II restoration (Case E). The stratication should begin from
the margin for a better control of the contact area. A pre-adapted
metallic matrix and a balsa wedge should be placed to guarantee
the best continuity with the walls of the remaining tooth structure
and to create a proper contact area with the adjacent tooth. A thin
wall is applied with incisal shades until the height of the occlusive
area. The approximal surface and the contact area are controlled
with a dental oss after removing the matrix (leaving the wedge to
avoid bleedings). The operation should be carried out at this point,
because the wall can be quickly destroyed and rebuilt, if there
should be any errors.

Characterizations, if needed, and incisal masses should be placed


to end the restoration. To close, the occlusion is checked and the
restoration nished and polished.

21

Case studies posterior teeth


Case D

An old amalgam vestibular/occlusal restoration


that presents leakage and secondary caries.
The latest generation composite materials can
replace amalgam even in posterior sectors, improving the aesthetic properties and maintaining
optimum biomechanical characteristics.

22

Leaking of an amalgam
restoration in 3.6.
The shade is selected.
The morphology and
occlusion are assessed
before isolating the
operative eld. The
tooth involved is isolated with a rubber
dam (the restoration
will not involve the
interproximal zone,
so we can isolate the
single tooth and not
the whole sextant).

Case studies posterior teeth | Case D

The amalgam lling is


removed with a multiuted bur mounted on
a turbine, ultrasonic
scaling tips and hand
instruments, to minimize the amount of
healthy dental tissue
sacriced.

The rst translucent


increment of composite (e.g. T1) is
applied to seal the
vestibular surface of
the cavity perimeter.
The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

Caries detecting solution can be used to


ensure that all carious
tissue is removed.
The marginal nishing
line (microchamfer)
is established with a
012 ball bur mounted
on a turbine.
Tissues are then
hybridized with an
adhesive system
following the
manufacturers
instructions.

23

Case studies posterior teeth | Case D

The rst translucent


increment of composite
(e.g. T1) is applied to
seal the vestibular
surface of the cavity
perimeter.
The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

The stratication
begins with a horizontal increment of
opaque composite
(e.g. OA2) that helps
to mimic the colour
of the tooth to be
reconstructed. If the
cavity is very wide, it
is better to apply this
composite in several
increments.
Each individual
increment is
polymerised for
40 seconds.

24

Case studies posterior teeth | Case D

In order to desaturate
the colour, rst a
darker shade composite (e.g. A3.5) and
then lighter shades of
composite (e.g. A1)
are applied.
Increments are applied
in triangles in order
to reduce stresses on
the cavity walls due to
polymerization shrinkage and to allow better
anatomical modelling.

Stratication concludes
with the application
of a thin increment of
translucent composite
(e.g. T1) along the
edge of the cavity and
along the rst part of
the cuspal surface.
The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

Each increment is
polymerised.

25

Case studies posterior teeth | Case D

The restoration is then


nished and polished.
Once the rubber dam
has been removed,
occlusal marking paper
is used to check that
the correct relationship
between reconstruction
and function has been
achieved.

26

Case studies posterior teeth


Case E

Recurrence of caries in this upper molar, which


had previously been lled using amalgam; the
treatment plan is to remove the old restoration and
replace it with a composite lling.

Recurrence of caries in
tooth 2.6, previously
restored with amalgam.
The shade is selected.
The morphology and
occlusion are assessed
before isolating the
operative eld.
The tooth involved is
isolated with a rubber
dam (as the interproximal walls have to be
restored, the adjacent
teeth will have to be
isolated as well as the
tooth itself).

27

Case studies posterior teeth | Case E

The amalgam lling is


removed with a multiuted bur mounted on
a turbine, ultrasonic
scaling tips and hand
instruments, to minimize the amount of
healthy dental tissue
sacriced.
Caries detecting solution can be used to
ensure that all carious
tissue is removed.
The marginal nishing
line (microchamfer)
is established with a
012 ball bur mounted
on a turbine.
Tissues are then
hybridized with an
adhesive system
following the
manufacturers
instructions.

28

A sectional or ring
matrix is put in position
and xed with a balsa
wedge so that it ts
tightly against the
cervical margin and
the contact area.
The rst vertical increment of translucent
composite (e.g. T1) is
applied to reconstruct
the interproximal wall;
particular care must
be taken to avoid any
gaps in the cervical
margin seal.

Case studies posterior teeth | Case E

The increment is
polymerised for 20
seconds.
The next increment of
translucent composite
completes the reconstruction of the interproximal wall, extending it to the height
of the marginal crest.
The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

The matrix is removed


(not the wedge, to
avoid bleeding) and
dental oss is used to
check that there is
sufcient contact area.
If this is not the case,
the increments applied
must be removed, the
matrix must be repositioned and the interproximal wall must be
reconstructed.
A layer of about
0.5 mm of Venus ow
is then applied and
spread with a probe
to eliminate any air
bubbles.
The layer is
polymerised.

29

Case studies posterior teeth | Case E

Stratication begins
with a horizontal increment of opaque composite (e.g. OA2) that
helps to mimic the
colour of the tooth to
be reconstructed. If the
cavity is very wide, it
is better to apply this
composite in several
increments.
Each individual increment is polymerised for
40 seconds.

In order to desaturate
the colour, rst a
darker shade composite (e.g. A3.5) and
then lighter shades of
composite (e.g. A1)
are applied.
Increments are applied
in triangles in order
to reduce stresses on
the cavity walls due to
polymerization shrinkage and to allow better
anatomical modelling.
Each increment is
polymerised.

30

Case studies posterior teeth | Case E

A thin increment of
translucent composite
(e.g. T1) is applied
along the edge of the
cavity and along the
rst part of the cuspal
surface.
The increment
is polymerised for
20 seconds.

The restoration is
nished and polished.
Once the rubber dam
has been removed,
occlusal marking paper
is used to check that
the correct relationship
between reconstruction
and function has been
achieved.

31

Annex

Shade selection:
Natural teeth are made of various kinds of tissue, which strongly
differ aesthetically and optically wise. Dentine, for instance, is
duller when compared to enamel. It is therefore clearly difcult
to restore the original optical properties of a tooth using only one
material when the cavity preparation involves both dentine and
enamel.
The shade selection is to be done before placing the rubber dam.
Once isolated the dental elements structures tend to dehydrate,
what makes the tooth appear more shiny and opaque than normally.
Consequently, just after removing the rubber dam, the restoration
appears darker and too translucent, even if the composite masses
had been properly selected.
A nal evaluation of the combination of masses and layers can
only be done a few days after having completed the restoration;
the composite materials attain their denite optical properties only
after the tooth has been rehydrated.
The shade selection should be done under daylight keeping in mind
that not only the interested tooth but also the adjacent ones have
to be observed. The dentine shade should be selected based on the
mid and cervical thirds of the tooth of concern.

32

At the end, the level of translucence should be dened. A reconstruction will be able to achieve the highest aesthetical level
only if dentine, enamel and translucent incisal shades are used.
An appropriate incisal shade can be selected by determining the
translucency of the incisal third of the tooth. When necessary,
the level of translucency can be changed by using supercial
characterisation (e.g. Cre-active) under the last translucent layer.

Preparation:
The penetration capacity of uid resins or adhesives into the
conditioned dental structures enable the optimisation of the
materials micromechanic linkage and thus the reconstructions
resistance.
The nishing of the margins allows extending the surface to
mordant with acid agents and therefore increases the linkage
between composite and dental structure.

At the cervical level manual instruments should be used, because


it is difcult to use the rotating instrument oriented at 45 without
causing dents. Deep class II cavities are the most difcult area.
Here at least 1 mm must be left before the amelo-cement junction
to assure the success of a direct restoration (a marginal nishing
at 90 should be avoided to decrease the risk of fracture).

Internal corners and sharp angles should be rounded off. The


direction of the enamels prisms which, during their centrifugal
growth, place themselves in a radial manner as regards to the
tooths axe, should also be considered. If the cavity wall shows
prisms directed transversally with respect to their axe, they will be
very resistant to traction. If, instead, the cavity wall shows prisms
directed in a parallel direction with respect to their axe, their
resistance to traction will be low.
Therefore, the marginal preparation should be done using a
45 oriented chamfer or a microchamfer (nishing ball bur 012
diameter) so as to transversally cut the prisms.

33

Adhesion:
Adhesion is a physical concept, which foresees interaction between two elements, the adhesive and the adherent, through an
interface. In the case of amalgam llings the restoration maintains
a macro-retention relation with the tooth. Restorations based on
the adhesion principle show a reversed concept: a micro-retention
to the tooth is achieved. The extension and shape of the cavity are
in strict correlation with the decayed tissue to be removed. A large
quantity of healthy dental tissue is therefore preserved.
The adhesive systems can be classied according to the approach
in treating dentinal mud (or smear layer). The rst is intended
to fully remove the smear layer through a simultaneous acid conditioning of enamel and dentine (total-etch), while the second
tends to modify the same dentinal mud by incorporating it into the
dentines resin impregnation process.
Both so-called three-steps adhesives (e.g. Gluma Solid Bond)
and those two-steps adhesives (e.g. Gluma Comfort Bond) are
a part of the rst group and differ one another for the association
or not of primer and bonder.
In the second group instead, we can distinguish the so-called
self-etching primers and the new self-etching adhesives or
all-in-one bondings (e.g. iBond). These adhesive systems do
not remove the smear layer but modify it.

34

Polymerisation:
Composites are made of a resin matrix with scattered lling
particles. Resins are monomers, which, following a proper phototreatment, reach their nal mechanical properties through
polymerisation. The photo-polymerisation process is therefore
very delicate and important in order to achieve a good
predictability of the restoration.
It is always recommended to observe the composite
manufacturers instructions and polymerisation times.
Polymerisation times for Venus and Venus ow are:

A1, A2, A3, A3.5,


B1, B2, C2, D2,
T1, T2, T3, SB1,
SB2, HKA2.5

Curing time with


halogen or LED
curing light

20 seconds

A4, B3, C3, C4,


D3, OA2, OA3,
OA3.5, OB2, OC3,
OD2, SBO, HKA5,
Baseliner

Curing time with


halogen or LED
curing light

40 seconds

All shades

Maximum layer
thickness

2 mm

35

Finishing and polishing:


The nishing step, for removing composite excesses and modelling the anatomic shape, is done using ne grain diamond burs
mounted on a turbine.
It is important to work at a low number of revolutions to avoid
damaging the composites resin matrix, which would turn opaque.
During the same operational phase a correct replication of the
macro- and micro-surface texture and tooths morphology should
be achieved.
The polishing stage will follow, paying attention to the supercial
micro-morphology of the restoration. Pre-polishing is conducted
with coarse and thin grain points, polishing with silicone rubber
polishers to achieve a high gloss surface (e.g. iPol). All the
polishing processes should be carried out under a powerful air or
water jet to avoid overheating of the tooth.
Once polishing is completed, uid resin (bonding agent) can be
applied on the restoration, spread using a soft air jet, and
cured for 20 seconds. This allows sealing possible cracks caused
by polymerisation contraction and enables a full cure of the
last composite layer.

36

At the specic chapter we will deal in detail with different instruments and techniques to be used during the nishing and
polishing process, highlight the differences between nishing of
anterior and posterior teeth, and the importance of a proper
polishing for both aesthetical and microbiological integration
reasons.

References

Davidson CL, de Gee AJ. Relaxation of polymerization contraction


stresses by ow in dental composites. J Dent Res 1984;63:
146 148
Ernst C-P. Komposit als Hckerersatz. DZW 6/06:10 11
Feilzer AJ, De Gee AJ, Davidson CL. Setting stress in composite
resin in relation to conguration of the restoration. J Dent Res
1987;66:16361639
Grandini R, Rengo S, Strohmenger L. Odontoiatria Restaurativa.
Ed. UTET (To) 1999
Roberson T, Heymann HO, Swift EJ. Sturdevants Art and Science
of Operative Dentistry. Ed. Elsevier 2006
Vanini L, Mangani F. Il Restauro Conservativo dei Denti Anteriori.
Ed. Promodent 2003

Conception:
Raquel Neumann
Heraeus Kulzer GmbH

37

Venus indications

Indication
Class I cavities

Venus

Venus shades

Venus ow

(not subject to chewing pressure)

Class II cavities

Enamel shades
(higher
transparency)

(not subject to chewing pressure)

Class III cavities

Class IV cavities
Class V cavities
Inlays
(direct and indirect)

Onlays
(direct and indirect)

Veneers
(direct and indirect)

Crown build-ups
Posts and cores

D2

SB1*

C3

D3

SB2*

A3

B3

C4

OB2

OC3

OD2

SBO

A3.5
A4

HKA5*
Enamel shades
(very high
transparency)

T1

Dentine shades
(low
transparency)

OA2

T2
T3

OA3
OA3.5

Venus shades are matched to Vita shades.


*Heraeus Kulzer shades

(Only veneers, light cured)

Fissure and
pit sealing

Cavity linings

38

C2

B2

Adhesive luting
Temporary
restorations

B1

A2

HKA2.5*

(slightly subject to strain)

A1

The Venus tones are tuned to the Vita colours.


Customised shades for whitened teeth:
Shade SB1: Super Bleach (warm), light incisal shade
Shade SB2: Super Bleach (cold), light incisal shade with a
slightly cool blue hue effect
Shade SBO: Super Bleach Opaque, light dentine shade,
low transparency

Venus product outline

Venus Masters Kit

Venus Basic Kit

Venus ow Assortment

2Layer Shade Guide

This kit was developed


for dentists, who want to
make clinical use of
the complete range of
Venus shades and be
ready for all cases.

This kit contains the


6 most commonly used
enamel and dentine
shades, as well as the
incisal shade T1
cool blue. It is ideal
as a starter set.

Venus ow shades are


perfectly matched to
the Venus shades. You
have a choice between
14 Venus ow shades.
This assortment contains
the 4 most popular ones.

Hand layered, made


from original material.

Venus PLTs* 10 x 0.25 g


shades A1, A2, HK A2.5, A3, A3.5,
B1, B

Venus syringes 4 g or
PLTs* 10 x 0.25 g
shades A2, A3, OA2, OA3,
T1, HKA2.5

Venus ow syringes 1,8 g


shades A1, A2, A3,
Baseliner White
Accessories

shades A1, A2,


HKA25, A3, A3.5, A4,
HKA5, B1, B2, B3,
C2, C3, C4, D2, D3,
SB1, SB2, T1, T2, T3

Art. No. 66014561

Art. No. 66008711

Venus PLTs* 5 x 0.25 g


shades A4, HK A5, B3, C2, C3, C4,
D2, D3, OA2, OA3, OA3.5, OB2, OC3,
OD2, SB1, SB2, SBO, T1, T2, T3

Venus shade guide


Accessories

Venus ow syringe 1.8 g


shades A2, Baseliner
Gluma Desensitizer 1ml
Venus shade guide
Venus shade guide with
6 empty tabs
Venus DVD Masters Aesthetic Series
Accessories
Art. No. 66013214

Art. No. 66013214

*PLTs = pre-loaded capsules for direct application

39

Venus product outline

Product
Venus
PLTs contents 20 x 0.25 g
PLT A1
PLT A2
PLT A3
PLT A3.5
PLT B1
PLT B2
PLT C2
PLT OA2
PLT HKA2.5
PLTs contents 10 x 0.25 g
PLT A4
PLT B3
PLT C3
PLT C4
PLT D2
PLT D3
PLT OA3
PLT OA3.5
PLT OB2
PLT OC3
PLT OD2
PLT SB1
PLT SB2
PLT SBO
PLT T1
PLT T2
PLT T3
PLT HKA5
40

Art. No.

66007979
66007981
66007983
66007985
66007988
66008000
66007989
66008012
66007996
66008159
66008001
66008089
66008003
66007992
66008095
66008016
66007997
66007999
66008002
66008004
66008008
66008009
66008014
66007995
66008005
66008006
66007998

Product
Venus
Each syringe contains 4 g
SYR A1
SYR A2
SYR A3
SYR A3.5
SYR A4
SYR B1
SYR B2
SYR B3
SYR C2
SYR C3
SYR C4
SYR D2
SYR D3
SYR OA2
SYR OA3
SYR OA3.5
SYR OB2
SYR OC3
SYR OC2
SYR SB1
SYR SB2
SYR SBO
SYR T1
SYR T2
SYR T3
SYR HKA2.5
SYR HKA5

Art. No.

66007366
66007367
66007368
66007369
66008156
66007370
66007600
66007601
66007371
66008086
66007603
66007372
66008092
66007410
66008098
66007597
66007599
66007602
66007604
66007608
66007609
66007411
66007373
66007605
66007606
66007596
66007598

Product

Art. No.

Venus flow
Each syringe contains 1.8 g
Venus flow A1
Venus flow A2
Venus flow A3
Venus flow A3.5
Venus flow A4
Venus flow B2
Venus flow B3
Venus flow OA2
Venus flow SB1
Venus flow SB2
Venus flow SBO
Venus flow T2
Venus flow Baseliner White
Venus flow HKA2.5

66014562
66014563
66014565
66014566
66014567
66014568
66014569
66014570
66014571
66014572
66014573
66014575
66014574
66014564

XXXXXXXX 00 02.08 GB

Conception:
Heraeus Kulzer GmbH

Thanks to:
Prof. Antonio Cerutti
Nicola Barabanti
Stefano Sicura
University Brescia, Italy
Heraeus Kulzer srl

Contact in Germany

Contact in the United Kingdom

Contact in Australia

Heraeus Kulzer GmbH

Heraeus Kulzer Ltd.

Heraeus Kulzer Australia Pty. Ltd.

Grner Weg 11

Heraeus House, Albert Road

Locked Bag 750

63450 Hanau

Northbrook Street, Newbury

Roseville NSW 2069

Phone +49 (0) 6181 355 444

Berkshire, RG14 1DL

Phone +61 29 417 8411

Fax +49 (0) 6181 353 461

Phone +44 (0) 1635 30500

Fax +61 29 417 5093

info.dent@heraeus.com

Fax +44 (0) 1635 30606

Mail: sales@kulzer.com.au

www.heraeus-kulzer.de

Mail: sales@kulzer.uk

www.kulzer.com.au

www.heraeus-kulzer.com

In compliance with the European guideline 93/42/EWG our medical devices are CE-marked according to the classi cations.