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13.

Mid Shoulder height (sitting): The subject sits erect, upper arms hanging
relaxed and forearms and hands extended horizontally, with the anthropometer he
vertical distance from the sitting surface to midshoulder landmark is measured. This
measure defines the height at which the forward arm reach is at its maximum value.
It is also defines the top of the torso for chair design.
14. Eye Height (sitting): The subject sits erect with the head level and with the feet
resting at the o a surface adjusted so that the knees are bent at the right angle. Eye
height is measured as the vertical distance from the vertical distance from the sitting
surface to the inner corner of the eye (internal cantus). This measured the measured
to define locations for visual displays in seated workplaces.
15. Sitting Height Normal: The subject seats normally relaxed. Hands in lap,
looking straight ahead. The anthropometer is held vertically along the middle of the
back, and the measuring bar is brought down into firm contact with the top of the
head, in the midline. Height is measured from the sitting surface. This measured
defines the vertical clearance needed for seated work.
16. Functional Overhead Reach (sitting): This reach is measured with an
anthropometer as the vertical distance from the sitting surface to a pointer held
horizontally in a cylindrical grasp when the arm is extended directly upward. The
subject sits erect, looking straight ahead, with the knees bent a right angles. This
measure defines the maximum height at which controls should be located at
overhead panels.
17. Knee Height (sitting): The subjects sits erect, with the legs bent to form right
angles at the knees. The vertical distance from the surface of the footrest or floor to
the top of the knee at the kneecap is measured with an anthropometer. This
measure is useful in the design of seated workplace heights.
18. Popliteal Height (Sitting): The subject sits erect on the table or bench, with the
legs bent to form right angles at the knees. The vertical distance from the surface of
the footrest to the underside of the right knee, the tendon of the biceps femoris is
measured with an anthropometer. The value is used to define sit height and
adjustability and footrest needs at seated workplaces.
19. Leg Length (sitting): The horizontal distance from the wall to the bottom of the
foot is measured, with the subject sitting against the wall, leg extended. This value is
useful in defining maximum leg clearances for seated workplaces or for task where
the person has to sits on the floor to do the task.
20. Upper-Leg Length (sitting): The subject sits erect, with the feet on the
adjustable platform, knees flexed 90 and thighs parallel to the floor, with a beam
caliper held parallel to the long axis, of the thigh, the horizontal distance from the
most posterior aspect of the right buttocks to the most anterior aspect of the right
knee is measured. The measure is useful in defining seat depth for chairs, for
example of minimum forward clearance for seated workplaces.
21. Buttocks-to-Popliteal Length: The subject sits erect, with feet resting on a
surface adjusted so that the knees are bent at right angles. Buttocks-to-Popliteal
length is measured as the horizontal distance from the back of the buttock to the

back of the knee. This value defines the maximum seat depth for a chair to ensure
that pressure on the underside of the thigh is not excessive.
22. Elbow-to-Fist Length (forearm length): The subject holds a pointer vertically in
a cylindrical grasp with the upper arm at the side and the lower arm parallel to the
floor, forming a right angle at the elbow. The horizontal distance from the back of the
elbow, or epicondyle to the pointer is measured with an anthropometer. This distance
can be measured with the subject in either standing or sitting posture. This measure
is useful in defining maximum forward reach in situations where elbow flexion is
limited, as in glove box manipulations.
23. Upper arm Length: The subject stands with the trunk erect, humerus, or upper
arm vertical, forearm horizontal. Upper-arm length is measured from the top of the
acromial process to the bottom of the elbow. This measure is used to help define the
level at which shoulder abduction or raising the elbows, may become necessary to
do a task. From maintenance tasks through access ports, this measure becomes an
important clearance requirement as well.
24. Shoulder Breadth: This value is measured across from the large muscles on
the outer side of each upper arm in the shoulder region. It is used in determining
whole body requirements for access ports, for instance.
25. Hip Breadth: This distance is measured across the widest portion of the hips. It
is used in determining seats widths and whole body access port clearance.