Anda di halaman 1dari 492

SERVICE MANUAL

Manual Part Number 304421-000


ELECTRIC STAND-UP RIDER TRUCK

RCX

Effective Serial Number RCX__2604001

RCX25
RCX30C
RCX30
RCX35
RCX40
RCX45
RCX50

Read and observe all warnings on this unit


before operating it.
DO NOT operate this equipment unless all
factory installed guards and shields are
properly secured in place.

ISSUED OCTOBER 1995

Return

Return

Foreword
This Service Publication provides information
covering normal service, maintenance and repair of
the BT Prime-Mover lift truck noted on the cover. It
has been specifically prepared to help owners and
service personnel maintain these trucks in efficient
and safe operating condition.
This Manual is intended for use by persons who are
trained and authorized to do lift truck maintenance.
It is designed to provide essential information about
the correct and safe service maintenance and repair
of the truck by trained mechanics or service
technicians.
The Pictorial Contents list components or systems
by Basic Group Number of Major Parts. Additional
content listings are placed at the beginning of each
Section in the manual.
General and detailed service and repair
procedures are outlined (as required) for each
component or subsystem. Some procedures include
explanations that are common to several
components or subsystems.

Procedures have been easier to use by providing


specific steps only when necessary and general
instructions required to explain the activity,
component, assembly, or process being worked on.
The technician is expected to include obvious
additional steps of standard procedure for removal,
disassembly, cleaning, inspection, reassembly,
installation, etc., as needed.
To be better prepared to do the necessary service
work, take time to completely read the entire
procedure, including any special instructions, before
starting any work.
Before beginning to work, the technician is
cautioned and expected to:

Do all necessary service work.

Take time to read entire procedures,


including any special instructions.

NOTICE
The descriptions and specifications included in this manual were in effect at the time of
printing. BT Prime-Mover reserves the right to discontinue models at any time, or make
improvements and changes in specifications or design without notice and without
incurring obligation. Specifications, torques, pressures, measurements, adjustments,
illustrations and other items may change at any time. Contact your authorized BT
Prime-Mover dealer for information on possible updates or revisions.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Foreword-1

Return

CONTENTS

Group SA - Safe Maintenance


Group PS - Periodic Service
Group 12 - Battery
Group 13 - Electrical Control Handle
Group 16 - Electrical Motor
Group 17 - Electrical Schematics
Group 19 - Electrical Controls
Group 20 - Drive Axle
Group 22 - Wheels and Tires
Group 23 - Brake System
Group 25 - Steering Gear
Group 26 - Steering Axle
Group 29 - Hydraulic Pump, Sump and Filters
Group 30 - Hydraulic Control Valves
Group 31 - Hydraulic Supply System
Group 32 - Cylinders
Group 33 - Selector Solenoid Valve
Group 34 - Upright
Group 40 - Specifications

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Contents-1

Pictorial Contents
Group PS - Periodic Service
Group 12 - Battery
Group 13 - Electrical Control Handle
Group 16 - Electrical Motor
Group 17 - Electrical Schematics
Group 19 - Electrical Controls

Contents-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Pictorial Contents

Group 20 - Drive Axle


Group 22 - Wheels and Tires
Group 23 - Brake System
Group 25 - Steering Gear
Group 26 - Steering Axle

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Contents-3

Pictorial Contents

Group 29 - Hydraulic Pump,


Sump and Filters
Group 30 - Hydraulic Control
Valves
Group 31 - Hydraulic Supply
System
Group 32 - Cylinders
Group 33 - Selector Solenoid
Valve
Group 34 - Upright
Group 40 - Specifications

Contents-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Group SA
SAFE MAINTENANCE

Safety........................................................................................... Section 1
Lifting, Jacking, and Blocking................................................... Section 2

OCTOBER 1995
Return

SA-00-1

SA-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Safety

Safety Signs and Messages.............................................................. 2


Safety Maintenance Practices .......................................................... 2
General Shop Precautions................................................................ 4

OCTOBER 1995
Return

SA-01-1

Safety Signs and Messages

Safe Maintenance Practices

Safety signs and messages in this manual and on


the lift truck provide instructions and identify specific
areas where potential hazards exist and special
precautions should be taken. Be sure you know and
understand the meaning of these instructions,
signs, and messages. Damage to the truck, serious
injury, or death may result to you or other persons if
these messages are not followed.

The following instructions have been prepared from


current industry and government safety standards
applicable to industry truck operation and
maintenance. These recommended procedures
specify conditions, methods, and accepted
practices that aid in the safe maintenance of
industrial trucks. They are listed here for the
reference and safety of all workers during
maintenance operations. Carefully read and
understand these instructions and the specific
maintenance procedure before attempting to do any
repair work.

NOTE
This message is used when special
information is required relating to
procedures,
equipment,
tools,
pressure, capacities, and other
special data.

IMPORTANT
This message is used when special
precautions should be taken to
ensure a correct action or to avoid
damage to, or malfunction of, the
truck or a component.

CAUTION
This message is used as a reminder
of safety hazards that can result in
personal
injury
if
proper
precautions are not taken.

WARNING
This message is used when a
hazard exists that can result in
injury or death if proper precautions
are not taken.

DANGER
This message is used when an
extreme hazard exists that can
result in injury or death or serious
injury if proper precautions are not
taken.

The above terms have been adopted by BT PRIMEMOVER Company. The same terms may be used in
different context in service literature supplied
directly or indirectly by vendors or truck
components.

SA-01-2
Return

When in doubt of any maintenance procedure,


please contact your local BT PRIME-MOVER
dealer.
1. Powered industrial trucks can become
hazardous if maintenance is neglected.
Therefore, suitable maintenance facilities,
trained personnel, and procedures must be
provided.
2. Maintenances and inspection of all powered
industrial trucks shall be done in conformance
with the manufacturers recommendations.
3. A
scheduled
planned
maintenance,
lubrication, and inspection program shall be
followed.
4. Only trained and authorized personnel shall be
permitted to maintain, repair, adjust, and
inspection industrial trucks. Work should be
performed
in
accordance
with
the
manufacturers specifications.
5. Properly ventilate work area, vent exhaust
fumes, and keep shop clean and floor dry.
6. Avoid fire hazards and have fire protection
equipment present in the work area. Do not
use an open flame to check for level or
leakage of fuel, electrolyte, or coolant. Do not
use open pans of fuel of flammable cleaning
fluids for cleaning parts.
7. Before starting work on truck:
a. Wear eye protection and remove all
jewelry.
b. Raise drive wheels off of floor or
disconnect power source and use blocks
or other positive truck positioning devices.
c. Disconnect battery before working on the
electrical system.
8. Operation of the truck to check performance
must be conducted in an authorized, safe,
clean area.

OCTOBER 1995

9. Before starting to drive truck:


a. Be in operating position.
b. Be sure parking brake is engaged.
c. Put direction control in neutral.
d. Check functioning of direction and speed
controls, steering, brakes, warning
devices, and any load handling
attachments.
10. Before leaving truck:
a. Stop truck.
b. Put directional control in neutral.
c. Apply the parking brake.
d. Stop all movement and turn ignition
circuit to off.
e. Put blocks at the wheels if truck is on an
incline.
11. Brakes, steering mechanisms, control
mechanisms, warning devices, lights,
guards, safety devices, and frame members
must be carefully and regularly inspected
and maintained in a safe operating
condition.
12. Special trucks or devices designed and
approved for hazardous area operation must
receive special attention to ensure that
maintenance
preserves
the
original,
approved, safe-operating features.
13. The
truck
manufacturers
capacity,
operation, and maintenance instruction
plate, tags, or decals must be maintained in
legible condition.
14. Batteries, motors, controllers, limit switches,
protective devices, electrical conductors,
and connections must be inspected and
maintained in conformance with good
practices. Special attention must be paid to
the condition of electrical insulation.

17. Modifications and additions that affect


capacity and safe truck operation must not
be done without the manufacturers prior
written approval.
18. Care must be taken to assure that all
replacement parts, including tires, are
interchangeable with the original parts and
of a quality at least equal to that provided in
the original equipment. Parts, including tires,
are to be installed per the manufactures
procedures. Always use genuine BT PrimeMover approved parts.
19. Use special care when removing heavy
components from the truck, such as
counterweight, seat deck, upright, etc. Be
sure that lifting and handling equipment is of
the correct capacity and in good condition.
Also, this removal may upset stability of the
truck. The frame must always be safely
blocked for major component removal.

NOTE
You should also be familiar with
additional
operating
and
maintenance safety instructions
contained
in
the
following
publications:

ANSI/ASME B56.1 Safety Standard for Low Lift and


High Lift Trucks. Published by: American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, United Engineering Center,
345 E. 47th Street, New York, NY 10017
NFPA505 Powered Industrial Trucks. Including
Type, Areas of Use, Maintenance, and Operation.
Available from: National Fire Protection Assoc., Inc.,
Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269.
General Industrial Standards, OSHA 2206: OSHA
Safety and Heath Standards (29 CFR 1910),
Subpart N-Materials Handling and Storage, Section
1910.178 Powered Industrial Trucks. For sale by:
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402.

15. To avoid injury to personnel or damage to


the equipment, consult the manufacturers
procedures in replacing contacts on any
battery connection.
16. Industrial trucks must be kept in a clean
condition to minimize fire hazards and help
in the detection of loose or defective parts.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

SA-01-3

General Shop Precautions


The following list contains general precautions that
should be followed when working on a lift truck.

Always wear safety glasses for eye protection.

Remove rings, watches, loose jewelry and


open clothing before working on a vehicle, to
avoid serious injury.

Do not smoke while working on a vehicle.

Put power key switch in the OFF position,


unless otherwise required by the procedure.

Set the parking brake. Place chocks to the


front and rear surfaces of the tires to provide
further restraint from inadvertent vehicle
movement.

Use Safety stands or blocks whenever a


procedure requires you to be under the
vehicle.

Service Electric Truck Batteries in a wellventilated area to avoid the danger of lighting
explosive gases.

Follow Safety Instructions outlined in Group


12, Battery Handling.

Always Discharge the Capacitors prior to


working on or around electrical components.

Avoid contact with battery acid. The battery


contains corrosive acid which can cause
injury. Follow the instructions outlined in Group
12 and those instructions received with your
battery and charger.

Cautions
The following is a list of CAUTIONS connected with
the operation and maintenance of trucks equipped
with solid state control panels.

CAUTION
WELDING ON TRUCK
1.Make sure the truck has no grounds.
2.Disconnect truck battery.
3.Protect
electrical
wiring
and
components from weld spatter with a
shield.
4.Ventilate battery or remove battery
from truck.
If the above is not followed, damage
can result to wring and electrical
components on solid state control
truck.

SA-01-4
Return

CAUTION
WELDING ON TRUCK
Do not steam clean a solid state
controlled truck as excessive
moisture will interfere with proper
operation of the solid state
components.

Solid State Controls Should be cleaned at regular


intervals. Blowing dirt off with an air (30 psi
max.[207 kPa]) hose periodically will, for the most
part, eliminate any serious cleaning problems.
Should the need arise for a more thorough cleaning,
water may be hosed over the control and if
necessary a mild detergent applied such as that
used in washing dishes in our home. The detergent
should be rinsed off and the controls must be
thoroughly air dried before putting truck into service.
Periodic cleaning, such as those mentioned above,
should preclude the need for using a degreaser.
However, if a degreaser is used we recommend the
following:
Only approved solvents should be used to clean
Solid State Control Components. Use a Degreaser,
or the equivalent to MS-180 Freon TF Degreaser
and Cleaner.

CAUTION
CHECK POLARITY
Battery Polarity must be correct or
the truck will not operate.

CAUTION
USE TRUCK BATTERY ONLY
Do not use a motor generator unit
such as ready power or a battery
charger to move and/or check this
truck as serious damage may
occur.

IMPORTANT
SAFETY NOTICE
Read and understand all Safety
Precautions and Warning before
performing repairs on lift trucks.

Appropriate service methods and proper repair


procedures are essential to the safe, reliable
operation of industrial trucks as well as the personal
safety of the individual doing the work. This Service
Manual
provides
general
directions
for
accomplishing service and repair work with tested,
effective techniques. Following them will help
assure successful repair and reliable truck
operation.

OCTOBER 1995

There are numerous variations in procedures,


techniques, tools and parts for servicing industrial
trucks, as well as in the skill of the individual doing
the work. This manual cannot possibly anticipate all
such variations and provide advice or precautions
as to each. Accordingly, anyone departing form the
instructions provided in this manual through
procedure used or choice of tools, materials, and
parts may jeopardize his or her personal safety and/
or the safety of the vehicle user.
Improper or careless techniques cause accidents.
Don't take chances with incorrect or damaged
equipment. Read and understand the procedures
for safe operation and maintenance outlined in this
manual.
Drive and work safely and follow the safety
signs and their messages displayed in the work
area, on the truck and in this manual.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

SA-01-5

Return

Section 2.
Machine Jacking and Blocking

Raising Drive Wheels ........................................................................ 2


Blocking the Upright in Raised Position ......................................... 3
Raising Rear of Truck........................................................................ 3
Raising Truck with a Hoist................................................................ 4

IMPORTANT
BT Prime-Mover dose not recommend towing the RCX lift truck.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

SA-02-1

CAUTION
To perform these service procedures, first:
Park truck on a hard, level, and solid
surface, such as a concrete floor with no
gaps or breaks.
Put upright in vertical position and fully
lower the forks or attachment.
Turn key switch OFF.

WARNING
DEFECTIVE EQUIPMENT
CAN CAUSE ACCIDENTS
All tools and lifting equipment must be in
good condition, meet the load capacity
requirements and have OSHA labels
when required. Tools with defects can
have failures causing sever injury or
death.

RAISING DRIVE WHEELS

4. Tilt the upright full forward. This action


should raise the drive wheels off the floor.
Release the tilt control pushbutton.
5.

Turn key switch OFF.

6. Check for safe clearance between drive


wheels and floor.
7. Check the stability of the truck. Be sure that
the blocks are located securely under the
upright rails before operating the drive motor
or working on truck.
8. Lower the drive wheels to the floor by
reversing the above procedure.
Turn key switch ON.
Tilt upright fully back.
Turn key switch OFF.

9. Remove the blocks and steel plates from


under the upright rails.

This procedure uses the upright as a lever to lift the


drive wheels off the floor and prevent accidents due
to inadvertent powering of the drive wheels.
1. Park the truck safely.
2. Turn key switch ON. Tilt the upright fully
back.

3. Put a solid 4x4 inch (100x100mm) hardwood


block under the front section of each upright
rail. Put a 0.125-0.250 inch (3-6mm)
thickness steel plate on top of each block.

SA-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Blocking
Position

the

Upright

in

Raised

Raising Rear of Truck


Refer to Group 40, Specifications for truck weights.

This procedure is used to safely provide clearance


for access from the front of truck to components on
or near the drive axle.

WARNING
Do not stand under the forks when
blocks are put under the carriage
and rails. The forks can fall and
cause injury or death to personnel.

1. Park truck safely.


2. Put chocks in front of and behind drive
wheels.
3. Put wooden support blocks conveniently
near upright rails before raising the upright.
Use two 4x4 inch(100x100mm) hardwood
blocks of approximate lengths.

The truck may be raised at the rear by jacking and


blocking under the side near the rear section of the
frame.
1. Park the truck safely. Put chocks at front and
rear of drive wheels.

NOTE
When
convenient,
it
is
recommended to remove the
battery from truck, to reduce weight
for both safer and easier jacking.

2. Put a floor jack under the rear of truck frame.

NOTE
If there is insufficient clearance
under frame for your jack, the truck
may first be driven onto thin
platforms, such as 1in. x 6in. x 12in.
pieces of board (shims), to increase
the truck frame under-clearance.

NOTE
For STANDARD UPRIGHT, block
may be needed to be cut to suit.
TRIPLE STAGE UPRIGHT, the
carriage may be blocked as shown.

4. Turn key switch ON and raise the upright


carriage.
5. Hold the taller block against inner rail. Have
another person operate the lift lever to lower
the upright until carriage rests on block.
6. Hold the shorter block against the outer rail
and lower the upright until inner rails rests
on the block.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

SA-02-3

3. Raise the truck only as high as necessary to


perform the maintenance work.

Lifting Front of Truck


1. Remove battery.

4. Put blocks at both sides of the truck, fully


under the frame main side structure. Put an
equal amount of blocks under each side of
the truck to provide a level working position.
Individual pieces of blocking with minimum
length equal to the width of the truck are
recommended.

2. Chock steer wheels.


3. Raise front of truck using two chains hooked
into the upright tie bar. Lift truck up and
place wheel cradles under the drive wheels.
Lower drive wheels onto the cradles.

5. Lower the truck onto the blocks and remove


the jack. Check truck stability before
performing any maintenance work.
6. When maintenance work is completed,
lower the rear of truck to the floor by
reversing the above procedure:
Put jack under frame and raise truck.
Carefully remove blocks and lower truck.
Remove jack.
Remove chocks from drive wheels.

Lifting Rear of Truck

Raising Truck with a Hoist


When suitable equipment is available, the truck may
be raised by means of a hoist and wheel cradles
placed under the wheels.

IMPORTANT
Lift only the front or the rear of the
truck at one time. Watch truck for
signs of lateral instability. It may tip
sideways. You may have to support
or guide the side of the truck or
overhead guard to prevent tipping.

1. Remove battery.
2.

Put chock at drive wheels.

3.

Remove forks.

4. Raise rear of truck using hoist and chain


hooked at the location shown.

Refer to Group 40, Specifications for truck weights.

SA-02-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Group PS
PERIODIC SERVICE

Maintenance Schedules ............................................................. Section 1


Planned Mainetenance ............................................................... Section 2

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-00-1

PS-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Maintenance Schedules

Maintenance Schedules .................................................................... 2


Lubrication Points ............................................................................. 3
Lubrication Check Key...................................................................... 4
Miscellaneous Lubricants................................................................. 5

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-01-1

Maintenance Schedules
This Service Publication provides information
covering normal service, maintenance and repair of
the BT Prime-Mover lift truck noted on the cover. It
has been specifically prepared to help owners and
service personnel maintain these trucks in efficient
and safe operating condition.

About Planned Maintenance


The Planned Maintenance Procedures provide
located in the front of this manual provide as basic
steps by step guide which should be followed in
servicing the vehicle. Adjustment Procedures,
Specifications, Lubrication Guides, Overhaul
Procedures and other data are found in rear of this
manual listed under Group and Section Numbers.
Refer to the index.
Regular, correct maintenance and care of industrial
trucks is not only important for long and efficient
truck life but it is essential for safe operation. The
importance of proper maintenance through planned
service, inspection and qualified repairs cannot be
emphasized too strongly. Preventive maintenance
instruction are provided for reference in setting-up
and conducting a recommended periodic Planned
Maintenance (PM) program.
Planned Maintenance is a program in which
inspections, minor adjustment, cleaning, lubrication,
oil changes and replacement of filters are performed
on a scheduled and systematic basis. A solid PM
program should incorporate a method of record
keeping which enables you to better determine PM
schedules and enables you to tract the maintenance
cost per truck.
An effective PM program should incorporate two
basic phases:

Record will tell you how often PM should be done.

If an operation is clean and not punishing, a


PM interval can be extended.

If an operation is extremely dirty and


punishing, the PM interval may have to be
reduced.

If the PM is religiously followed, need for repair,


major adjustment and component replacement will
be discovered automatically and such work can be
scheduled eliminating unnecessary downtime and
cost. For instance, brake checks which are part of
the PM will uncover the need for adjustments and/or
repairs which may be required periodically.

The objectives of PM are:


1. To reduce costly unscheduled down times.
2. Reduce maintenance costs.
3. Increase vehicle productivity.
4. Increase personal safety of drivers and other
personnel.

Inspection Forms
To insure that the daily inspection and PM are
properly performed, we recommended the use of
inspection forms. Such forms not only provide a
guide for the inspections and maintenance
requirements for each vehicle, they will assist you in
determining when to schedule this vehicle for major
repair. Consequently these repairs can be done
without the disruptive effect of unscheduled down
time.
NOTE

1. An inspection performed by the driver or


maintenance man at the beginning of each
shift. This is a quick visual check for obvious
damage and leaks - a check of fluids and
water levels, lights (if so equipped),
instruments and warning devices.
2. The Planned Maintenance routine is based
on 50 to 250 operating hours - with the
interval being determined by operating
conducts.

PS-01-2
Return

Refer to the Operator's Manual,


located on the truck, for additional
information on the operation, care
and maintenance of your truck.
Contact your authorized BT PrimeMover dealer for more information
on maintenance and repair of these
trucks.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-01-3

Lubrication Chart Key


L1

L2

General Purpose
Grease
with EP additive

Use NLGI #1 Grade


A multi-purpose grease of refined mineral oil
blended with a lithium soap thickener or
equal containing anti-wear, anti-rust and antioxidants with EP additives.

General Purpose
Grease
with EP additive
and Moly Additive

Use NLGI #2 Grade


A multi-purpose grease of refined mineral oil
blended with a lithium soap thickener or
equal containing anti-wear, anti-rust and antioxidants with EP and, 3 to 5% moly additives.

L3

80 W 90

L4

Chain Lube

L5

L6

PS-01-4
Return

Hydraulic Fluid

Brake Fluid "Dot 3"

Gear Lubricant.

Roller and Leaf Chain Lube.


1-case of 12 one-pint cans

Hydraulic Fluid.
Use only high quality hydraulic fluid with Zinc
or equivalent Anti-Wear additive which meets
the requirements of ASTM
D-2882 pump wear test with 50 mg total
weight loss maximum.
Use only heavy-duty Hydraulic Brake Fluid
which meets or exceeds the requirements of
SAE J1703 Specification, or alternatively,
Type DOT Brake Fluid, Grade DOT 3, as
specified by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety
Standard No. (FMVSS 116).
Non-petroleum type.

OCTOBER 1995

Miscellaneous Lubricants
Miscellaneous Linkage

Any good grade of motor oil in SCR10,20 or 30 weight as the


temperature and conditions and conditions, dictate

Corrosion Protection
Mechanical Lubricant
Apply to electrical connections any time they are disconnected. The lubricant should be reapplied before
making the connection.
Application Examples (Standard and Cold Storage Applications):

PL and DP plug connections.


Solenoid Coil Connections.
Reverse Alarm terminals (if applicable).
Push on terminals.
Light Terminals (headlights, strobe, etc.) (if applicable)
Thermostat terminals (if applicable).
Heater connections terminals (if applicable).

Corrosion Protection
Mechanical Paste Lubricant
Apply to electrical connections any time they are disconnected. The lubricant should be reapplied before
making the connection.

Application Examples (Standard and Cold Storage Applications.)

All power cable connections

- All motor cable connections.


- Brake Switch.
- Lift pump ground strap, both ends.
- Steer interlock switch.
- Reverse alarm (if so equipped).

All screw-on type wire terminals


- Card retainer screws.
- All cable connection points on the control panel.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-01-5

Return

Section 2.
Planned Maintenance

Use PM Report Form ......................................................................... 2


How to Perform the PM Periodic Inspections and Maintenance... 2
Visual Inspection ............................................................................ 2
Functional Checks.......................................................................... 5
Test Drive Truck with Load............................................................... 8
Lift Mechanism and Controls.......................................................... 9
Battery Compartment Inspection................................................... 10
Motor SCR Control Inspection....................................................... 11
Control and Hydraulic Compartment Inspection............................ 11
Control Levers and Linkage Inspection ......................................... 11
Air Cleaning....................................................................................... 11
Critical Fastener Torque Checks..................................................... 11
Lubrication, Fluids and Filters ........................................................ 12
Hydraulic Sump ............................................................................. 12
Hydraulic Fluid and Filter Change ................................................. 12
Hydraulic Oil Filter ......................................................................... 12
Sump Tank Breather Maintenance................................................ 12
Access to the Drive Axle ............................................................... 12
Drive Axle Fluid ............................................................................. 12
Drive Axle Fluid Change................................................................ 13
Truck Chassis Inspection and Lubrication..................................... 13
Uprights and Tilt Cylinder Lubrication ........................................... 13
Lift Chains ..................................................................................... 13

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-02-1

Use PM Report Form


A planned maintenance program of regular, routine
inspections and lubrication is important for long life
and trouble-free operation of your lift truck. Make
and keep records of your inspections. Use these
records to help establish the correct PM intervals for
your application and to indicate maintenance
required to prevent major problems from occurring
during operation.
As an aid in performing and documenting your PM
inspections, Clark has prepared an ELECTRIC
TRUCK PLANNED MAINTENANCE REPORT
form. Copies of this form may be obtained from your
authorized BT Prime-Mover dealer. We recommend
that you use this form as a checklist and to make a
record of your inspection and truck condition.
The periodic maintenance procedures outlined in
this manual are intended to be used with the PM
report form. They are arranged in groupings of
maintenance work that are done in a logical and
efficient sequence.
A check mark or entry is made on the PM Report
Form when the PM is performed. Please note the
special coding system for indicating the importance
of needed repairs and/or adjustments.
When you have finished the PM inspections, be
sure to give a copy of the report to the designated
authority or the person responsible for lift truck
maintenance.

CAUTION
Do not operate a lift truck with damaged
or missing decals and nameplates.
Replace them immediately. They contain
important information.

Check to be sure all capacity, safety and warning


plates or decals are attached and legible.

DANGER
Do not operate a lift truck with damaged
or missing decals and nameplates.
Replace them immediately. They contain
important information.

Do not make repairs adjustments unless authorized


to do so.
For safety, it is good practice to:

Remove all jewelry (watch, rings, bracelets,


etc.) before working on the truck.

Disconnect battery from truck receptacle


before working on electrical components.

Always wear safety glasses. Wear a safety


(hard) hat in special work areas where
protection is necessary or required.

Inspect the truck for signs of external leakage of


transmission fluid, etc. Check for hydraulic oil
leaks and loose fittings.
Be sure that the driver's overhead guard, load
backrest, extension, finger guards, and any
other safety devices are in place, undamaged,
and attached securely.

How To Perform The Pm Periodic


Inspections And Maintenance
Visual Inspection
First, perform a visual inspection of the lift truck and
its components. Walk around the truck and take
note of any obvious damage and maintenance
problems. Check for loose fasteners and fittings.

PS-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

DANGER
For trucks equipped with spark-enclosed
(EE) construction, or with polyurethane
tires, check the ground strap for wear and
secure attachment.

DANGER
Upright can drop suddenly. Look at the
upright, but keep hands out.

Check all of the critical components that handle


or carry the load.

IMPORTANT
Uprights and lift chains require special
attention and maintenance to maintain them
in safe operating condition. Refer to Lift
Chain Maintenance in Group 34 for additional
information.

Check the overhead guard for damage. Be sure that


it is properly positioned and all mounting fasteners
are in place and tight.

CAUTION
If load backrest has been removed, a bolt
and washer must be in place on each end of
the top fork bar to act as a fork stop.

Check the upright assembly. Inspect the upright


rails, carriage rollers, lift chains, lift and tilt cylinders.
Look for obvious wear, and damaged or missing
parts. Check for any loose parts or fittings. Check
for leaks, any damaged or loose rollers, and rail
wear (metal flaking). Carefully check the lift chains
for wear, rust and corrosion, cracked or broken
links, stretching, etc. Check that the lift and carriage
chains are correctly adjusted to have equal tension.
Check that the lift chain anchor fasteners and
locking means are in place and tight.
Be sure all safety guards and chain retainers are in
place and not damaged. Inspect the carriage stops
and cylinder retainer bolts. Check all welded
connections.
Inspect all lift line hydraulic connections for leaks.
Check the lift cylinder rods for wear marks, groves,
and scratches. Check the cylinder seals for leaks.

Check the load backrest for damage. Inspect the


welds on the carriage and load backrest for cracks.
Be sure that the mounting fasteners are all in place
and tight.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-02-3

FORKS
Inspect the load forks for cracks, breaks,
bending and wear. The fork top surfaces should
be level and even with each other. The height
difference between both fork tips should be no
more than 0.25 inch (6mm).

Inspect the fork latches. Be sure they are not


damaged or broken and operate freely and lock
correctly. Check the fork stop pins (or bolt and
washer) for secure condition.

WHEELS AND TIRES

WARNING
If the fork blade at the heel is worn down by
more than 10%, the load capacity is
reduced and the fork must be replaced. Do
not attempt to fill with weld.

Check the amount of wear at the heel of the fork.

CAUTION
If the forks are obviously bent or damaged,
have them inspected by a trained
maintenance person before operating the
truck.

Inspect the forks for twists and bends. To check, put


a 2" x 4" x 24" long block on the blade of the fork
with the 4 in. surface against the blade. Put a 24 in.
carpenters square on the top of the block and
against the shank. Check the fork 18 in. above the
blade to be sure it is not bent more than 1 inch (25.4
mm) maximum at Y.

PS-02-4
Return

Check the condition of the drive and steer wheels


and tires. Remove objects that are embedded in the
tread. Inspect the tires for excessive wear, breaks or
chunking out, and bond failure between the tire
and rim.

OCTOBER 1995

Damaged tire.
Damaged wheels or loosening of the locking
rings on multi-piece rims.

Missing bolt

Loosening of the clamping bolts and nuts on


two-piece, split-rim wheels.

Low inflation pressure.

Check all wheel mounting bolts to be sure none are


loose or missing.

CAUTION
Personnel working on wheels and tires
must be trained and qualified to do wheel
and tire maintenance.

DANGER
RIM SEPARATION
Remove the air from tires before doing
any work on tires or rims. Multi-piece
rims cans separate with enough force to
cause injury or death.

FUNCTIONAL CHECKS
Replace missing bolts and tighten loose bolts to the
correct torque before operating the truck.

1. Check horn to be sure it operates.

PNEUMATIC TIRES

CAUTION
Check tire pressure from a position facing
the tread of the tire, not the side. Use a longhandle gauge to keep your body away from
the side. If tires are low, don't add air. The tire
may require removal and repair. Have the tire
and wheel inspected by a person trained and
authorized to do tire and wheel maintenance.
Low tire pressure can reduce the stability of
your lift truck and cause it to tip over.

Check for the correct air pressure on trucks with


pneumatic tires.
Inspect pneumatic tires and wheels carefully for:

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-02-5

IMPORTANT

NOTE

The battery is the heart of the electric lift


truck. Because the battery is such an
important part of electric truck operation,
it
requires
its
own
specialized
maintenance program which should
include full scale battery cleaning and
inspection. Refer to Group 12 in this
manual for specific instructions.

Make sure the hourmeter works. Turn the


key switch to the off position. The hour
glass symbol light should come on. The
hours registered on the truck should
appear on the digital readout for about
four seconds.

2. Check Diagnostic Display

Turn key switch OFF and then ON. Read the


digital readout.

Digital readout should display 8888 for about


one second after your turn the key switch ON.
This indicates that the digital readout is okay.
Then, either the battery symbol or the wrench
symbol light should come on.

Battery Symbol: When the battery symbol light


comes on, the digital readout shows the
percentage of usable remaining battery
charge. If the readout registers 19 or less, the
readout will flash. If the readout registers 10,
the lift function becomes inoperable. At this
point the battery is 80% discharged and there
should be enough power to get you to the
battery charging station.

Wrench Symbol: If this light comes on, a


status code will appear on the digital readout.
The status code may indicate an easily
correctable operator fault or it may indicate
that the truck should be serviced.

If the status codes registered are in the range


of 1 to 6, these are easily correctable (refer to
the codes registered on the following page).
Any other code is a service code covered in
Group 19.

Fault Codes
Code
-01
-02

Condition
Brake switch open.
Truck in forward when the key is turned on
and accelerator is depressed.

Likely Corrective Action


Step on brake pedal releasing parking brake.
Put the Multi-Function Control in neutral
before starting.

-03

Truck in reverse when the key is turned on


and the accelerator is depressed.

-04

When key is on and truck in either forward


or reverse.

-05

Brake and accelerator at the same time.

Use only one at a time.

-06

Accelerator actuated with neutral selected.

Select direction first.

Truck needs service.


other

PS-02-6
Return

Call service technician.

OCTOBER 1995

3. Check Multi-Function Control


Gently pull back on the Multi-Function Control. The
pump motor should turn on and the carriage should
begin to elevate. Release the control. It should
return to neutral without binding and the pump
motor should turn off. The control should not bind
when moving it to any position. Hold in one button
at a time and check tilt, reach and side shift (if
applicable) for proper operation. Forks should tilt
evenly and smoothly. Fork Side Shift operation
should be smooth without binding.

LOWER

LIFT

4. Check Drive Motor (Brake) Cut-Off Switch


Make sure forward and reverse travel path is clear.
Move the truck forward at a slow speed. Slowly lift
foot brake pedal. Drive motor should cut off before
the brakes apply.
Move truck in reverse at a slow rate of speed.
Slowly lift foot from pedal, the motor should shut off
and the truck should stop.
If operation is not satisfactory. DO NOT operate
the truck. Report condition to designated
authority.

5. Check Steering

REVERSE

Make sure forward and reverse travel path is clear.


While moving the truck at a slow rate of speed in
forward direction of travel, make a full turn and
listen for unusual steering noise. The steering
should be smooth without hesitation.
You will hear the power steering pump operate
over relief when in a full turn.
Note any excessive slop or noise in the upright
that may indicate roller damage or roller shimming
is required.

6. Check Brakes
Move the truck forward at a slow speed. Slowly lift
foot brake pedal, truck should come to a smooth
stop.
Repeat above step in reverse.
Check braking lining wear by inspecting the brake
actuating spring length. See procedure in Group
23, Section 2.

7. Check Truck Performance


Make sure forward and reverse travel path is clear.
Now, drive the truck in a straight line at a high rate
of speed in a forward direction of travel. Listen for
unusual drive train noise. Stop truck.
Check acceleration from a stand condition to stop
travel speed. Acceleration should be smooth
without hesitation. Stop the truck.

Report condition on PM check sheet.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-02-7

Test Drive Truck With Load

the brake pedal. Note any unusual reactions in


driving or braking performance, and need for
adjustment.

NOTE
It is recommended that these
tests be conducted with a rated
capacity load, if possible.

WARNING
Make sure travel path is clear of obstacles
and personnel.

Test the truck for proper operation and drive train


function by driving the truck in both the forward and
reverse directions. Drive fist in a straight line and
slowly through a series of full right and left turns.

2. PLUGGING is an SCR control function which


provides for reversing the direction of travel
under controlled conditions. A correctly-adjusted
plugging control should result in a smooth
deceleration and stop from any speed in one
direction, and acceleration in the opposite
direction. Plugging speed and distance are
determined by the control handle travel position.
Check PLUGGING function first at a slow
speed. If plugging operates correctly, the test at
full speed. First, drive truck in the FORWARD
direction. Accelerate to the desired travel speed.
Then, rotate the control handle to the same
speed in REVERSE travel position. The truck
should slow to smooth, controlled stop and then
accelerate in the opposite direction. Repeat test
by turning control handle back to FORWARD
position.

Carry Loads Low and Tilted Back


Check all around to be sure that your intended path
of travel is clear of obstructions.
Test for correct function of the SCR control.
Check CREEP SPEED,1A RANGE, and PLUGGING.

1.Check CREEP SPEED and 1A RANGE while


driving the truck in a straight line both
FORWARD and REVERSE directions. CREEP
SPEED should be obtained at the beginning of
SCR RANGE after slightly rotating the control
handle and closing 1MS switch. 1A RANGE When the control handle is rotated farther and
then completely, the truck should accelerate in
SCR RANGE and make a smooth transition into
1A RANGE for maximum travel speed. As the
1A contactor closes, there should be very little
surge as the truck goes out of SCR RANGE and
into 1A. All speed changes should be smooth
while increasing and decreasing speed. Listen
for any unusual drive train noses or actions of
the controls and drive train components.

Check the accelerator control while conducting the


speed range test. It must move easily and smoothly
throughout the acceleration stroke, and return
without binding. There should be no restriction to
movement on either acceleration or deceleration.
Test the service brake (drive motor cut-off) switch.
Drive the truck FORWARD (or in REVERSE) at
creep speed. While holding the control handle
steady in creep-speed position, release brake
pedal. The brake action should interrupt power to
the drive motor and stop the truck. Depress the
brake pedal. The drive motors should again start
moving the truck.

Stop truck with the service brakes by releasing

PS-02-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Do not operate lift truck if the brakes are not


operating properly.

Lift Mechanism and Controls


NOTE
If is recommended that these test
be conducted with a
capacity load, if possible.

rated

Test the operation of the hydraulic system and up-right.

Test brake operation by depressing and releasing


the brake pedal several times while driving the
truck. The brake should bring the truck to a smooth
stop, without pulling, squealing, or shuddering,
Have the brake adjusted or repaired as necessary.
To check brake holding capability and adjustment,
park the truck on a grade and release brake pedal.
The brake should hold a lift truck with rated load on
a 15% grade.
Do not operate lift truck if steering system is not
operating properly.
Check steering control operation. First, drive the
truck in a straight line. The truck must drive in a
straight line without drifting towards either side.
Then, drive slowly (creep speed) through a series of
full right and left turns. Check steering response and
smoothness of operation. Turning effort must be the
sane in either direction. If there is a steering
problem, have it repaired. Also refer to Group 17,
Drive Motor Cut-Out check and adjustment.

NOTE
It is recommended that the
following tests also be conducted
with a rated capacity load, if
available.

Test for general drive train operation. Drive the truck


at various speeds and operating conditions, in both
FORWARD and REVERSE directions. Test shifting
from NEUTRAL to FORWARD, then back to
NEUTRAL. Next, test shift from NEUTRAL to
REVERSE, then back to NEUTRAL. Check for
positive control action when changing directions.

CAUTION
Be sure there is adequate overhead
clearance before raising the upright.
Perform test on level, firm surface.

Cycle (raise to full height and the lower) the upright


at both slow and fast speed, with the upright tilted
slightly backwards. Watch the upright assembly as it
rises. All movements of the upright, fork carriage,
and lift chains must be even and smooth, without
binding or jerking motions. Watch for chain wobble
or looseness; the chains should have equal tension
and move smoothly without noticeable wobble.
Check function of the control handle and main
hydraulic valve. Listen for abnormal noises in the
hydraulic valve, main hydraulic pump, and system
components.
If the maximum fork height is not reached, there is
low oil level in the hydraulic sump tank, or severe
binding within the upright.

Listen for clunking, squealing, grinding, scraping or


other unusual noises. Check for vibration. Listen for
wheel bearing or other specific running noise.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-02-9

WARNING
FALLING FORKS
Do not walk or stand under raised forks. The
forks can fall and cause injury or death.

Check fork height adjustment and carriage chain


adjustment. Tilt the upright to the vertical position
and fully lower the carriage. The forks should stop
and be held approximately 0.50 inch [13 mm] above
the floor. If the forks hit the floor, the carriage lift
chains should be adjusted.
If truck is equipped with an attachment, check the
control for correct function by briefly operating the
attachment.

CAUTION
When
you
have
completed
the
operational tests, park and leave truck
according to standard shutdown

Never Walk Under Raised Forks!


Check the upright rails, rollers, carriage, lift chains
and cylinders as they move. Watch for binding or
excessive freeplay (looseness) between the
carriage and the upright rails and rollers. Listen for
abnormal noises. If there is excessive clearance
between the rails and channels, the need for upright
roller adjustment is indicated. If the rails or carriage
bind or hesitate when lowering, the rollers are either
damaged or roller adjustment is incorrect.
Check the upright for excessive downdrift. Stop the
fork carriage in an intermediate position. Check that
it holds its position and raises or lowers smoothly
from any height position. If the forks carriage does
not hold its position when stopped, the lift cylinder
seals may be worn. Conduct an upright cylinder
downdrift test, with rated load, as needed.
Test the tilt function. Check for excessive tilt
cylinder drift. Stop the upright at a position near
vertical. Check that the upright holds its position
without moving forward. If you observe forward
movement (drift), or have a report of a tilt drift
problem, the tilt cylinder seals may be worn.
Test for correct tilt cylinder rod adjustment. Raise
the carriage to an intermediate position. Tilt the
upright fully FORWARD, without a load on the forks.
Check for upright racking (twisting) as the tilt
cylinders reach the end of their stoke.
Tilt the upright fully BACK. The upright should not
rack (twist) when the tilt cylinders reach the end of
their travel. If upright racking is found, adjustment of
the tilt cylinder rod ends (yokes) is required.

PS-02-10
Return

Standard Shutdown Procedures:

Always come to a complete stop.


Park only in authorized locations.
Lower the forks to the floor and tilt them
forward.

Allow travel control to return to neutral.


Turn the key switch off.
Step from the truck; the brake will set itself.
Be sure to make a report of all maintenance and
operating problems you find.

Battery Compartment Inspection


Turn key switch OFF. Disconnect battery from truck
receptacle.
Inspect condition of the battery connector and truck
battery receptacle. Check the spring-loaded
terminals, connectors, and retaining tabs. Look for
poor connections due to burning, bad crimps, or
broken or loose retainers. Check the molded body
for damage from overheating, burning and chips or
cracks. Clean all corrosion from contacts, as
necessary.

OCTOBER 1995

Inspect Condition of the battery and cables. Check


the battery cables for wear or other damage. Also
check for signs of interference or rubbing with other
components. Be sure that the cable terminals are
tight and clean. Clean off minor deposits of
corrosion that you find on the battery.
Never wash the battery when it is in the truck.
Check battery post terminals for corrosion and
damage. Clean all corrosion from cable end and
battery post. Check tightness of cable and post
terminals.
If necessary, check the state-of-charge condition of
the battery. Take a specific gravity test of the
electrolyte with a hydrometer. Be sure to check a
minimum of six battery cells.
Check the electrolyte lever of the battery. Add
distilled water, as required, to fill each cell to the
correct lever. Check to be sure the vent hole in all
battery cell caps is open. If caps vents are plugged
with corrosion, remove the caps and wash in a
solution of baking soda and water.
Refer to Group
information.

12,

Battery,

for

additional

Control Levers And Linkages Inspection


Inspect the drive motor, lift pump motor and steer
pump motor power cables. Check drive motor
mounting fasteners. Check steer and lift pump
mountings.

Air Cleaning
Always maintain a lift truck in a clean condition. Do
not allow dirt, dust, lint, or other contaminants to
accumulate on the truck. Keep the truck free from
leaking oil and grease. Wipe up all oil spills. Keep
the controls and floorboard clean and dry. A clean
truck makes it easier to see leaks, loose, missing or
damaged parts, and will help prevent fires. Clean
truck will run cooler.
The environment in which a lift truck operates will
determine how often and to what extent cleaning is
necessary. For example, trucks operating in
manufacturing plants which have a high level of dirt
or lint (e.g., cotton fibers, paper dust, etc.) in the air
or on the floor, will require more frequent cleaning. If
air pressure does not remove heavy deposits of
grease, oil, etc., it may be necessary to use steam
or liquid spray cleaner. Do not clean electrical
components with steam.
LIFT TRUCKS SHOULD BE AIR CLEANED AT
EVERY PM INTERVAL, AND OTHERWISE AS
OFTEN AS REQUIRED.

Motor SCR Control Inspection


IMPORTANT
Do not clean electrical components with
steam. Only approved solvents should be
used to clear controls and SCR
components. Use Digreaser (equivalent
to MS-180 Freon TF Degreaser and
Cleaner).

Turn key switch OFF. Disconnect battery from truck


receptacle. Remove control and hydraulic
compartment cover from truck.
Discharge the capacitor. Use an insulated tool, such
as a screwdriver with plastic or wood handle, to
short between the terminals.
Inspect the SCR controls for clean condition. Check
for oily dirt buildup on contactors, SCR control card,
capacitor, etc. Inspect all controls wiring and
terminals for any obvious damage. Look for cracks
or worn areas in the wiring insulation. Check for
loose connections at the control terminals. Air clean,
as necessary.

Control and Hydraulic Compartment


Inspection
Check the condition of all hydraulic system
components, hoses, piping and connections. Check
for wear, leakage, and damage.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

CAUTION
Use clean, dry, low-pressure compressed
air; restrict air pressure to 30 psi (207
kPa), maximum. Wear suitable eye
protection and protective clothing.

Air cleaning should be done using an air hose with


special adapter or extension have a control valve
and nozzle to direct the air properly.
Air clean the following: Upright assembly; drive
axle; battery, cables, switches and wiring harness;
SCR controls and wiring; drive, lift, and steering
motors; steering axle, steer cylinder.

Critical Fastener Torque Checks


Fasteners in highly loaded (critical) components can
quickly fail if they loosen. Loose fasteners can
cause damage or component failure. For safety, it is
important that the correct torque be maintained on
all fasteners of components which directly support,
handle or control the load, or protect the operator.
Check torque of critical items, including:
Overhead guard; drive axle mounting; drive and
steering wheel mounting; counterweight mounting;
load backrest extension; tilt cylinder mounting and
yokes; upright mounting and components.

PS-02-11

Lubrication, Fluids And Filters

Sump Tank Breather Maintenance

Cleanliness is very important. When servicing any


hydraulic component, keep work area, tools, and
components clean. Very small particles can do
major damage.

Remove the sump tank fill cap/breather and inspect


for excessive contamination and damage. Clean or
replace the fill cap/breather, per recommended PM
schedule or as required by operating conditions.

Hydraulic Sump
Check the hydraulic sump tank fluid level. Correct
fluid level is important for proper hydraulic system
operation. Low Fluid level can cause pump damage.
Overfilling can cause loss of fluid or lift system
malfunction.
Hydraulic fluid expands as its temperature rises.
Therefore, it is preferable to check the fluid level at
operating temperature, after approximately 30
minutes of truck operation. To check the fluid level,
first park the truck on a level surface. Put the upright
in a vertical position and lower the fork carriage fully
down. KEEP DIRT OUT OF THE SUMP. Pull the
dipstick out, wipe it with a clean wiper and reinsert it
fully into the dipstick tube. Remove the dipstick and
check the oil level. Keep the oil level above the
LOW mark on the dipstick by adding recommended
hydraulic fluid only, as required. DO NOT
OVERFILL.
Check the condition of the hydraulic fluid for color,
clarity, and contamination. Change (replace) the oil
as necessary.

Hydraulic Fluid and Filter Change

Access to the Drive Axle


The best method to use for reaching the drive axle
check points (oil level/filler plug and drain plugs) is
dependent upon the style of upright, carriage and

attachments on your truck. One method is to


raise the upright carriage to provide easy
access to the drive axle from the front.

WARNING
An upright or carriage can unexpectedly.
Chain or block the carriage and rails.
Failure to follow this warning can result in
serious injury.

Refer to Lifting, Jacking and Blocking, Group SA,


Section 2, for additional information on supporting
the upright.
Block the wheels. Be sure to put blocking under the
carriage and upright rails.

Drive Axle Fluid


Drive axle inspection and service plug openings are
shown by the following illustration.

Drain and replace the hydraulic sump fluid every


2000 operating hours, or sooner, as required.
Replace the hydraulic oil filter at every oil change.
Replace the sump tank breather/fill cap every 1000
operating hours.
There is on drain plug in the hydraulic sump tank.
The hydraulic fluid can be changed by one of the
following methods:
A. Removal of the hydraulic sump tank cover assembly
and pumping the fluid out by suction using a
separate pump and hose.
B. Pumping the fluid out by using the truck hydraulic
system. This method may be used most easily and
satisfactorily for routine changes of the fluid if
procedures in Group 31 are followed closely.

Hydraulic Oil Filter


Remove and replace the hydraulic system fluid filter
per recommended PM schedule, or as required by
truck operating conditions and usage. Install a new
oil filter. Be sure to follow the installation instructions
printed on the filter. Check for leaks after installation
of the filter. Also, check that the hydraulic line
connections at the filter adapter are tightened
correctly.
Always use genuine BT PRIME-MOVER parts

PS-02-12
Return

1.Fill oil level dipstick plug. Also acts as the


breather cap.
2.Drain plug.

Check the drive axle fluid level with the truck on


a level surface and oil at operating temperature.
Remove the fluid level inspection plug located
in the front surface of the drive axle center
housing.
Wipe dipstick clean and reinstall.
Remove dipstick and examine. Oil level should
be between the two marks on the dipstick. If oil
OCTOBER 1995

level is low, add enough oil to bring oil level up to full


mark on dipstick. DO NOT OVER FILL.
Add recommended fluid only, as required. Refer to
Specifications for drive axle recommended oil
specification.
Inspect the fill plug for damage. Replace as needed.
Install and tighten the plug.

Drive Axle Fluid Change


NOTE
Check the PM interval (operating
hours), or the condition of the oil to
determine if the drive axle fluid needs
to be changed.

WARNING
Be sure to put blocking under the
frame to keep the truck safe.

Be sure to clean the grease fittings before


lubricating and remove the excess grease from all
points after lubricating.

Upright and Tilt Cylinder Lubrication


Clean the fittings and lubricate the tilt cylinder rod
end bushings, front end only.
Clean the fittings and lubricate the upright trunnion
bushings (one fitting on top of trunnion, each side).

Lift Chains
NOTE

Drain and replace the drive axle fluid every 1000


operating hours. The oil Should be drained when it
is at operating temperature. Put the truck in a level
position. Block the wheels to prevent truck from
moving.

Do not lubricate the carriage roller


rails.

Lubricate the entire length of the rail lift and carriage


chains with BT Prime-Mover Chain and Cable Lube.

Inspect and clean the drive axle breather (air vent).

Truck Chassis Inspection and Lubrication


Lubrication and inspection of truck chassis
components, including steering wheels and wheel
bearings will be easier if the rear of the truck is
raised and blocked up under the frame. Refer to
Lifting, Jacking and Blocking, Group SA, Section 2,
for additional information.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

PS-02-13

Return

Group 12
BATTERY

Battery Handling ......................................................................... Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

12-00-1

12-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Battery Handling

Typical Battery Service Area ............................................................ 2


Battery Handling ................................................................................ 3
Battery Maintenance.......................................................................... 5
How to Get Maximum Life Out of Your Battery .............................. 6
Battery Vents.................................................................................. 7
Battery Cleaning............................................................................. 7
Battery Charging ............................................................................ 7
Battery Electrolyte .......................................................................... 7
Clean Battery Compartment........................................................... 7
Replacement Battery...................................................................... 7
Install Battery ..................................................................................... 8
Keeping Battery Records.................................................................. 8

OCTOBER 1995
Return

12-01-1

Typical Battery Service Area

12-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Battery Handling

WARNING
Electric truck batteries are heavy and awkward to handle. On
charge, they give off hydrogen and oxygen which, in certain
concentrations, are explosive. Electric truck batteries are also
costly, so before you remove, service, or install a truck
battery, consult BATTERY MANUFACTURER, for more
recommendations and instructions on handling and charging
batteries. Carefully read and follow recommendations and
instructions.

Change or service batteries only in an area


designated for this purpose. Refer to Page 6 for
additional information.
Be sure this area has provisions to flush and
neutralize acid spillage.
Be certain the area has proper ventilation to
ventilate fumes from gassing batteries.
Check to see that there is fire protection. Fire
extinguishers should be properly maintained
and located in designated areas.

DANGER
Explosive gas is always present
around batteries, especially when
they are being charged. The
following should be adhered to:

No smoking shall be allowed in


the charging area.

Battery electrolyte shall never


be checked with an open flame.

Open flame, sparks, or electric


arcs shall never be allowed in
the battery charging area.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

12-01-3

WARNING
SULFURIC ACID
The battery contains corrosive acid which can cause injury. If acid
contacts your eyes or skin, flush immediately with water and get
medical assistance.

Persons maintaining storage batteries must wear


protective clothing such as:
Face and Head Shields
Long Shirt Sleeves
Gauntlet Gloves

Be sure the battery service area is equipped with


material handling equipment designed for the
purpose of removing and replacing batteries, such
as a conveyer or overhead hoist equipped with
safety hooks.
When using an overhead hoist, be sure to use
an insulated spreader bar or similar lifting
device.
To prevent side forces from damaging the
battery, the distance between the lifting hooks
(of the spreader bar) must be adjusted to the
same dimension as measured between the
battery lifting eyes. Make sure the lifting hooks
are the correct size to fit the lifting eyes of the
battery.
Be sure the hoist is equipped with a chain
container to accumulate excess lifting chain.
When this is not possible, be sure the battery is
covered as shown below.

If the battery does not have a cover of its own,


cover it with a non-conductive material such as
plywood.

12-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Never lay tools or other metal objects on a


battery. Metal objects contacting battery
terminals will cause short circuits. The shorted
circuits could ignite battery fumes and cause
the battery to explode.

Battery Removal
1. Move truck to the designated battery service
area.
2. Turn key switch OFF and disconnect battery.

3. Remove battery retainer plate.


4. The battery must be pushed out of the
compartment. A recommended method of
handling the battery is to use a platform
equipped with rollers similar to the one shown
in opposite illustration.
If the battery to be handled is uncovered,
cover battery with a non-conducting material
(plywood, heavy cardboard, etc.) prior to
removal from truck.

NOTE
Do not wash battery in truck.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

12-01-5

5. Once the battery is out of the truck, a lifting


device equipped with an insulated spreader
bar and safety hook(s) can be used to
transport battery. Be sure battery is covered
prior to attaching lifting device.
An overhead hoist (of sufficient lifting capacity,
refer to Weights in Group 40) should be used
to lift battery. The safety hooks of the insulated
spreader bar should be attached to the lifting
eyes provided in the battery casing.

Battery Maintenance
Batteries are used to supply the electrical power to
operate an Electric Industrial Truck. Their voltage
depends on the number of individual cells they
contain. There are approximately 2 volts for each
cell in the commonly used lead-acid type battery.
Batteries normally range from 6 volts to 72 volts.
Their capacity varies depending on the application.
Only use batteries that comply with factory
specifications as to size and capacity.

How To Get Maximum


Life Out Of Your Battery
Do not add acid to a battery. Only qualified
Battery Representatives should determine if this
is necessary.
When lifting a battery, use a lifting device
designed for this purpose.
Check the electrolyte level before placing a
battery on charge. Add water, if required, before
charging the battery. The electrolyte level in a
battery should be slightly below the lower lip of
the filling hole vent. Do not over fill. Over
flushing causes loss of electrolyte.
Keep the battery clean, dry and in good
condition.
Keep metal objects and tools away from the top
of the battery. Short circuits will cause battery
damage and could ignite battery fumes
exploding the battery.
Maintain good battery cable connections.
Check power cables and wiring for damage that
can cause premature drainage of the battery.
Do not over charge a battery.
Do not under charge a battery.
Follow the instructions provided by your
supplier(s) of the battery and battery charging
equipment.
Maintain accurate battery records. If battery

troubles occur, these records will help you


and your battery representative determine
the nature of the problem.

Battery Maintenance
To obtain maximum performance and
battery life, the instructions supplied by
your Battery Vendor should be adhered to.

12-01-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Battery Vents
When Charging Batteries: The vent caps
must be kept in place to avoid electrolyte
spray. Care must be taken to assure that vent
caps are functioning. The cap vents must be
open to allow the battery to breath. The
battery cover must be removed/opened to
dissipate heat and explosive gas.
When Cleaning Batteries: The vents must be
tightly in place.

until dissolved. It is advisable to have this


solution around the battery service area at all
times.
After washing battery, thoroughly rinse with
clear cold water.

Battery Charging
Follow the instructions supplied by the Battery
Charger Vendor.

Battery Electrolyte
Always use a carboy tilter or siphon when
handling battery electrolyte.
When mixing electrolyte, always pour acid
into water ~ never pour water into acid.
Pouring water into acid will cause a dangerous
chemical action.

Clean Battery Compartment


Battery Cleaning
The easiest and most satisfactory method of
cleaning a battery is to wash it with a low pressure
cold water spray. The battery top can also be
washed with a baking soda solution and rinsed with
clear water.

Using baking soda and water solution, clean


the walls and floor of the compartment. Rinse
with clear water.
Blow off the compartment walls and floor with
an air hose. Allow to air dry.

Check to be sure all vent caps are tight before


washing the battery.
Fill a bucket with cold water while adding a
box of baking soda to the pail. Stir the solution

Replacement Batteries
CAUTION
IMPORTANT
Vent caps must be free of obstruction and in
good condition. Battery top should be clean and
free of cracks or breaks. Battery terminals must
be clean and solidly mounted. Damaged
batteries should be repair or replaced.your
battery vendor.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Caution should be exercised to use a battery


properly sized to the dimensions of the
battery compartment. Batteries too small can
shift and cause damage to the truck or injury
to the operator or bystanders.
Only use batteries that comply with factory
recommendations as to size and capacity.

12-01-7

Install Battery
If the battery is uncovered, cover the battery with a
non-conducting material (i.e., plywood, heavy
cardboard, etc.) prior to installation.
Push battery into battery compartment.
Install battery retainer.
Remove non-conductive material from battery.
Connect battery to truck.

Keeping Battery Records


should be maintained to get the best service out of
your battery and truck.

These Records Should Contain:


Test Date. Each test should be dated for
future reference and comparison.
Specific
Gravity
and
Temperature
Readings. Each battery cell should be
checked and recorded before and after
charging. The specific gravity reading of the
electrolyte should not be less than 1.260. If
below 1.250, the battery should be recharged
and tested.
Variation Between Each Cell Tested. The

12-01-8
Return

variation in specific gravity reaching between


cells should not be greater than 15 points
(.015). If readings are greater, this indicates
there are defective cells.
The pilot cell should be changed occasionally
to distribute any electrolyte loss over the
battery when taking readings.
Load Voltage Tests should be performed and
recorded indicating the condition of a battery
while it is performing work.
Actual Operating Hours Of The Battery.
Record the actual time the battery is in use
before putting it on charge.
Charging Time. Keep an accurate record of
the actual time the battery is on charge. After
each charge, check to see if the battery is fully
charged. Test the battery before placing it
back into service. Record these results.
Visually
Inspect
for
loose
terminal
connections or posts, a cracked case, or
damaged cell covers (vent caps) and
excessive corrosion. This data should be
noted to help ascertain work environment and
possible trouble areas.
For further information, refer to Group 19, Section 4
in this manual.
Check with your local battery supplier for complete
battery maintenance procedures and their
expertise.

OCTOBER 1995

Group 13
ELECTRICAL HANDLE SWITCH

Control Handle Switch................................................... Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

13-00-1

13-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Control Handle Switch

Tilt, Auxiliary 1 and Auxiliary 2 (Attachment) Switches................. 4


Remove and Install......................................................................... 4
UP and DOWN Switches ................................................................... 5
Remove and Install......................................................................... 5
Forward and Reverse Switches, Transducer (Speed Control) ...... 6
Remove and Install Switches ......................................................... 6
Remove and Install Transducer ..................................................... 6

OCTOBER 1995
Return

13-01-1

13-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

13-01-3

Tilt, Auxiliary 1 And Auxiliary 2


(Attachment) Switches
These switches (1) are located in a separate
housing within the control handle. The handle grip
has two halves (switch side and heel side).

Remove Switch
1. Remove fasteners (2 and 3), refer to
opposite illustration.
2. Remove inner fasteners(4 and 5).
3. Pull harness wires free of their retainer slots
in handle (heel side).
4. Provide some wire slack in the housing
before removing a switch,
5. Pull switch from housing.
6. Remove wires from switch connections.

Install Switch
IMPORTANT
Connector plugs and receptacles are
permanently labeled with the proper PL
(Plug) and SO (Socket) number for easy
identification.

CAUTION
If disconnected, match plug number
with appropriate socket number before
making a connection, i.e., Plug #PL-9
plugs into pin Socket #SO-9, etc. If not,
electrical shorts and possible damage
to equipment may result.

1. Connect wires to the new switch and install


switch into plastic housing.
2. Carefully pull wires taunt but not so tight as
to cause damage to the connections. Place
housing into handle (heel side).
3. Carefully push wires into their retainer slots
using a blunt instrument so as not to
damage wire insulation.
4. Assemble handle being certain to tighten
fasteners (2-5) securely.

13-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

UP and DOWN Switches


These adjustable switches control lift and lower
functions of the upright and are mounted to a
bracket on the left side bracket the handle bracket.
Refer to opposite illustration.

Remove Switch
1. Remove cam fastener, washer and cam.
Refer to illustration.
2. Disconnect switch assembly
removed) from the wire harness.

(to

be

3. Remove fasteners securing switches and


switch adjustor to bracket.
4. Remove switch adjustor bolt, both lock
washers, spring, and switch adjustor.
Remove switch assembly.

Install Switch
1. Install new switch assembly.
2. Connect switch assembly to wire harness.
3. Adjust switch. Refer to Group 19, Section 5,
for switch adjustment procedures.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

13-01-5

Transducer (Speed Control) Forward


and Reverse Switches
Two adjustable switches mounted to a bracket at
the rear of the multi-function control handle provide
forward and reverse direction of the truck. A
transducer and adjustor plate are attached to a
mounting plate at the rear of the control. The
tranducer provides variable speed control until the
1A contactor operates to put the truck in top speed
mode.

Remove Forward/Reverse Switch


1. Disconnect switch assembly from the wire
harness.
2. Remove adjustor screw and lock washer
securing the switch, switch adjustor, lock
washer and spring to the switch bracket.

Install Forward/Reverse Switch


1. Install new switch assembly, switch adjustor,
lock washer and spring to the reverse order
of removal. Secure the sub-assembly with
adjustor screw and lock washer.
2. Connect switch assembly to wire harness.
3. Adjust switch. Refer to Group 19, Section 5,
for switch adjustment procedures.

Remove and Install Transducer (Speed


Control)
1. Disconnect transducer from wire harness.
2. Remove fasteners securing the transducer
adjustor plate to bracket.
3. Remove nut and lock washer securing
transducer to adjustor plate. Install new
transducer.
4. Install transducer and adjustor plate to
bracket.
5. Adjust switch. Refer to Group 19 for switch
adjustment procedures.

13-01-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Group 16
ELECTRICAL MOTORS

General Information.................................................................... Section 1


Drive Motors................................................................................ Section 2
Hydraulic Pump Motor ............................................................... Section 3
Steer Pump Motor....................................................................... Section 4

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-00-1

16-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
General Information

Safety.................................................................................................. 2
Servicing Electric Motors.................................................................. 2
Electric Motor Maintenance .............................................................. 3
Inspection Procedures.................................................................... 3
Motor Cleanliness........................................................................... 3
Motor Inspection............................................................................. 3
Test for Motor Insulation Resistance to Ground......................... 4
Using a 500 Volt Megger................................................................ 4
Using a Simpson 260-6p Volt Ohmmeter or
Equivalent Calibrated on the Rx10,000 Scale................................ 4
Brush and Commutator Inspection.................................................. 5
Operating Conditions ........................................................................ 5
Brush and Commutator Inspection................................................. 5
Brush Inspection Chart ..................................................................... 7

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-01-1

Safety

Slip boot off cover lip and tuck bottom of boot


into cover hole.

WARNING
Always wear safety glasses.

Remove fasteners securing cover(s) to


truck.

Remover covers.

Remove all jewelry before working on truck.

Servicing Electric Motors


Move Truck to Service Area
1. Park truck on a flat level surface.

Fully lower lift carriage.

Tilt forks full forward

2. Turn key switch off.

Remove key.

Disconnect truck battery.

4. Discharge the capacitors.

Be sure the battery is unplugged.

Discharge capacitor.

3. Remove cover(s).

16-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Electric Motor Maintenance


A planned maintenance program of regular, routine
inspections is important for long life and trouble-free
operation of electric motors. Make and keep records
of your inspections. Use these records to help
establish correct P.M. intervals and to indicate
maintenance required to prevent major problems
from occurring during operation.

Inspection Procedures
To perform these service
recommended that you first:

procedures,

it

is

Wear eye protection when air cleaning


(blow out) open motors; using clean, dry
(moisture-free) compressed air at 30 psi.
(207 kPa) maximum air pressure. Air
clean all inner areas around commutator
and brushes, including cooling air vents
and fan.

The presence of any oil on or near motor could


indicate either bad bearings or leaking hydraulic
system. Determine cause and repair problem before
extensive motor damage occurs.

Motor Insulation

Park truck safely.

Fully lower upright.

Apply parking brake.

Turn key switch OFF.

contamination

Disconnect battery from truck receptacle.

mechanical Factors

Discharge capacitors, see page 2.

high Temperatures

Motor Cleanliness
Electric motors should be kept clean at all times to
prevent shorting, minimize wear, and for best
cooling.

Wipe off all dust, dirt, oil, water, etc., from


outer surface of motor.

Remove any debris from cooling air vents


and around motor frame to prevent
overheating.

WARNING
Wear eye protection and protective
clothing when cleaning or drying with
compressed air. Reduce air pressure
to 30 psi (207 kPa). Debris removed
with air pressure can cause injury.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

If a reduction in motor performance has been noted,


it may be due to breakdown in motor insulation
causing internal grounding or a short circuit.
Failures of motor insulation are due to:

Contamination includes dirt, moisture, oily vapors,


metal chips, carbon dust from brushes, etc.
Mechanical factors include shock, vibration, over
speed, etc.
Operation at prolonged or excessively high
temperature will cause insulation to become brittle
and crack leading to premature failure. The
insulation condition can be judged both visually and
by
test
measurement.
Regular,
periodic
measurements of insulation resistance can give a
useful indication of the rate of insulation
deterioration.
A sudden drop or consistent trend toward low
values of insulation resistance give evidence that
insulation is deteriorating and that failure may be
imminent.

16-01-3

Using a Simpson 260-6p Volt-Ohmmeter


(VOM) or Equivalent Calibrated on the
Rx10,000 Scale.

Test For Motor Insulation


Resistance To Ground
Using a 500 Volt Megger

This test may be made with motor in the truck.

Test must be made with motor out of truck.

1. Disconnect battery from truck receptacle.


2. Disconnect power cables from all motor
terminals.
3. Connect one lead of a 500 volt megger to
any motor terminal.

1. Disconnect battery from truck receptacle.


2. Disconnect
terminals.

power

cables

from

motor

3. Connect the positive lead of the VOM to all


terminal studs of test motor. Use jumper
wires to connect between motor terminals.
Connect VOM negative lead to motor frame.

NOTE
Test ALL terminals individually or by
interconnecting with jumper wires.

NOTE
Test all terminals individually, or
joined together, as noted.

4. Connect other lead to motor frame. Apply


voltage.
5. Resistance should measure
1,000,000 ohms (1 megohm).

at

least

6. If less than 1 megohm is measured, air


clean motor and repeat test. If air cleaning
does not make an improvement, the motor
will have to be removed from the truck and
disassembled for a closer inspection.

16-01-4
Return

4. VOM
must
show
1,000,000
ohms
(1megohm) resistance or higher for a good
motor insulation.
5. If less than 1 megohm is measured, air
clean motor and repeat test. If air cleaning
does not make an improvement, the motor
will have to be removed from the truck and
disassembled for a closer inspection.

OCTOBER 1995

Brush and Commutator Inspection

Brush and Commutator Inspection


The key to planned maintenance of the brush
and commutator is recognizing the undesirable
brush and commutator conditions. If this is done,
corrective action can be taken before a major
component is damaged beyond serviceability. The
brushes and commutator should be inspected for
even wear and good commutation.

1. Remove brush cover(s) and remove brushes


from brush holders. Clean brushes and
holders. Check brush holders for damage.

Good Commutation: A dark uniform coloring


pattern at the brush wearing surface.

3. Clean
commutator
surface.
Wipe
commutator with a dry, lint-free cloth. DO
NOT use lubricant or solvent on
commutator.

Poor Commutation: The


surface
of
the
commutator appearing rough, pitted, scored or
signs of burning or heavy arching between bars.
The coloring pattern will be:

Streaky film with commutator wear.

Bar edge burning.

Uneven film.

Brushes should be inspected for uneven wear


and signs of overheating:

Discolored brush shunts.

Discolored brush springs.

Refer to the Brush Inspection Chart at the end of


this section.

2. Inspect condition of brushes. Remove each


brush from brush holder and inspect
brushes and commutator for worn condition
and uneven wear.

4. Check appearance of commutator surface


where brushes ride, inspect commutator
bars for burned, damaged or raised areas.
The best signs of good commutation are a
dark brown highly-polished commutator and
uniform glossy brush-wearing surfaces.
5. Measure and make a record of brush length
at each inspection. The record will verify
amount of brush ear and indicate if there is
enough brush length remaining until next
scheduled inspection.
6. Brushes must be replaced when worn to
approximately 1/3 of original length.

IMPORTANT

Different Grade Brushes:When the brushes being


fitted are of a different grade from those previously
used, then it is advisable to remove the film left by
the previous grade brushes.
This film removal should be done by scouring with a
strip of abrasive cloth (do not use emery cloth) while
the armature is rotating. Do not finish with a lapped,
highly polished surface. A moderately abraded
commutator surface will help the new brushes to run
in and the commutator will acquire more readily the
film appropriate to the new brush grade.

Operating Conditions
Operating environment of lift truck motors
varies widely: The following recommendations
should be applied as actual conditions dictate.
Normal Service: Basically an eight hour day of
mostly indoor or outdoor material
handling.
Severe Service:

Extended operating
constant usage.

hours,

or

Extreme Service: Chemical Processing


Freezer operation
Processing plants (poultry, meat)

OCTOBER 1995
Return

New brushes must be of same size


and equal or better grade (material
specification) as replaced brushes.
Observe
how
brushes
are
assembled in brush holders, and
position of brush lead (pigtail). New
brushes must be installed in same
manner.

7. Check brush lead (pigtail) for good contact


with brush holder. Be sure lead is not
damaged or burned since this may cause
brush spring to carry current and lose
tension.
8. If brushes do not need to be replaced, and
commutator is in good condition, install
brushes and brush springs into brush
holders.

IMPORTANT

Always replace both brushes


springs. Do not use old springs.

and

NOTE

Be sure brush spring is correctly


placed on brush holder and that
brush is free to slide in brush box.

16-01-5

9. Clean and check brush box and connector


screws. Tighten if loose. Be sure brush box
shunt connection is tight. Install brush cover
on motor case.
10. Check and tighten all motor bolts. Check
lower nut on each terminal post. It should be
installed finger-tight, then tightened another
1/4 turn with a wrench.

16-01-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-01-7

Return

Section 2.
Drive Motors

Safety.................................................................................................. 2
General Information........................................................................... 3
Operating Conditions ........................................................................ 3
Drive Motor Description .................................................................... 4
Drive Motor Removal......................................................................... 4
Drive Motor......................................................................................... 5
Drive Motor......................................................................................... 6
Disassembly ................................................................................ 6
Component Inspection and Troubleshooting............................... 8
Testing......................................................................................... 9
Frame and Field Service notes.................................................... 9
Assembly ..................................................................................... 9
36-Volt Drive Motor Specifications ................................................. 11
Brush Inspection Chart .................................................................... 12

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-02-1

Safety

Always wear safety glasses.

WARNING
Wear eye protection and protective
clothing when cleaning or drying with
compressed air. Reduce air pressure
to 30 psi (207 kPa). Debris removed
with air pressure can cause injury.

Use a torque wrench to tighten terminal connections.

Remove all jewelry before working on truck.

16-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

General Information

Operating Conditions

Routine maintenance schedule with recorded


findings is the best way to reduce costly shutdowns and repair of equipment during operating
hours.

Operating environment of lift truck motors


varies widely: The following recommendations
should be applied as actual conditions dictate.

The goal of any maintenance program long-life and


trouble-free operations is related to the time spent
making inspections and correcting minor problems
as they occur.
The key to planned maintenance of the brush and
commutator is recognizing the undesirable brush
and commutator conditions. If this is done,
corrective action can be taken before a major
component is damaged beyond serviceability. The
brushes and commutator should be inspected for
even wear and good commutation.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Normal Service: Basically an eight hour day of


mostly indoor or outdoor material
handling.
Severe Service:

Extended operating
constant usage.

hours,

or

Extreme Service:Chemical Processing

Freezer operation
Processing plants (poultry, meat)

16-02-3

Drive Motor Description


The drive motor is a series wound type with Class H
insulation and integral cooling fan. The exterior
connections are easily accessible from side of
motor where they are protected from external
damage. The brushes are accessible and can easily
be changed. The motor has no armature shaft
bearing on the drive end; armature shaft is
supported in drive axle pinion pilot.

Drive Motor Removal

Drive Motor
Installation
1. Install service brake if removed. Refer to
service brake group for details.
2. Install new O-ring on drive motor flange pilot.

IMPORTANT
Coat spline shaft of motors with never
seize before installation.

Refer to illustration on page 2.


1. Turn key switch off, disconnect battery and
block the wheels.
2. Remove top cover and front cover.
3. Identify, tag, and disconnect motor leads.
Replace the motor terminal nuts to avoid
loss.
4. Disconnect wiring from brake pressure
switch.
5. Disconnect pressure switch from brake line.
6. Disconnect hydraulic brake line to brake
slave cylinder on drive motor to be removed.
7. Remove motor mounting bolts and washers.
8. Use chain hoist and strap to remove drive
motor from drive axle. Lower motor to floor
or dolly.

WARNING
Use only approved hoist, chains, and
straps to lift drive motor. Be sure
hoist and accessories have correct
capacity to safely support the load.

3. Use chain hoist and strap to lift drive motor


from floor or dolly. Lower motor and carefully
insert motor shaft into splined pilot of drive
axle pinion.
4. Install motor mounting bolts and washers.
Torque bolts to:
52-59 lb./ft. [70-80 Nm]
5. Connect hydraulic brake lines to slave
cylinders and brake pressure switch using
Teflon thread sealant on male pipe threads.
(If removed: Apply Threadlocker to switch
and bracket mounting bolts and nuts.)
6. Bleed brake lines. Refer to procedures in
Group 23.
7. Connect power cables to correct drive motor
terminals. Replace motor terminal nuts and
tighten using two wrenches, one to hold the
bottom nut while tightening the upper nut.
8. Install wiring to brake pressure switch.
9. Replace top cover and front cover.
10. Connect battery and test truck operation.

9. Remove and discard O ring from drive motor


flange pilot.

10. Remove service brake. Refer to Group


23 for details.

16-02-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-02-5

Drive Motor
Disassembly

Remove the cover band (if so equipped)


from the commutator end of the motor. Use
a brush hook to reach into the motor and lift
the brush springs. Pull the brushes out of the
brush holders. Either position the brushes
outside the motor or remove the brush
retaining screws and remove the brushes
from the motor.

Scribe or center punch locating marks in the


end heads and the frame. Although locating
marks are not always necessary because of
locating pins in some motors, they can save
a lot of time when the motor does not have
locating pins.

Remove the commutator end head retaining


screws or bolts. Almost all motors have a
slip fit bearing at the commutator end, and
the end head can be removed with very little
trouble. Remove end head.

Remove bearing from head.

Remove the drive end head retaining bolts


or screws, if necessary.

Remove the drive end head.

Pull the armature assembly


housing and field coil assembly.

If the shaft, or spline is damaged when


removing the end head, the armature or the
drive spline usually has to be replaced. Use
caution and do not damage the armature.

from

the

Remove Ventilating Fan


There will be occasions when it will be necessary to
remove the ventilating fan and/or drive splines from
the armature shaft. The ventilating fan is, for the
most part, cast iron or cast aluminum. Once the fan
has been pressed onto the armature, it must be
heated to be removed without damage.

Remove Fan
A puller is installed and a slight pressure exerted
against the fan. Use a small propane torch to heat
the area of the fan around the shaft. When the fan
becomes loose on the shaft, as evidenced by the
puller becoming loose, it should be removed as
quickly as possible.

Remove Retainer Pin


Press or drive the spline retaining pin out of the
shaft and spline.

Remove Spline
Use a hammer and chisel or drift punch to drive
spline out of shaft.

16-02-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-02-7

Component Inspection and Troubleshooting


After the motor components have been thoroughly
cleaned and dried, they should be inspected for the
following:

Brushes should be inspected for uneven wear and


signs of overheating, i.e.:

Discolored brush shunts.


Discolored brush springs.
Refer to the Brush Chart at the end of this
section.

Drive End Head


1. Check bearing recess for any signs of wear.
2. Check mounting holes for any stripped or
crossed threads or broken studs.

Commutator End Head


1. Check bearing recess for any signs of wear.
2. Check brush holder insulation for cracks or
any signs of burning.
3. Check brush holders and springs for wear.

Bearings
1. Check bearings by turning them with your
fingers. Feel for binding or gritty effects and
excessive looseness or wobble. A good
bearing should also have a small amount of
drag or stiffness caused by the lubrication
but should turn smoothly. If the bearing turns
very freely, it should be replaced. Bearings
should also be changed, if worn out,
damaged or removed from armature shaft.
Ball bearings that have been pulled off of
shafts, pressed out of end heads, or side
loaded in such a way as to apply pressure
on the balls and races must be replaced.
Although the bearing may appear or feel
good, the bearing races have been brinelled
and will fail within a relatively short period of
service.

Armature
1. Check security of fan.
2. Check for loose commutator bars. Loose
commutator bars will usually be indicated by
excessive wear or burning on one bar. The
commutator can be checked for loose bars
by lightly tapping all of the bars with the
handle of a plastic or wooden handled
screwdriver. A contrasting dull thud or
vibration will indicate a loose bar in which
case, the armature must be replaced.
3. Check for grounded circuits using a test
light. Most commercial growlers incorporate
a test light as shown in illustration below.

Check the armature for grounded


circuits by placing one test lead of the
test lamp on the commutator and the
other test lead on the armature shaft. If
the test light lights, the armature is
grounded.

Brush and Commutator


The brushes and commutator should be inspected
for even wear and good commutation.
Good Commutation:A dark uniform
pattern at the brush wearing surface.

coloring

Poor Commutation:The surface of the commutator


appearing rough, pitted, scored or signs of burning or
heavy arcing between bars. The color pattern will be:

Streaky film with commutator wear.


Bar edge burning.
Uneven film.
Carbon dust bridging between bars.

16-02-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

4. Standard Winding Armatures are tested on a


growler (see illustration below) using a steel
strip or hacksaw blade to locate any shorted
windings.
Check for shorted windings by slowly
rotating the armature in the growler while
holding the strip or blade so that it passes
over each armature core slot. If a winding is
shorted, the strip or blade will vibrate and
the blade will get hot.

Testing
Frame and Field Assembly
After thorough inspection, the Frame and Field
Assembly should be checked for grounded, open or
shorted circuits. Grounded and open circuits can be
checked using a test light. Most commercial
growlers incorporate a test light as shown in
opposite illustration.

Grounded Circuit
Touch one test lead to a clean bare metal
spot on the frame and check all terminals
with the other lead. If a grounded condition
exists, the test light will light.

Open Circuit
Check between all connecting terminals with
test leads. If the bulb fails to light, an open
circuit is indicated.

Shorted Circuit
Shorted windings in series coils are very
difficult to detect. Generally, if the coil
insulation is sound and these are no signs of
overheating, the coil can be presumed good.

Frame and Field Service Notes


NOTE
If the armature has been turned and
undercut prior to testing, check for
and remove any copper buildup or
filings between commutator bars
and at the commutator riser. This
condition will cause an armature to
check shorted and usually results
from a dull undercutting tool.

5. Check commutator bars for any signs of


burning. If deep burned sections are evident,
either in the brush track or on the riser ends
of the commutator bars, an open or short
circuit in the armature windings is indicated.

Frame and Field Assembly


Check the condition of all insulation. If the insulation
on the field coils appears blackened or charred, the
serviceability of the coils is questionable. Burned or
charred insulation is a result of coil overheating due
to overloading conditions, grounded or shorted coil
windings. Check condition of all other insulation
such as brush rigging, under coil connections and
around terminal studs.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

If the inside of the motor is exceptionally dirty and


there is evidence of a grounding condition caused
by the dirt, the inside of the motor can be given an
additional coat of insulating varnish. Red glyptol can
be used if a better material is not available,
however, we recommend using a class H
Polyurethane air drying insulating varnish. This is
readily available under various brand names from
electrical repair or parts houses in aerosol type
dispensers.
Before spraying field coils, make sure they are
absolutely clean and dry. Protect brush rigging, pole
shoe faces and end head seats to keep varnish off.

Assembly
Field Coil Installation
Good solder connections are important due to the
vibration characteristics encountered by these
motors which can cause cold or poorly soldered
connections to break.

Prior to installing the field coils, the


connections which require soldering should
be buffed or wire brushed clean to remove
any oxidation. The connections should then
be tinned with a soldering iron.

16-02-9

NOTE
We do not recommend using a
soldering gun or torch. Soldering
gun cannot provide the heat
concentration
required
and
soldering torches can damage the
insulation.

After field coil installation, connect the solder


joint making sure the solder is flowing
properly to avoid a cold soldered joint.

Continue assembly in the reverse of disassembly,


paying particular attention to the following points.
Bearing Installation
1. Whenever ball bearings are pressed into an
end head or onto a shaft, always press
against the race that is absorbing the
pressure.
Press on the outer race when installing into
end heads.
Press against the inner race when installing
onto a shaft.
2. End heads having slip-fit bearings are
normally retained by a snap ring. Always
install new snap ring(s).
After Assembly

Pole Shoe Screw Removal & Installation


(Field Coil Removal & Installation)

The motor should be connected as specified


in Troubleshooting, and tested to the
specifications.

When testing motors, the voltmeter


connections must be made at the motor
terminals.

When changing brushes


When changing brushes, the commutator must be
serviced as follows:

16-02-10
Return

Resurface the commutator by taking only


light cuts each time, 0.005 in. (0.12mm).

If reslotting/undercutting is necessary, the


final operation is to lightly sand the
commutator with a fine sandpaper to remove
any burrs left from the undercutting
operation.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-02-11

16-02-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 3.
Hydraulic Pump Motors

Safety.................................................................................................. 2
General Information........................................................................... 3
Operating Conditions ........................................................................ 3
Hydraulic Pump Motor ...................................................................... 4
Disassembly ................................................................................ 4
Component Inspection and Troubleshooting............................... 6
Testing......................................................................................... 7
Frame and Field Service notes.................................................... 7
Assembly ..................................................................................... 7
36-Volt Drive Motor Specifications .................................................. 9
Brush Inspection Chart .................................................................... 10

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-03-1

Safety

Always wear safety glasses.

WARNING
Wear eye protection and protective
clothing when cleaning or drying with
compressed air. Reduce air pressure
to 30 psi (207 kPa). Debris removed
with air pressure can cause injury.

Use a torque wrench to tighten terminal connections.

Remove all jewelry before working on truck.

16-03-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

General Information

Operating Conditions

Routine maintenance schedule with recorded


findings is the best way to reduce costly shutdowns and repair of equipment during operating
hours.

Operating environment of lift truck motors


varies widely: The following recommendations
should be applied as actual conditions dictate.

The goal of any maintenance program long-life and


trouble-free operations is related to the time spent
making inspections and correcting minor problems
as they occur.
The key to planned maintenance of the brush and
commutator is recognizing the undesirable brush
and commutator conditions. If this is done,
corrective action can be taken before a major
component is damaged beyond serviceability. The
brushes and commutator should be inspected for
even wear and good commutation.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Normal Service: Basically an eight hour day of


mostly indoor or outdoor material
handling.
Severe Service:

Extended operating
constant usage.

hours,

or

Extreme Service:Chemical Processing

Freezer operation
Processing plants (poultry, meat)

16-03-3

Hydraulic Pump Motor


Disassembly

Remove the cover band (if so equipped)


from the commutator end of the motor. Use
a brush hook to reach into the motor and lift
the brush springs. Pull the brushes out of the
brush holders. Either position the brushes
outside the motor or remove the brush
retaining screws and remove the brushes
from the motor.

Scribe or center punch locating marks in the


end heads and the frame. Although locating
marks are not always necessary because of
locating pins in some motors, they can save
a lot of time when the motor does not have
locating pins.

Remove the commutator end head retaining


screws or bolts. The motors have a slip fit
bearing at the commutator end, and the end
head can be removed with very little trouble.

Remove bearing from head retaining bolts or


screws. Separate the armature and drive
end head as an assembly from the frame
and field coil assembly.

Separate the bearing from the end head.


The bearing is retained with a snap ring.
Remove the snap ring, then press the
bearing out of the end head.

Coupling

Separate the armature from the drive end


head.
This
operation
is
usually
accomplished by pressing the armature out
of the drive end bearing. The end head and
bearing may have to be removed with a
puller. When a puller is used, protect the end
of the armature shaft with a nut or a thick flat
washer. If the shaft, coupling, or spline is
damaged when removing the end head, the
armature or the drive spline usually has to
be replaced. Use caution and do not
damage the armature.

16-03-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-03-5

Component Inspection and Troubleshooting


After the motor components have been thoroughly
cleaned and dried, they should be inspected for the
following:

Brushes should be inspected for uneven wear and


signs of overheating, i.e.:

Discolored brush shunts.


Discolored brush springs.
Refer to the Brush Chart at the end of this
section.

Drive End Head


1. Check bearing recess for any signs of wear.
2. Check mounting holes for any stripped or
crossed threads or broken studs.

Commutator End Head


1. Check bearing recess for any signs of wear.
2. Check brush holder insulation for cracks or
any signs of burning.
3. Check brush holders and springs for wear.

Bearings
1. Check bearings by turning them with your
fingers. Feel for binding or gritty effects and
excessive looseness or wobble. A good
bearing should also have a small amount of
drag or stiffness caused by the lubrication
but should turn smoothly. If the bearing turns
very freely, it should be replaced. Bearings
should also be changed, if worn out,
damaged or removed from armature shaft.
Ball bearings that have been pulled off of
shafts, pressed out of end heads, or side
loaded in such a way as to apply pressure
on the balls and races must be replaced.
Although the bearing may appear or feel
good, the bearing races have been brinelled
and will fail within a relatively short period of
service.

Armature
1. Check security of fan.
2. Check for loose commutator bars. Loose
commutator bars will usually be indicated by
excessive wear or burning on one bar. The
commutator can be checked for loose bars
by lightly tapping all of the bars with the
handle of a plastic or wooden handled
screwdriver. A contrasting dull thud or
vibration will indicate a loose bar in which
case, the armature must be replaced.
3. Check for grounded circuits using a test
light. Most commercial growlers incorporate
a test light as shown in illustration below.

Check the armature for grounded


circuits by placing one test lead of the
test lamp on the commutator and the
other test lead on the armature shaft. If
the test light lights, the armature is
grounded.

Brush and Commutator


The brushes and commutator should be inspected
for even wear and good commutation.
Good Commutation:A dark uniform
pattern at the brush wearing surface.

coloring

Poor Commutation:The surface of the commutator


appearing rough, pitted, scored or signs of burning or
heavy arcing between bars. The color pattern will be:

Streaky film with commutator wear.


Bar edge burning.
Uneven film.
Carbon dust bridging between bars.

16-03-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

4. Standard Winding Armatures are tested on a


growler (see illustration below) using a steel
strip or hacksaw blade to locate any shorted
windings.
Check for shorted windings by slowly
rotating the armature in the growler while
holding the strip or blade so that it passes
over each armature core slot. If a winding is
shorted, the strip or blade will vibrate and
the blade will get hot.

Testing
Frame and Field Assembly
After thorough inspection, the Frame and Field
Assembly should be checked for grounded, open or
shorted circuits. Grounded and open circuits can be
checked using a test light. Most commercial
growlers incorporate a test light as shown in
opposite illustration.

Grounded Circuit
Touch one test lead to a clean bare metal
spot on the frame and check all terminals
with the other lead. If a grounded condition
exists, the test light will light.

Open Circuit
Check between all connecting terminals with
test leads. If the bulb fails to light, an open
circuit is indicated.

Shorted Circuit
Shorted windings in series coils are very
difficult to detect. Generally, if the coil
insulation is sound and these are no signs of
overheating, the coil can be presumed good.

Frame and Field Service Notes


NOTE
If the armature has been turned and
undercut prior to testing, check for
and remove any copper buildup or
filings between commutator bars
and at the commutator riser. This
condition will cause an armature to
check shorted and usually results
from a dull undercutting tool.

5. Check commutator bars for any signs of


burning. If deep burned sections are evident,
either in the brush track or on the riser ends
of the commutator bars, an open or short
circuit in the armature windings is indicated.

Frame and Field Assembly


Check the condition of all insulation. If the insulation
on the field coils appears blackened or charred, the
serviceability of the coils is questionable. Burned or
charred insulation is a result of coil overheating due
to overloading conditions, grounded or shorted coil
windings. Check condition of all other insulation
such as brush rigging, under coil connections and
around terminal studs.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

If the inside of the motor is exceptionally dirty and


there is evidence of a grounding condition caused
by the dirt, the inside of the motor can be given an
additional coat of insulating varnish. Red glyptol can
be used if a better material is not available,
however, we recommend using a class H
Polyurethane air drying insulating varnish. This is
readily available under various brand names from
electrical repair or parts houses in aerosol type
dispensers.
Before spraying field coils, make sure they are
absolutely clean and dry. Protect brush rigging, pole
shoe faces and end head seats to keep varnish off.

Assembly
Field Coil Installation
Good solder connections are important due to the
vibration characteristics encountered by these
motors which can cause cold or poorly soldered
connections to break.

Prior to installing the field coils, the


connections which require soldering should
be buffed or wire brushed clean to remove
any oxidation. The connections should then
be tinned with a soldering iron.

16-03-7

NOTE
We do not recommend using a
soldering gun or torch. Soldering
gun cannot provide the heat
concentration
required
and
soldering torches can damage the
insulation.

After field coil installation, connect the solder


joint making sure the solder is flowing
properly to avoid a cold soldered joint.

Continue assembly in the reverse of disassembly,


paying particular attention to the following points.
Bearing Installation
1. Whenever ball bearings are pressed into an
end head or onto a shaft, always press
against the race that is absorbing the
pressure.
Press on the outer race when installing into
end heads.
Press against the inner race when installing
onto a shaft.
2. End heads having slip-fit bearings are
normally retained by a snap ring. Always
install new snap ring(s).
After Assembly

Pole Shoe Screw Removal & Installation


(Field Coil Removal & Installation)

The motor should be connected as specified


in Troubleshooting, and tested to the
specifications.

When testing motors, the voltmeter


connections must be made at the motor
terminals.

When changing brushes


When changing brushes, the commutator must be
serviced as follows:

16-03-8
Return

Resurface the commutator by taking only


light cuts each time, 0.005 in. (0.12mm).

If reslotting/undercutting is necessary, the


final operation is to lightly sand the
commutator with a fine sandpaper to remove
any burrs left from the undercutting
operation.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-03-9

16-03-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 4.
Steer Pump Motor

Safety.................................................................................................. 2
General Information........................................................................... 3
Operating Conditions ........................................................................ 3
Steer Pump Motor (permanent Magnet Type .................................. 4
Troubleshooting Prior to Disassembly......................................... 4
Disassembly ................................................................................ 6
Component Inspection and Troubleshooting............................... 8
Assembly ..................................................................................... 9
36-Volt Drive Motor Specifications ................................................. 10
Motor Specifications ................................................................... 10
Brush Inspection Chart .................................................................... 11

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-04-1

Safety

Always wear safety glasses.

WARNING
Wear eye protection and protective
clothing when cleaning or drying with
compressed air. Reduce air pressure
to 30 psi (207 kPa). Debris removed
with air pressure can cause injury.

Use a torque wrench to tighten terminal connections.

Remove all jewelry before working on truck.

16-04-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

General Information

Operating Conditions

Routine maintenance schedule with recorded


findings is the best way to reduce costly shutdowns and repair of equipment during operating
hours.

Operating environment of lift truck motors


varies widely: The following recommendations
should be applied as actual conditions dictate.

The goal of any maintenance program long-life and


trouble-free operations is related to the time spent
making inspections and correcting minor problems
as they occur.
The key to planned maintenance of the brush and
commutator is recognizing the undesirable brush
and commutator conditions. If this is done,
corrective action can be taken before a major
component is damaged beyond serviceability. The
brushes and commutator should be inspected for
even wear and good commutation.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Normal Service: Basically an eight hour day of


mostly indoor or outdoor material
handling.
Severe Service:

Extended operating
constant usage.

hours,

or

Extreme Service: Chemical Processing


Freezer operation
Processing plants (poultry, meat)

16-04-3

Steer Pump Motor


(Permanent Magnet Type)
The permanent magnet motor differs from
conventional D.C. motors in that the field winding
has been replaced with ceramic magnet pole
pieces. Do not impact, drop or squeeze the
motors as this can cause damage to the ceramic
pole pieces and it will make motor unfit for
further use.

Troubleshooting Prior to Disassembly


1. Read the nameplate to become familiar with
the motor, especially the rated voltage.
2. Try to turn the shaft by hand. Keep motor
leads separated while doing this. If the shaft
turns freely, go to Item 3. If the shaft won't
turn, proceed to Item 2A.

16-04-4
Return

2A. The shaft could be tight for a number of


reasons. This check is to determine if the
tightness is of a temporary nature only.
Obtain a power source to produce the rated
voltage. Do Not Make a permanent
connection. First touch the motor leads
quickly to the power supply, just long
enough to observe if the shaft turns. If it
does turn, then hold the motor leads on the
power supply for a longer time. If the motor
sounds normal, go to Item 3. If the motor
sounds noisy, it should be taken apart as
described herein.
3. If the motor turned freely, connect an
ammeter in the circuit as shown below. With
rated voltage applied and the shaft running
free, the ammeter should read less than
20% of the nameplate full load current. If the
motor meets the above conditions, then it
can be assumed the original problem is
external to the motor. A higher current
indicates a faulty armature.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-04-5

Disassembly

4. Remove the brushes as follows:

Care must be taken when the permanent magnet


motor is disassembled, since the magnet pole
pieces will attract ferrous metals. This fact dictates
motors should be disassembled in an area free of
ferrous (iron, steel) metal chips.

Remove brush spring clip from its mounting


on top of brush assembly. Use a brush hook
to reach into motor and lift brush springs.

Disconnect brush assembly lead.

Lift brush assembly from brush holder.

CAUTION
Do not place the stator ring (motor
housing) in any mechanical holding
device (e.g., vise) during the
disassembly
or
assembly
operation. Permanent distortion or
other damage will result. With the
motor disassembled, care must
also be taken not to drop the stator
ring assembly, since it can be
distorted. Motor may be held by
clamping on the mounting bracket.

IMPORTANT
Before disassembling motor, note
that there are match marks on the
stator assembly housing the
commutator cover. If marks are not
visible, use a scribe tool to make
match mars. These marks will be
used at assembly:

1. Loosen and remove clamping screw in


brush cover band.
2. Remove brush cover band segments by
prying cover pins out of engagement in
motor housing.

WARNING
Wear eye protection and protective
clothing when cleaning or drying
with compressed air. Reduce air
pressure to 30psi (207 kPA). Debris
removed with air pressure can
cause injury.

3. Air clean inside of motor around brushes


and commutator, using dry (moisture-free)
compressed air.
The armature should be blown off with
compressed air to remove brush dust and
dirt from around the commutator and
windings.

NOTE
Observe
how
brushes
are
assembled in brush holders. Note
position of the brush lead (pigtail).

16-04-6
Return

5. Remove any carbon dust or dirt from brush


ring assembly.
6. Remove pump drive coupling segment from
motor shaft end.
7. Loosen motor assembly through bolts at
commutator end of motor and remove bolts
from motor.
8. Scribe a match mark on drive end cover and
housing.
Remove drive end (pump mounting) cover.
Using a pry bar, carefully pry on cover to
loosen. Tap lightly on pry bar, if necessary.
9. The drive
inspected.

end

bearing

may

now

be

10. Support and hold stator housing firmly on


the end cover (a second person is
suggested).
11. Pull armature out of assembly in one quick
motion.

CAUTION
It is important that the pulling
motion on the armature be
continuous. Do not pull part way
out and release. If this is done, the
magnets will pull the armature back
into the stator and cause severe
damage.
To avoid damage to either the
armature
or
the
permanent
magnets, it is recommended that
the armature be removed only with
the motor housing and armature
shaft positioned vertically.

12. Remove commutator end cover.


Remove and save bearing spring washer
from the cover bore.

OCTOBER 1995

CAUTION
Do not drop, hit or clamp motor

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-04-7

Component Inspection and Troubleshooting


After the motor components have been thoroughly
cleaned and dried, they should be inspected for the
following:

Brushes should be inspected for uneven wear and


signs of overheating, i.e.:

Discolored brush shunts.


Discolored brush springs.
Refer to the Brush Chart at the end of this
section.

Drive End Head


1. Check bearing recess for any signs of wear.
2. Check mounting holes for any stripped or
crossed threads or broken studs.

Commutator End Head


1. Check bearing recess for any signs of wear.
2. Check brush holder insulation for cracks or
any signs of burning.
3. Check brush holders and springs for wear.

Bearings
1. Check bearings by turning them with your
fingers. Feel for binding or gritty effects and
excessive looseness or wobble. A good
bearing should also have a small amount of
drag or stiffness caused by the lubrication
but should turn smoothly. If the bearing turns
very freely, it should be replaced. Bearings
should also be changed, if worn out,
damaged or removed from armature shaft.
Ball bearings that have been pulled off of
shafts, pressed out of end heads, or side
loaded in such a way as to apply pressure
on the balls and races must be replaced.
Although the bearing may appear or feel
good, the bearing races have been brinelled
and will fail within a relatively short period of
service.

Armature
1. Check security of fan.
2. Check for loose commutator bars. Loose
commutator bars will usually be indicated by
excessive wear or burning on one bar. The
commutator can be checked for loose bars
by lightly tapping all of the bars with the
handle of a plastic or wooden handled
screwdriver. A contrasting dull thud or
vibration will indicate a loose bar in which
case, the armature must be replaced.
3. Check for grounded circuits using a test
light. Most commercial growlers incorporate
a test light as shown in illustration below.

Check the armature for grounded


circuits by placing one test lead of the
test lamp on the commutator and the
other test lead on the armature shaft. If
the test light lights, the armature is
grounded.

Brush and Commutator


The brushes and commutator should be inspected
for even wear and good commutation.
Good Commutation:A dark uniform
pattern at the brush wearing surface.

coloring

Poor Commutation:The surface of the commutator


appearing rough, pitted, scored or signs of burning or
heavy arcing between bars. The color pattern will be:

Streaky film with commutator wear.


Bar edge burning.
Uneven film.
Carbon dust bridging between bars.

16-04-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

4. Standard Winding Armatures are tested on a


growler (see illustration below) using a steel
strip or hacksaw blade to locate any shorted
windings.
Check for shorted windings by slowly
rotating the armature in the growler while
holding the strip or blade so that it passes
over each armature core slot. If a winding is
shorted, the strip or blade will vibrate and
the blade will get hot.

Assembly
Continue assembly in the reverse of disassembly,
paying particular attention to the following points.
Bearing Installation
1. Whenever ball bearings are pressed into an
end head or onto a shaft, always press
against the race that is absorbing the
pressure.
Press on the outer race when installing into
end head.
Press against the inner race when installing
onto a shaft.
2. End Heads having slip-fit bearings are
normally retained by a snap ring. Always
install new snap ring(s).
After Assembly

The motor should be connected as specified


in trouble shooting, and tested to the
specifications.

When testing motors, the voltmeter


connections must be made at the motor
terminals.

NOTE
If the armature has been turned and
undercut prior to testing, check for
and remove any copper buildup or
filings between commutator bars
and at the commutator riser. This
condition will cause an armature to
check shorted and usually results
from a dull undercutting tool.

5. Check commutator bars for any signs of


burning. If deep burned sections are evident,
either in the brush track or on the riser ends
of the commutator bars, an open or short
circuit in the armature windings is indicated.

When Changing Brushes


When changing brushes the commutator must be
serviced as follows:

Resurface the commutator by taking only


light cuts each time, 0.005" (0.12mm).

If re-slotting/undercutting is necessary, the


final operation is to lightly sand the
commutator with a find sandpaper to remove
and burrs left from the undercutting
operation.

Stator
1. Check magnets to be sure they are securely
mounted.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-04-9

36-Volt Auxiliary/Steer Pump Motor Specifications


This motor is equipped with Standard Winding
Connections and meets latest revision of U.L.583

Motor Specifications

Frame Size: 6.5" (165.1 mm) Diameter

Weight (Approx.): 34 lbs. (15.4 kg)

Internal Bearings on Pump End and


Commutator End. Bearings are double
sealed and lubricated with high temperature
grease for the lift of the bearing.

Motor Coupling

A coupler is used to connect the motor to the


pump. One half the coupler attaches to the
motor and the other half to the pump.

Insulation

Armature components, Class F

Commutator components, Class F

Commutator Servicing Diameters

Maximum Diameter, NEW:

2.92" (74 mm)

Minimum Diameter for


RESLOTTING:

2.80" (71 mm)

Minimum Diameter for


REPLACEMENT:

2.75" (70 mm)

Brush Data

1 Brush per Holder

4 Brushes per Motor

Maximum Length of Worn Brush


0.375" (15.9 mm)

Maximum Force per New Brush


33.7 oz. (955 gm)

Maximum Force per Worn Brush


19.3 oz. (519 gm)

Brush Drop
0.5 Volt @ 29 Amps

16-04-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16-04-11

Return

Group 17
ELECTRICAL SCHEMATICS

Wiring Schematics and Diagrams............................................. Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

17-00-1

17-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Wiring Schematics and Diagrams

Standard Wiring Schematic .............................................................. 2


Standard Wiring Diagram.................................................................. 3
Optional Wiring Schematic ............................................................... 4
Optional Wiring Diagram................................................................... 5
Lights Wiring Schematic................................................................... 6
Lights Wiring Diagram ...................................................................... 7
Strobe and Alarm Wiring Schematic ............................................... 8
Strobe and Alarm Wiring Diagram ................................................... 9

IMPORTANT
Schematic and diagrams subject to change. Call your BT PrimeMover dealer to make sure you have latest schematic or diagrams.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

17-01-1

17-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

17-01-3

17-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

17-01-5

17-01-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

17-01-7

17-01-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

17-01-9

Return

Group 19
ELECTRICAL CONTROLS

Control Panel .............................................................................. Section 1


EV-100MK Troubleshooting....................................................... Section 2
Recommended Tests, Equipment
and Procedures ..................................................................... Section 3
Drive Motor Cut-Out Switch Check
and Adjustment ..................................................................... Section 4
Forward and Reverse Switches, Up and Down
Switches and Transducer Adjustments .............................. Section 5
Periodic Electrical Checks......................................................... Section 6
Battery Tests ............................................................................... Section 7
Solenoid Control Card Troubleshooting .................................. Section 8
EV-100LXT Control Panel Supplement .................................... Section 14
EV-100LXT Control Panel Status Codes
and Component Checking................................................... Section 15
Checking Components.............................................................. Section 16

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-00-1

19-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Control Panel

Control Panel Description................................................................. 2


Control Features.......................................................................... 4
Control Panel Maintenance............................................................... 5
Control Panel Troubleshooting ........................................................ 5
Troubleshooting Notes ................................................................ 6
Control and Contactor Panel Removal ............................................ 6
Control and Contactor Panel Component Identification................ 8
Contactor and Contactor Inspection .............................................. 12
1A and Main Pump Contactors................................................... 12
Pugging and Power Steering Contactor ..................................... 15
Forward and Reverse Contactor ................................................ 16
Oscillator Card............................................................................ 20
Control and Contactor Panel Installation ....................................... 21

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-1

Control Panel Description

Pulsing Current from Battery

The EV-100MK Control is an electronic device that


controls electrical power supplied to the vehicle
drive motor to provide smooth power to move the
truck and to minimize power drain from battery.
The control consists of a SCR unit and a contactor
assembly unit. The SCR unit monitors power
demand of the truck and then responds by
controlling the power applied to drive components.
The contactor panel contains switching devices to
direct heavy power loads to the drive motor and its
components.
The control circuit is energized by closing key
switch and brake switch and moving control handle
to desired forward or reverse position. Moving the
control handle closes the directional switch; further
movement gives desired speed. This applied power
to control card, which will close selected directional
contactor and complete circuits to drive motor.
The control card then supplies a gate pulse to #2
REC, turning it on to a conducting state. This allows
current to flow from battery through 1C, 1X, #2
REC, motor field, motor armature, sensor, and back
to battery.

During off time, energy stored in motor, by virtue of


motor's inductance, will cause current to circulate
through motor around loop formed by #3 REC. This
current is called FLYBACK CURRENT.
Dash Line Shows Average Motor Current

After 1C changes, #2 REC turns off, due to lack of


holding current. The control card checks that 1C is
charged and unlocks gate to #1 REC and #5 REC.
The control card then supplies a gate pulse to #1
REC, turning it on to a conducting state. This allows
current to flow from battery through #1 REC, motor
field, motor armature, sensor, and back to battery.
#5 REC turns on and allows current to flow through
T4-T3, 1C, #1 REC, #5 REC, and to T4-T3.
This current charges bottom of 1C positive with
respect to battery positive bus. This charging cycle
occurs in less than one millisecond (00.001 second)
and #5 REC shuts off. This charge is now stored on
capacitor until it is time to turn off #1 REC.
Current continues to flow in #1 REC until control
card fires #2 REC. When #2 REC conducts,
capacitor 1C discharges around circuit composed
on 1C, #2 REC, 1X and #1 REC.
This discharge current opposes battery current
through #1 REC so that resultant current is zero.
Due to lack of holding current, #1 REC is turned off.
Current continues to flow in #2 REC, 1C, motor and
battery loop until capacitor (card terminal 14) is fully
charged negative.
This charge exceeds battery voltage by an amount
which is a function of peak motor current, and #2
REC turns off.

19-01-2
Return

Illustration above shows nature of motor current


which is composed of both battery current and
inductive (or flyback) current.
It should be noted that measured average motor
current will be greater than average battery current.
The SCR control converts battery current at battery
volts into a higher motor current but at a lower motor
voltage.
The time for next ON/OFF cycle to start is
determined by time that control card takes to
oscillate. This frequency of oscillation is controlled
by position of variable inductor in accelerator and
oscillator control circuitry in card.
Slow speed is obtained by having maximum input
volts from accelerator. As input volts decrease,
speed of motor increases. The SCR circuit is
capable of delivering approximately 95% of
maximum speed. For full speed operation, 1A
contactor is closed to apply full battery voltage
across motor.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-3

Control Features
Oscillator - The oscillator section of card has two
adjustable features and one fixed feature. With
accelerator output voltage at maximum volts, creep
speed can be adjusted by CREEP trimpot on card.
Top speed is fixed by card design and is obtained
with accelerator output voltage at minimum.
The % ON-TIME has a range of approximately 595%.
The center (or mid) operating condition of oscillator
is at 50% ON-TIME with a nominal 1.8 milliseconds
ON-TIME and 1.8 milliseconds OFF-TIME. This
corresponds to maximum operating frequency of
about 300 Hertz.
At
CREEP,
ON-TIME
will
decrease
to
approximately 0.8 milliseconds while OFF-TIME will
rise to about 20 milliseconds. At full SCR operation,
this condition will be reversed (short OFF-TIME and
long ON-TIME).
This variation of ON/OFF-TIME of oscillator
produces optimum frequencies through SCR range.
The frequency curve of oscillator is shown in
illustration on opposite page.
The rate at which oscillator may increase its percent
ON-TIME
is
limited
by
CONTROLLED
ACCELERATION. The minimum time required to
go from creep speed to 80-85% ON-TIME point may
be varied by trimpot (C/A) on card. This is
adjustable from approximately 0.5 seconds to 3.54.5 seconds.

PLUGGING or slowing down of the truck is


accomplished when reversing by providing a small
amount of retarding torque for deceleration.
If the truck is moving and the directional lever is
moved from that direction selection to opposite
direction selection, the motor field is reversed.
The plug signal is initiated by the fact that the
directional switch has been shifted from one
direction to the opposite direction.
The motor armature, driven by the inertia of vehicle,
acts as a generator. This generated current passes
through the #4 REC and the sensor. The oscillator
circuit regulates at a plug current limit level as set by
the PLUG trimpot on control card.
This controls pulse rate of the #1 REC to regulate
generated motor current and bring the truck to a
smooth controlled stop and then reversal.
The accelerator input will modulate plugging
current. With the accelerator at maximum
depression, the plugging trimpot will enable
adjustment of plugging current limit from maximum
to minimum current limit level. With the accelerator
at minimum depression, plugging current limit will
be reduced to minimum.
RAMP START - This feature provides full SCR
torque to restart a vehicle on an incline. The
memory for this function is the directional control
switch. When stopping on an incline, the directional
switch must be left in its ORIGINAL position to allow
the control to assure full power when restarted. The
accelerator will modulate ramp start current.
PULL POWER TRANSITION - This built-in feature
provides smooth transition from SCR to 1A bypass.
This is accomplished by the SCR continuing to
pulse until 1A contactor power tips close.
1A CONTROL - The contactor has two modes of
control:

CURRENT LIMIT - This circuit monitors motor


current by utilizing a sensor in series with armature.
The information detected across sensor is fed back
to card so current may be limited to a preset value.
If heavy load currents are detected, this circuit
overrides oscillator and limits average current to a
value set by C/L adjustment pot. The C/L setting is
based on maximum thermal rating of #1 REC and
peak voltage on capacitor.
Because of flyback current through #3 REC, motor
current usually runs 2 to 3 times that of battery
current. The current limit is set with C/L trimpot on
card.

19-01-4
Return

Timed Pick-Up - This feature works with the


accelerator. When the accelerator is
activated so that the accelerator voltage is
reduced to 0.4 volts or less, then 1A time is
enabled. The time delay pick-up of 1A is
provided by a circuit in card. This allows the
truck to accelerate through SCR range until
1A picks up, even if the accelerator is
actuated immediately.
This time delay is adjustable by means of a
1A TIME Trimpot on card.

If motor currents reduced during thermal


cutback to a point where 1A pick-up would
cause a severe torque increase, 1A timed
pick-up function will be disabled.

OCTOBER 1995

STATIC RETURN TO OFF. This built-in feature of


control requires the operator to return directional
selection lever to neutral position whenever he
leaves truck and then returns.
If either the brake switch or key switch is opened,
the control will shut off and cannot be restarted until
the direction lever is returned to neutral position. A
time delay of 1.0 second is built into the control for
allowing momentary opening of brake switch, if a
bump is encountered.
THERMAL PROTECTOR (TP). This temperature
sensitive device is mounted on 1 REC. If the 1 REC
temperature begins to exceed design limits, the
thermal protector will lower maximum current limit
and not allow the 1 REC to exceed its temperature
limits.
Even at reduced current limit, the truck will normally
be able to reach sufficient speed for full 1A
operation, thereby allowing panel to cool.

Scheduled cleaning (as outlined) should


preclude the need for using a degreaser.
Not all degreasers are acceptable. If a
degreaser is to be used, we recommended
degreaser or the equivalent to MS-180
Freon TF degreaser and cleaner.

Do not HIPOT (or MEGGER) control.

Use a lead-acid battery with voltage and


ampere hour rating as specified for the
vehicle. Follow normal battery maintenance
procedures, recharging before 80 percent
discharged and with periodic equalizing
charges.

DO NOT plug the truck when it is jacked up


and drive wheels are in a free-wheeling
position. The high motor speeds can create
excessive voltages that can be harmful to
the control.

Normal Cleaning

1A THERMAL HOLD-OFF. This feature prevents


the 1A contactor from closing when the trucks is in
severe thermal cut-back to avoid torque jumps.
When the control goes into severe cut-back, MUST
PULSE TO TIME will disable 1A timer.

Blowing dirt off with an air hose periodically


will, for the most part, eliminate any serious
cleaning problems. Should the need arise
for more thorough cleaning, water may be
hosed over the control and if necessary a
mild detergent applied as such as that used
in washing dishes in the home. This
detergent should be rinsed off and the
control dried with an air hose.

MUST PULSE TO TIME. This feature prevents the


1A timer from timing if oscillation pulse rate has not
reached a particular level of operation.

The Control Panel Assembly must be


thoroughly dry before putting the truck back
into service or components may be damaged.

Terminal boards and other exposed SCR


control parts should be kept free from dirt
and paint that might change effective
resistance between points.

As the panel cools, the thermal protector will


automatically return the control to full power status.

LOW VOLTAGE. Batteries under load particularly if


undersized or more than 80 percent discharged, will
produce low voltages at the SCR control terminals.

Control Panel Troubleshooting

Low battery volts may cause the control not to


operate correctly but PMT should open F or R
contactor in event of a commutation failure.

A digital VOM (Simpson Digital Multi-Meter


Model 461, or equivalent) is recommended for
all electrical and control settings.

Control Panel Maintenance

When diagnosing and correcting cause of trouble


with a SCR control, DO NOT BEGIN by
disassembling components.

The SCR control, like all electrical apparatus, does


have thermal losses. The semiconductor junctions
have finite temperature limits, above when these
devices may be damaged.
For these reasons, normal maintenance should
guard against any action which will expose
components to excessive heat, (such as steam
cleaning).
Observe the following DO'S and Don't's;

Any controls that will be used in ambients of


120F (50 C) or over should be brought to
attention of BT PRIME-MOVER.

All external components having inductive


coils must be filtered.

IMPORTANT

Do not clean electrical components


with steam. Only approved solvents
should be used to clean Solid State
components.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Start by analyzing complaint of symptoms. Make a


preliminary
investigation
of
trouble.
Then
systematically determine probable cause.
The following points are fundamental to
troubleshooting a SCR system:
Get The Facts: Never start your
troubleshooting until you get facts. Talk with
truck operator and review work order.
Determine Where To Start: Operate truck
to observe fault and then determine what
corrective action should be.
Perform Basic Checks: Check battery and
test for grounds and shorts. Do not take
short cuts by assuming these checks do not
have to be made.
Take Time To Investigate: Unnecessary
work can be avoided by diagnosing trouble
accurately
on
basis
of
preliminary
investigation and correct use of information
in troubleshooting guide. Take necessary
time for sufficient preliminary investigation.

19-01-5

Use symptoms indicated by the trouble to


locate the proper diagnosis chart in
troubleshooting section. You may also want
to use the sequence of operation manual
as a diagnostic tool.

Use Flow Chart: Proceed to find problem by


using the flow chart in the troubleshooting
guide which defines symptom and its
possible cause(s) and solution. Locate
trouble by a process of elimination. The
cause is usually simple, rather than
mysterious and complicated.

MOST IMPORTANT: Use the Electrical


Schematic Diagram for the truck you are
working on. You must be able to trace the:

POWER CIRCUITS which consist of


heavy
cables
and
main
power
components of truck.
CONTROL CIRCUITS which control
speed, time delay, and controlled
plugging.

DIRECTIONAL CIRCUITS which control


forward and reverse contactors.

ACCESSORY CIRCUITS which control


components, including horn, battery
indicator and hourmeter.

IMPORTANT
ALL TESTING SHOULD BE DONE
WITH DRIVE WHEELS RAISED OFF
THE FLOOR. (Do not plug the truck
when it is jacked up and drive
wheels are in a free-wheeling
position. The high motor speeds
can create excessive voltages that
can be harmful to the control.)

TroubleShooting Notes
Troubleshooting is based on using a digital
voltmeter to determine if correct voltages are
available to permit control to operate correctly.
The pulsing of main SCR is too fast for conventional
instruments to measure. When control is functioning
properly, a low hum can be heard.
Before proceeding with any testing, visually check
for loose wiring, signs of overheating of
components, condition of battery and battery
receptacle, etc. Refer to Group 19, Section 8 in this
manual.
Discharge capacitor by using an insulated
screwdriver or similar device that is insulated to
short across terminals of capacitor (1C).

19-01-6
Return

Check resistance(s) from frame to SCR power and


control terminals. A resistance of less than 20,000
ohms can cause misleading symptoms. If less than
20,000 ohms resistance is measured, conduct
further tests to eliminate short circuit/ground fault
conditions.
An index of most common symptoms for EV-100MK
SCR control trouble is:

Directional contactors will not close.

Directional Contactors Close.

No Power. No audible SCR hum.

Truck inoperative with accelerator in SCR


Range.

Directional Contactors close once or Twice


and then remain open.

PMT trips.

Control and Contactor Panel Removal


WARNING
ELECTRICAL SHOCK

Disconnect
the
battery
and
discharge the capacitor(s) before
handling the control panel.
BREAKING THIS RULE CAN CAUSE
SERIOUS INJURY.

1. Make sure truck has been parked in a safe


position with upright fully lowered. Block
drive tires.
2. Turn power key switch OFF and disconnect
battery (if not already removed from truck).
3. Remove front and top access covers.
4. Discharge capacitor (1C) by using an
insulated screwdriver or similar device to
short across terminals of capacitor.
5. Remove power cables from control
assembly. Make sure terminals of all cables
have identification labels to assure correct
assembly.
6. Separate wire harness sections by
disconnecting the wiring couplers. Press
lever on side of coupler to release and then
pull apart.
7. Remove fasteners attaching control panel to
mounting plate.
8. Remove control panel assembly. The SCR
panel and contactor panel are considered an
assembly and are removed as a unit.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-7

19-01-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

CONTROL PANEL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Conductor, SCR Panel (A2)


Conductor, Plugging Contactor Feed
Conductor, Plugging Contactor Feed
Conductor, Contactor Feed
Conductor, Contactor Feed
Conductor, 1A Contactor Feed
Conductor, 1A Contactor Feed
Conductor, 1A Contactor Feed
Wiring Harness, Control Panel
Conductor, 1A Contactor Feed
Conductor, Contactor Terminal
Conductor, Forward & Reverse Contactor Feed
Conductor, Pump Contactor Feed
Conductor, Contactor Panel Negative
Conductor, Forward and Reverse Contactor Feed
Conductor, SCR Control Feed
Conductor, Forward and Reverse Contactor Feed

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-9

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

#4 REC, SCR panel


Fastener, SCR Panel transformer terminal
Lockwasher, SCR panel transformer
Washer, flat
Conductor, SCR panel
Fastener, control panel conductor terminal
Lockwasher
Washer, flat
#3 REC, SCR panel
Fastener, terminal block conductor
Lockwasher
Washer, terminal block conductor
Fastener, current limiting shunt
Lockwasher
Washer, current limiting shunt
Fastener, current limiting shunt
Lockwasher
Washer, current limiting shunt
Shunt, current limiting
Fastener, heat sink

19-01-10
Return

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40

Lockwasher
Washer
Heat sink, voltage sensor
Fastener, #4 REC heat sink
Lockwasher
Washer, #4 REC heat sink
Insulator
Heat sink, #4 REC
Insulator
#5 REC, SCR panel
Conductor, #5 rectifier
Conductor, SCR control panel
Lockwasher
Fastener, SCR panel REC
#2 REC, SCR panel
Conductor
Transformer
Washer, transformer
Lockwasher
Fastener, SCR transformer

OCTOBER 1995

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Fastener, terminal block


Fastener, SCR panel filter
Lockwasher
Washer
Filter, pump SCR panel #3 REC
Filter, pump SCR panel #5 REC
Screw
Lockwasher
Thermo cut-out
Fastener
Lockwasher
Washer
Fastener
Lockwasher
Fastener
Lockwasher

OCTOBER 1995
Return

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

Washer
Bracket
Capacitor
Base
Harness, wiring
Fastener
Lockwasher
Control unit
Insulator
#1 REC
Block, terminal
Washer
Lockwasher
Filter, pump SCR panel #2 REC
Filter, SCR panel #4 REC

19-01-11

Contactor Inspection
Before attempting to disassemble a contactor to
install a new contact tip set, carefully observe
location and orientation of each part.

1A and Main Pump Contactors


Refer to illustrations on page 13 and 14.
1. Check armature and movable contacts for
freedom of movement by depressing
movable arm with a screwdriver or small rod.

Check for any restrictions to movement


and for return of parts by action of spring.

2. Inspect contact tips. Look for any worn or


eroded surfaces. Look for evidence of tip
welding. Inspect for evidence of any
contaminants on tips (paint, dirt, paper or
cloth material, etc.) which would impair
operation.

Do not use sandpaper or file tips. Any


damage must be corrected by tip
replacement.

Tips must be replaced before they wear


through and damage copper base.

To remove and replace contact tips:


1. Loosen and remove retaining lock nut,
lockwasher, flat washer, spring seat, and
spring from armature bolt of center movable
contact tip set.
2. Remove the movable contact tip set.
3. Loosen four long bolts holding fixed contact
and insulators to assembly. Observe
position of short and long contact tip bus bar
terminals.
4. Remove bolts, lockwasher, insulators and
two contact tips.
5. Install new contact tips by reversing above
procedure. Check for correct positioning of
long and short fixed contact bus bars.
6. Tighten four long bolts of fixed contact set
gradually and by even torque increments
until firmly seated. Tighten each fastener in
a sequential manner and use torque
increments to avoid over stressing and
damaging insulator bars. Tighten bolts to 1418 lbs/in. (1.6-2.0 Nm). DO NOT OVER
TORQUE!
7. Tighten armature and movable contact
assembly retaining nut. Tighten bolts to 1418 lbs/in. (1.6-2.0 Nm).DO NOT OVER
TORQUE!
8. Check parts for freedom of movement.

19-01-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

CONTACTOR ASSEMBLT 1A/PUMP

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Base, magnet
Coil, field
Frame, magnet
Spring
Armature
Base, buss
Tip, contact
Bushing
Carrier
Tip, movable
Cap
Spring
Washer, flat
Nut, lock
Clamp
Lockwasher
Screw, machine
Suppression, pump contactor
Seat

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-13

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Nut, Contactor Conductor


Lockwasher, Contactor Conductor
Nut, Pump Contactor
Lockwasher, Contactor
Screw, Start Contact
Insulator
Spring
Seat, Movable Contactor Spring
Armature, Contactor
Bracket, Mountaineering used)
Coil, Contactor
Tip, Movable
Tip

1. Check armature and movable contacts for


freedom of movement by depressing
movable arm with a screwdriver or small rod.
Refer to illustrations on pages 16.

Check for any restrictions to movement


and for return of parts by action of spring.

2. Inspect contact tips. Look for any worn or


eroded surfaces. Look for evidence of tip
welding. Inspect for evidence of any
contaminants on tips (paint, dirt, paper or
cloth material, etc.) which would impair
operation.

Do not use sandpaper or file tips. Any


damage must be corrected by tip
replacement.

Tips must be replaced before they wear


through and damage copper base.

To remove and replace contact tips:


IMPORTANT
Before attempting to disassemble a
contactor to install a new contact
tip set, carefully observe location
and orientation of each part.

1. Loosen and remove two cover mounting


screws securing cover to coil frame.
Observe position of positive (+) marking on
the cover.
2. Remove cover. Be sure to note location of
spring seat and spring under cover.
3. Remove lock nut and lockwasher from each
stationary contact stud.
4. Remove contact studs from cover.
5. Install new studs and secure with
lockwashers and lock nuts. Tighten lock nuts
firmly on each stud.

Power Steering and Plugging Contactors

19-01-14
Return

6. Lift armature assembly with movable contact


set from coil frame. Observe location of
components upon removal.

OCTOBER 1995

7. Remove lock ring, contact set, insulating


washer and spring from armature stem. Be
careful not to disassemble or loose other
parts under contact tips on armature
assembly.
8. Install spring, washer, new contact set onto
stem and secure with lock ring. Make sure
lock ring is fully seated into armature stem
groove.
9. Assemble contactor by putting moving
contact assembly armature shaft into coil
plunger with return spring on top of armature
shaft.
10. Put top cover over spring and install cover
mounting screws. Be sure return spring is in
the cover recess.

IMPORTANT

When assembly cover to base


(frame), make sure it is installed
with the positive sign (+) markings
located properly.
Use a bar or rod to move contacts
and be sure movement is free of
binding. Be certain contact tips are
in correct orientation and tips
contact correct mating parts.

Forward and Reverse Contactor


1. Check armature and movable contacts for
freedom of movement by depressing
movable arm with a screwdriver or small rod.
Refer to illustration on page 18.

Check for any restrictions to movement


and for return of parts by action of spring.

2. Inspect contact tips. Look for any worn or


eroded surfaces. Look for evidence of tip
welding. Inspect for evidence of any
contaminants on tips (paint, dirt, paper or
cloth material, etc.) which would impair
operation.

Do not use sandpaper or file tips. Any


damage must be corrected by tip
replacement.
Tips must be replaced before they wear
through and damage copper base.

To Remove and Replace Contact Tips:


IMPORTANT

Before attempting to disassemble a


contactor to install a new contact
tip set, carefully observe location
and orientation of each part.

1. Disconnect power cables from contactors.


Remove bolts with washers, lockwashers
and spacers from contacts. Move power
cables out of the way.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

2. Disconnect connecting buss bars from


contacts.
3. Disconnect
terminals.

wiring

from

contactor

coil

4. Remove mounting bolts securing Forward


and Reverse Contactor Assembly to the
control panel base plate that is attached to
the truck. Remove assembly from truck.
5. Disassemble the contactors. Loosen
cover screws on both contactors. There are
four screws per cover. Note location of
contacts so the new ones may be installed
to the same location as the old ones.
6. Press downward on Cover (A) and
completely back out screws until they are
free of the contactor base. Do not remove
cover yet.
7. Press downward on Cover (B) and
disconnect screws from base. Hold pressure
on Cover (B) and then remove Cover (A)
from the assembly. Set cover and screws to
one side.
8. Now remove Cover (B) and screws. Again,
note locations of the buss bars, contacts and
the large side insulators (C) for ease of
reassembly.
9. Remove and discard upper contacts.
10. Remove and inspect Insulators (C) for
cracks and damage. An insulator found to be
cracked or broken should be replaced with a
new one.
11. Remove and discard lower contacts.
12. Hold Bracket (D) with one hand and remove
support sub-assembly (armature, contacts,
etc.). The return spring should cone off with
the armature as it fits into a recess in the
bottom of the armature.
13. Secure support in a vice equipped with soft
jaws using minimum pressure to hold
support.
14. Loosen and remove nut freeing core parts
(washer, insulators, movable contacts,
spring seats and spring). Note the position
and location of each part for proper
reassembly. Remove these parts.
15. Pull insulator and core bushing from core.
16. Remove armature core with spring from
bottom of support and remove support from
vice.
17. Remove Bracket (D) from coil and base.
18. Remove coil from base.
19. Disassemble
the
opposite
contactor in same manner.

(reverse)

20. Inspect armature core insulators for cracks,


breaks, etc. If parts are found to be
damaged, they should be replaced with new
ones.
21. Inspect springs for damage.
damage parts with new ones.

Replace

19-01-15

19-01-16
Return

OCTOBER 1995

22. Inspect spring seats for damage (cracks,


breaks, etc.). Replace damaged parts with
new.
23. Inspect the thin washer located on the
armature for cracks, etc., and security of
mounting.

Material on the armature stem has been up


set in four places to retain the washer.
Inspect all four places to be certain this thin
washer is properly retained and free to
rotate about the armature stem.
Inspect the cone surface of the armature
and the corresponding surface in the base
plate for scoring, etc.
Inspect the small white bushing for wear.
The bushing I.D. must be perfectly round. If
the bushing becomes egg shaped (out-ofround), it should be replaced with a new
bushing.

IMPORTANT

The coil has four blind alignment


holes in the top and two in the
bottom. These holes must properly
align with the off-set pins in the
bracket and contactor base at
reassembly.

24. Inspect coil for damage.

Inspect alignment holes to be certain they


are perfectly round and not egg shaped
(damaged).

Inspect coil terminals for damage.

Replace damaged parts with new ones.

25. Reassembly The Contactors. Install both


coils onto contactor base. Terminal
connections must point outward away from
center of base. Be certain the coils are
properly located over the base alignment
pins.
26. Locate Brackets (D) on each coil and onto
the base. Be certain the bracket alignment
pins properly seat in the holes on the top
side of each coil.
27. Now, secure the Forward Contactor
Assembly Support into the vice using
minimum pressure to hold the support.

Install spring into coil recess.

Locate white bushing over armature stem


and insert armature through bottom of
support positioning armature tab into
support slot.

Install lower insulator, lower movable


contact, and lower spring seat over armature
stem.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Install spring and upper spring seat, upper


contact, upper insulator, lockwasher and nut
onto armature stem.

IMPORTANT

Torque Nut to: 18-20 lbs./in.(2.0-2.4 Nm)

28. Remove support and


assembly from the vice.

movable

contact

29. Assemble the Reverse Contactor Support


and Movable Contact Assembly in the same
manner.
30. Now locate the Forward Contactor Support
and Movable Contact Assembly over
Bracket (D).

IMPORTANT

Be certain the armature tab is


pointing inward toward the center
of the contactor base when
positioning support over bracket.
Refer to the boxed illustration on
opposite page.

31. Now locate the Reverse Contactor Support


and Movable Contact Assembly over its
bracket. Again, be certain the armature tab
is pointing inward toward the center of the
contactor base.
32. Install the long lower buss bar and stationary
contacts (having threaded holes in one end)
into the grooves located on the top side of
each contactor support. The cable end of the
buss bar should extend outward on the right
hand side of the forward contactor support
and extend outward on the left hand side of
the reverse contactor support. Be certain the
notches in the buss bar and stationary
contacts properly seat with the screw guides
of each contactor support.
33. Install the short buss bar and stationary
contacts (having threaded holes in one end)
in the same manner as previously
described. Be certain the notches in each
bar fit properly to the screw guides of each
support.
34. Position Insulators (C) over the buss bar/
contacts and supports as shown in
illustration on opposite page. Be certain the
openings in the bottom of the insulators face
downward and that the insulators are
properly seated in the slots of the supports.
35. Assemble spacer, upper buss bar/contacts
over the insulators. Make certain the
contacts are seated properly in the
insulators.

19-01-17

19-01-18
Return

OCTOBER 1995

36. Assemble covers (A & B). Make certain


covers, buss bars and contacts are in
alignment and press both covers downward
with one hand...hold in this position and
install all cover screws until snug. Check to
be sure all parts are in proper alignment,
and position the Power Cable Bolts (with
lockwashers, and washers) through the
upper buss bar/contacts and spacers.
Tighten bolts finger tight into the lower buss
bar/contacts.
37. Tighten cover screws to: 14-18 lbs./ in. (1.62.0 Nm).
38. Use a bar or rod to move contacts. Be sure
movement is free of binding and that tips are
in correct orientation and tips contact correct
mating parts.
39. Install Forward and Reverse Contactor
Assembly to panel base plate.

Oscillator Card

IMPORTANT
When removing connectors: To
prevent damage to the oscillator
card, always remove the connector
by pressing down on center tab
of connector with a wide blade
screwdriver,
then
rotate
screwdriver 90 (while continuing to
press down) to pry the connector
out of its socket.
When installing connectors: Be
sure the connectors are pressed
fully into socket and the locking tab
is fully engaged.

Removal
1. Remove two six-conductor plug connectors
from left hand side of card marked (A & B).
2. Remove two fourteen-conductor plug
connectors from right hand side of card
marked (Y & Z) in a similar manner
described above.
3. Remove control wires from six screw
terminals on top surface of card.
4. Remove two card retainer screws and
remove card.

Installation
1. Install card on SCR panel base plate and
tighten retainer screws.
2. Install control wires to terminals top surface
of card.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-19

3. Connect both six-conductor plugs to left


hand side of card marked (A & B).
4. Connect both fourteen-conductor plugs to
right hand side of card marked (Y & Z).

Control and
Contactor Panel Installation
1. Before attempting to install control in truck,
make sure truck is correctly blocked and
battery is disconnected.
2. Clean area where control panel is to be
mounted. Make sure surface is free from
dirt, dust, rust, etc., which would not permit
panel base to make good contact with
mounting surface.
3. Apply an even, thin film (0.20 (5mm) max.)
of Thermal Joint Compound milled portion of
control base plate.
4. Install control panel on mounting plate and
tighten fasteners to specifications specified
in opposite illustration.
5. Connect wiring harness sections by joining
wiring couplers.
6. Connect power cables to correct terminals
on control panel. Make sure all connections
are tightened firmly.
7. Install top compartment covers.
8. Remove blocks from drive wheels.
9. Connect battery and test control panel
operation.

19-01-20
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-21

19-01-22
Return

OCTOBER 1995

CAUTION
Make connections as shown
here or you may experience
electrical
shorts
and
component damage.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-01-23

Return

Section 2.
EV-100MK Troubleshooting

Check #1,2,5 RECs (SCRs) ............................................................. 2


Check Capacitor (1C) ........................................................................ 6
Checking Component with VOM (Only)........................................... 5
#22,23,24 and 25 Filter Block ...................................................... 7
#3 and 4 Rectifiers....................................................................... 8
Filter Mounting Terminal Block .................................................... 9
Sensor ........................................................................................ 10
Thermal Protector....................................................................... 11
Reactor/Choke Module ............................................................... 12
EV-100MK Card Factory Settings.................................................... 13
Oscillator Card Voltage Checks ...................................................... 14
Oscillator Card Wiring Schematic............................................... 15
Solenoid Function Control Card Voltage Checks.......................... 16
Solenoid Function Control Card Wiring Schematic .................... 17

NOTE
Refer to Supplements in Group 14,15, and 16 for additional information.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-1

Check #1, 2, 5 REC's (SCR's)


(Use this 4 step procedure to check any SCR using a VOM)
STEP 1:

Set meter to R X 10,000 and calibrate. Connect positive meter lead to anode of SCR. Connect
negative meter lead to cathode of SCR. Results should be above 100,000 ohms.

STEP 2:

With meter set as in Step 1, connect the meter positive to the cathode of SCR. Connect the
meter negative to the anode of the SCR. Again, the results should be above 100,000 ohms.

STEP 3:

Set the meter to R X 1 and calibrate. Connect positive meter lead to the gate terminal. Connect
the negative meter lead to the cathode. Results should be from 10 to 200 ohms.

STEP 4:

With the meter set as in Step 3, connect the meter positive to the cathode of the SCR. Connect
the negative lead to the gate terminal. Results should be from 5 ohms to infinity.

IMPORTANT
ON EV-100 PANELS, THE #2 AND #5 RECTIFIERS
(PRESS PACK DESIGN) USE A PACKAGING
ENCLOSURE THAT HAS THE POLARITY SYMBOLS
MIS-MARKED. ON THE SIDE OF THE PACKAGE, YOU
WILL SEE THE SCHEMATIC SYMBOL. USE THE
SCHEMATIC SYMBOL AND NOT THE POLARITY
SYMBOLS TO DETERMINE POLARITY!

19-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-3

19-02-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

#2 AND #5 PRESS BACK RECTIFIERS

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-5

19-02-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-7

19-02-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

CHECK FILTER MOUNTING TERMINAL BLOCK

Disconnect batter and discharge capacitor. Remove filters from mounting


block. Note positions and hardware location. Mark wires for proper
reinstallation. Disconnect mounting block from #1 Rectifier. Use VOM (R x
1 scale) to measure resistance in steps 1 through 4 (all measurements
must be 0 ohms). Other terminals are for mounting purposes only.
Replace mounting block if readings other than 0 ohms. When
reassembling, be sure to use original hardware in proper locations. Also,
make sure all wires are connected correctly.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-9

19-02-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

CHECK THERMAL PROTECTOR

Disconnect battery and discharge the capacitor.


Do not remove the Thermal protector from the #1 rectifier heatsink. Remove the Z
plug from the card. Using a VOM (R X 100 scale) measure the resistance between the
black and gray wires. With the #1 Rectifier heatsink at room temperature (24C or 75F)
the meter should read 50 to 200 ohms. Replace thermal protector if readings are other
than this range.
If the readings are to specifications, set VOM to R x 10,000 scale and measure
resistance from each wire end (at Z plug) to #1 Rectifier heatsink. Readings should be
infinity.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-11

CHECK REACTOR/CHOKE MODULE

Disconnect battery and discharge capacitor. Remove wires and buss bars
from connection points. Be sure to mark leads for proper reinstallation.
NOTE:

Zero meter before checking.

STEP 1:

Use a VOM (R X 1 scale) to measure resistance from T-3 to T-4


(Reactor).

STEP 2:

Use a VOM (R X 1 scale) to measure resistance from T-3 to T-5


(Choke).
Both measurements must be 0 ohms. Replace reactor/choke
module if readings are other 0 ohms.
Terminal A-1 is a binding post only. It has no electrical connections
to any other terminal.

19-02-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

EV100MK Card Factory Settings


Description

Factory
Setting

Actual
Value

F1

Stored Status Code

-----------

-----------

F2

Creep Speed (with Transducer)

018-022

5.5-5.7%

F2

Creep Speed (with Potentiometer)

145-155

9.35-9.5%

F3

C/A & 1A Time (with Transducer)

004-006

0.4-0.6 Sec.

F3

C/A & 1A Time (with Potentiometer)

013-015

1.3-1.4 Sec.

F4

Current Limit

250-255

Max. Current

F5

Plugging Distance (Current)

148-152*

665-677 A

F6

1A Drop Out

250-255

Function Disabled

F6

1A Drop Out (ESM 17/25 w/EE)

106-110

793-807A

F7

Turn Switch Speed Limit

001-003

Function Activated

F8

Not Applicable

NA

NA

F9

Not Applicable

NA

NA

F10

Not Applicable

NA

NA

F11

Speed Limit 1

052-055

70-72% Battery Volts

F12

Speed Limit 2

000-001

Function Disabled

F13

Speed Limit 3

000-001

Function Disabled

F14

Internal Resistance Compensation

014

1.6 Volt Drop

F15

Battery Volts

032-044

36 Volts

F16

Pedal Position Plug

038-042

222-234A

F17

Card Type Selection

000-004

Standard C/L

F18

Steer Pump Time Delay

175-177

23.5-24.5 Sec.

Function No.

Functions highlighted in bold can be adjusted to suite your needs.


Refer to Supplements in this Group, Sections 14 and 15.

*NOTE
This factory setting will provide
approximately 22 ft. (6.7 m) of
plugging distance.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-13

Oscillator Card Voltage Checks


Terminal

Condition

Voltage Reading

TB1

Key ON and Accelerator Released ...........................................................3-4 volts


Key ON and Accelerator Fully Actuated....................................................0.2 Volts or less

TB2

Key OFF....................................................................................................0 Voltage


Key ON, Brake Pedal Depressed..............................................................B+ Volts

TB3

Key OFF....................................................................................................0 Voltage


Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Volts

TB4

Key OFF....................................................................................................0 Voltage


Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Volts

TB5

Key OFF....................................................................................................0 Voltage


Key ON, Brake Pedal Depressed and then
Forward Switch Actuated ..........................................................................B+ Volts

TB6

Key OFF....................................................................................................0 Voltage


Key ON, Brake Pedal Depressed and then
Reverse Switch Actuated ..........................................................................B+ Volts

B+=Battery Voltage

Refer to Schematic on opposite page.

19-02-14
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Oscillator Card Wiring Schematic

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-15

Solenoid Function Control Card Voltage Checks


Terminal

Condition

Voltage Reading

TB1

Battery Plugged In.....................................................................................B- Voltage

TB2

Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Voltage


Tilt, Auxiliary 1 or Auxiliary 2 Buttons depressed
with UP (lift) or DOWN (lower) Switch actuated ........................................0 Voltage

TB3

Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Voltage


Auxiliary 1 Button depressed ....................................................................0 Volts

TB4

Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Voltage

TB5

Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Voltage


Auxiliary 2 Button Depressed....................................................................0 Volts

TB6

Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Voltage


Tilt Button Depressed and With UP
(lift) or DOWN (lower) Switch Actuated.....................................................0 Volts

TB7

Battery Charged ........................................................................................Approx 10 Volts


Battery Discharged....................................................................................0 Volts

TB8

Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Voltage


UP (lift) Switch Actuated ...........................................................................0 Volts

TB9

Not Applicable

TB10

Key ON......................................................................................................0 Volts


Auxiliary 1 Button Depressed....................................................................B+ Voltage

TB11

Key ON......................................................................................................0 Volts


Tilt Switch Depressed ...............................................................................B+ Voltage

TB12

Key ON......................................................................................................0 Volts


Auxiliary 2 Button Depressed....................................................................B+ Voltage

TB13

Key ON......................................................................................................0 Volts


DOWN (lower) Switch Actuated ................................................................B+ Voltage

TB14

Key ON......................................................................................................0 Volts


UP (lift) Switch Actuated ...........................................................................B+ Voltage

TB15

Key OFF....................................................................................................0 Volts


Key ON......................................................................................................B+ Voltage

B+=Battery Voltage

19-02-16
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Solenoid Function Control Card Wiring Schematic

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-02-17

19-02-18
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 3.
Recommended Tests, Equipment, and Procedures

Recommended Tests......................................................................... 2
Test Equipment ........................................................................... 2
Test Procedures .......................................................................... 2
Test Procedures................................................................................. 2
Ground Fault Condition ............................................................... 2
Power Steer Idle Current ............................................................. 3
SCR Current Limit ....................................................................... 3
1A Free-Wheeling Current........................................................... 3
1A Time Delay ............................................................................. 4
Creep Speed Motor Volts ............................................................ 4
Pugging ....................................................................................... 5

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-03-1

Recommended Tests
1. Ground Fault Condition
2. Power Steer Idle Current
3. SCR Current Limit

STEP #3:
Read and record voltage reading displayed.
This is OPEN CIRCUIT BATTERY
VOLTAGE.
6. Always have key switch turned OFF and
parking brake SET before connecting
battery to truck.

4. 1A Free-Wheeling Current
5. 1A Time Delay
6. Creep Speed Motor Volts
7. Plugging Function

Test Equipment
1. Current Monitoring Shunt, 500 Amps, 50mV.
2. Digital Multi-Meter - Recommend "Simpson
D.M.M. Model #461" or equivalent.
3. Digital stop watch.

Test Procedures
PRELIMINARY PRECAUTIONS: The following
precautions must be adhered to while preparing for
and/or conducting above tests:
1. Tests #1 through #6 require drive wheels be
raised off floor.
2. Always inspect condition of battery cables
and connector of battery being used for test.
If battery cables are worn out, cable ends at
terminations cracked, or cable insulation
broken/cracked, battery should not be used
for test but should be sent for repair or
maintenance.
3. No extension cables should be used to
connect battery to truck for test. It is
recommended to install battery in truck for
test whenever possible. When such
installation is not practical, battery should be
set on floor close to truck battery receptacle,
to eliminate need for extension cable.
4. Always inspect condition of battery cells for
proper water level.
5. Before conducting any test, measure open
circuit voltage of battery. Record measured
value, nominal rating of battery volts, and
battery type number on test sheet. Open
circuit battery voltage is measured as
follows:
STEP #1:
Turn Digital Multi-meter ON Select 200 volts,
DC scale.
STEP #2:
Connect red lead to POSITIVE (+) terminal
on battery. Connect black lead to
NEGATIVE (-) terminal on battery.

19-03-2
Return

7. The test for parameter #3 (SCR Current


Limit) requires truck's components (e.g.,
cables, controls, axles, brakes, etc.) be in
cold condition, i.e., components are at
approximately same temperature as normal,
not to be operated/driven for any significant
period of time (more than 10 minutes) before
conducting test. If required, provide
sufficient cool down period for truck.
8. Before connecting battery to truck, visually
inspect to be sure contactor tips are not
welded.
9. The preferred method of disabling any
function/component (e.g., preventing 1A
contactor from closing) is to disconnect
appropriate control wire, in order to break
electrical circuit. Use of cardboard and/or
any other mechanical device is not advised.
These methods should only be used if
breaking electrical connections is not
practical. SUCH METHODS SHOULD BE
USED WITH CAUTION!

Test Procedures
Ground Fault Condition
NOTE
It is recommended that if ground
fault is detected on truck, tests for
other
parameters
should
be
conducted
ONLY
AFTER
ELIMINATING CAUSE OF AND
THEREBY GROUND FAULT.

STEP #1:
Disconnect battery from truck receptacle
and turn key switch OFF.
STEP #2:
Turn ON Digital Multi-meter; select
resistance measurement function, 20,000
Ohm scale.
STEP #3:
Connect Red lead of Multi-meter to
POSITIVE (+) terminal of truck receptacle
and connect BLACK lead of Multi-meter to
an unpainted surface (e.g., bolt, etc.) of truck
frame. Record resistance.

OCTOBER 1995

STEP #4:
Connect red lead of Multi-meter to
NEGATIVE (-) lead of truck receptacle and
leave BLACK lead of Multi-meter connected
as in Step #3. Record resistance.
STEP #5:
Compare values obtained in Steps #3 and
#4 against specification to determine
PRESENCE/ABSENCE
of
GROUND
FAULT. Refer to Group 40, Section 1, for
specification.

Power Steer Idle Current


STEP #1:
Raise drive wheels off floor.
STEP #2:
Connect current monitoring shunt to
measure battery current. Shunt sensor wires
are connected to Digital Multi-meter. The
voltage reading across these two sensor
wires give Direct Current (DC) reading. Turn
ON the digital Multi-meter, select DC
VOLTS.
STEP #3:
Connect battery to truck receptacle. Turn
key switch ON, push hand brake down,
select a direction of travel. The power steer
motor noise should be heard.
IMPORTANT
Caution should be taken not to
touch steering handwheel while
taking measurements/reading.

STEP #4:
Measure and record voltage across shunt
sensor wires (or terminals).
STEP #5:
The voltage reading obtained in Step #4 is a
direct reading of POWER STEER IDLE
CURRENT using conversion of 1mV equal
10 Amps. Refer to Group 40, Section 1, for
acceptable current range.

SCR Current Limit


STEP #1:
Raise drive wheels off floor. Make sure truck
is in cold condition. Turn key switch to OFF
and disconnect battery cables.
STEP #2:
Connect shunt to measure battery current
(i.e. connect in series with positive or
negative cable).

OCTOBER 1995
Return

STEP #3:
Install jumper wire on foot brake switch to
defeat its operation.
STEP #4:
Disconnect control wire #34 from 1A
contactor coil negative terminal and tape up.
STEP #5:
Connect battery to truck receptacle, turn key
switch ON.

IMPORTANT
Precautions should be taken not to
stall traction motors more than 20
seconds during Step #6.

STEP #6:
To obtain a HARD STALL condition of the
motor, do not depress foot brake pedal,
gradually rotate the multi-function control
handle to the FULLY FORWARD position.
Measure and record highest current reading
(voltage across shunt) obtained.
STEP #7:
Subtract power steer idle current from
reading obtained in Step #6 to obtain SCR
CURRENT LIMIT FOR DRIVE SYSTEM.
NOTE
There should be wait (idle) period
minimum
of
two(2)
minutes
between Steps #6 and #8.
Drive wheels should be allowed to
turn between Step #6 and #8.

STEP #8:
Repeat Steps #6 and #7. Take average of
two (2) readings and compare average
value to specifications. Refer to Group 40,
Section 1 for acceptable current range.

1A Free-Wheeling Current
STEP #1:
Raise drive wheels off floor. Turn key switch
to OFF and disconnect battery cables.
STEP #2:
Install jumper wire on foot brake switch to
defeat its operation.
STEP #3:
Connect control wire #34 to 1A contactor coil
negative terminal.

19-03-3

STEP #4:
Connect shunt to measure battery current.
STEP #5:
Connect battery to truck receptacle. Turn
key switch ON.
STEP #6:
Depress the foot brake pedal, rotate the
multi-function control handle to the FULLY
FORWARD position.
STEP #7:
Gradually release the brake pedal until the
battery current reading is between 100-200
Amps. Hold brake and control handle in
these positions for a minimum of ten (10)
minutes.
STEP #8:
After ten (10) minutes, depress the brake
pedal completely while still holding the
control handle fully rotated. After current
reading has stabilized, measure and record
it.
STEP #9:
Release the control handle completely. After
current reading has stabilized, measure and
record it as POWER STEER IDLE
CURRENT.
STEP #10:
The difference of current readings obtained
in Steps #8 and #9 is 1A FREE-WHEELING
CURRENT and must be used to compare
against specifications. Refer to Group 40,
Section 1, for free-wheeling current
specification.

1A Time Delay
STEP #1:
Raise drive wheels off floor. Turn key switch
to OFF and disconnect battery cables.
STEP #2:
Install jumper wire on foot brake switch to
defeat its operation.
STEP #3:
Connect battery to truck receptacle, turn key
switch ON.
STEP #4:
To obtain a HARD STALL condition of the
motor, do not depress foot brake pedal.

19-03-4
Return

STEP #5:
Rotate the multi-function control handle to
the FULLY FORWARD position as fast as
possible and start Digital Stop Watch the
moment control handle stops.
STEP #6:
Stop the stop watch the moment any motion
or movement of 1A (bypass) contactor tip is
detected.
STEP #7:
Stop Watch reading is 1A TIME DELAY.
Repeat Steps #5 and #7 at least four (4)
times. Take average of all readings as 1A
TIME
DELAY
to
compare
against
specifications.Refer to Group 40, Section 1,
for time specification.

Creep Speed Motor Volts


STEP #1:
Raise drive wheels off floor. Turn key switch
to OFF and disconnect battery cables.
STEP #2:
Connect RED lead of Multi-meter to pig-tail
of communicating diode (#3 REC) and
BLACK lead of Multi-meter to NEGATIVE (-)
terminal on control panel.
STEP #3:
Turn Digital Multi-meter ON; select DC Volt
measurement function, 20 Volt scale.
STEP #4:
Install jumper wire on foot brake switch to
defeat its operation.
STEP #5:
Connect battery to truck receptacle. Turn
key switch ON.
STEP #6:
With the foot brake pedal in the UP position,
gradually rotates the control handle until the
FORWARD switch closes. Record voltage
reading of meter.
STEP #7:
Repeat Step #6.
Average of two reading is CREEP SPEED
MOTOR VOLTS and should be compared
against specifications. Refer to Group 40,
Section 1, for specification on creep speed
voltage.

OCTOBER 1995

Plugging
STEP #1:
Lower drive wheels to floor, remove jumper
wire from foot brake switch. Turn key switch
to OFF and disconnect battery cables.
STEP #2:
Connect battery to truck receptacle, turn key
switch ON, drive truck to open space or aisle
where at least 250 feet (76 m) of running
space is available.
STEP #3:
Drive in the FORWARD direction at top
speed. After the 1A contactor has picked up
(closed) and truck has traveled in top speed
mode at least 75 feet (23 m), change
direction of travel to FULL REVERSE.
STEP #4:
If truck continues to travel forward with
continuously decreasing speed until truck
stops and smoothly accelerates in reverse
direction, PLUGGING function is correct.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

STEP #5:
Repeat Steps #3 and #4 starting out with
reverse travel, then changing to forward
travel. The PLUGGING function should
operate same way.

NOTE:
Measurements made in step #6
should only be compared to
specifications,
if
test
was
conducted after truck was operated
for a minimum of 50 hours.

STEP #6:
Measure distance from point on travel path
where direction change was initiated to point
where truck actually started moving in
reverse direction. This measurement is
PLUGGING DISTANCE. Factory set
plugging distance is approximately 22 ft. (6.7
m).
The plugging distance is adjustable by
means of a trim pot on the oscillator card
and may be adjusted to suit the customer's
needs. Refer to Section 14 in this group for
procedures on adjusting plugging distance.

19-03-5

Return

Section 4.
Drive Motor Cut-Out Switch Check and Adjustment

Drive Motor Cut-Out Switch Check .................................................. 2


Drive Motor Cut-Out Switch Adjustment ......................................... 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-04-1

Drive Motor Cut-Out Switch Check


CAUTION
To perform this service procedure,
it is necessary for you to first:
Park truck
surface.

on

solid,

level

Lower forks to floor.


Turn steering tiller so that steer
wheels are in a straight ahead
travel position.
Turn key switch OFF.
Jack and block the truck up to
raise the steer and drive wheels
off the floor.

1. Remove top compartment cover.


2. Turn key switch ON.
3. Rotate control handle slowly to forward
travel, creep position. Both drive wheels will
begin turning.
4. Slowly turn the tiller arm to make a right turn.
The right drive wheel should stop turning
when the steering axle trunnion is turned at
an angle of 41.5 from the center (straight
ahead travel) position.
5. Repeat test for left turn. Check the left drive
wheel, as in Step 4.
6. If the respective drive motor does not cut-out
correctly or the drive wheel stops turning at
a steering axle trunnion angle other than that
specified, the cut-out switches require
adjustment or replacement.

19-04-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Drive Motor Cut-out Switch Adjustment


Be sure that truck is parked and blocked up
correctly to raise the drive and steer wheels off the
floor. See CAUTION preceding page.
1. Turn key switch ON.
2. Turn tiller arm so that steer wheels are in a
straight ahead travel position. Note position
of cut-out cam, see below.
3. Identify RH and LH cut-out switches by
wires.

RH Switch: Wire #51 (brown w/green stripe)

LH Switch: Wire #52 (red w/green stripe)

4. Slowly turn tiller arm for a RH turn until cam


rotates 41.5 from center position. Loosen
fasteners for right hand switch and adjust
switch position on mounting plate until
switch just closes. Repeat adjustment
procedure for a LH turn.
5. Check cut-out switch adjustment for RH and
LH turns.
6. Turn key switch OFF.
7. If after adjustment, drive motors do not cutout properly, check switch continuity with a
Volt-Ohm Meter. Replace switches as
required and adjust.
8. Lower truck to floor.
9. Install top compartment cover.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-04-3

Return

Section 5.
Forward and Reverse Switches, Up and Down
Switches, and Transducer Adjustments

Multi-Function Control Handle Connector Identification............... 2


Switches and Transducer Adjustments .......................................... 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-05-1

19-05-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Switches and Tranducer Adjustments

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-05-3

Step 1

Measure accelerator voltage at wire


#29 on terminal TB1 of traction control
oscillator card and battery negative.

19-05-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Step 2
Forward, Reverse, Up & Down Switch Adjustment
Each switch must be adjusted so the switch arm just
touches the switch plunger with the arm roller in
contact with the cam surface, refer to example.
The adjustment is made with the adjusting screw of
each Do not over adjust. Slowly rotate adjusting
screw until the above conditions are met.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-05-5

Step 3

Turn key switch ON.


DO NOT step on brake pedal.
Loosen Lock Nut holding transducer to mounting plate.

Step 4

Measure voltage between wires #29 and #13.

IMPORTANT
To prevent damage to wiring: Loosen wires #29 & #13 by pulling them part way throw cam "slot".

Holding the body of the transducer, slowly rotate body clockwise and then counterclockwise by hand
(Voltage will increase and decrease as the body is rotated). Do not rotate the body to the extent that
wires are pulled out (or damaged).
Stop rotation when voltage registers between 3.50 and 3.75 volts. This is know as the "neutral point" or
maximum accelerator voltage position. Note when in this position the wire harness will be on the body
as shown here.

19-05-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Step 5

With transducer at the "neutral point", tighten Lock Nut securing transducer in position.

Verify accelerator voltage is between 3.50 and 3.75 volts and, any handle movement (in either
direction) results in reducing accelerator volts.

Step 6

Move handle to maximum forward and maximum reverse direction positions. Verify
accelerator volts are less then 0.20 volts.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-05-7

Step 7

Disconnect connectors SO-8 and PL-8.

19-05-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Step 8

Step on brake pedal. Measure directional switches and accelerator voltages at wire #6, wire #8
and wire #29 with respect to battery negative (wire #13).

Step 9

Move control handle to neutral position,


see illustration. Directional switch voltage
at wire #6 and wire #8 must be zero (0). If
voltage at one and/or both wires is battery
volts, turn the "adjustment screw(s) as
required to open (deactivate) the forward
and/or reverse switches.

NOTE
Adjusting
the
screw
counterclockwise will operate the
switch closer to neutral position
of the control handle.

Adjusting the screw clockwise


operates switch further away
from neutral position.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-05-9

Step 10

Move control handle extremely slow to


operate the forward switch. When switch
operates, hold handle in this position.

Now, verify forward switch voltage is battery


volts (measure voltage at wire #6).

Monitor and note "specific accelerator


voltage" corresponding to forward switch
operating position. This accelerator voltage
(wire #29) must be between 3.40 and 3.60
volt.

Step 11

19-05-10
Return

Move control handle extremely slow to


operate the reverse switch. When switch
operates, hold handle in this position.

Now, verify reverse switch voltage is battery


volts (measure voltage at wire #8).

Observe and note "specific accelerator


voltage" corresponding to reverse switch
operating position. This accelerator voltage
(wire #29) must be between 3.40 and 3.60
volt.

OCTOBER 1995

Step 12
To adjust actuation (operating) positions of Forward and /or Reverse Switches:

Rotate the adjustment screw(s), as required to obtain "specific accelerator voltage" of 3.40 to 3.60
volts corresponding to the actuation positions of both switches.
The voltage measure at the "actuation moment" of each switch must be 3.40 - 3.60 volts
(+0.05 volts apart maximum).

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-05-11

Return

Section 6.
Periodic Electrical Checks

Truck Preparation .............................................................................. 2


Electric Connectors........................................................................... 3
Power Cables ................................................................................. 5
Fasteners ....................................................................................... 6
Motor Connections ......................................................................... 7
Control Panel Connections............................................................. 8
Cable Routing and Connections..................................................... 9
Control Cards Connections ........................................................... 13

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-06-1

Truck Preparation

Slip boot off cover lip and tuck bottom of boot


into cover hole.

WARNING
Always wear safety glasses.

Remove fasteners securing cover(s) to


truck.

Remover covers.

Remove all jewelry before working on truck.

Move Truck to Service Area


1. Park truck on a flat level surface.

Fully lower lift carriage.

Tilt forks full forward

4.Discharge the capacitors.

2. Turn key switch off.

Be sure the battery is unplugged.

Remove key.

Discharge capacitor.

Disconnect truck battery.

3.Remove cover(s).

19-06-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Electrical Connectors
Connector
plugs
and
receptacles
are
permanently labeled with the proper PL (Plug) and
SO (Socket/Receptacle) number for easy
identification.

IMPORTANT
Match the plug number with the
appropriate
receptacle
number
before making a connection. If you
do not, electrical shorts and
possible damage to the equipment
may result, i.e., plug #PL-10 plugs
into pin socket #SO-10, etc.

Tape Markers are used to correctly position each


wire harness and electrical cable on the truck.
When correctly installed, the tape marker will be
hidden by the mounting clamp (guide).

IMPORTANT
Be sure to follow the instructions,
where noted in this manual, when
installing a wire harness or
electrical cables. If you do not,
possible shorts and equipment

Special instructions have been illustrated to show


proper installation of multiple cable and wire
connections. If the instructions are not specifically
followed, possible electrical shorts and control
damage may result.

Torque specifications (where noted) for mounting


hardware, clamps, etc., must be adhered to or
equipment damage may result.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-06-3

The electrical connectors on this truck are


equipped with rubber seals to protect them from
water and condensation. There is a seal at each
end (wire end) of the connector. The plug is
equipped with a seal and retainer plate, see below.
There is a pin retainer plate in the socket subassembly.

Check seals for damage that would make


them unfit for further service (cuts, etc.).

The retainer plates snap into place to secure


the pins and their sockets. Check the plates
for damage and security of mounting.

Check the plates for damage and security of


mounting.
IMPORTANT
Firmly push plug into socket until
latch clicks locking the two
components together.
End Seals must be firmly seated
within the assembly housing.

Seal should be pressed flush with housing.

19-06-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Inspect all connectors (plugs and


sockets) for damage and proper installation.

Inspect Plug & Socket Wires for cuts


(exposed wires).or replace damaged wires.

Report condition on the PM check sheet and


give to the designated authority.

Cables or wiring having small cuts in the


casing may be repaired with electrical tape.

Electrical Tape

POWER CABLES

Cables having damage as shown in this


illustration should be removed immediately
and replaced with new. Be certain the
replacement cable is the exact same length,
size and has the proper connector. Make
absolutely certain the cable end is properly
crimped and its connection properly torqued
upon installation.

Cable unfit for further service.

IMPORTANT
Every cable and wiring harness on
this truck is manufactured to an
exact specification. A shorter cable
or harness will not fit. If either a
harness or cable is routed
improperly
it
will
not
fit.
Subsequently, electrical shorts and
damaged components may result if
the replacement part is the wrong
one, or if it is routed incorrectly.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-06-5

Fasteners
IMPORTANT
Improperly Torqued Fasteners Can
Cause Damage!
Use an appropriate wrench and
tighten all fasteners to the torque
specified
in
the
following
inspection procedures.

19-06-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Check motor cables, cable connections


and clamps for damage and security of
mounting. Loose connections should be
torqued to specifications. Damaged parts
should be replaced with new parts. Cables
must be routed as shown or they will not fit
properly and component damaged may
result.

Refer to detailed drawings on following


pages.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-06-7

Control Panel Connections

Inspect power cables and connections on


the control panel for damage and security
of mounting.

If any connection is found to be loose, be


sure to torque the fastener to specification
listed.

Check clamp for security of mounting.


Torque to specifications outlined below.

Cables must be routed as shown or


electrical shorts and component damage
may result.

Replace damaged parts.

NOTE
1.Inner nut must be supported during
torque operation.
2.Torque outer jam nut of terminal to
135-165 lbs./in. (15-19 Nm.
3.Torque outer jam nut of terminal to
90-110 lbs./in.(10.0-12.5 N m).
4.Torque outer jam nut of terminal to
68-83 lbs./in. (7.5-9.5 Nm).

19-06-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Cable Routing and Connections


Refer to illustrations on the following pages.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-06-9

19-06-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Inspect power cables and connections on


the lift and steer pump motors for damage
and security of mounting.

If any connection is found to be loose, be


sure to torque the fastener to specification
listed using a second wrench to hold the
bottom nut.

Check clamp for security of mounting.


Torque nut to 100 lb. in. (11.3 Nm).

Cables must be routed as shown or


electrical shorts and component damage
may result.

Replace damaged parts.

NOTE
1.Inner nut must be supported during
torque operation.
2.Torque outer jam nut of terminal to
135-165 lbs./in. (15-19 Nm.
3.Torque outer jam nut of terminal to
90-110 lbs./in.(10.0-12.5 N m).
4.Torque outer jam nut of terminal to
68-83 lbs./in. (7.5-9.5 Nm).

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-06-11

Inspect power cables and connections on


the traction motors for damage and
security of mounting.

If any connection is found to be loose, be


sure to torque fasteners to specification
listed below. (Use two wrenches: one to hold
the bottom nut and the other to torque the

upper nut.) Check clamp for security of


mounting. Torque nut 100 lb. in. (11.3 Nm).

Cables must be routed as shown or


electrical shorts and component damage
may result.

Replace damaged parts.

NOTE
1.Inner nut must be supported during
torque operation.
2.Torque outer jam nut of terminal to
135-165 lbs./in. (15-19 Nm.

19-06-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Control Cards Connections

Check all wiring for damage (cuts, etc.).


Repair or replace as required.

Check Solenoid Control Card connection


PL-4 to be sure it is securely plugged in and
that the wiring is in good condition.

Be certain all terminal connections are tight


and properly installed on the solenoid
control card and the solenoid control valve.

Be certain the card and control are securely


mounted.

Check Key Switch for security of mounting.

Inspect switch wiring 12 & 12B and 10A &


10C for security of mounting and damage.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Check the Diagnostic Display Unit security


of mounting and damage. Inspect wire PLDP for security of mounting and damage.

Check all electrical plugs, sockets and


receptacles for damage. Be certain the
plugs are locked (snapped) into their
sockets and/or card receptacles.

Inspect harness clamps for security of


mounting. Make sure harness Marking
Tape(s) are in alignment with or covered by
the clamp(s). This assures the harness is
correctly positioned.

Inspect the multi-function control handle for


damage. The handle has two halves. Check
to be sure the fasteners on the switch and
heel sides of the handle are secure.

Check switches for security of mounting and


damage. Refer to Group 13 for adjustments.

19-06-13

19-06-14
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 7.
Battery Tests

Battery Tests ...................................................................................... 2

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-07-1

Battery Tests
NOTE
Use both tests described here.

Specific Gravity Test


Test at least six cells across battery with a
temperature corrected hydrometer, see chart.
Battery should be fully changed if the reading falls in
the 1.280 to 1.300 range. If the difference between
cells is more than.015, battery needs maintenance.

SPECIFIC GRAVITY TEST


SPECIFIC GRAVITY
1.260 - 1.300
1.230 - 1.250
1.200 - 1.220
1.170 - 1.190
1.140 - 1.160
1.110 - 1.130

STATE OF CHANGE
100% CHANGE
75% CHANGE
50% CHANGE
25% CHANGE
VERY WEAK
DISCHARGED

BY USING A HYDROMETER, THE SPECIFIC GRAVIFIY OF THE ELECTROLYTE SOLUTION IN A


BATTERY CAN BE DETERMINED. THE BATTERY SPECIFIC GRAVITY IS AN INDICARTION OF THE
BATTERYS STSTE OF CHARGE. IF THE STATE OF CHARGE IS LOW, THE HYDROMETER WILL
READ LOW. IF THE STATE OF CHARGE IS HIGH, THE HYDROMETER WILL READ HIGH.
AS AN EXAMPLE A READING FROM:
1.260 TO 1.300 INDICATEDS A FULLY-CHARGED BATTERY
1.200 TO 1.220 INDICATEDS A BATTERY IS IN A DISCHARGED
CONDITION AND CANNOT GIVE A SATISFACTORY SERVICE.

Load Test
Put the main hydraulic system into by-pass while
reading battery volts with a voltmeter.
Minimum acceptable voltage
drop for 36 volt battery............................. 28.8 volts
Battery needs rechange or repair if voltage drops below
80% of the rated voltage of the battery.

19-07-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 8.
Solenoid Control Card Troubleshooting

Indicator Lights.................................................................................. 2
Troubleshooting Solenoid Control Card ......................................... 3
Lift Function ONLY Disabled ............................................................ 5
Install New Solenoid Control Card................................................... 7

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-08-1

Indicator Lights

Indicator Lights (LEDs)


It is normal for the indicator lights (LEDs) to "flicker"
when the different hydraulic switches are activated.
This does not indicate a problem. There is a problem,
however, when one or both lights illuminate with no
"flicker" (a solid glow). Refer to the procedures on the
following pages.

19-08-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Troubleshooting Solenoid
Control Card
IMPORTANT
It is normal for the Indicator Lights (LEDs) to "flicker" when any
part of the hydraulic system is put into use. This does not indicate a
problem. There is a problem, however, when one or both lights
illuminate with "no flicker".

PROBLEM: All Hydraulic Functions Disabled


Check Indicator Lights (RH4 & RH5)
Open door on solenoid Control Card and check to see if the indicator lights (leds) are illuminated.

Both Lights ON (RH4 & RH5) (key switch ON and all hydraulic switches open.)
If both lights are illuminated, the Solenoid Card is defective and should be replaced with a new one.

RH4 Light ON (Key Switch "ON" and all hydraulic switches Open.)
Check for shorted switch or wire to corresponding terminal with a volt-ohm meter, see opposite
illustration. Connect black (-) lead to ground and check each one of the following using red (+) meter
lead [Meter should be set on the 50V + DC Scale):

Connect RED (+) to:

Meter should read:

TB10 - Wire #45

0V

TB11 - Wire #55

0V

TB12 - Wire #65

0V

TB13 - Wire #35

0V

TB14 - Wire #5

0V

If there is any voltage present at any of


these checks, there is a short in the switch
and/or wire. Repair or replace as required.

RH5 Light ON (Key Switch "ON" and all hydraulic switches Open.)

Check for open solenoid or wires to corresponding terminals shown below:


Connect RED (+) to:

Meter should read:

TB2 - Wire #18

Battery Positive - 36 Volts

TB3 - Wire #58

Battery Positive - 36 Volts

TB4 - Wire #48

Battery Positive - 36 Volts

TB6 - Wire #38

Battery Positive - 36 Volts

TB8 - Wire #28

Battery Positive - 36 Volts

TB5 - Wire #68

*Battery Positive - 36 Volts

If voltage is other than specified at any of


these checks, the solenoid is defective or
there is a open in the wiring. Repair or
replace as required.

*only when truck is equipped with second auxiliary function, otherwise meter should register: - 0 volts

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-08-3

19-08-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

PROBLEM: Lift Function ONLY Disabled


(The remainder of the Hydraulic Functions should be operable.)
Check Indicator Light (RH4 & RH5) (Key Switch "ON" and all hydraulic switches Open.)
Open door on solenoid Control Card and check to see if the indicator lights (leds) are illuminated.

Both Light ON (RH4 & RH5)


If both lights are illuminated, the Solenoid Card is defective and should be replaced with a new one.

RH4 & RH5 Lights OFF

Connect RED (+) to:

Meter should read:

TB1 - Wire #13

Battery NEG. (0V)

TB15 - Wire #22

Battery POS. (36V)

Battery Charged

RH5 Lights ON (Key Switch "ON" and all hydraulic switches Open.)

Connect RED (+) to:

Meter should read:

TB7 - Wire #30

10 to 12 Volts - Battery Charged indicating the Solenoid Card is receiving


BDI Signal from the EV100 Oscillator Card.
10 to 12 Volts - Battery is below 80% Discharge and must be taken out
of service and fully charged or replaced if defective.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-08-5

19-08-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Install New Solenoid Control Card

When installing a new solenoid control card, it is


important to check the jumper plug, JP2, for proper
truck operation.

- The monitoring function of the card for


second auxiliary solenoid circuit will not
work.

IMPORTANT

- However, the second auxiliary circuit will


be operable.

For trucks with second auxiliary


function, remove JP2 plug for
proper operation.

Remove jumper plug JP2, if truck is equipped with a


second auxiliary function.

If a truck is equipped with a second auxiliary


function and the Jumper Plug JP2 is in
place, the following conditions will exist:

If a truck without second auxiliary function


and the Jumper Plug JP2 is removed, the
following conditions will exit:
- The hydraulic system will fail to function
(there will be no hydraulics at all).
- The RH5 Indicator Light (LED) will be ON

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-08-7

Return

Section 14.
EV100LXT Control Panel

General ............................................................................................... 2
Operation............................................................................................ 2
Function Set-up Procedures............................................................. 3
Description of Function Numbers for:
IC3645EVLXCDI1TT................................................................. 4
IC3645EVLXCDI1TX ................................................................ 4
IC3645EVLXCDI1TK ................................................................ 4
IC3645EVLXCDI1MT................................................................ 7
IC3645EVLXCDI1MX................................................................ 7
IC3645EVLXCDI1MK................................................................ 7
IC3645EVLXCDI1PX ............................................................... 10

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-14-1

General
The Handset is a multi-functional tool to be used
with the EV100/200 LX and LXT SCR controls. The
Handset consist of a Light Emitting Diode (LED)
display and a keyboard for data entry.

installing the handset tool, plug in the battery and


turn on the key switch. The following is the start-up
display sequence that will occur:
START-UP DISPLAY

Purpose
The purpose of the Handset is to allow authorized
personal to perform the following functions:

Monitor existing system fault codes for both


traction and pump SCR systems.
Monitor intermittent random status code.
Monitor battery state of change on LXT
systems.
Monitor hourmeter reading on traction and pump
SCR systems.
Monitor or adjust the following control functions:
- Creep speed
- Controlled Acceleration and 1A time
- Current Limit
- Steer pump time delay and define signal
input (seal switch or directional switch)
- Plugging distance (Current)
- Pedal position plug range or disable
- A drop out current or disable
- Field Weakening drop out
- Field Weakening pick up
- Regen braking current limit
- Regen braking drop out
- Speed limit points (SL1,SL2, and SL3)
- Truck Management fault speed limit
- Internal resistance compensation for battery
state of charge indication
- Battery voltage (36/48 volts is auto ranging)
Selection of card operation type:
- Standard traction card selection:
- Standard traction with Field Weakening
- Standard traction with speed limits
- Standard traction with Regen/Field
Weakening
- High or Low current limit for all of the
above.

Key Switch
Verify Display Segments
for
one second

BDI Display
or
Blank Display

Diagnostics
override
with fault

Run Mode
Diagnostics
override
with fault

BDI Display
or
Blank Display
Key Switch OFF
Display traction
hourmeter for
four seconds
Display pump
hourmeter for
four seconds
or
Blank

NOTE

Operation

WARNING
Before connecting or disconnecting
the handset tool, jack up the drive
wheels of the truck, turn off the key
switch, unplug the battery and
discharge the capacitors.

The truck can be operated with the


handset connected, however, the
adjustment knob must be set fully
clockwise to insure the control
operates at top speed.

At the SCR control traction card, unplug the Y plug


if dash display is in use and plug in the handset to
the plug location Y on the control card. After

19-14-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Description and Location

Function Set-Up Procedures

WARNING
Before making any adjustments to
the control you must consult the
operating
and
maintenance
instructions supplied by the vehicle
manufacturer. Failure to follow
proper set up instructions could
result in misoperation or damage to
the control system.

With the Handset connected, hold down the CONT


key and turn on the key switch. This will place you in
the set up mode, ready or monitor or adjust control
function settings.

NOTE
The term push, means to depress
key for approximately one second.

SET UP MODE
Action

Display shows

Hold down CONT.

Remarks

turn on key

8888

Segment check
displayed

Push function
number

U888

Selected
function number
is displayed

After one second


time delay

_085

Stored value for


the function is
displayed

_088

Displayed valve
will blink

_125

Value changes
while blinking

Push CONT.
Charge value with
adjustment knob
Push STORE

Push ESC

_125

New valve
stored and
blinking stops

8888

Segment check
displayed

At this point another can be monitored/ changed by


pushing another function number, or the truck can
be placed in the mode by holding the ESC key down
for one second or longer. The display will return to
either the diagnostics mode or the BDI display or a
blank display (if BDI is not used and there are no
fault codes). The truck can now be operated with
the handset connected or the handset can be
disconnected before operation.
NOTE
You can return to the segment
check mode at any time, by holding
down the ESC key until 8888
appears in the display.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-14-3

Description of Function Numbers for:

Set

Control Cards

Example:

Function 1

IC3645EVLXCD1TT
IC3645EVLXCD1TX
IC3645EVLXCD1TK

Stored Fault Code


(Push 1)

This function register contains the last fault that shut


down truck operation (PMT type fault that is reset by
cycling the key switch). This fault code will be over
written each time a new fault occurs and be cleared
from memory by adjusting the value to zero.
Function 2

Creep Speed
(Push2)

Function 5

5% to 15% on time
0 to 255
.03% per set unit

Example:

Setting of 20 = 5.6% on time

Function 3

Controlled Acceleration
and 1A Time
(Push 3)

This function allows for the adjustment of the rate of


time it takes for the control to accelerate to 96%
applied battery voltage to the motor on hand
acceleration. The 1A contactor will automatically
close .2 seconds after the controlled acceleration
stops and the accelerator input is less then .5 volts
or less then 50 ohms.
Range
Set
Resolution

.1 to 22.0 seconds
0 to 255
.084 seconds per set unit

Example:

Setting of 20 = 1.8 seconds C/A


and 2.0 1A time.

Function 4

Current Limit
(Push 4)

This function allows for the adjustment of the


current limit of the control. The rating of the control
will determine the range of adjustment for this
function. Please refer to the operating instructions
for the control used in this truck.
Range

19-14-4
Return

0 = min. current, 255 = max. current


Plugging Distance (Current)
(Push 5)

This function allows for the adjustment of the


plugging distance of the truck. The larger the
current setting, the shorter the stopping distance.
Range
Set
Resolution
Example:

200 to 1000 amps (EV100)


300 to 1500 amps (EV200)
0 to 255
3.14 amps per set unit (EV100)
4.7 amps per set unit (EV200)
Setting of 20 = 1263 amps (EV100)

WARNING

This function allows for the adjustment of the creep


speed of the truck. A constant creep speed
frequency will be maintained when an accelerator
input voltage between 3.7 and 3.5 volts or an
accelerator ohmic input between 6K and 4.7K ohms
is provided.
Range
Set
Resolution

0 to 255

Plug
settings
must
be
in
accordance with control operating
instructions. An excessively high
setting could cause damage to
control system or drive motor.

Function 6

1A Drop Out Current


(Push 6)

This function allows for the adjustment of the 1A


contactor drop out current. The 1A contactor will be
dropped out and the vehicle motor torque will be
limited to SCR current limit when the set drop out
current is reached.
Range
Set
Resolution

450 to 1260 amps (EV100)


675 to 1890 amps (EV200)
0 to 250
3.24 amps per set unit (EV100)
4.86 amps per set unit (EV200)

Settings above 250 set units will disable 1A drop out


function (1A will not drop out).
Example:
Function 7

Setting of 20 = 515 amps (EV100)


Field Weakening Pick Up
(Push 7)

This function allows for the adjustment of field


weakening contactor pick up current. This setting
allows the FW contactor to pick up when the truck
has returned to about 150% of its full load level
running current after acceleration.
Range
Set
Resolution
Example:

52 to 466 amps (EV100)


78 to 699 amps (EV200)
0 to 255
1.6 amps per set unit (EV100)
2.4 amps per set unit (EV200)
Setting of 20 = 84 amps

See control C/L curves

OCTOBER 1995

Function 8

Field Weakening Drop Out


(Push 8)

This function allows for the adjustment of the field


weakening contactor drop out current. This setting
allows the FW contactor to drop out when the truck
requires greater then 300% of the full load level
running current for greater torque.
Range
Set
Resolution

65 to 895 amps (EV100)


89 to 1343 amps (EV200)
0 to 255
3.25 amps per set unit (EV100)
4.88 amps per set unit (EV200)

Example:

Setting of 20 = 130 amps

Function 9

Regen Braking C/L


(Push 9)

This function allows for the adjustment of the regen


braking current limit. The higher the current the
shorter the stopping distance.
Range
Set
Resolution

75 to 630 amps
0 to 255
2.2 amps per set unit

Example:

Setting of 20 = 119 amps

Function 10

Regen Start
(Push 10)

This function allows for the adjustment of the


percent on time at which the control will start to
regen. Adjustment of this function allows the OEM
to set the regen start speed of the truck to eliminate
regen attempts when motor regen current is low.
Range
Set
Resolution

0 to 95% on time
0 to 255
.37% per set unit

Example:

Setting of 20 = 7.4% on time

Function 11

Speed Limit 1 (SL1)


(Push 11)

This function allows for the adjustment of the speed


limit (maximum battery volts to motor) when the SL1
limit switch is normally closed switch connected to
battery negative, the switch opening enables speed
limit.
Range
Set

96% to 0% battery volts


0 to 180

Setting of 0 set units will disable speed limit function


and allow top speed with no limit switch connected.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Function 12

Speed Limit 2 (SL2)


(Push 12)

Same as function 11 except using SL2 limit switch


for input.
Function 13

Speed Limit 3 (SL3)


(Push 13)

Same as function 11 except using SL3 limit switch


for input.
The SL3 set speed limit is also activated by the
Truck Management Module fault codes 90 and 93.
See instructions for IC3645TMM1A Truck
Management Module for details.
Function 14

Internal Resistance
Compensation
(Push 14)

This function is used when the Battery Discharge


Indicator is present. Adjustment of this function will
improve the accuracy of the BDI. In order to make
this setting the voltage drop of the battery under
load must first be determined by following the steps
listed below.
1. Load the drive motor to 100 amps in 1A and
record the voltage (VO) at the SCR positive
and negative power terminal.
2. Load the drive motor to 200 amps in 1A and
record the voltage (VL) at the SCR positive
and negative power terminal.
3. Calculate voltage drop (VD) as follows:
VD=VO-VL
4. Use the table below to determine the setting
using the calculated VD as a reference
.
Setting
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

EV100
VD
11.44
07.60
05.72
04.57
03.81
03.27
02.86
02.54
02.28
02.08
01.90
01.76
01.63
01.52
01.43

EV200
EV100
VD
Setting
VD
07.63
17
01.34
05.07
18
01.27
03.81
19
01.20
03.05
20
01.14
02.54
21
01.09
02.18
22
01.04
01.91
23
00.99
01.69
24
00.95
01.52
25
00.91
01.39
26
00.88
01.27
27
00.85
01.17
28
00.82
01.08
29
00.79
01.01
30
00.76
00.95
31
00.74

EV200
VD
00.80
00.85
00.80
00.78
00.73
00.69
00.66
00.63
0061
00.59
0057
00.55
00.53
00.51
00.49

19-14-5

Function 15

Battery Volts
(Push 15)

This function allows for the adjustment of voltage


range for controls equipped with the Battery
Discharge Indication function. In order for the BDI to
operate properly, the setting as shown in the table
must be entered.
Battery volts

Set units

24 volts
36 volts
48 volts
72 volts
84 volts
36/48 volts
No BDI

Between 0 and 31
Between 32 and 44
Between 45 and 69
Between 70 and 80
Between 81 and 183
Between 184 and 250
Between 251 and 255

The following functions have function numbers


larger than the numbers on the Handset
keyboard. To access these functions, push the
CONT key and the number shown in the
following instructions at the same time.
Function 16

Pedal Position Plug


(Push CONT and 1)

This function will allow the adjustment of the pedal


position plug range. Pedal position will reduce the
plugging current to the current value set by this
function as the accelerator is returned to the creep
speed position. Maximum plug current is obtained
with the accelerator in the top speed position.
Range
Set
Resolution
Example

100 to 930 amps (EV100)


150 to 1425 amps (EV200)
0 to 255
3.2 amps per set unit (EV100)
5.0 amps per set unit (EV200)
Setting of 20 = 164 amps

To disable the pedal position plug function, adjust


the current value to the same current value as the
plug distance current.
Example: If plug distance current Function 5 is set
at 500 amps, then set pedal plug current at 500
amps. With this setting pedal position will have no
effect on plugging distance.
Function 17

Card Type Selection


(Push CONT and 2)

This function allows for the selection of the card


type used for your vehicle's application. The table
below shows the setting to select card application
type depending on which control card is used.

19-14-6
Return

EV100
Function

Standard
with FW

Speed
Limit

Regen/FW

STD C/L
High C/L
STD C/L
(Auto plug)
High C/L
(Auto plug)

0 to 4
5 to 9

20 to 24
25 to 29

40 to 44
45 to 49

10 to 14

30 to 34

50 to 54

15 to 19

35 to 39

55 to 59

EV200
Function

Standard
with FW

Speed
Limit

Regen/FW

STD C/L
STD C/L
(Auto plug)

64 to 68

84 to 88

104 to 108

74 to 78

94 to 98

114 to 118

Settings for these functions should be made in


between the values shown.

WARNING
These settings must be changed by
authorized
personnel
only,
following instructions supplied by
the
manufacturer.
Card
type
selection must be made within the
capabilities of the SCR control
panel used and the supporting
electro-mechanical devices. Failure
to comply with proper application
standards
could
result
in
misoperation or damage to the
control and/or motors.

Function 18

Steer Pump Time Delay


(Push CONT and 3)

This function allows for the selection of steer pump


contactor pick up input, either seat switch or
directional switch closing and adjustment of the time
delay for the contactor drop out.
Pick up on seat switch closure and time delay drop
out on seat switch opening.
Range
Setting
Resolution

1.5 to 65 seconds
Between 0 and 128
.5 seconds per set unit

Example:

Setting of 20 = 10.5 seconds

Pick up on directional switch closure and drop out


time delay in directional switch opening.
Range
Setting
Resolution
Example:

.5 to 63 seconds
129 to 255
.5 seconds per set unit
Setting of 149 = 10.5 seconds

Drop out will be 1.5 seconds after the seat switch


opens.

OCTOBER 1995

Description of Function Numbers for:

Set

Control Cards

Example:

Function 1

IC3645EVLXCD1MT
IC3645EVLXCD1MX
IC3645EVLXCD1MK

Stored Fault Code


(Push 1)

This function register contains the last fault that shut


down truck operation (PMT type fault that is reset by
cycling the key switch). This fault code will be over
written each time a new fault occurs and be cleared
from memory by adjusting the value to zero.
Function 2

Creep Speed
(Push2)

0 to 255

Function 5

5% to 15% on time
0 to 255
.03% per set unit

Example:

Setting of 20 = 5.6% on time

Function 3

Controlled Acceleration
and 1A Time
(Push 3)

Plugging Distance (Current)


(Push 5)

This function allows for the adjustment of the


plugging distance of the truck. The larger the
current setting, the shorter the stopping distance.
Range
Set
Resolution
Example:

200 to 1000 amps (EV100)


300 to 1500 amps (EV200)
0 to 255
3.14 amps per set unit (EV100)
4.7 amps per set unit (EV200)
Setting of 20 = 1263 amps (EV100)

WARNING

This function allows for the adjustment of the creep


speed of the truck. A constant creep speed
frequency will be maintained when an accelerator
input voltage between 3.7 and 3.5 volts or an
accelerator ohmic input between 6K and 4.7K ohms
is provided.
Range
Set
Resolution

0 = min. current, 255 = max. current

Plug
settings
must
be
in
accordance with control operating
instructions. An excessively high
setting could cause damage to
control system or drive motor.

Function 6

1A Drop Out Current


(Push 6)

This function allows for the adjustment of the 1A


contactor drop out current. The 1A contactor will be
dropped out and the vehicle motor torque will be
limited to SCR current limit when the set drop out
current is reached.
Range

450 to 1260 amps (EV100)


675 to 1890 amps (EV200)
0 to 250
3.24 amps per set unit (EV100)
4.86 amps per set unit (EV200)

This function allows for the adjustment of the rate of


time it takes for the control to accelerate to 96%
applied battery voltage to the motor on hand
acceleration. The 1A contactor will automatically
close .2 seconds after the controlled acceleration
stops and the accelerator input is less then .5 volts
or less then 50 ohms.

Set
Resolution

Range
Set
Resolution

.1 to 22.0 seconds
0 to 255
.084 seconds per set unit

Function 7

Example:

Setting of 20 = 1.8 seconds C/A


and 2.0 1A time.

This function allows for the selection of PA4 input


function. The PA4 input can be adjusted to operate
in either of the following modes:

Function 4

Current Limit
(Push 4)

This function allows for the adjustment of the


current limit of the control. The rating of the control
will determine the range of adjustment for this
function. Please refer to the operating instructions
for the control used in this truck.
Range

OCTOBER 1995
Return

See control C/L curves

Settings above 250 set units will disable 1A drop out


function (1A will not drop out).
Example:

Setting of 20 = 515 amps (EV100)


Pa4 Input Switch Function
Selection
(Push 7)

1) To activate a speed limit if a normally closed


switch is opened between PA4 and
negative.
2) To reverse the direction of the in-board motor
and activate a speed limit if a normally open
switch is closed between PA4 and negative.
Set 128 or greater to select option 1 above.

19-14-7

Function 11

Speed Limit 1 (PA5 OR PA6)


(Push 11)

This function allows for the adjustment of the speed


limit (maximum battery volts to motor) when the L1
or R1 limit switch input signal is received by the
control card. L1 or R1 limit switch is normally closed
switch connected to battery negative, the switch
opening enables speed limit.
Range
Set

96% to 0% battery volts


0 to 180

Setting of 0 set units will disable speed limit function


and allow top speed with no limit switch connected.
Function 12

Speed Limit 2 (PA4)


(Push 12)

Same as Function 11 except using L2 or R2 limit


switch for input. See Function 7 for switch
operation.
Function 13

Speed Limit 3
(Push 13)

This speed limit is activated by the Truck


Management Module fault codes 90 and 93. See
instructions for IC3645TMM1A Truck Management
Module for details.
Function 14

Internal Resistance
Compensation
(Push 14)

This function is used when the Battery Discharge


Indicator is present. Adjustment of this function will
improve the accuracy of the BDI. In order to make
this setting the voltage drop of the battery under
load must first be determined by following the steps
listed below.
1. Load the drive motor to 100 amps in 1A and
record the voltage (VO) at the SCR positive
and negative power terminal.
2. Load the drive motor to 200 amps in 1A and
record the voltage (VL) at the SCR positive
and negative power terminal.
3. Calculate voltage drop (VD) as follows:
VD=VO-VL

Setting
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

EV100
VD
11.44
07.60
05.72
04.57
03.81
03.27
02.86
02.54
02.28
02.08
01.90
01.76
01.63
01.52
01.43

Function 15

EV200
VD
00.80
00.85
00.80
00.78
00.73
00.69
00.66
00.63
0061
00.59
0057
00.55
00.53
00.51
00.49

Battery Volts
(Push 15)

This function allows for the adjustment of voltage


range for controls equipped with the Battery
Discharge Indication function. In order for the BDI to
operate properly, the setting as shown in the table
must be entered.
Battery volts

Set units

24 volts
36 volts
48 volts
72 volts
84 volts
36/48 volts
No BDI

Between 0 and 31
Between 32 and 44
Between 45 and 69
Between 70 and 80
Between 81 and 183
Between 184 and 250
Between 251 and 255

The following functions have function numbers


larger than the numbers on the Handset
keyboard. To access these functions, push the
CONT key and the number shown in the
following instructions at the same time.
Function 16

Pedal Position Plug


(Push CONT and 1)

This function will allow the adjustment of the pedal


position plug range. Pedal position will reduce the
plugging current to the current value set by this
function as the accelerator is returned to the creep
speed position. Maximum plug current is obtained
with the accelerator in the top speed position.

4. Use the table below to determine the setting


using the calculated VD as a reference

Range

Set
Resolution
Example

19-14-8
Return

EV200
EV100
VD
Setting
VD
07.63
17
01.34
05.07
18
01.27
03.81
19
01.20
03.05
20
01.14
02.54
21
01.09
02.18
22
01.04
01.91
23
00.99
01.69
24
00.95
01.52
25
00.91
01.39
26
00.88
01.27
27
00.85
01.17
28
00.82
01.08
29
00.79
01.01
30
00.76
00.95
31
00.74

100 to 930 amps (EV100)


150 to 1425 amps (EV200)
0 to 255
3.2 amps per set unit (EV100)
5.0 amps per set unit (EV200)
Setting of 20 = 164 amps

OCTOBER 1995

To disable the pedal position plug function, adjust


the current value to the same current value as the
plug distance current.
Example: If plug distance current Function 5 is set
at 500 amps, then set pedal plug current at 500
amps. With this setting pedal position will have no
effect on plugging distance.
Function 17

Card Type Selection


(Push CONT and 2)

This function allows for the selection of the card


type used for your vehicle's application. The table
below shows the setting to select card application
type depending on which control card is used.
EV100
Function

Standard
with FW

STD C/L
High C/L
STD C/L
(Auto plug)
High C/L
(Auto plug)

0 to 4
5 to 9

Pick up on seat switch closure and time delay drop


out on seat switch opening.
Range
Setting
Resolution

1.5 to 65 seconds
Between 0 and 128
.5 seconds per set unit

Example:

Setting of 20 = 10.5 seconds

Pick up on directional switch closure and drop out


time delay in directional switch opening.
Range
Setting
Resolution
Example:

.5 to 63 seconds
129 to 255
.5 seconds per set unit
Setting of 149 = 10.5 seconds

Drop out will be 1.5 seconds after the seat switch


opens.

10 to 14
15 to 19

EV200
Function

Standard
with FW

STD C/L
STD C/L
(Auto plug)

64 to 68
74 to 78

Settings for these functions should be made in


between the values shown.

WARNING
These settings must be changed by
authorized
personnel
only,
following instructions supplied by
the
manufacturer.
Card
type
selection must be made within the
capabilities of the SCR control
panel used and the supporting
electro-mechanical devices. Failure
to comply with proper application
standards
could
result
in
misoperation or damage to the
control and/or motors.

Function 18

Steer Pump Time Delay


(Push CONT and 3)

This function allows for the selection of steer pump


contactor pick up input, either seat switch or
directional switch closing and adjustment of the time
delay for the contactor drop out.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-14-9

Description of Function Numbers for:


Control Cards

Function 1

IC3645EVLXCD1PX

Stored Fault Code


(Push 1)

This function register contains the last fault that shut


down truck operation (PMT type fault that is reset by
cycling the key switch). This fault code will be over
written each time a new fault occurs and be cleared
from memory by adjusting the value to zero.
Function 2

Internal Resistance
Compensation State
(Push2)

This function allows for the adjustment of current


level at witch the internal resistance compensation
feature (Function 16) will take effect.
Range
Set
Resolution

0 to 1325 amps
52 to 255
6.5 amps per set unit

Example:

Setting of 72 = 130 amps

Function 3

Controlled Acceleration
and 1A Time
(Push 3)

This function allows for the adjustment of the rate of


time it takes for the control to accelerate to 96%
applied battery voltage to the motor on hand
acceleration. The 1A contactor will automatically
close .2 seconds after the controlled acceleration
stops and the accelerator input is less then .5 volts
or less then 50 ohms.

(Push 11)
This function allows for the adjustment of the speed
limit (maximum battery volts to motor) when the SL1
limit switch is normally closed switch connected to
battery negative, the switch opening enables speed
limit.
Range
Set
Resolution

0% to 100% battery volts


0 to 255
.375 volts per set unit

Example:

Setting of 50 = 18.75 volts

Function 12

Speed Limit 2 (SL2)


(Push 12)

Same as function 11 except using SL2 limit switch


for input.
Function 13

Speed Limit 3 (SL3)


(Push 13)

Same as function 11 except using SL3 limit switch


for input.
Function 14

Speed Limit 4 (SL4)


(Push 14)

Same as function 11 except using SL4 limit switch


for input.
The following functions have function numbers
larger than the numbers on the Handset
keyboard. To access these functions, push the
CONT key and the number shown in the
following instructions at the same time.

Range
Set
Resolution

.1 to 5.5 seconds
0 to 255
.021 seconds per set unit

Function 16

Example:

Setting of 20 = .52 seconds C/A


and.72 seconds 1A time.

Function 4

Current Limit
(Push 4)

This function is used to stabilize pump speed at


heavy loads. This function is set using information
obtained from the speed torque curve of the motor
used. See OEM service manual for your truck for
this setting.

This function allows for the adjustment of the


current limit of the control. The rating of the control
will determine the range of adjustment for this
function. Please refer to the operating instructions
for the control used in this truck.
Range
Set

See control C/L curves


0 to 255

Example:
0 = min. current, 255 = max. current
Function 11
Speed Limit 1 (SL1)

19-14-10
Return

Internal Resistance
Compensation
(Push CONT and 1)

Internal Resistance Compensation Table


Setting
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Voltage Drop
11.44
07.60
05.72
04.57
03.81
03.27
02.86

Setting
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

Voltage Drop
01.34
01.27
01.20
01.14
01.09
01.04
00.99

OCTOBER 1995

Setting
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Voltage Drop
02.54
02.28
02.08
01.90
01.76
01.63
01.52
01.43

Function 17

Setting
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

Voltage Drop
00.95
00.91
00.88
00.85
00.82
00.79
00.76
00.74

Card Type Selection


(Push CONT and 2)

This function allows for the selection of the card


type used for your vehicle's application. The table
below shows the setting to select card application
type depending on which control card is used.

Function
STD C/L
High C/L
STD C/L
BDI (Lockout)
High C/L
BDI (Lockout)

with Pump
Ctr/PMT

Without Pump
Ctr/PMT

0 to 8
9 to 17

36 to 44
45 to 53

18 to 26

54 to 62

27 to 35

63 to 71

BDI lockout means that the BDI signal from the


traction control must be present in order for the
pump control to operate. This control will stop
operation when the battery state of charge reaches
10%.
Setting for these functions should be made in
between the valve shown.

WARNING
These settings must be changed by
authorized
personnel
only,
following instructions supplied by
the
manufacturer.
Card
type
selection must be made within the
capabilities of the SCR control
panel used and the supporting
electro-mechanical devices. Failure
to comply with proper application
standards
could
result
in
misoperation or damage to the
control and/or motors.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-14-11

Return

Section 15.
EV100LXT Control Panel Status Codes

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-1

19-15-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-3

19-15-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-5

19-15-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-7

19-15-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-9

19-15-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-11

19-15-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-13

19-15-14
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-15

19-15-16
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-17

19-15-18
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-19

19-15-20
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-21

19-15-22
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-23

19-15-24
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-25

19-15-26
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-27

19-15-28
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-29

19-15-30
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-31

19-15-32
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-15-33

Return

Section 16.
Checking Components

Main Logic Card................................................................................. 2


Capacitor ............................................................................................ 3
Contactors F,R,1A,SP,FW,D,Regen, and P...................................... 3
Potentiometer in Accelerator............................................................ 3
SCRs (1REC, 2REC, 3REC) .............................................................. 3
Rectifiers (3REC, 4REC, Diode Blocks ............................................ 4
Thermal Protector (TP)...................................................................... 4
Filter Block (23FIL, etc.) .................................................................... 4
1X Choke and Reactor T3-T4 ............................................................ 4
Replacement of EV-100 Components .............................................. 5
1REC, 2REC, or 5REC................................................................ 5
Capacitor ..................................................................................... 5
22REC,23REC, and 25REC........................................................ 5

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-16-1

Main Logic Card


All troubleshooting is written to check all outside
devices and eliminate them as the source of the
symptoms. The conclusion being then that the card
is faulty.

Instructions for Removal of Control Card.

Remove control wires on the


terminals 1 through 6 as required.

Unplug A, B, and Z plugs by pressing down


on tab with wide blade screwdriver and
rotating 90 degrees.

Remove the two(2) mounting screws and lift


card box.

screw

NOTE
Do not attempt to remove circuit
broad from card box.

Reverse procedure to install new control


card.

19-16-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Capacitor 1C

SCRs (1REC, 2REC, 5REC)

Disconnect the battery and discharge the capacitor.


Measure ohms Through the capacitor using the R x
10,000 scale. Meter should read zero and the swing
slowly to above 100,000 ohms. Replace the
capacitor if above reading is not obtained.

These are silicon controlled rectifiers. Before


checking, disconnect the battery and discharge
capacitor 1C. Disconnect gate leads of SCRs at the
SCR terminal.

Contactors F,R,1A,SP,FW,D,REGEN
and P
150 ampere contactors instruction sheets.
300 ampere contactors instruction sheets.

NOTE
Control is arranged so that the F
and R contactors do not break
current. Check to see that the 1A
contactor drops before the F and R
contactor.
Most contactor coils are polarity
sensitive. The left-hand terminal
must be connected to positive.

Potentiometer in Accelerator
To check operation of potentiometer, disconnect the
battery and disconnect the wire at control card TB1.
Connect a VOM to the wire that was removed from
TB1 and to negative. Place the VOM on the R x 100
scale. With the accelerator in the creep speed
position, the ohms reading should be 4800 to 6000
ohms. With the accelerator in the top speed
position, the ohm reading should be 50 ohms or
less. With the wire disconnected as above, check
for resistance of 1 megohm or higher from pot wire
to the truck frame.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

To check an SCR, it is necessary to have a 6 volt


battery and 2 a-14 diodes.
Connect the positive lead to the anode, connect the
negative lead to the cathode as shown below.
1. The lamp should not light. If the lamp does
light, the SCR is shorted and must be
replaced.
2. If check (1) was satisfactory, test the SCR
for its ability to be turned on by the gate.
Connect positive through two diodes to the
gate terminal. If the gate is operative, the
lamp will come on and remain on when the
gate is removed. Some SCRs will operate
correctly even if the lamp dose not remain
on, particularly with a weak battery.
3. If the lamp cannot be lit under step (1) the
SCR is open and must be replaced.

NOTE
If you
check
above,
shorts
VOM.

do not have a test light to


the SCRs as described
they may be checked for
and opens by use of the

Measure resistance from anode to


cathode (R x 100 scale. If SCR is
shorted (zero ohms), it must be
replaced.
Measure resistance from the gate
terminal to the cathode and then
from the cathode to the gate
terminal (R 100 scale). If resistance
reads either zero ohms (short) or
infinity ohms (open), replace the
SCR. When resembling SCRs, refer
to TABLE 5.

19-16-3

Rectifiers (3REC, 4REC, Diode Blocks)

Filter Block (23FIL, etc.)

When checking diodes, disconnect battery and


discharge capacitor 1C. When replacing rectifiers,
refer to TABLE 5. For 3REC and 4REC, disconnect
one lead or flexible connection.

To check, disconnect all wires from the filter block


on removal from panel. With VOM on the R x
10,000, touch the leads to the filter terminals
change the filter. After a few seconds, reverse the
meter leads and touch the filter terminal. The VOM
needle will deflect and return to infinity. If this
capacitor action is not observed, replace the filter
block.

3REC and 4REC are diodes with about 7 to 12


ohms in the conducting direction (anode to catode)
measure on the R x 100 scale, and 10,000 ohms or
higher, in the non-conducting direction (cathode to
anode) measured on the R x 10,000 scale.

Filter Block (23FIL, etc.)


Filter block test 4K is only to detect an open or
shorted filter. If the control has symptoms as in 1E,
interchange 22REC and 25REC and try again. If the
problem is corrected, the old 25REC is marginal
and should be replaced. If the problem is not
corrected, replace both filters.

Thermal Protector (TP)


Remove both the GRAY and BLACK wires from the
Z plug that connects to the control card. Read the
resistance between these two wires with the VOM
set on the R x 100 scale. VOM should read 100 to
200 ohms if the 1REC heatsink is at room
temperature (75F or 25C). Set the VOM to the
highest ohm scale and read from each wire end to
the 1REC heatsink. Reading should be infinity.

19-16-4
Return

1X Choke and Reactor T3-T4


Refer to panel wiring diagram to locate windings.
With VOM on R x 1 scale, measure choke or reactor
winding. Reading should be less then 1 ohm.

OCTOBER 1995

Replacement of EV-100 Components


When replacing stud semiconductors such as 3REC
and 4REC, it is not necessary to torque these
devices to a specific valve.

IMPORTANT
The use of heat-transfer grease
(such as GE Versilube G-350-M or
equivalent) is recommended.

Capacitor

Remove nuts from capacitor connections


and remove wires.

Remove hold down brackets and lift out.

Reverse procedure to replace capacitor.

22REC, 23REC and 25REC

When replacing module semiconductors such as:

1REC, 2REC or 5REC


1

Remove all
required)

module

connections.

(As

Remove module by backing out the two


screws at the device sides.

Clean the insulator surface with a clean rag


and isopropyl alcohol.

Inspect the insulator surface for tears or


cracks. If defective, replace. Wipe a light
layer of machine oil on the base and smooth
the insulator into position.

Remove mounting screws and lift out.

NOTE
When replacing these devices, use
the original hardware in the same
holes, as the insert are used for
electrical connections.

NOTE
Insulator not required for 2REC and
5REC.

Coat insulator with a light coat of heattransfer grease similar to GE-350.

Set new module on insulator and start


screws back into base. Be sure to use the
original screws and washers. Run screws
into base finger tight.

Check that the bottom of the module is flat


against the insulator or base.

Alternately tighten the two (2) screws by 1/4


turn until firm.

Replace all connections removed in step 1.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

19-16-5

Return

Group 20
DRIVE AXLE

Drive Axle .................................................................................... Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

20-00-1

20-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Drive Axle

General Description........................................................................... 2
Service Notes ..................................................................................... 2
Drive Axle Maintenance .................................................................... 2
Fluid Level Checks ...................................................................... 2
Fluid Change Procedure.............................................................. 2
Drive Axle Removal ........................................................................... 3
Drive Axle Special Tools ................................................................... 4
Drive Axle Disassembly .................................................................... 8
Drive Axle Assembly ........................................................................ 11
Assembly Notes.......................................................................... 11
Assembly .................................................................................... 11
Drive Axle Installation ...................................................................... 14

OCTOBER 1995
Return

20-01-1

General Description
The drive axle consists of right hand and left hand
axle end assemblies. The two axle ends are
fastened together to form the drive axle assembly.
Each axle end half contains a ring gear and pinion
and final drive gearing. The drive motors are
mounted directly to the axle ends.

Refer to Group
recommended
specification.

40 Specifications, for
transmission
fluid

Fluid Change Procedure


IMPORTANT
Drain drive axle when fluid is at
operating temperature.

Service Notes
The drive axle contains metric fasteners. Use only
metric tools to service unit.

WARNING
Make certain blocks are secure and
installed under carriage so that
carriage can not fall.

Service instructions refer to one axle end, unless


otherwise noted.

Drive Axle Maintenance


When troubleshooting a drive axle problem, it
should be kept in mind that the drive axle is only a
central unit in a group of related powertrain
components.
Proper operation of drive axle depends on condition
and correct function of other components of group.
It is necessary to consider transmission fluid, drive
motors and connections to properly diagnose and
repair a problem.

Raise upright carriage only to height that will


permit access to plugs on axle. Block
carriage. Refer to Group SA, Lifting,
Jacking, and Blocking.

Turn key switch OFF. Disconnect battery.

Place a low flat drain pan under drive axle.


Pan should have a capacity of more than 6.8
quarts [6,5L].

Remove dipstick cap. Remove drain plug


from each axle end and allow fluid to drain.
While fluid is draining, check condition of
vent in dipstick cap. Replace dipstick cap if
vent is damaged or plugged.

Install drain plugs.

Fill drive axle to proper level with specified


fluid through dipstick hole. DO NOT
OVERFILL.

Connect battery, remove blocking and lower


carriage.

Fluid Level Check


Check fluid level. It must be at correct level.

Check fluid level by removing dipstick on the


right hand axle end. Wipe dipstick clean and
reinstall.
Remove dipstick and examine. Fluid level
should be between the two marks on
dipstick. If fluid level is low, add enough fluid
to bring level up to full mark on dipstick. DO
NOT OVERFILL.

20-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

12. Disconnect hydraulic brake lines.

Drive Axle Removal

13. Identify and disconnect motor power cables.


Tie cables out of way to avoid damage.

1. Park truck on hard, level surface.


2. Lower upright.

WARNING

3. Remove forks.
4. Turn key switch OFF and disconnect
battery.
5. Remove battery.

Use only approved hoist, chains,


and straps to lift the drive axle and
motors.
Be
sure
hoist
and
accessories have correct capacity
to safely support the load.

14. Put lift straps on drive motors and hook


straps to chain hoist. Remove slack from
hoist chain to stabilize drive axle assembly.

6. Blocks steer wheels front and rear.


7. Lift truck with a jack and put blocks under
each side of frame just behind drive wheels.
Refer to truck jacking in Group SA, Section
2, for details.

WARNING

CAUTION
To avoid injury, remove all the axle
fasteners in the order listed.

15. Remove axle rear mounting fasteners from


each side of frame.

Make sure blocks are secure and


placed so that there is clearance to
remove axle without interfering with
blocking or truck.

8. Remove two front and top compartment


covers.

16. Remove axle front mounting fasteners from


each side of frame. Rock axle until axle is
free of alignment pin(s).

9. Remove drive wheels.

17. Lower axle to floor and remove it from under


truck. Store axle in a safe manner.

10. Put a drip pan under drive axle to catch any


fluid.

18. If drive motors are to be removed, refer to


Motor Group 16 for details.

11. Remove upright. Refer


Uprights, for details,

to

Group

34

* Apply General Purpose Theadlocker

to nut threads prior to assembly.


** Alignment Pin(s)
When removing Drive Axle(s),
Rock
Axle(s) until free of the
alignment
pin(s).

OCTOBER 1995
Return

20-01-3

Drive Axle Special Tools


Special Socket

20-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Drive Axle Special Tools


Special Socket

OCTOBER 1995
Return

20-01-5

Drive Axle Special Tools


Special Socket

20-01-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Drive Axle Special Tools


Pinion Retainer Tool

OCTOBER 1995
Return

20-01-7

Drive Axle Disassembly


Disassembly drive axle only on a clean floor or on a
work table strong enough to support the weight of
the axle. Drain drive axle fluid, if has not been done
previously.
1. Block axle to stabilize it on the work surface.
2. Clean exterior of axle before beginning
disassembly.
3. Remove drive motors, if they have not been
removed previously. Refer to Group 16,
Motor for details.
4. Examine entire assembly for damage. Note
if there is any evidence of cracks or broken
parts.
5. Remove housing flange cap screws, refer to
illustrations on next two pages.
6. With a drift pin and hammer, drive out
housing flange roll pins.

NOTE
Sealant was applied to the axle end
housing flanges at assembly. Force
may be required to separate the two
housings.

Note
In order to remove lock nut, it will
be necessary to fabricate a tools to
keep the output shaft from turning.
Refer to Drive Axle Special Tools.

11. Use a soft hammer to drive the pinion from


the motor mounting flange. The upper
bearing cone will come off the pinion shaft in
the process. Clean and inspect bearing for
wear or damage. Replace as required.
Bearing cone and cup should be replaced as
a set.
12. Remove backing washers and adjusting
sleeve. Press lower pinion bearing cone
from pinion.
13. Draw pinion bearing cups from the motor
mounting flange.
14. Loosen bevel gear nut, using fabricated tool
to keep output shaft from turning. Refer to
previous pages.
15. Remove locking cap screw.
16. With special tool, remove output shaft nut.
Use fabricated tool to keep output shaft from
turning.
17. Remove housing cover cap screws (item #2)

7. Separate the two axle end assemblies.

8. Remove the motor mounting flange cap


screws.
1

9. Use two(2) mounting flange cap screws


(item #1 above) to remove motor mounting
flange from axle housing. Thread cap
screws into tapped holes "A" in motor
mounting flange. Turn cap screws
alternately into tapped holes until mounting
flange is extracted from axle housing.
10. With special tool, remove pinion retaining
nut.

20-01-8
Return

18. Use two(2) housing cover cap screws (item


#2) to remove housing cover from axle
housing. Install cap screws into tapped
holes "B" in housing cover. Turn cap screws
alternately into tapped holes until housing
cover is extracted from axle housing. After
the housing cover assembly is off, reach into
the axle end housing and remove loose
inner bearing cone.
19. With special tool, remove output shaft nut.
Use fabricated tool to keep output shaft from
turning. Slide output gear off shaft.

OCTOBER 1995

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

Nut, Drive axle pinion shaft lock


Cone, Differential pinion bearing
Cup, Differential pinion outboard bearing
Shim kit, Differential pinion bearing cage
Spacer, Pinion bearing cone
Spacer, Pinion bearing
Cup, Differential pinion inboard bearing
Cone, Differential pinion inner bearing
Pinion
Shim, Differential pinion bearing carrier
Seal, Differential pinion bearing carrier
Housing, Drive Axle-Right Hand
Cup, Ring gear shaft outboard bearing
Cone, Ring gear shaft outboard bearing
Cap Screw, Pinion bearing carrier
Carrier, Differential pinion bearing
Spacer, Drive axle ring gear inboard bearing
Bearing, Drive axle ring gear shaft
Cap Screw, Thin flange to axle housing
Gear, pinion

OCTOBER 1995
Return

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

Retainer, Drive axle ring gear


Cup, Ring gear shaft inboard bearing
Spacer, Drive axle ring gear shaft
Cap Screw, Drive axle shaft Retainer
Retainer, Drive axle shaft bearing
Cone, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Cap Screw, Thick Flange to axle housing
Dowel ring, Axle housing fastener
Plug, Drive axle drain
Cup, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Spacer, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Locator, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Retainer, Drive axle shaft gear
Gear, Drive axle shaft
Housing, Drive axle end-right hand
Cap Screw, Drive axle end housing
Shaft, Drive axle
Seal, Drive axle end housing
Seal, Drive axle shaft
Bearing, Drive axle shaft-outer
Shaft, Drive axle ring gear

20-01-9

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

Retainer, Drive axle ring gear


Gear, Pinion
Cap Screw, Pinion bearing carrier
Carrier, Bearing
Spacer, inboard bearing
Bearing, Drive axle ring gear shaft
Cap Screw, Thin flange axle housing
Vent, Differential and Axle
Shim, Differential pinion bearing carrier
Seal, differential pinion bearing carrier
Housing, Drive axle-Left Hand
Cup, Ring gear shaft outboard bearing
Cone, Ring gear shaft outboard bearing
Shaft, Drive axle ring gear
Nut, Drive axle pinion shaft lock
Cone, Differential pinion bearing
Cup, Differential pinion outboard bearing
Skim kit, Differential pinion bearing cage
Spacer, Pinion bearing cone
Spacer, Differential pinion bearing
Cup, Differential pinion inboard bearing

20-01-10
Return

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Cone, Differential pinion inner bearing


Pinion
Shaft, Drive axle
Seal, Drive axle end housing
Seal, Drive axle shaft
Bearing, Drive axle shaft-outer
Cap Screw, Drive axle end housing
Housing, Drive axle end-Left Hand
Gear, Drive axle shaft
Retainer, Drive axle shaft gear
Locator, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Spacer, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Cup, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Plug, Drive axle drain
Dowel ring, Axle housing
Cap Screw, Thick flange to axle housing
Cone, Drive axle shaft inboard bearing
Retainer, Drive axle shaft bearing
Cap Screw, Drive shaft bearing retainer
Spacer, Drive axle ring gear shaft
Cup, Ring gear shaft inboard bearing

OCTOBER 1995

20. Remove the output shaft from housing


cover.
21. Press outer bearing cone off output shaft.
Clean and inspect bearing for wear or
damage. Replace as required. Bearing cone
and cup should be replaced as a set.
22. Remove oil seal and outer bearing cup from
housing cover.
23. Remove snap ring and back-up ring from
housing cover.
24.Pull inner bearing cup out of axle end
housing.
25. Remove and discard bevel gear nut.
Remove bevel gear and spacer from output
gear pinion.
26. From inside the axle end housing, use a soft
hammer to drive the output gear pinion out
of the housing. Remove loose inner bearing
cone from housing. Clean and inspect
bearing for wear or damage. Replace as
required. Bearing cone and cup should be
replaced as a set. Remove spring bushing
from output gear pinion.
27. Remove spacer from output gear pinion.
28. Press outer bearing cone off output gear
pinion. Remove outer bearing cup using a
puller if necessary. Clean and inspect
bearing for wear or damage. Replace as
required. Bearing cone and cup should be
replaced as a set.

Drive Axle Assembly


Assembly Notes
IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

1. Clean all parts with a good grade of solvent


and dry thoroughly. DO NOT let bearing spin
dry if drying parts with air pressure.

5. Use Permatex and General Purpose


Threadlocker only where specified. Spray
threads of fasteners with Primer T 5
minutes before applying Theadlocker.
6. All lead-in chamfers for oil seals and O rings
must be smooth and free from burrs. Inspect
at assembly. Correct as necessary.
7. Coat all bearings with transmission fluid
before installing.

Assembly
1. Install pinion bearing cups into axle end
housing.
2. Press outer bearing cone onto output gear
pinion.
3. Slide spring bushing onto output gear pinion.
Install pinion into axle end housing.
4. Install inner bearing cone onto pinion. Install
spacer, bevel gear, apply Threadlocker to a
new bevel gear nut and install. Tighten bevel
gear nut to give a running torque of [0.7
Nm] 6.2 lb./in on the pinion bearing.
5. Install pinion bearing cups into motor
mounting flange.
6. Press inner bearing cone onto pinion and
insert pinion into motor mounting flange.
7. Slide backing washer, spring bushing,
backing washer, and outer bearing cone
onto pinion.
8. Apply Threadlocker to pinion shaft lock nut
and install on pinion. Tighten nut to give a
rolling torque of [0.5 Nm] 4.4 lbs/in on the
pinion bearing. Use special tool to torque
nut.
9. Check motor pinion and bevel gear mesh
adjustment.

NOTE
Mesh adjustment is made with
motor mounting flange shims and
bevel gear spacer. Mark teeth of
motor pinion and bevel gear with
gear checking compound.

2. Remove all Permatex and General


Purpose Threadlocker residue from threads
and machined surfaces.
3. Inspect all components for wear or damage.
Replace as required.
4. Replace all oil seals and O rings.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Install flange and pinion assembly into axle


end housing, using shim to align assembly
with housing. Install and tighten only two(2)
flange cap screws.

20-01-11

Tooth Bearing Contact Chart

Check Ring and Pinion Tooth Contact

Paint ring gear teeth with thin coating of a


mixture of red lead and linseed oil. Rotate
pinion shaft to cause one full revolution of
ring gear. Check tooth pattern on ring gear
and pinion to determine if proper pinion-toring gear tooth engagement exists.

Toe contact on both sides of gear tooth. To


move contact toward the heel, increase
backlash within limits by moving the gear
away from pinion.

20-01-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Heel bearing on both side of gear tooth. To


move bearing toward the toe, decrease
backlash within limits by moving the gear
toward pinion.

Low bearing on Gear and High Bearing on


Pinion
Correct by moving pinion away from gear.
(Increase mounting distance).

High bearing on Gear and Low bearing on


Pinion.
Correct by moving pinion in toward gear.
(Decrease mounting distance.)

OCTOBER 1995
Return

20-01-13

NOTE
Do not install O ring (item # 10 on
right hand drive axle) at this time.

Rotate the pinion several times in a


clockwise or counterclockwise direction and
check against the tooth bearing contact
chart on previous pages. Pinion gear
backlash should be 0.0078-0.0040 inch
(0.198-0.102 mm).

10. Adjust pinion by changing the number of


flange shims. The bevel gear is adjusted by
grinding the gear spacer to the thickness
required. Use a surface grinder to remove
material from the gear spacer.
11. When gear mesh adjustment is correct,
remove two(2) cap screws and flange and
pinion assembly. Coat O ring with
transmission fluid and install. Apply General
Purpose Threadlocker to all flange cap
screws and re-install flange and pinion
assembly. Torque cap screws to [67 Nm]
49.5 lb./ft.
12. Lock the bevel gear nut by crimping the nut
into the groove in the end of pinion shaft.
13. Install inner bearing cup, bearing ring, and
snap ring into axle end housing.

17. Slide bearing cone onto output gear shaft.


Apply General Purpose Threadlocker to nut.
Install nut and torque to (68 Nm) 50.2 lb./ft.
with special tool. Apply General Purpose
Threadlocker to locking screw. Lock nut with
screw. Torque screw to (13 Nm) 9.6 lb./ft.
18. Apply a thin layer of Permetex#2 to
machine surface of axle end housing
flanges. Mate the two axle end housings
together and drive in roll pins. Apply General
Purpose Threadlocker to cap screws and
fasten axle end housing together. Torque
cap screws to (67 Nm) 49.5 lb./ft.
19. Install drive motors. Refer to Group 16,
Section 2.

Drive Axle Installation


1. Make sure truck is blocked in a secure
manner and that there is clearance to move
axle in place from underside of truck without
disturbing blocking.

WARNING
Use only approved hoist, chains,
and straps to lift the drive axle and
motors.
Be
sure
hoist
and
accessories have correct capacity
to safely support the load.

14. Install outer bearing cup and cone into


output shaft housing. Apply a thin coating of
grease between the lips of oil seal. Apply a
thin layer of Permetex#2 to the outside
diameter of oil seal and install.

2. Put lift straps on drive motors and hook


straps to chain hoist.

15. Insert output shaft through housing. Do not


damage oil seal with splines of output shaft.
Slide output gear onto shaft. Apply General
Purpose Threadlocker to nut and install.
Torque nut with special tool to (200 Nm)
147.5 lb./ft. Use fabricated tool on page 2001-07 to keep output shaft from turning.

4. Align drive axle slot with axle mounting


alignment pins, see next illustration.

16. Apply a thin layer of Permetex#2 to


machine surface of housing cover. Apply
General Purpose Threadlocker to cap
screws and install housing cover axle end
housing. Torque cap screws to (67 Nm)
49.5 lb./ft.

5. Secure axle assembly to frame by first


installing front two fasteners on each side of
frame.

20-01-14
Return

3. Position axle under truck with chain


hoist.

CAUTION
To avoid injury, install all the axle
mounting bolts in the order
indicated.

6. Install rear two fasteners on each side of


frame. Tighten all nuts snug, then torque
nuts to 301-339 lb./ft. (408-469 Nm).

OCTOBER 1995

7. Connect drive motor power cables. Make


sure cable ends are connected to correct
motor terminals.

12. Fill drive axle to correct level with specified


fluid.
13. Install front and top compartment covers.

8. Connect hydraulic brake lines and bleed


brakes.
9. Install upright and attach tilt cylinders at
upright. Refer to Group 32 & 34 for details.

14. Remove blocks and lower truck to floor.


Refer to truck jacking group for details.
15. Install battery.
16. Install forks. Connect battery and test drive
axle operation.

10. Connect hydraulic lift cylinder line.


11. Install drive wheels and torque mounting
bolts to188-203 lb./ft. [225-275 Nm]

NOTE
Coat spline shaft of motors with
Anti-Seize, before installation.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

20-01-15

Return

Group 22
WHEELS AND TIRES

Cushion Wheels and Tires......................................................... Section 1


Pneumatic Drive Tire and Wheel Maintenance ........................ Section 2

OCTOBER 1995
Return

22-00-1

22-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Cushion Wheels and Tires

Cushion Drive and Steering Tire Specifications............................. 2


Cushion Drive Tire Removal............................................................. 2
Cushion Drive Tire Inspection.......................................................... 2
Cushion Drive Tire Removal and Replacement .............................. 3
Cushion Drive Wheel Installation..................................................... 3
Steering Wheel Removal................................................................... 4
Steering Tire Inspection.................................................................... 5
Steering Wheel Installation............................................................... 5

OCTOBER 1995
Return

22-01-1

Cushion Drive and


Steering Tire Specifications

Remove the drive wheel mounting bolts.

NOTE
The cushion drive and steering tires
specified for this series forklift
trucks were chosen after extensive
testing as the best combination of
tread and shape design and
material compounding, including
hardness, to provide the required
wear and handling characteristics.

Remove the tire and wheel assembly from the


drive axle hub.

Standard Cushion Drive Tire Size:


RCX 25, 30C, 30
RCX 35, 40
RCX 45, 50

18 x 7 x 12.12
18 x 8 x 12.12
18 x 9 x 12.12

Steering Tire Size: All models

9x5

Cushion Drive Tire Inspection


Remove objects (nails, metal fragments, etc.)
embedded in the tread of the tire. Be careful not to
further damage the tire when removing these
objects.

IMPORTANT
The
user
is
advised
that
replacement
of
the
original
equipment tires with tires other
than those recommended by BT
Prime-Mover
may
result
in
decreased operating performance
and stability.

Cushion Drive Tire Removal


CAUTION
To perform this service procedure, first:

Part truck on a level surface.


Put the upright in a vertical position

Check the tire for separation from the base band. If


a thin steel rule or similar tool can be inserted more
than [12 mm] 0.5 inch into the separation area from
the side of the tire, the tire should be replaced.

and lower the carriage fully down.

Turn key switch OFF.

Install chocks in front and behind steer wheels.


Use a portable jack of correct capacity placed under
the frame of the truck to raise the drive wheel off the
ground. Refer to Lifting, Jacking and Blocking,
Group SA, for details.

Check the tire tread. If the tread is worn down to [6


mm] 0.25 in. or less in height, the tire should be
replaced.
Check the tire for damage from chunking or heat
damage. This is a judgment requirement for
replacement. In general, if the damage is greater
than [12 mm] 0.5 in. deep and involves more than
[650 mm2] 4 in.2, it will usually affect the tire
performance and the tire should be replaced.
Look for bulges or other evidence of internal
damage. Replace all tires that show evidence of
internal damage.

22-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Cushion Drive Tire


Removal And Replacement
The correct procedure for tire removal and
replacement requires a suitable press for pressing
tire off wheel and for pressing new tire onto wheel.
Position tire on a hydraulic press. Be sure there is
adequate clearance for the tire to be pressed off
wheel assembly.

Install new tire. Be sure to press the tire on the


wheel with the same offset as measured above
when originally installed.

Cushion Drive Wheel Installation


Be sure the truck is safely positioned on a level floor
and upright fully lowered.
Install drive wheel mounting bolts and tighten
securely.
Be sure to take note of the mounting distance that
the original tire is offset on the wheel (distance from
edge of tire base band to edge of wheel).
Use suitable tooling with the hydraulic press to
correctly contact the base band of tire to press it off
the wheel.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Use a portable jack of sufficient capacity placed


under truck frame to raise truck off the floor and
block. Remove blocks.
Lower truck to floor and remove jack.
Tighten wheel mounting bolts to a final torque of
188-203 lb./ft. (225-275 NM).

22-01-3

Steering Wheel Removal


CAUTION
To perform this service procedure,
fist:

Part truck on a level surface.


Put the upright in a vertical
position and lower the carriage
fully down.

3. Install chocks in front and behind drive


wheels.
4. Use a portable jack of sufficient capacity
placed under the frame of the truck to raise
the steer wheel off the floor. Refer to Lifting,
Jacking and Blocking, Group SA, for details.
Be sure that truck is correctly and safely
blocked up.
5. Remove axle shaft mounting bolt.
6. Remove axle shaft and steer wheels.

1. Turn steer axle trunnion to expose axle shaft


mounting bolt.
2. Turn key switch OFF.

22-01-4
Return

6. Remove wheel bearings, spacers and thrust


washer from steering wheels. Clean
bearings and thrust washer and inspect for
wear or damage. Replace as required.

OCTOBER 1995

Steering Tire Inspection


Remove objects (nails, metal fragments, etc.)
embedded in the thread of the tire. Be careful not to
further damage the tire when removing these
objects.

Steering Wheel Installation


1. Pack wheel bearings with grease. Refer to
Group PS for proper grease. Install wheel
bearings in wheel.
2. Position wheels, thrust washer and wheel
spacers in steering axle trunnion. Slide axle
shaft through axle trunnion and wheels.
3. Install axle shaft bolt. Torque axle shaft bolt
to [40-45 Nm] 30-33 lb./ft.
4. Remove block. Lower truck to floor and
remove jack.
5. Remove chocks at drive wheels.

Check the tire for separation from the base band. If


a thin steel rule or similar tool can be inserted more
than [12 mm] 0.5 inch into the separation area from
the side of the tire, the tire should be replaced.
Check the tire for damage from chunking or heat
damage. This is a judgment requirement for
replacement. In general, if the damage is greater
than [12 mm] 0.5 in. deep and involves more than
[650 mm2] 4 in.2, it will usually affect the tire
performance and the tire should be replaced.
Look for bulges or other evidence of internal
damage. Replace all tires that show evidence of
internal damage.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

22-01-5

Return

Section 2.
Pneumatic Drive Tire and Wheel Maintenance

Pneumatic Tire Warning.................................................................... 2


Safety Procedures ............................................................................. 2
Pneumatic Drive Tire Specifications................................................ 4
Pneumatic Tire Maintenance ............................................................ 4
Pneumatic Drive Wheel and Tire Removal and Disassembly........ 5
Pneumatic Drive Tire Assembly ....................................................... 8
Filling Tires with Air .................................................................... 10
Filling Tires with Nitrogen ........................................................... 10
Procedures for Adding Air Pressure to Mounted Tire
and Wheel Assembly.................................................................. 12
Directional-Tread Tires ............................................................... 13
Pneumatic Drive Wheel and Tire Installation ................................. 13

OCTOBER 1995
Return

22-02-1

WARNING
For your safety and the safety of others!
Before you do tire or rim maintenance:
Read the OSHA rules regarding owner. DO
NOT work on tires or rims you have been
trained in the correct. Read and understand
all and repair procedures on tires and rims.
Serious injury or death can result if the
safety messages are ignored.

The Occupational safety and Health Act (OSHA)


specifies required procedures for servicing multipiece rim wheels in 29 CFR Section 1910.177. It is
the owner's responsibility to comply with OSHA.
In accordance with OSHA, the owner must provide
a training program to train and instruct all
employees who service multi-piece rim wheels in
the hazards involved and the safety procedures to
be followed. Do not let anyone mount, demount or
service multi-piece rim wheels without correct
training.
The owner should obtain and maintain in the service
area current copies of the United States Department
of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration
publications
entitled
"Safety
Precautions for Mounting and Demounting TubeType Truck/Bus Tires" and "Multi-Piece Rim/Wheel
Matching Chart" or other similar publications
applicable to the types of multi-piece rim wheels
being serviced.
The following instructions supplement the OSHA
requirements. In the event of any conflict or
inconsistency between these instructions and the
OSHA requirements, the OSHA requirements shall
be controlling.

22-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Safety Procedures
1. Do not fill a tire with air that has been run flat
without first inspecting the tire, rim and
wheel assembly. Double check the lock ring
for damage. Make sure that it is secure in
the gutter before filling the tire with air.

10. Do not be careless or take changes. If you


are not sure about the proper mating of rim
and wheel parts, consult a wheel and rim
expert. This may be the tire man who is
servicing your fleet, the rim and wheel
distributor in your are, or the BT PrimeMover dealer.

2. Never sit on or stand in front of a tire and rim


assembly that is being filled with air. Use a
clip-on chuck and make sure hose is long
enough to permit the person filling the tire
with air to stand to the side of the tire, not in
front or in back of the tire assembly.

11. Mixing parts of one manufacturer's rims with


those of another is potentially dangerous.
Always ask manufacturer for approval.

3. Do not let anyone mount or demount tires


without proper training.

13. Do not overload rims. Ask your rim


manufacturer if special operating conditions
are required.

4. Always remove all air from a tire and prior to


removing any rim components.
Always remove the valve core to remove air
from tire. Be sure all air is removed from the
tire. Check the valve stem by inserting a
piece of wire through the stem to make sure
it is not plugged.
5. Check rim components periodically for
fatigue cracks. Replace all cracked, badly
worn, damaged and severely rusted
components.
6. Do not, under any circumstances, attempt to
rework, weld heat, or braze any rim
components that are cracked, broken or
damaged. Replace with new parts or parts
that are not damaged, which are of the same
size, type and make.
7. Never attempt to weld on an inflated tire/rim
assembly.
8. Clean rims and repaint to stop detrimental
effects of corrosion. Be very careful to clean
all dirt and rust from the lock ring gutter. This
is important to secure the lock ring in its
proper position.
A filter on the air filling equipment to remove
the moisture from the air line prevents a lot
of corrosion. The filter should be checked
periodically to make sure it is working
properly.
9. Make sure correct parts are being
assembled. Ask your distributor or the
manufacturer if you have any doubts.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

12. Do not use undersized rims. Use the right


rims for the job.

14. Do not seat rings by hitting with a hammer


while the tire is filled with air pressure. Do
not hit a filled or partially-filled tire/rim
assembly with a hammer.
15. Double check to make sure all the
components are properly seated prior to
filling tire with air.
16. Always enclose wheel and tire assembly in a
safety cage to fill with air or nitrogen.
17. When removing wheels, regardless of how
hard or firm the ground appears, put
hardwood blocks under the jack.
18. Block the tire and wheel on the other side of
the vehicle, before you place the jack in
position. Place blocks under the truck frame
as near as possible to the jack to prevent the
truck from falling if the jack should fail.
19. Remove the bead seat band slowly to
prevent it from dropping off and crushing
your toes. Support the band on your thigh
and roll it slowly to the ground. This will
protect your back and feet.
20. Bead breakers and rams apply pressure to
bead flanges. Keep your fingers away from
the bead flanges. Slant bead breaker about
10 to keep it firmly in place. If it slips off, it
can fly with enough force to kill. Always
stand to one side when you apply hydraulic
pressure.
21. When using a cable or chain sling, stand
away (clear). It might break.

22-02-3

Pneumatic Drive Tire Specifications


NOTE
The pneumatic drive tires specified
for the for this series forklift trucks
were chosen after extensive testing
as the best combination of tread
and shape design and material
compounding
to
provide
the
required
wear
and
handling
characteristics.

CAUTION
Check tire pressure from a position
facing the tread of the tire, not the
side. Use a long-handled gauge to
keep your body away from the side.
If tires are low, don't add air. Have
the tire and wheel inspected by a
person trained and authorized to do
tire and wheel maintenance. The tire
may require removal and repair.
Incorrect (low) tire pressure can
reduce the stability of your lift truck
and cause it to tip over.

Standard pneumatic drive tire size:


RCX 25, 30C, 30
RCX 35, 40
RCX 45, 50

18 x 7 x 8 16 PR
18 x 9 x 8 16 PR
Not Available

Pneumatic Tire Maintenance


WARNING
If tire is to be removed from the
wheel, remove the air from the tires
before you remove wheels from the
truck.

Check for the correct tire air pressure.


Refer to Group 40, Specifications for tire pressure
specifications.

IMPORTANT
Check wheels and tires for damage
every
time
you
check
tire
pressure.repairs when needed. Dirt
can into cuts and cause damage to
the tire cord and thread. Remove
debris all cuts.

Check the condition of pneumatic drive wheels and


tires. Remove objects that are imbedded in the
tread. Inspect the tires for excessive wear, cuts and
breaks.
Check all wheel mounting bolts to be sure none are
loose or missing. Have missing bolts replaced and
loose bolts tightened to the correct torque before
operating the truck.

22-02-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Checking, Minor Repair and Clean-up


Inspect pneumatic tires and wheels carefully for:

Low inflation pressure.

Damaged tire. Check tires for cuts and


breaks.

Damaged wheels or loosening of the locking


rings on multi-piece rims.

Check for loose nuts or bolts not in position.

Check the bolts for damage.

Check the surface of the wheels for bent


flanges.

Check all parts for rust or corrosion.

Mark the damaged areas with chalk so that


the parts can be removed from operation.

Remove all parts that have damage and


install new parts in the same position.

Replace parts with the correct sizes and


types. See your parts manual.

Include your truck serial number when


ordering replacement parts.

Pneumatic Drive wheel and Tire


Removal and Diassembly

WARNING
Before you loosen the wheel
mounting bolts, remove the air from
the tire. Failure to remove the air
from the tire can result in injury.

Remove valve core from the valve stem.


Remove all air from the tire, then loosen and
remove the wheel mounting bolts. Remove the
wheel.

Remove lock ring.

CAUTION
To perform these service procedures, first:

Park truck on a hard, level and solid


surface.

Put upright in vertical position and fully


lower the forks or attachment.

Turn key switch OFF.


Block the wheels.
Refer to Lifting, Jacking and Blocking, Group SA for
additional information.

Remove wheel wedge.


OCTOBER 1995
Return

22-02-5

Remove tire from wheel.

Check for cracks in the lock ring.


CRACKS IN THE LOCK RING ARE CAUSED BY:

Deep rim tool marks.

Too much load on wheels.

Too much air pressure in the tires.

Using the wrong size tires.

Remove the rubber tube protector (flap). Repair tire


and /or tube.

Check for cracks between the stud holes in the


wheel.
CRACKS BETWEEN THE STUD HOLES ARE
CAUSED BY:
Check for cracks in the wheel.

Loose wheel mounting bolts.

CRACKS IN THE WHEEL ARE CAUSED BY:

The wheel was not installed correctly.

Deep rim tool marks.

The wrong size or type of parts was used.

Too much load on wheels.

Too much air pressure in the tires.

Too much torque on the wheel fasteners. If


the wheel mounting bolts are too tight, the
bolts can break, causing cracks in the wheel
between the stud holes.

Using the wrong size tires.

Too little torque on the wheel mounting bolts.


If the wheel mounting bolts are loose,
damage to parts and tire wear will result.

22-02-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Check wedge ring for wear or damage.


CORROSION BUILDUP WILL CAUSE WEAR AND
DAMAGE TO THE WHEEL WEDGE RING.

Clean wedge and lock rings. Make sure the seating


surface and bead seat areas are clean.

Clean the wheels. Remove rust and dirt.


Apply paint to the tire rim with a brush, or use an
aerosol can of metal primer. This will prevent rust
and corrosion from occurring inside the rim.
The parts must be clean and dry before you apply
the paint. Make sure to apply paint to the outside or
tire side of the rim. This is important because air is
on the metal surface of the tire side of the rim.

Clean the tire bead seat area. Remove all rust and
rubber.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Apply lubricant on the tire side of the rim base. Do


not use a lubricant that has water or solvent which
will cause damage to the rubber. BT PRIMEMOVER DEALERS CAN SUPPLY THE CORRECT
LUBRICANT WHICH CONTAINS A RUST
INHIBITOR.

22-02-7

Pneumatic Drive Tire Replacement

Put the tube into the tire.

Install the wheel wedge.

IMPORTANT
Install washer on tube over valve
stem before flap is installed, if
specified.

Put the rubber tube protector (flap) over the tube.

Put the side ring over the rim and install the lock ring
as shown.

Install the tire onto the wheel rim, against the bead
seat area.

Connect air chuck and put (21 kPa) 3 psi of air into
the tire.

Put the wheel wedge over the rim.

22-02-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Turn wheel to the other side. Check to make sure


lock ring is in correct location.

Put the tire in an OSHA approved safety cage.


Follow the procedures on the next two pages when
you put air into your tires.
Use a mallet and hit the ring to make sure the ring is
fully installed. Disconnect the air chuck.

WARNING
Make sure all items of equipment
use (nitrogen cylinder, regulator,
gauges, hoses) are UL approved
and in good condition. Use the
correct regulator and hose for the
pressures that are necessary.

WARNING
Use nitrogen only. DO NOT use
oxygen or any other gas to fill your
tires.

NOTE
If your air supply does not have
enough pressure to fill the tire, you
can use a pressurized cylinder of
commercial nitrogen gas to get the
correct tire pressure. Connect the
nitrogen cylinder to the valve stem
with the use of an air chuck. BE
SURE TIRE IS STILL IN SAFETY
CAGE! Refer to How to adjust the
regulator on the nitrogen cylinder".

OCTOBER 1995
Return

22-02-9

Filling Tires With Air

CAUTION
Put equal air pressure in both tires
of assembly. Do not put air into a
tire is flat without first inspecting it
and the wheel for damage.

Filling Tires With Nitrogen

CAUTION
Put equal nitrogen pressure in both
tires of assembly. Do not put air
into a tire is flat without first
inspecting it and the wheel for
damage.

Adjust the Regulator on the Nitrogen Cylinder


All wheel and tire assemblies must be filled in a
safety cage. The air hose and components should
be arranged as shown below. The hose must have
an adapter that can be connected to the valve stem.

Be sure cylinder valve is closed.

1. Attach an air hose to valve stem.


2. Open the control valve which will let
compressed air into the tire.
3. At intervals, close the control valve and
check the pressure in the tire by reading the
gauge. Do not overinflate the tire.
4. Continue to inflate the tire to the correct air
pressure reading.

22-02-10
Return

Turn the regulator valve counterclockwise (CCW)


until you can feel no resistance from the regulator.
This will adjust the regulator pressure to a low
pressure near zero.

OCTOBER 1995

Slowly turn the cylinder valve counterclockwise


(CCW) to open position.

Turn the tank valve clockwise (CW) and close the


valve.

The tank gauge will now show tank pressure.

Turn the regulator valve clockwise (CW) until the


regulator gauge reads the correct tire pressure. Fill
the tire with nitrogen.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Disconnect the air chuck from the valve stem.

22-02-11

Turn the regulator valve counterclockwise (CCW) to


the off position.

CAUTION
Use a long-handled gauge so that
your hand does not go inside the
cage, or in front of any component
of a multi-piece wheel.

Use a tire pressure gauge to check the tire


pressure. If necessary, put more air into the tire. Do
this as many times as necessary to reach the
correct tire pressure.

WARNING
Before you add air pressure to the
tire, make sure the lock ring is
correctly positioned in the rim and
side ring. The lock ring can
separate from the rim with enough
force to cause injury or death.

Procedures for Adding Air Pressure to


Mounted Tire and Wheel Assemblies

WARNING
Use compressed air or nitrogen
only to fill your tires. DO NOT use
oxygen or any other gas.

Adding Compressed Air


Attach a clip-on air chuck to valve stem. Stand by
the side of the wheel and put the correct air
pressure in the tire.
If your air supply does not have enough pressure to
fill the tire, you can use a nitrogen cylinder to get the
correct pressure.

22-02-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Adding Nitrogen

Pneumatic Drive Wheel


and Tire Installation
Be sure the truck is safely positioned on a level floor
and upright fully lowered.
Install drive wheel mounting bolts and tighten
securely.
Use a portable jack of sufficient capacity placed
under truck frame to raise truck off the blocks.
Remove blocks.
Lower truck to floor and remove jack.

Put a clip-on type air chuck on the nitrogen cylinder


hose and attach it to the valve stem. Refer to "How
to adjust the regulator on the nitrogen cylinder" for
details.

Tighten wheel mounting bolts to a final torque of


188-203 lb./ft. (225-275 Nm).

Directional - Thread Tires


All directional - thread ties are to be mounted in the
correct position with respect to the arrow cast on the
side of the tire as explained below.

Tire arrow to point in the direction of forward


rotation.
Rotate wheel to bring arrow on tire above the wheel
center. Arrow must point toward front of truck.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

22-02-13

Return

Group 23
BRAKE SYSTEM

Brake System and Bleeding ...................................................... Section 1


Brake Adjustment ....................................................................... Section 2
Brake Slave Cylinder .................................................................. Section 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

23-00-1

23-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Brake System and Bleeding

Brake System Description ................................................................ 2


Bleeding the Brake System .............................................................. 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

23-01-1

Brake System Description


The brake system consists of a brake assembly,
equipped with a slave cylinder, mounted on top of
each drive motor. Both brakes are spring applied
and hydraulically released by a brake pedal and two
master cylinders. A plastic reservoir supplies fluid to
the master cylinders. A Hydraulically actuated
pressure switch closes activating the circuit to the
drive motors when the brake pedal is depressed.

23-01-2
Return

When force is applied to the foot pedal, brake fluid


is forced from the master cylinders through the
brake lines to the brake slave cylinders. The slave
cylinders in turn disengage the brakes by rotating
the brake arms against spring pressure. When force
on the foot pedal is released, fluid is forced from the
slave cylinders as the brake arms return under
spring pressure, Brake fluid moves freely between
the master cylinder and the fluid reservoir. The
release of brake fluid pressure allows the spring to
engage the brakes.

OCTOBER 1995

Bleeding the Brake System


1. Attach Pressure Bleeder to bleeder screw as
shown below.
2. Open bleeder screw allowing fluid (under
low pressure) to push air out of system and
into reservoir.

3. When bleeding is complete (air bubbles no


longer appear in fluid), close bleeder screw
and disconnect pressure bleeder.
4. Repeat procedure at opposite slave cylinder.
5. Adjust fluid level in reservoir.

IMPORTANT
Reservoir should be
approximately 1/4 full
before you begin to
bleed the system.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

IMPORTANT
Check reservoir often during the
bleeding operation
to prevent overflowing of hydraulic fluid.

23-01-3

Return

Section 2.
Brake Adjustment

Brake Lining Wear Check ................................................................. 2


Brake Lining Wear Adjustment ........................................................ 3
Minor Brake Adjustment .............................................................. 3
Major Brake Adjustment .............................................................. 4
Replacing Brake Linings................................................................... 5

OCTOBER 1995
Return

23-02-1

Brake Lining Wear Check


Proper brake adjustment must be checked during
regular PM inspections. As linings wear the brake
actuating spring will increase in length, as
measured between the spring retainers with the
brake pedal in the full up position. See illustration
below. For proper brake operation both motor
brake spring length must be maintained at 1-3/4
inches (44.5 mm).

23-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Brake Lining Wear Adjustment


Minor Brake Adjustment
IMPORTANT
Use two wrenches when loosening
or tightening the adjustment and
jam nuts.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

To make minor adjustment, loosen push rod jam nut


(at each brake arm) and rotate nut (A) inward until
proper spring length is attained. (Adjust both
actuating springs until they measure exactly 1-3/4
in. (44.5 mm) in length as measured from the inside
of one spring retainer to the other. See illustration
below.

23-02-3

Major Brake Adjustment


When linings wear to the extent that the brake arms
are within 1/4 in. (6.4 mm) of the cylinder mounting
bracket (see below), the brake drums should be
removed and the linings inspected for further
serviceability. If linings are fit for further service,
then a major adjustment may be made. The brake
arm must be removed and readjusted by rotating
arm 1-notch inward toward the slave cylinder. The
brake linkage must be readjusted to factor
specification as outlined under heading "Replacing
Brake Linings" found on the following pages. If the
linings are no longer usable, they must be replaced
with new linings.

23-02-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Replace Brake Linings


1. Loosen and back off nuts (B) and nuts (A)
relieving spring pressure.
2. Remove brake drum(s) from drive motor(s).
3. Remove old brake shoes and install new
ones. Install brake drum.
4. Carefully pump the brake pedal until both
slave cylinders are fully extended. On the
last pedal stroke, hold/block pedal in the
down position. The pedal must be held in the
full down position through Step 6.
If the pedal is stuck in the up position,
slightly open both of the bleeder screws (one
located on each slave cylinder) while
applying light pedal pressure to depress
pedal to the full down position. Immediately
tighten bleeder screw. Be sure to hold/block
pedal in the full down position through Step
6. Be careful not to get oil on brake drum or
shoes.

5. With the push rod properly seated in the


slave cylinder piston, pull the brake arm to
one side (toward the slave cylinder). The
push rod retainer nuts should allow the arm
to move far enough for the brake shoes to
make contact with the drum. You can feel
this happen.
6. With the brake arm pulled fully to the side
(shoes in contact with drum), adjust retainer
adjustment nuts (A) up to the brake arm.
Now back off nut (A) 3 or 4 turns away from
the slave cylinder. This will loosen the brake
arm and keep the brake shoes linings from
dragging on the drum when the slave
cylinders are fully extended. Tighten nuts
(A) and jam nut using two(2) wrenches.
7. Release the brake pedal allowing it to
resume the full up position. Adjust both
brake actuating springs, using nuts (B), until
proper spring measurement of 1-3/4"
(44.5 mm) is attained.
9. After adjustments are made, tighten both
nuts using two(2) wrenches.
10.Check brake performance. It may be
necessary to bleed the brakes. Refer to
Section 1.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

23-02-5

NOTE
Spray threads of nuts and bolts
with "Primer T" five(5) minutes
before applying General Purpose
Threadlocker at time of installation.

23-02-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 3.
Brake Slave Cylinder

Brake Slave Cylinder ......................................................................... 2


Removal ...................................................................................... 2
Disassembly ................................................................................ 3
Inspection .................................................................................... 3
Assembly ..................................................................................... 3
Installation ................................................................................... 4

OCTOBER 1995
Return

23-03-1

Brake Slave Cylinder


Removal
IMPORTANT
Cleanliness
is
of
extreme
importance. Before disconnecting
cylinder, clean exterior of plumbing
and cylinder to prevent dirt and
foreign
matter
from
entering
system.

CAUTION
To perform these service procedures, first:

Park truck on a hard, level and solid


surface.

Put upright in vertical position and fully


lower the forks or attachment.

Turn key switch OFF.


Block the wheels.

IMPORTANT
When
removing
or
installing
hydraulic lines and components, it
is necessary to prevent any dirt
particles
from
entering
the
hydraulic system. The smallest
particles are capable of severely
damaging the system.

1. Turn key switch OFF and disconnect


battery.
2.

Remove front cover.

3. Disconnect line to brake slave cylinder.


4. Release push rod spring pressure by
backing off jam nut and adjusting nut, see
illustration.
5. Pull push rod out of slave cylinder.
6. Remove slave cylinder mounting fasteners
and slave cylinder assembly.

23-03-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

Disassembly
1.Remove rubber boot, bleeder screw and filling.
2.Remove retainer ring and internal components.

Inspection
Clean the cylinder body and other metal parts in a
Stoddard type cleaner solvent and thoroughly rinse
with clean brake fluid. Clean rubber parts in
Stoddard type solvent and rinse in clean brake fluid.
Use only low pressure compressed air or a lint-free
cloth to dry parts. Lay the cleaned parts on a clean
sheet of paper and protect from contamination until
reassembly.
Inspect the piston and cylinder bore for visible score
marks, ridges, and corrosion. Check that the
cylinder bore is smooth to the touch. Replace the
slave cylinder if there is any doubt about its
serviceability.

Assembly
Use all parts from the service kit.
1. Fit spring seat and spring into cylinder bore.
2. Lubricate new piston cup with clean brake
fluid and install. Install piston, retaining ring,
and rubber boot.
3. Reinstall bleeder screw and fitting.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

23-03-3

Installation
1. Fit push rod into seat of slave cylinder
piston. Mount slave cylinder to mounting
bracket with fasteners. Torque fasteners to
(9.4-10.6 Nm) 83-94 lb./in.
2. Connect line to brake slave cylinder.

23-03-4
Return

3. Adjust brake. Refer to Section 1.


4. Bleed brake system. Refer to Section 2.
5. Install front compartment cover.
6. Connect battery
operation.

and

test

truck

brake

OCTOBER 1995

Group 25
STEERING GEAR

Steering Gear .............................................................................. Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

25-00-1

25-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Steering Gear

Steering Gear Description ................................................................ 2


Steering Gear Troubleshooting........................................................ 3
Steering Gear Removal ..................................................................... 3
Steering Gear Disassembly .............................................................. 4
Steering Gear Parts Inspection ........................................................ 6
Steering Gear Assembly ................................................................... 6
Steering Gear Installation ................................................................. 9

OCTOBER 1995
Return

25-01-1

Steering Gear Description


The power steering gear is a remote positioning
control valve that senses an input signal from
steering tiller arm, multiplies this signal to assist in
reducing steering effort, and turns steer wheels to
desired position by supplying hydraulic oil flow and
pressure to steering actuator on steer axle.
When steering tiller arm is turned, it causes the
valve spool to shift from its closed neutral position to
a "turn" position and allows oil under pressure to
flow to steering actuator. When steering tiller arm
stops turning, centering springs in valve
automatically center spool, stopping flow of oil
pressure to steering actuator.

1. Dust Seal
2. Retaining Ring
3. Seal Gland Bushing
4. Seal, 2-1/8"OD
5. Quad Ring Seal
6. Needle Bearing Kit
7. Bearing Race
8. Needle Thrust Bearing
9. Set Screw

25-01-2
Return

The low-pressure oil from steering actuator is


returned through the opposite port in valve. It is
controlled by the same spool as the high pressure
port.
In event of power or pump failure, steering gear can
develop sufficient hydraulic pressure for limited,
emergency steering only by manual movement of
steering tiller arm. An internal check valve closes
automatically to divert this manually generated oil
flow to selected port of steering actuator. However,
steering tiller arm turning effort is considerably
higher than with power steering. This method of
steering is for emergency use only.

10. Seal, 5/8"OD


11. Check Ball Seat
12. Seal, 7/16"OD
13. Check Ball
14. Check Ball Retainer
15. Control Parts Assembly
16. Housing
17. Control Sleeve
18. Control Spool

19. Centering Sleeve


20. Pin
21. Seal, 3 OD
22. Spacer Plate
23. Drive
24. Meter (Gerotor)
25. Spacer(s)
26. End Cap
27. Cap Screw

OCTOBER 1995

Steering Gear Troubleshooting


The following list of symptoms and possible causes
of steering problems
1. High number of steering tiller arm turns:
Cylinder seal leakage

Steering Gear Removal


1. Turn key switch OFF and disconnect battery
from truck receptacle.
2. Remove top compartment cover.
3. If necessary, remove tiller knob plug (cover)
and bolt.

Steering gear wear


2. Steering tiller arm effort too high:
Relief valve setting too low
Axle load too heavy
3. Steering tiller arm spins freely:
Air in system (cavitation)
Low oil supply
Faulty steering gear

4. Remove retainer to remove tiller (hand


wheel).
5. Remove dirt and contamination around
steering gear ports before disconnecting
hydraulic steering lines. Make sure hydraulic
steering lines are correctly identified and can
be installed in same location at installation.
6. Disconnect hydraulic lines from steering
gear and cap open ends. Plug ports in
steering gear.
7. Remove steering gear cap screws and
lockwashers.

4. Truck turns in wrong direction:


8.

Remove steering gear assembly from truck.

Hydraulic lines not installed correctly


5. Steering tiller arm kickback:
Check valve faulty or not in system
6. Slow steering response:
Oil viscosity too heavy

OCTOBER 1995
Return

25-01-3

Steering Gear Disassembly


When working on steering gear, it is important to
keep internal parts free from dirt and other
contaminants. Thoroughly clean exterior of gear
before disassembly. Disassemble steering gear in a
clean work area.
1. Remove steering gear column fasteners and
column.
2. Clamp gear housing in a vise that has had
jaws protected with brass liners or
equivalent material. DO NOT over tighten
jaws.

8. Remove drive.
9. Remove spacer plate.
10. Remove seal from housing.

3. Remove 5/16 inch cap screws that retain


end cap to housing.
4. Remove seal from housing.
11. Remove housing from vise and place on a
soft clean surface. Use a thin-bladed
screwdriver tip to pry retaining ring from
housing.

5. Remove meter (gerotor) assembly from


housing be careful not to drop star gear.
6. Remove seal from meter.
7. Remove drive spacers from housing.

25-01-4
Return

12. Rotate seal and sleeve until pin inside


steering gear spool is horizontal. Then, use
fingers to push spool and sleeve assembly
forward until gland bushing clears housing.
Remove bushing.

OCTOBER 1995

17. Push pin from sleeve and spool assembly.

13. Remove quad ring seal from seal gland


bushing.
14. Use a thin-bladed screwdriver tip to pry dust
seal from seal gland bushing. Be careful not
to damage bushing.

18. Push spool part of the way off control end of


sleeve sufficient to expose six (6) centering
springs. Remove these springs carefully.
Note their position in unit before they are
removed.
19. Push spool opposite way after springs have
been removed. Separate spool from sleeve
by rotating slowly as sleeve is pushed off.
20. Remove seal from housing.

15. Remove two bearing races and needle


thrust bearing from spool and sleeve
assembly.

21. Remove set screw in end of housing.


22. Thread a 1/8-24 NC machine screw into end
of check ball seat. Then pull on screw using
pliers (or equivalent method) to pull seat out
of housing.
16. Remove spool and sleeve assembly from
cap end of housing.

IMPORTANT
Be careful not to bind spool and
sleeve in housing. Rotating spool
and sleeve slowly while removing
will help prevent binding.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

23. Remove two (2) seals from check valve


seat.
24. Remove check ball by tiling housing and
lightly tapping on side of housing if ball
sticks.
25. Remove steer gear check valve retainer.

25-01-5

Steering Gear Parts Inspection


1. Inspect housing for damage, including
cracks or broken parts, damaged threads,
corrosion or erosion of surfaces, worn spots,
burrs or scratches on machined surfaces.
2. Examine meter assembly for evidence of
excessive wear, corroded or pitted surfaces,
nicks or scratches, or any other damage that
might hamper operation of assembly.

3. Put new seals on check ball seat. Lubricate


seal with petroleum jelly before installing
seat. Install seat in housing using care not to
damage seals when installing seat. Insert
open end of seat first.
4. Install set screw and tighten to a torque of
[11 Nm] 100 lb./in. Top of set screw should
be slightly below surface of housing
mounting surface to prevent interference of
parts.

3. Check springs to be sure they are not bent,


worn, or twisted. Examine ends to be sure
they are not damaged and will seat properly.
4. Make sure sleeve assembly does not bind
when it is rotated on spool. Inspect
assembly for any corrosion, nicks or
scratches, or evidence of damage.
5. Check bearing and races making sure they
are not damaged and that they rotate
without being noisy or have evidence of
binding.
6. Replace all seals with new seals.
7. Inspect steer gear pump drive shaft making
sure drive end and spline end are not
damaged.
8. Check wear plate for corrosion or evidence
of abnormal wear.
9. Check steering gear cover to make sure
machines surface is not damaged and will
seat properly on housing.
10. Make sure all parts are clean and free of
dust.
Before assembly, coat all internal parts with oil. If
parts are left exposed, cover them with a clean
cover to prevent airborne dust from collecting on
them.

5. Position sleeve on spool assembly, making


sure spring slots line up at same end. When
sliding sleeve on spool use a rotary motion
as well as a sliding motion. If spool and
sleeve have identification marks, they
should be aligned.
After parts are in correct position, test for
freedom of rotation. Parts should slide and
rotate on each other with "finger force".
6. Stand sleeve and spool assembly on end
after making sure spring slots are aligned.

Install spring-installation tool through


spring slots of both parts. Position three
(3) pairs of centering springs (or 2 sets of
3 each) on bench so that extended edge
is down and arched center sections are
together. Insert one end of this
arrangement of springs into insertion
tool.

Steering Gear Assembly

1. Use needle-nosed pliers to put steering gear


check valve retainer in steering gear valve
housing. Make sure retainer is seated in
housing in correct position to support ball
and is not tilted on edge.
2. Insert check ball into housing.

25-01-6
Return

Compress free ends of centering springs


together as springs are inserted into
spool and sleeve assembly.
Center springs in assembly to ensure
they push evenly and are flush with outer
surface of spool and sleeve assembly.
OCTOBER 1995

11. Install a new dust seal in dust seal bushing


with flat or smooth side of dust seal face
down toward bushing.

7. Install pin into sleeve and spool assembly


until it is flush with outer surfaces.

12. Install a new DRY quad ring seal in seal


gland bushing by smoothing seal in place
with light finger pressure. Seal should not
"fall" into place but should require light force
to seat.
8. Insert sleeve and spool assembly into
housing (from end opposite check valve
assembly).

IMPORTANT
Do not insert assembly beyond
flush position. This will prevent pin
from dropping into discharge
groove of housing.

When inserting, use a light force plus a slow


rotation of parts. Do not force parts and use
care not to tilt assembly. The assembly should
be inserted until it is flush with face of housing.
Check installation for freedom of movement by
turning with light finger pressure.

13. Install seal gland bushing over spool


assembly end using a rotary motion as well
as a sliding motion.
Tap bushing in place using a soft-faced
hammer. Make sure bushing is flush and
against bearing race and that retaining ring
groove is exposed.
14. Insert retaining ring into housing. After
installing, use a soft-faced hammer and drift
to tap around circumference of ring to
ensure it is seated in groove.
15. Put housing in a vise with spool and sleeve
assembly upward. Use light clamping force
to retain housing.
Make sure spool and sleeve are flush or
slightly below face of housing. Be sure
surfaces are clean.
Install a new seal in housing.

9. Install new seal in housing (from check valve


end).
10. Install needle thrust bearing and two bearing
races.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

16. Install spacer plate. Be sure bolt holes in


spacer plate are aligned with threaded holes
in housing.

25-01-7

Note position of meter on housing (there are


seven (7) holes to be aligned with threaded
bolt holes).
Make sure star has engaged spline and is in
position shown.
20. Install new seal in end cap.

17. Rotate sleeve and spool assembly until pin


is parallel with port face.
Before installing drive shaft, mark spline end
of drive shaft with a line that is parallel to slot
in opposite end. This will assist in proper
assembly of unit.
Install drive shaft making sure slotted end
engages pin.

21. Install end cap on rotor.


22. Install seven (7) fasteners holding cap and
meter to housing and tighten to an initial
torque of [17 Nm] 150 lb./in.

18. Install new seal in meter.

23. Tighten these fasteners to a torque of [31


Nm] 275 lb./in. in the sequence shown
above.
24. Mount steering gear column with 2 cap
screws. Torque cap screws to [28,25 Nm]
250 lb./in.
Inspect assembly to be sure all parts have
been installed and fasteners have been
correctly positioned and tightened.

19. Position meter on housing with seal side of


meter toward spacer plate.

25-01-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Steering Gear Installation


1. Position steering gear assembly on truck.
2. Install steering gear mounting cap screws.
Tighten to 25-28 lb./ft. (34-38 Nm).
3. Connect hydraulic lines to steering gear. Be
sure of correct position of each line. Make
sure O rings are in correct position on fittings
and that port seal surfaces and fittings are
clean. Tighten all fittings to a torque of 70-80
lb./in. (8-9 Nm).

4. Install tiller (hand wheel) and retainer on


steering gear shaft.
5. Install tiller knob bolt. Torque bolt to 35-40
lb./ft. (47-54 Nm).
6. Install tiller knob cover.
7. Install top compartment cover.
8. Connect battery and test steering operation
of truck.

Spray threads of bolt with Primer T 5 minutes


before applying General Purpose Threadlocker at
time of installation.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

25-01-9

Return

Group 26
STEERING AXLE

Steering Axle Repair................................................................... Section 1


Power Steering Pump................................................................. Section 2
Steer Torque Generator ............................................................. Section 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-00-1

26-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.
Steering Axle Repair

Steering Axle Removal...................................................................... 2


Steering Axle Installation.................................................................. 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-01-1

Steering Axle Removal


CAUTION
To perform this service procedure,
it is recommended that you first:

Park truck on a solid, level surface.


Lower forks to floor.
Turn key switch OFF.
1. Remove the battery.
2. Put chocks at the drive wheels.
3. Remove forks.
4. Remove the steer torque generator. Refer to
Steering Torque Generator Section 3, for
details.
5. Loosen, but do not remove, the steering axle
upper fork bearing retainer.

WARNING
All lifting components used in this
procedure must be in good
condition,
meet
the
lifting
requirements, and have OSHA
approval labels when required.

26-01-2
Return

6. Use a chain hoist to carefully lift the rear of


the truck to allow removal of the steer axle
fork. Refer to machine lifting and blocking
group for details.

OCTOBER 1995

7. Remove the upper fork bearing retainer,


lockwasher, thrust washer. The upper
bearing cone will remain in housing upon
removal of fork. Carefully lower and remove
the steer axle fork from the truck.
9. Inspect steer axle fork lower housing for
wear or damage. Replace parts that are unfit
for further service.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

8. Remove, inspect, and replace fork bearings


and other components as required. Inspect
steer axle fork for wear or damage. Replace,
if required.

Steering Axle Installation


1. Assemble steering axle and wheels. Refer to
specifications in diagram below.

26-01-3

2. Pack lower fork bearing with grease. Refer


to
Specifications
Group
40
for
recommended bearing grease.
3. Assemble steering axle fork lower bearing
cup, cone and seal on steering axle fork.
4. Install steer axle fork into truck and repack
upper bearing cone with grease.
5. Install upper bearing cone, retainer, thrust
washer, lockwasher and retainer.
6. Lock bearing retainer in position by bending
up tab of lockwasher.
7. Carefully lower rear if truck to floor.
8. Install steer torque generator. Refer to
Steering Torque Generator Section 3, for
details.
9. Install forks.
10. Remove drive wheel chocks and install
battery.

NOTE
Tighten upper bearing retainer to
75 lb./ft. (100 Nm) to remove free
play.

Loosen and torque retainer again


to 15-19 lb./ft. (20-25 Nm).
Rolling

resistance
of
fork
assembly should be no more then
27 lb./in. (3 Nm).

26-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 2.
Power Steering Pump

Steering Pump Description............................................................... 2


Steering Pump Troubleshooting ...................................................... 2
Steering Pump Removal ................................................................... 2
Steering Pump Disassembly ............................................................ 4
Steering Pump Parts Inspection ...................................................... 5
Steering Pump Assembly ................................................................. 6
Steering Pump Installation ............................................................... 7
Steering Pump Installation Specifications ...................................... 8
Steering Lines Installation Specifications....................................... 9
Reverse Steering Lines Installation Specifications....................... 11

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-02-1

Steering Pump Description


The power steering pump is a fixed displacement
type gear pump. The steering system relief pressure
is controlled by a pressure relief valve in the power
steering pump. This valve is set at 1000 psi.(6895
kPa)

Check relief setting.


4. Low Pump Output.
a)
Cavitating pump.
b)

See 1a,b,c,d
Air in fluid.

Steering Pump Troubleshooting

c)

See 2b
Relief valve leakage or valve set too low.

Before
steer
pump
is
removed
and/or
disassembled, check the following list of problems
and solutions. It could save cost, time, and effort.

d)

Check relief valve.


Overheated oil.

1. Noisy Pump.
a)
Low supply of oil.

See 3 a, b, c, d, e, f.
5. Shaft Seal Leakage.
a)
Damaged or worn seal.

b)

Fill reservoir.
Oil too heavy.

b)

Replace seal.
Front cover bearing out position.

c)

Change to correct viscosity.


Inlet line has restriction.

c)

Replace front cover assembly.


Scratches on shaft seal housing bore.

d)

See 5b
Improper fit of shaft.

d)

Check for foreign material.


Clean filter or strainer.
Air leak in inlet line.

See 5b.

Check plumbing tightness.


6. External Leakage.
2. Foaming Oil
a)
Cavitating pump.

a)

O ring damaged.

See 1a,b,c, d
Wrong fluid.

b)

Replace O ring.
Damaged surfaces in O Ring groove.

b)

Replace damaged parts.

Drain and fill with correct oil.


3. Heated Pump and/or Oil.
a)
Thin oil
b)

Drain and fill with correct oil.


Contaminated oil.

c)

Drain oil, clean filter and fill.


Cavitating pump.

d)

See 1a,b,c,d
Drive shaft not aligned.

e)

Check mounting and alignment.


Axial loading on drive shaft.

f)

Check shaft end clearance.


Check shaft alignment.
Check for worn key or spline.
Relief valve usually in bypass.

26-02-2
Return

7. Failure to Build Pressure.


a)
Defective relief valve.
b)

Repair and reset valve.


Low oil supply.
Fill reservoir.

Steering Pump Removal


1. Remove pump and motor assembly from
truck See steering pump motor section in
Group 16 for details.

OCTOBER 1995

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Plug, Steer pump relief valve


Adjuster, Steer pump relief valve
Spring, Steer pump relief valve
Retainer, Steer pump drive gear
Bearing, Steer pump shaft
Shaft, Steer pump idler
Gear, Steer pump drive
Retainer, Steer pump idler gear
Screw, Steer pump cover
Cover, Steer pump outlet
Dowel, Steer pump cover assembly
Gear, Steer pump idler
Key, Steer pump idler gear

OCTOBER 1995
Return

14.
14.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.

Seal, Steer pump body - Amber


Seal, Steer pump body - Gold
Seal, Steer pump body - Silver
Seal, Steer pump drive shaft
Shaft, Steer pump drive
Gasket, Steer pump mounting
Coupler, Steer pump drive
Key, Steer pump drive gear
Cover, Steer pump shaft end
Valve sub-assembly, Steer pump relief
Plunger, Steer pump relief valve
Seal, Steer pump relief valve plug

26-02-3

Steering Pump Disassembly

10. Remove gasket, then idler shaft and gear


assembly from the end cover.

IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

1. Clean exterior of pump and motor assembly.


Be sure to plug pump ports to avoid
contaminating internal parts.
2. Put an identification mark on pump and on
motor to assure that pump will be reinstalled
in same location on motor as when removed
(ports and terminals will be in proper
position).

11. Disassemble idler shaft and gear assembly


only if necessary for replacement of these
parts.
As these parts are removed from end cover,
carefully note position of each to be sure of
correct reassembly.

3. Remove cap screws and lockwashers to


separate pump from motor.
4. Keep coupling with pump. Put motor in a
safe place.
5. Use a sharp scribe or marker to scribe a line
or punch marks into body halves to assure
correct positioning of parts at assembly.
6. Loosen and remove bolt from end of shaft
and lift coupling from pump.
7. Clamp pump in a vise with shaft end pointing
down.

12. Remove shaft retainer snap rings, drive gear


and key from drive shaft.

Use only a light clamping force by vise to


avoid damaging pump.
8. Remove fasteners which hold pump

assembly together.

13. Remove pump drive shaft from front end


cover by pulling it through the oil seal from
the mounting flange side.

9. Carefully separate pump assembly by lifting


pump body off assembly.
It may be necessary to tap lightly on housing
with soft faced hammer to assist separation
of parts.
Do not rotate parts in an attempt to separate
them. There is an alignment dowel in mating
face.

26-02-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

IMPORTANT
Be careful not to damage the shaft
seal bore in end cover. Nicks or
scratches in the surface where seal
is press fitted will result in leakage.

Steering Pump Parts Inspection


1. Wash all parts in solvent and dry thoroughly.
Do not use material that leaves lint when
drying parts. If parts must be left for a long
period of time or overnight, cover them with
a clean cover.
2. Inspect the bearing journals on both gear
shafts for wear. Replace if journals are
scored or worn over 0.001 inch.
3. Replace complete pump if bearing journals
on shafts show signs of unusual wear.
4. Check drive shaft for wear in the seal lip
contact area. If the shaft is grooved, pitted,
or worn undersize, the shaft must be
replaced.

14. Remove needle bearings by pulling from


pump body and end cover.
15. Turn pump end cover over and clamp in vise
with input drive shaft seal up. Remove shaft
seal by prying it out with a large screwdriver.

5. Inspect gear faces and sides (ends) for


scoring or galling. Smooth off sharp edges of
otherwise undamaged gear teeth with
crocus cloth and return to service.
If gears are pitted or eroded, they should be
replaced.
6. Check fit of drive gear key in shaft and in
gear. Replace key, shaft, and/or gear, if
excessive wear is found.
7. Check fit or idler gear on shaft and key.
Remove idler gear if necessary. Remove
idler gear retainer snap ring with screwdriver
and remove gear. If key (pin) is worn or pin
hole is elongated in shaft, replace as
needed.

NOTE

16. Loosen and remove relief valve cap nut and


seal. Remove adjustor, pin, springs, and
relief valve.

If bearings are worn enough to


require
replacement,
it
is
recommended the complete pump
be replacement.

8. Check needle bearings. The needle rollers


should roll freely. If they bind, skew, or fall
out, replace the bearing.

NOTE
Slight lapped condition of gear
bores
will
neither
harm
performance
nor
require
replacement.

9. Inspect gear bores in pump body and gear


side face of end cover for scoring and galling
(metal pickup). Pump must be replaced if
these surfaces are scored or worn
excessively.
10. Inspect components of relief valve for wear
or damage. Replace as required.
11. Examine all port threads to be sure they
have not been damaged and will form good
seals.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-02-5

Steering Pump Assembly


1. Put pump body on a flat surface with shaft
seal up.

IMPORTANT
A shoulder is machined in bearing
bore to ensure correct depth of
bearing seating. Press bearing fully
against this shoulder.

3. Install needle bearings in inlet and end cover


bearing bores.
Shaft Diameter A
0.4387 in.
0.5000 in.

Install new seal by pressing inward on seal


until it is [2,794-3,048 mm] 0.110-0.120 inch
below inner face of pilot (Dimension E).
Coat lips of seal with Lubriplate, or
equivalent lubricant.

Dimension B
0.045-0.050 in.
0.058-0.063 in.

5. Apply Lubricate gears, shafts, bearings, and


pump housing and cover inner surfaces with
hydraulic fluid. Assemble and install gears
and shafts into end cover.

2. Install the pump relief valve components.

26-02-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

5. Lubricate gears, shafts, bearings, and pump


housing and cover inner surfaces with
hydraulic fluid. Assemble and install gears
and shafts into end cover.
6. Install new gasket and assemble the pump
body onto end cover. Be sure the dowel pin
is in place. Install and tighten the assembly
fastener bolts to draw pump together. At this
point, rotate the drive shaft to be sure the
pump turns freely. The pump body and
cover can be shifted slightly to allow the
gears to turn freely. Then torque assembly
bolts to [12.88-14.24 Nm] 9.5-10.5 lb./ft.
Check again to verify that pump shaft still
turns freely.
7. Install one half of drive coupling on pump.
Put elongated hole of on half of drive
coupling over matching shape on pump
drive shaft, with flat side towards pump.
Install lockwasher and short bolt furnished
with the coupling. Torque bolt [9.6 Nm] 85
lb./in.
8. Install other half of coupling on motor shaft.
Put coupling half on motor shaft with flat side
towards motor. Install square washer,
lockwasher, and bolt into motor shaft.
Torque bolt to [9.6 Nm] 85 lb./in.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Steering Pump Installation


IMPORTANT
Do not lubricate coupling with
grease or oil, which will cause
rubber insert to soften and be
damaged.

NOTE
When installing pump to motor,
install the rubber coupling insert
(cross) into either the motor or
pump half of coupling, with slots in
the insert over the tangs of
coupling half.

1. Install new pump mounting gasket. Use


match marks to properly align pump and
motor. Align coupling tangs with remaining
two holes in rubber insert. Mount pump to
motor with cap screws and lockwashers.
Torque cap screws to [19.3-21.5 Nm] 170191 lb./in.
2. Install pump and motor assembly into truck.
See steer pump motor section in Group 16
for details. Use the following diagrams for
installation specifications of pump assembly,
lines and fittings.

26-02-7

Steering Pump Motors Installation Specifications

1. Coat pump shaft splines with grease


2. Torque to 70-80 lb./in. (8-9 Nm).
3. Torque to 71-88 lb./in. (8-10 Nm).
4. Torque to 170-191 lb./in. (19.3-21.5 Nm).
5. Torque to 36-39 lb./ft. (49-53 Nm).

26-02-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Steering Lines Installation Specifications


1. Torque to 213-240 lb./ft. (289-325 Nm).
2. Torque to 170-191 lb./in. (19.3-21.5 Nm).
3. Torque to 10-12 lb./in. (14-16 Nm).
4. Torque to 30-33 lb./ft. (40-45 Nm).
5. Torque to 50-66 lb.ft. (68-78 Nm).
6. Torque to 32-40 lb.ft. (43-54 Nm).
7. Torque to 24-26 lb.ft. (33-35 Nm).
5. Torque to 18-20 lb.ft. (24-37 Nm).

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-02-9

26-02-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Reverse Steering Lines Installation Specifications

Torque Fitting to 24-26 lb./ft. (33-35 Nm).

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-02-11

Return

Section 3.
Steering Torque Generator

Steering Torque Generator Description .......................................... 2


Steering Torque Generator Removal ............................................... 2
Steering Torque Generator Disassembly ........................................ 4
Steering Torque Generator Parts Inspection .................................. 5
Steering Torque Generator Assembly ............................................. 6
Steering Torque Generator Installation ........................................... 7
Steering Lines Installation Specifications....................................... 9
Reverse Torque Generator Lines Installation Specifications....... 10

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-03-1

Steering Torque Generator Description


The unit generates torque to turn the steer axle. The
steer torque generator responds to hydraulic
pressure signals from the steering gear to turn the
steer axle in the direction indicated by the steer
gear.

Steering Torque Generator Removal


1. Turn key switch OFF and disconnect battery
from truck receptacle.

26-03-2
Return

2.

Remove front and top compartment covers.

3. Remove motor cut-out cam cap screw.


Remove motor cut-out cam.
4. Remove (2) front and one rear bracket
mounting cap screws.
5. Lift off motor cut-out switch bracket and set
aside.
6. Identify hydraulic lines to torque generator
and disconnect. Cap hose ends.

OCTOBER 1995

NOTE
Position lifting straps as close to
center of torque generator as
possible.

7. Put hoist lifting straps


generator as shown

around

torque

8. Hook lifting straps to chain hoist and apply


tension to torque generator with hoist.
Carefully pry torque generator loose from
housing using a screwdriver.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-03-3

Steering Torque
Generator Disassembly

2. Remove cylinder tubes from the generator


housing by unscrewing with a spanner
wrench.

NOTE

3. Remove pistons from cylinder tubes by


pushing then out with a brass drift pin
inserted through the cylinder port. Use a drift
pin maximum diameter is 0.5 inch (13 mm).

When working on steering torque


generator, it is import to keep
internal parts free from dirt and
other contaminants. Thoroughly
clean exterior of torque generator
before disassembly. Disassemble
torque generator in a clean work
area.

1. Remove Allen-head
generator housing.

26-03-4
Return

set

screws

4. Remove piston U-cups from piston and


discard. Note the U-cup is equipped with an
O ring.
from

5. Position rack at midpoint of travel. Rack


should extent an equal distance from each
side of generator housing. Note and record
location of pinion shaft keyway. Keyway
location will be needed to properly
assembly to torque generation.

OCTOBER 1995

6. Remove upper snap ring from housing.


7. Push pinion and upper ball bearing out top
generator (see directional arrows in
illustration).
8. Remove upper bearing from piston output
shaft.
9. Remove rack from generator housing.
10. Remove U-cup seal from housing.
11. Remove lower snap ring from housing.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

12. Remove lower ball bearing from housing.

Steering Torque
Generator Parts Inspection
1. Clean all torque generator components and
lay on a clean sheet of paper. Protect parts
from dirt and contamination before
reassembly.
2. Inspect all parts for wear or damage.
Replace parts as required.

26-03-5

Steering Torque Generator Assembly


1. Install upper ball bearing and upper snap
ring in generator housing.
2. Insert rack into generator housing. Position
rack to extend an equal distance from each
side of generator housing.
3. Insert pinion output shaft into generator
housing, meshing pinion teeth with teeth on
rack. Be sure pinion output shaft keyway
is in same location as at disassembly.
4. Pack pinion and rack teeth with general
purpose grease. Fill gear cavity with grease
also.
5. Install lower ball bearing and lower snap ring
over the pinion shaft and into generator
housing.

26-03-6
Return

6. Install lower U-cup seal into housing.


7.

Install new U-cups and O ring seal on


pistons.

8. Lubricate pistons with hydraulic oil and


install into cylinder tubes. Be careful not to
nick or damage the piston seals during
installation.
9. Screw cylinder tubes into generator housing
with spanner wrench. Torque cylinder tubes
to [40.7 Nm] 30 lb./ft.
10.Install Allen-head set screws and Tighten
firmly to retain cylinder tubes in generator
housing.
11.Lubricate using grease fittings with grease
specified in lubrication chart, Group 40.

OCTOBER 1995

Steering Torque
Generator Installation
1. If installing replacement steering torque
generator, install motor cut-out cam locating
roll pin as shown below.
2. Coat pinion shaft with Anti-Seize Lubricant
before installation.
3. Position locating key in generator pinion key
way. Position torque generator on steering
axle, align generator pinion key with steering
axle and install. Seat torque generator by
carefully tapping on top surface of generator
housing with a block of wood and hammer.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

4. Connect hydraulic lines to torque generator.


Make sure O rings are in correct position on
fittings and that port seal surfaces and
fittings are clean. Tighten hoses and fittings
to specification. See page 26-03-10.
5. Install rear generator cap screws.
6. Position motor cut-out switch bracket and
install front mounting cap screws. Tighten
three cap screws to specifications. See page
26-03-9.
7. Position motor cut-out cam to
generator and install cap screw.

torque

8. Install both cut-out switches to switch


mounting plate if removed. Refer to Group
17, Section 1, for mounting illustrations and
adjustment procedures.

26-03-7

NOTE
Apply
lubricant
to
terminals
before
connection.

push-on
making

9. Connect wire harness at connector. Refer to


illustration.
10. Install top and front compartment covers.
11. Connect battery and test steering operation
of truck.

26-03-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Steering Torque
Generator Assembly Specifications

OCTOBER 1995
Return

26-03-9

Steering Torque Generator Lines


Installation Specifications

1.Torque to: 289-325 Nm (213-240 lb./in.)


2. Torque to: 19.3-21.5 Nm (170-191 lb./in.)
3. Torque to: 14-16 Nm (10-12 lb./in.)
4. Torque to: 40-45 Nm (30-33 lb./in.)
5. Torque to: 68-78 Nm (50-66 lb./in.)
6. Torque to: 43-54 Nm (32-40 lb./in.)
7. Torque to: 33-35 Nm (24-26 lb./in.)
8. Torque to: 24-27 Nm (18-20 lb./in.)

26-03-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Group 29
HYDRAULIC PUMP, SUMP AND FILTER

Hydraulic Pump .......................................................................... Section 1


Hydraulic Sump and Filter ......................................................... Section 2
Hydraulic Schematic .................................................................. Section 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

29-00-1

29-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Hydraulic Pump

Main Hydraulic Pump ........................................................................ 2


Removal.................................................................................... 2
Preparation for Disassembly..................................................... 2
Disassembly.............................................................................. 2
Parts Inspection ........................................................................ 2
Assembly .................................................................................. 4
Hydraulic Pump Installation Specifications ............................... 6
Installation................................................................................. 6

OCTOBER 1995
Return

29-01-1

Main Hydraulic Pump


Removal
Remove pump and motor assembly from truck. See
hydraulic pump motor, Group 16 Section 3.

Preparation For Disassembly


Overhaul pump only in a clean, dust-free location,
using clean tools and equipment. Dirt or grit will
damage the highly machined surfaces and will
result in leakage or premature failure of the pump.

Disassembly

An alternate method of removing the rear


cover is to pry simultaneously with two large
screwdrivers in the relieved areas between
body and cover.
IMPORTANT
At no time should screwdrivers be
inserted further into pump body
more than the depth of the relieved
areas. Any burr must be removed
from the body (14) and/or cover (3)
after this operation to assure a
good seal between body and cover.

4. Holding shaft end down, remove rear cover


(3). Dowel pins (7) may remain either with
the body or with the rear cover.

NOTE
All reference numbers refer to items
shown in the illustrations on the
next page.

1. Clean outside of pump in a Stoddard type


cleaning solvent and dry thoroughly.
2. On models with splined drive shaft, proceed
to Step 3. On models with keyed drive shaft,
remove drive key (11) from drive shaft.
Using a file or stone, remove any burrs from
shaft end or key way.

NOTE
During disassembly, take special
note of the wear patterns on the
wear plate (8), thrust plate (6) and
body (14). The large port in the rear
cover (3) always corresponds to the
inlet side of the pump. The inlet side
can be further identified by the gear
contact pattern in the body (gear)
bore. The wear plate (8) will have a
somewhat heavier wear pattern on
the inlet side. The thrust plate (6)
will also have a pattern than can be
established for reassembly. Also
note that the long journal of the
driven gear (13) is toward the front
of the pump.

3. Separate rear cover (3) from body (14) by


supporting pump, shaft end up, on mounting
flanges and pressing on drive shaft end in
arbor press, or tap drive shaft with a plastic
mallet. Use cardboard or other soft
material under press, since cover and
internal part will drop suddenly when
dowel pins (7) are disengaged.

29-01-2
Return

NOTE
Cover seal (5) and thrust plate (6)
may or may not remain with rear
cover. Should they remain with the
body, remove seal and lift out thrust
plate before proceeding.

5. Lift out driven gear (13), drive gear (12), and


wear plate (8).

IMPORTANT
Care should be taken not to damage
(gouge) the shaft seal bore,
because this will result in shaft seal
leakage.

6. Invert pump body with shaft seal up.


Remove shaft seal (10) by prying it out with
a large screwdriver.

Parts Inspection
1. Wash all parts and dry thoroughly with a
clean lint free cloth.
2. Inspect wear plate (8) and thrust plate (6).
Replace if scoring or uneven wear is
observed.

NOTE
Somewhat heavier wear pattern is
normal on the low pressure (inlet)
side of the plates (6& 8). However,
there should be no heavy scoring in
this area.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

29-01-3

3. Remove pressure loading seal (15) and seal


(9) from wear plate. The seals may be twopiece or one-piece design. In either case,
discard old seal or seals. All replacement
seals are two-piece design and should be
installed into groove. See circled view in
exploded parts illustration on opposite page.
The seal should extend a minimum of 0.005"
(0.127 mm) beyond surface of wear plate.
Do not push seals below wear plate
surface at any point.
4. Inspect bushings in body and cover.
Replace cover or body if bushings are
heavily scored or burned.
5. Inspect gear journals and faces. Replace if
faces or journals are scored or worn.
6. Inspect body for wear and scoring. If gear
contact wear on low pressure side (inlet)
exceeds 0.005" (0.m) depth, replace body. If
the body is usable lightly remove/wipe burr
with suitable de-burring tool.

sure that pressure loading seals (9 & 15) are


positioned properly in seal grooves and
installed against bottom of bore surface.
Ensure outside of "W" seal is exposed to the
discharge pressure. (Or legs of "W" seal
pointing toward the suction port).
3. Lubricate the bushings in body (14) and
wear plate (8) with SAE 10 engine oil.
4. Apply Lubriplate or equivalent to outer
surface of drive shaft in installation sleeve.
(Sleeve I.D. should be slightly larger than
the O.D. of the shaft.)
5. Lubricate rear gear faces and journals with
SAE 10 engine oil and install thrust plate (6)
in its original position, bronze face toward
the gears.
6. Apply a small amount of grease to rear
cover seal (5) and install seal into groove.
7. Lubricate bushings in rear cover (3) with
SAE 10 engine oil.

Assembly
1. Place body (14) on flat plate with shaft seal
bore up. Install new shaft seal (10). Press
seal into bore until it is to approximate depth
shown below. (The outside diameter of the
sleeve should be slightly smaller the outside
diameter of the shaft seal.)
Pack the area between the double lip of the
seal with Lubriplate or equivalent grease.
2. Invert body so that gear bores are up. Install
wear plate (8) in bottom of bore, making

29-01-4
Return

8. Position pump with shaft end down. Match


scribe marks on cover and body and install
cover.
9. Install cap screws (1) and washers (2) finger
tight. Torque bolts to: 34-38 lb.ft.
10. On models equipped with keyed drive shaft,
install drive key (11).
11. Check that drive shaft turns with adjustable
wrench without evidence of mechanical
bind.

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

29-01-5

Hydraulic Pump Installation


1. Apply grease to splines of pump shaft. See
Group 40, for specifications.
2. Use match marks to properly align pump
and motor. Mount pump to motor with cap
screws. Torque cap screws to 48-54 lb./ft.
(65-73 Nm).
3. Install pump and motor assembly into trick.
See hydraulic pump motor section in Group
16 for details. Use the following diagrams for
installation specifications of pump assembly,
lines, and fittings.

Hydraulic Pump Installation Specifications


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

29-01-6
Return

Coat pump shaft splines with grease


Torque to: 177-221 lb./in. (20-25 Nm)
Torque to: 24-26 lb./ft. (32-36 Nm)
Torque to: 46-56 lb./ft. (60-75 Nm)
Torque to: 48-54 lb./ft. (65-73 Nm)
Torque to: 72-80 lb./ft. (98-100 Nm)

OCTOBER 1995

Section 2.

Hydraulic Sump and Filter

Hydraulic Sump and Filter Assembly .............................................. 2

OCTOBER 1995
Return

29-02-1

Hydraulic Sump and Filter Assembly

29-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 3.

Hydraulic Schematics

Hydraulic Diagram ............................................................................. 2

OCTOBER 1995
Return

29-03-1

Hydraulic Diagram

29-03-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Group 30
HYDRAULIC CONTROL VALVES

Main Control Valve................................................................................ Section 1


Face Seal Fittings.................................................................................. Section 2
Hydraulic System Pressure Checks - Lift Circuit............................... Section 3
Hydraulic System Pressure Checks - Steering Circuit.......................Section4
Hydraulic System Pressure Checks - Auxiliary and Tilt Circuit ....... Section 5
Flow Controls - Selector Solenoid Valve ............................................ Section 6

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-00-1

30-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Main Control Valve

Servicing Main Control Valve ........................................................... 2


Relief Valve Assembly....................................................................... 4
Procedure for Cartridge Seal Replacement .............................. 4
Adjustable Relief Valve Seal Nut Replacement ........................ 5
Non-Adjustable Relief Valve ..................................................... 5
Load Check Valve .............................................................................. 6
Disassembly.............................................................................. 6
Inspection.................................................................................. 6
Assembly .................................................................................. 6
Main Control Valve End Cap and Components .............................. 7
Disassembly.............................................................................. 7
Assembly .................................................................................. 7
Main Control Valve ............................................................................ 9
Disassembly.............................................................................. 9
Assembly .................................................................................. 9

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-01-1

Servicing Main Control Valve

Slip boot off cover lip and tuck bottom of boot


into cover hole.

WARNING
Always wear safety glasses.

Remove fasteners securing cover(s) to


truck.

Remover covers.

Remove all jewelry before working on truck.

Servicing Electric Motors


Move Truck to Service Area
1. Park truck on a flat level surface.

Fully lower lift carriage.

Tilt forks full forward

2. Turn key switch off.

Remove key.

Disconnect truck battery.

4. Discharge the capacitors.

Be sure the battery is unplugged.

Discharge capacitor.

3. Remove cover(s).

30-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

IMPORTANT
When
removing
or
installing
hydraulic lines and components, it
is necessary to avoid any dirt
particles
from
entering
the
hydraulic system. The smallest
particles are capable of severely
damaging the system.

5. Tag and disconnect four hoses from main


control valve.
6. Disconnect linkage from valve spool.
7. Remove two fasteners to remove valve.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-01-3

Relief Valve Assembly


Procedure for Cartridge Seal Replacement

Remove relief valve from valve body. Cover


relief cavity in valve body to avoid
contamination of valve interior.

Remove and discard O rings and Backup


rings from cartridge. Care must be taken not
to scratch or nick cartridge when removing
old seals. It is recommended that a brass or
other soft metal tool be used.

Clean with a Stoddard type cleaning solvent.


and dry cartridge.

Lubricate new seals with hydraulic fluid.


Install large backup ring over threaded area
first. These backup rings can be of two
types. The first type is a solid type; the
second, a spiral cut type. The spiral type
must be installed as shown in above
illustration to avoid spiraling out of the
groove when installing cartridge in the valve
assembly.

Install the large O ring in the groove next to


the backup ring, being careful not to cut or
overstretch the O ring.

Complete this procedure by installing the


smaller backup ring and O ring.

Install cartridge in body and torque to: 35-40


lb./ ft. (47-68 Nm).

If equipped with an adjustable relief valve,


check seal nut. See next procedure.

30-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Adjustable Relief Valve Seal Nut Replacement

Loosen seal nut and remove adjusting bolt,


seal nut and O ring from the relief valve
cartridge.

Locate new parts in seal kit. Install seal nut


on adjusting bolt with chamfer of the seal nut
away from the hex head of bolt.

Lubricate O ring with clean hydraulic fluid


and install over adjusting bolt into the
chamfer in the seal nut.

Screw the assembly loosely into the relief


valve cartridge.

CAUTION
Do not attempt setting relief valve
without proper test equipment.
Refer to Section 3 for adjustment
procedures.

Keep seal nut loose when turning the


adjustment bolt inward. After adjusting for
proper relief valve setting (see below),
torque the seal nut against the relief valve
cartridge to approximately 10 lb./ft. (14
Nm). The adjustment bolt must be held in
place while torquing the seal nut to avoid
changing relief setting.

Non-Adjusting Relief Valve

OCTOBER 1995
Return

This is a Tamper Proof Type Relief Valve


and cannot be serviced or re-set. If
adjustment or service to the relief valve is
required, the relief valve assembly should be
replaced.

30-01-5

Load Check Valve


IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

Disassembly

Remove hex plug.

Remove spring and poppet. If poppet is to


be used again, care must be taken not to
damage it.

Remove O ring from hex plug. Discard O


ring.

Assembly

Lubricate the poppet and spring with clean


hydraulic fluid.

Install poppet into cavity center.

Next insert spring into poppet hole.

Lubricate new O ring with clean hydraulic


fluid. Install O ring onto hex plug. Take care
not to cut or over stretch the O-ring.

Install plug (finger tight) into valve body over


poppet and spring.

Torque hex plug to:

Inspection

Clean all parts in a Stoddard type cleaning


solvent and allow to air dry.

Inspect poppet for scratches or nicks. If


found, replace poppet with a new one.

30-01-6
Return

9/16-18 Threaded Plug: 15-20 lb.ft. (20-27


Nm)
3/4-16 Threaded Plug: 25-30 lb.ft. (34-41
Nm)

OCTOBER 1995

Main Control Valve End Cap and Components


IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

Assembly
1. If removed, install new O rings and valve
spool in valve body.
IMPORTANT
Threads should be free of dirt and
grease, in both the detent spool and
valve spool.

Disassembly
Required Tools

Standard Screwdriver

Phillips Screwdriver

3/32 or 5/32 inch Allen Wrench

3/8 inch Wrench

General Purpose Threadlocker


Refer to illustration on opposite page.

2. Install washer onto the end of the valve


spool, then insert the spacer into the spring.
Place one drop of locking liquid onto the end
of the threads of the detent spool. Excess
locking liquid could hamper proper
operations.
3. Insert the detent spool through the spacer/
spring and screw into place. Torque to 2-3
lb./ft. (3-4 Nm). Retain opposite end of
valve spool to keep it from turning while
torquing detent spool to specifications.

1. Remove two detent plugs with 3/8 wrench.


The balls and springs will now be free to
drop from the end cap.

Remove end cap by removing the two


mounting screws.

2. Remove Detent Spool.

Retain spool by placing a bar or rod through


the hole at the end of the valve spool.

IMPORTANT
Excessive valve spool travel into
valve body will possibly damage Orings.

4. After assembly, check for proper operation


or spring center. Push down on detent spool.
This should compress the spring and return
when released.

NOTE
Detent spool removal may require
greater then normal forces since
this part is liquid locked in place.

Take a screw driver and remove the detent


spool. Some of the detent spools may have
3/32 or 5/32 hex.

3. With the detent spool removed, remove the


spacer, spring and washer.

5. Place end cap over detent spool. Align the


mounting holes and install mounting screws
finger tight.
6. Insert one detent ball into each of the holes
on either side of the end cap.
Place detent springs into the detent plugs.
Put one drop of locking liquid onto the
threads of the detent plugs (use sparingly).

IMPORTANT
Movement of valve spool in or out
of the valve body can damage the O
ring.

4. Refer to next procedure for removal and


installation of valve spool and seals.

5. If parts are to be reused, clean


thoroughly using a Stoddard type
cleaning solvent and dry them. Make
sure to remove old lubricant from within
the end cap.
OCTOBER 1995
Return

Apply a medium coating of lubricant


(Lubriplate 630AA or equivalent) over the
spring and detent spool.

Screw detent plugs firmly into place. Torque


plugs to: 2-3 lb.ft. (3-4 Nm).

7. Remove end cap mounting screws one at a


time and apply locking liquid to threads.
Firmly tighten end cap mounting screws.
Torque them to: 2-3 lb.ft. (3-4 Nm).

Check valve spool for correct operation.

30-01-7

30-01-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Main Control Valve


IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

Wash all parts in a Stoddard type cleaning


solvent. Be certain all foreign matter has
been removed from the spool and valve
body. Air dry parts.

Replace all seals, spool seals and springs


with new parts.

Inspect the surface of the spool and body


bore for cuts, scratches, nick, etc. Examine
the spool. Look for loose chrome plating,
cracks or other damage caused by for
foreign material in the hydraulic system. Use
a light to inspect the spool bore in the valve
body. Nicks on the spool can be removed
with a crocus cloth. Any surface having cuts
or scratches makes the part unsuitable for
further service and the valve should be

Disassembly
End Cap Removal

NOTE
Refer to the previous control valve
end cap disassembly procedure.

Remove two detent balls and end cap.

Remove detent spool.

NOTE
This may require heavier than
normal forces since the screw has
been installed using loctite.

Remove spacer, spring and washer.

Spool and Seal Removal

CAUTION
Be
extremely
careful
when
removing spool and O rings from
the valve body. Do not scratch, nick
or mar the spool or the body bore.
To do so, will make the valve unfit
for further service.

Remove spool from valve body.

Using a brass similar to that shown, carefully


remove O rings from valve body bore.
Discard these seals.

Cleaning and Inspection

WARNING
Wear eye protection and protective
clothing when cleaning or drying
with air pressure. Reduce air
pressure to 30 PSI (207 kPa). Debris
removed with air pressure can
cause injury.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-01-9

replaced. The spool and body are a matched


set and cannot be replaced as individual
parts.

Assembly
Spool and Seals
1. Lubricate valve spool and new O ring with
clean hydraulic fluid.
2. Carefully insert spool into the bore at the cap
end of the valve body. Continue to push the
spool inward until the front (clevis) end of
spool is flush with the inward side of the front
O ring groove as shown here.
3. Next, pinch (as shown) a lubricated O ring
so it can be partially inserted into the groove.
4. Using a brass tool, completely push the O
ring into the groove. Be extremely careful
that you do not damage (cut or nick) the O
ring during installation. Be extremely careful
that you do not damage the body bore. To
do so will make the assembly unfit for
service.
5. Now, slowly rotate the spool while gently
moving it on through the front O ring.
Continue to push the spool inward until the
end of the spool is flush with the inside edge
of the groove located at the cap end of the
valve.
6. Lubricate and install a new O ring into this
groove. Follow the same procedure
described in Steps 3 and 4.
7. After the O ring is installed, use the
procedure previously described in step 5
and push the spool back through the valve
and the newly installed O ring. Continue this
process until the end of the spool is flush
with the casting at cap end of body.
End Cap Assembly (Refer to Control Valve End Cap
procedures.)

1. Install washer onto the end of the valve


spool.
2. Insert the spacer into the spring.

IMPORTANT

Threads of detent spool and those


in the valve spool should be free of
dirt and grease before applying
Loctite
and
assembling
the
components.
Sparingly
apply
Loctite to the screw threads. Too
much Loctite could hamper proper
operation.

3. Place one drop of Loctite onto the threaded


end of detent spool.

30-01-10
Return

4. Install detent spool through the spacer (and


spring) into the base end of the spool finger
tight.
5.

Position rod into the hole of the spool.

6. Hold rod and spool from turning and using a


flat bladed screw driver, securely tighten
detent spool to 2-3 lb./ft. (3-4 Nm)

Check Spring Operation

Push down on detent spool. The spring


should compress and upon releasing the
screw, the spring should return to its original
position.

Apply a medium coating of Lubricant


(Lubriplate or equivalent) to the spring and
spacer.

7. Sparingly apply Loctite to the threads of both


end cap mounting screws.
8. Align the mounting holes of the end cap with
those in the valve body. Install mounting
screws finger tight. Now tighten screws to 23 lb./ft. (3-4 Nm).
9. Install one detent ball into each of the holes
on either side of the end cap.

Place detent spring into the detent plug. Put


one drop of locking liquid onto the threads of
the detents plugs (use sparingly).

Screw detent plugs firmly into place. Torque


plugs to 2-3 lb./ft. (3-4 Nm).

10. Install port plugs into valve openings

until such time as the valve is installed


onto the truck.

OCTOBER 1995

Section 2.

Face Seal Fittings

Face Seal Fittings .............................................................................. 3


Assembly Suggestions.............................................................. 3
Hydraulic Hose or Tube Installation.................................. 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-02-1

30-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Face Seal Fitting


Use these general specifications if a specific torque
is not given for face seal connections.

1. Lubricate all O rings lightly with hydraulic


fluid.

Assembly Suggestions

2. Align the tube, or hose nut to the mating


fitting (or align the fitting to the port) and
check to see that the threads seat properly,
tighten finger tight, until it stops turning while
moving fitting or not lightly side to side to
prevent cocking, or thread damage.

Hydraulic Hose or Tube Installation.

IMPORTANT
Check to be sure the O ring face
seal is lubricated, seated and
properly retained in fitting groove.
See below. If the seal is missing or
not fitting properly in its groove, the
connection will leak.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Using finger tips only, lightly snug fitting


or not with a wrench until it bottoms out
on the seat or port.

30-02-3

3. Using a pen or marker, mark a line on the


nut and extend onto the adapter (or
connector) as shown at A.
4. Hold connector with one wrench and tighten
the cap with a second wrench.
Rotate nut just one flat as shown at B.

30-02-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 3.

Hydraulic System Pressure Checks - Lift Circuit

Test Ports ........................................................................................... 2


Hydraulic Lift Circuits Pressure Checks ......................................... 3
Check Lift Circuit Relief Valve Setting ...................................... 3
Relief Valve Adjustment............................................................ 3

NOTE
Refer to Section 4 Steering Circuit.
Refer to Section 5 for Auxiliary and Tilt Circuits.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-03-1

Test Ports
IMPORTANT
Check system pressure with the
hydraulic
fluid
at
operating
temperature: 110-130F (43-54C)

30-03-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Hydraulic Lift Circuit Pressure Checks


Check Lift Control Circuit Relief Valve Setting

NOTE
The relief valve is located at the end
the lift control valve. Refer to
illustration.

IMPORTANT
Check system pressure with the
hydraulic
fluid
at
operating
temperature: 110-130F (43-54C)

1. Remove cap from test port.

NOTE
The hydraulic relief valve setting
may be checked with a Mico
Quadrigage or with a conventional
pressure gauge having a scale of 04000 psi. (0-27,580 kPa).

2. Rotate adjustor CLOCKWISE to increase


pressure and COUNTERCLOCKWISE to
decrease pressure.
Adjust the relief valve to specification (see
Group 40, Section 1).
3. Once adjustment has been attained, turn
key switch OFF and fully lower upright.
4. Now, using two(2) wrenches, hold adjustor
and tighten lock nut to secure adjustment.
Lift Circuit
Relief Pressure
RCX 25-35
3000 psi (20,680 kPa)
RCX 40-50
3200psi (22,400 kPa)

2. Connect adaptor to pressure gauge.


3. Attach adapter to test port.
4. Turn key switch ON.
5. Move the multi-function control to elevate
upright to full maximum lift.
Hold control in the fully actuated position.
When the system operates over, relief,
Immediately read the pressure gauge and
then release control. Do not operate
system over relief any longer then it
takes to read the pressure gauge. Turn
key switch OFF.
6. If reading is not per specification (See Group
40, Section 1):
a. If equipped with an adjustable relief
valve, adjust as necessary.
b. If equipped with a non-adjustable relief
valve, replace relief valve.

Relief Valve Adjustment


IMPORTANT
Relief valve are factory preset and
should not require adjustment.
However, if adjustment is required,
DO NOT exceed specified setting.

1. Loosen lock nut securing the adjustor.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-03-3

Return

Section 4.

Hydraulic System Pressure Checks - Steering Circuit

Test Ports ........................................................................................... 2


Hydraulic Pressure Checks - Steering Circuit ................................ 3
Check Steering Circuit Relief Valve Setting.............................. 3
Relief Valve Adjustment............................................................ 3

NOTE
Refer to Section 3 Lift Circuit.
Refer to Section 5 for Auxiliary and Tilt Circuits.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-04-1

Test Ports
IMPORTANT
Check system pressure with the
hydraulic
fluid
at
operating
temperature: 110-130F (43-54C)

30-04-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Hydraulic Steering Circuit Pressure Checks


5. Rotate Steering Control to full turn and hold.

Check Steering Circuit Relief Valve Setting

As the hydraulic system operates over relief,


Immediately read the pressure gauge and
then release control. Do not operate
system over relief any longer then it
takes to read the pressure gauge. Gauge
should register 1000 PSI. (6,895 kPa). If it
does not, adjustment is required.

NOTE
The relief valve is located in the
steering pump. Refer to illustration
on next page.

IMPORTANT
Check system pressure with the
hydraulic
fluid
at
operating
temperature: 110-130F (43-54C)

Turn key switch OFF.

Relief Valve Adjustment


1. Loosen lock nut securing the adjustor (see
illustration on next page).

1. Remove cap from test port.

NOTE

IMPORTANT

The hydraulic relief valve setting


may be checked with a Mico
Quadrigage or with a conventional
pressure gauge having a scale of 04000 psi. (0-27,580 kPa).

2. Connect adaptor (see illustration


previous page) to pressure gauge.

Relief valve are factory preset and


should not require adjustment.
However, if adjustment is required,
DO NOT exceed1000 psi (6,895
kPa).

on

3. Attach adapter to test port. (Refer to next


page.)
4. Turn key switch ON.

2. Rotate adjustor CLOCKWISE to increase


pressure and COUNTERCLOCKWISE to
decrease pressure.
Adjust the relief valve to operate at 1000 PSI
(6,895 kPa).
4. Once adjustment has been attained, turn
key switch OFF.
5. Now, using screwdriver and a wrench, hold
adjustor and tighten lock nut to secure
adjustment.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-04-3

30-04-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 5.

Hydraulic System Pressure Checks - Auxiliary and Tilt Circuits

Test Ports ........................................................................................... 2


Hydraulic Pressure Checks .............................................................. 3
Check Auxiliary and Tilt Circuits Relief Valve Setting ............... 3
Relief Valve Adjustment............................................................ 3

NOTE
Refer to Section 3 Lift Circuit.
Refer to Section 4 for Steering Circuit.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-05-1

Test Ports
IMPORTANT
Check system pressure with the
hydraulic
fluid
at
operating
temperature: 110-130F (43-54C)

30-05-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Hydraulic Pressure Checks


Check Auxiliary and Tilt Circuits Relief
Valve Setting

NOTE
The relief valve RV1, RV2, are
located on the solenoid control
valve. Refer to illustration on next
page.

IMPORTANT
Check system pressure with the
hydraulic
fluid
at
operating
temperature: 110-130F (43-54C)

1. Remove cap from test port, refer to


illustration in opposite column.

NOTE
The hydraulic relief valve setting
may be checked with a Mico
Quadrigage or with a conventional
pressure gauge having a scale of 04000 psi. (0-27,580 kPa).

2. Connect adaptor (see illustration


previous page) to pressure gauge.

on

3. Attach adapter to test port.


4. Turn key switch ON.
.

5. Move the Multi-Function Control to tilt fully


forward.
Hold control in the fully actuated position.
When the system operates over relief,
immediately read the pressure gauge and
then release control. Do not operate
system over relief any longer than it
takes to read the pressure gauge. Gauge
should register as specified on next page.
Turn key switch OFF.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-05-3

Relief Valve Adjustment


IMPORTANT
Relief valves are factory preset and
should not require adjustment.
However, if adjustment is required,
do not exceed specified setting. DO
NOT exceed specified settings.

1. Loosen lock nut securing the adjustor.

3. Once adjustment has been attained, more


upright to vertical position and turn key
switch OFF and fully lower upright.
4. Now, using two wrenches, hold adjustor and
tighten lock nut to secure adjustment.
5. Check setting after tightening lock nut.

2. Rotate adjustor CLOCKWISE to increase


pressure and COUNTERCLOCKWISE to
decrease pressure.
Adjust the relief valve to operate at specified
pressure.

RV1 and RV2


Auxiliary and Tilt Circuit Relief
Pressure:
RCX 25-35
2000 psi (13,780 kPa)
RCX 40-50

30-05-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 6.

Flow Controls - Selector Solenoid Valve

Valve Identification ............................................................................ 2


Hydraulic Solenoid Valves................................................................ 3
Cartridge Valve Installation Procedure ..................................... 3
Service Specifications............................................................... 4
Optional Auxiliary 2 Valve Specifications.................................. 5

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-06-1

Valve Identification
NOTE
Selector solenoid valve shown with
device selector solenoid valve
attached. If device selector solenoid
valve is not used, an end plate is
attached to selector solenoid valve
instead.

30-06-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Hydraulic Solenoid Valves


IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make Sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

Check cartridge to insure it is free of external


contamination. Wash cartridge in a Stoddard
type cleaning solvent and allow to air dry.

Check to be sure O rings and back-up rings


are in position.

Dip cartridge into clean hydraulic fluid, to the


top of the threads, to lubricate the O rings.

3. Assembly

Cartridge Valve Installation Procedure

Insert and screw cartridge into its cavity by


hand. It should turn easily up to the top O
ring. If it does not, the cavity has been
damaged, and the body should be replaced.

Use the torque specifications listed in this


section.

1. Visually inspect the valve block.

Refer to illustration on next page.

Inspect the valve cavity to be sure it is free


of burrs on the threads, chips, or other
contamination.

2. Prepare cartridge for insertion into block.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-06-3

30-06-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

OCTOBER 1995
Return

30-06-5

Return

Group 31
HYDRAULIC SUPPLY SYSTEM

Hydraulic System .................................................................................. Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

31-00-1

31-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Hydraulic System

General Description........................................................................... 2
Hydraulic Fluid and Filter Change ................................................... 2
Remote Pump Method .............................................................. 2
Truck Pump Method.................................................................. 3
Hydraulic Sump Tank ........................................................................ 5

OCTOBER 1995
Return

31-01-1

General Description
The parts of the main hydraulic system are the
hydraulic sump tank, main hydraulic pump, main
hydraulic valve, selector solenoid valve, and
associated hydraulic lines and hoses.
The parts of the hydraulic steering system are the
steering pump, steering gear, and steering torque
generator.
The hydraulic sump is a separate, removable tank.

Hydraulic Fluid And Filter Change


IMPORTANT
When
removing
or
installing
hydraulic lines and components, it
is necessary to prevent any dirt
particles
from
entering
the
hydraulic system. The smallest
particles are capable of severely
damaging the system

There is no drain plug in the hydraulic sump tank.


Unless the sump tank is to be removed for other
repair or maintenance, the hydraulic fluid can be
changed by one of the following methods.

NOTE
If sump tank must be removed for
service, hose at the bottom of sump
can be disconnected and oil
allowed to drain. There is no access
to this hose unless drive axle is
removed.

Remote Pump Method

CAUTION
To perform this service procedure, first:

Park truck on a level surface.


Put the upright in a vertical
position and lower the carriage
fully down.

Oil from the hydraulic sump tank is fed by a gear


pump to the main hydraulic valve and the selector
solenoid valve. From the selector solenoid valve,
the oil is directed to the lift and tilt cylinders.
Filtration of the main hydraulic system oil is
provided through a spin-on, full-flow return-line filter
in the power steering circuit.

31-01-2
Return

Return control handle to neutral


and turn key switch OFF.

Remove the hydraulic sump fill cover assembly


(sump filler cap adapter). Pump the fluid out by
suction using a separate pump and hose.

OCTOBER 1995

Truck Pump Method


Pump the fluid out by using the truck hydraulic
system. This method, described below, may be
used most easily and satisfactorily for routine
changing of the fluid if proper procedures are
followed.

CAUTION
To perform this service procedure, first:

Park truck on a level surface.


Put the upright in a vertical
position and lower the carriage
fully down.

Return control handle to neutral


and turn key switch OFF.

Remove the two front compartment covers for


access to the hydraulic oil filter.
Remove the top compartment cover for access to
the hydraulic system pressure diagnostic check port
located on left-hand side of main hydraulic valve.

You will need a drain pain of 3.5 gallon (13.5 L)


minimum capacity, or other method of disposal, for
collecting the used oil. Be sure the outlet end of the
drain line is directed into the drain pan and held
from moving when pressurized.

NOTE
If battery is removed, use an
adapter cable connected between
battery and truck receptacle to
power hydraulic system.

Turn key switch ON.


Move control handle and push tilt button in the back
tilt position to start the main pump. Hold control
handle and push button in this position until sump
tank is emptied. A steady stream of used oil should
flow from the drain line.

IMPORTANT
Be careful when sump is nearly
emptied. Listen and watch for signs
of pump cavitation. DO NOT operate
pump after cavitation occurs.
Severe damage to pump gear, plate,
and housing will occur!

Continue operation until the sump tank is emptied.


This point will be reached when the pump starts to
cavitate. When cavitation occurs the pump speed
will increase. A change in pump speed pitch will be
heard. Also, watch the drain line. The oil flow will
become erratic or will stop when the pump can no
longer pick up oil from the tank.
Release the control handle and push button
immediately when pump cavitation occurs.
Turn key switch OFF.
Disconnect drain line from the truck. Replace cap
on main valve check port fitting.

NOTE
If old oil is excessively dirty or
hydraulic system contaminated, it
is recommended that the sump tank
be completely drained by removing
the pump suction line from the
sump outlet, and flushed with clean
oil.

Remove the snap-on cap and connect a suitable


drain hose line to the diagnostic check port fitting.

NOTE
Use quick-disconnect adapter fitting.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

IMPORTANT
Discard old oil
environmentally
manner.

and

filter in
acceptable

31-01-3

IMPORTANT
Always use genuine Prime-Mover
parts. Use recommended fluid only.

Install new sump breather cap.

CAUTION
Be sure there is adequate overhead
clearance before raising upright.

Check truck operation. Turn key switch ON.


Operate the hydraulic system. Cycle the lift system
several times; raise the lift carriage to full height and
lower fully down.

WARNING

Remove and discard old oil filter. Install new oil


filter. Be sure to follow the installation instructions
printed on the filter body. Also, check that the
hydraulic line connections at the filter base are
tightened correctly.
Remove the used sump breather cap.

NOTE
Remove sump filler cap adapter to
clean sump pre-filter screen, if
necessary.

Cover drive motors and brakes with plastic sheet


and fill sump tank with new fluid. Refer to Group 40
Specifications for recommended hydraulic fluid.

31-01-4
Return

Do not use your hands to check for


hydraulic leakage. Use a piece of
cardboard or paper to search for
leaks.
Escaping
fluid
under
pressure can penetrate the skin
causing serious injury. Relieve
pressure
before
disconnecting
hydraulic or other lines. Tighten all
connections
before
applying
pressure. Keep hands and body
away from pinholes and nozzles
which eject fluids under high
pressure.

Check for leaks in the hydraulic system. Clean up


any fluid spills.
Turn key switch OFF.
Check sump
recommended
OVERFILL.

tank
fluid

fluid level again. Add


as required. DO NOT

Install the top and two front compartment covers.

OCTOBER 1995

Hydraulic Sump Tank

Sump Tank Removal


1. Remove upright. Refer to Group 34 for
details.
2. Remove drive axle. Refer to Group 20 for
details.
3. Drain hydraulic oil from sump tank.

5. Loosen hose clamp and release sump tank


filler line from mounting bracket.
6. Carefully cut sump tank mounting strap and
remove sump tank.

Sump Tank Installation


1. Install sump tank in reverse order of
removal.

4. Position a drain pan under truck to hold


hydraulic fluid. Disconnect hydraulic lines at
sump tank.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

31-01-5

Return

Group 32
CYLINDERS

Tilt Cylinder ........................................................................................... Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

32-00-1

32-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Tilt Cylinder

Tilt Cylinder Components ................................................................. 2


Tilt Cylinder Plumbing Layout.......................................................... 3
Tilt Cylinder Drift Test ....................................................................... 4
Tilt Cylinder Removal ........................................................................ 4
Tilt Cylinder Rod End Removal ........................................................ 6
Tilt Cylinder Disassembly ................................................................. 6
Tilt Cylinder Inspection ..................................................................... 6
Tilt Cylinder Assembly ...................................................................... 8
Tilt Cylinder Installation .................................................................... 8
Face Seal Fittings ............................................................................. 10
Assembly Suggestions............................................................. 10
Tilt Check and Adjustment .............................................................. 12

OCTOBER 1995
Return

32-01-1

Tilt Cylinder Components

32-01-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Tilt Cylinder Plumbing Layout

OCTOBER 1995
Return

32-01-3

Tilt Cylinder Drift Test

Tilt Cylinder Removal

1. Make a test load:

CAUTION

Assemble weight on a pallet equal to the


weight of the specified capacity of the
truck to be tested.

Load should not extend beyond pallet and


be stacked for stability.

Forks must completely engage load and


be adjusted as wide as possible to provide
even distribution of weight.

2. Operate truck hydraulics until oil is


approximately 110-130F (43-54C). Put
hydraulic functions over relief to help heat oil
to operating temperature.
3. Lift carriage and test load 12-15 in. (305381mm) and place upright in full back tilt
position.

To perform this service procedure, first:

Park truck on a level surface.

Put the upright in a vertical


position and lower the carriage
fully down.

Return control handle to neutral


and turn key switch OFF.

IMPORTANT
When
removing
or
installing
hydraulic lines and components, it
is necessary to prevent any dirt
particles
from
entering
the
hydraulic system. The smallest
particles are capable of severely
damaging the system.

1. Be sure all hydraulic attachments are in a


position of rest and the upright and carriage
are in a fully lowered position.

WARNING
If both tilt cylinders are to be
removed, the upright must be
supported by use of an overhead
chain hoist of adequate capacity. If
not supported, the upright can
move with one cylinder connected
because oil will be pushed from the
cylinder to the disconnected hoses.

4. Measure length of exposed cylinder rod,


then measure again after 5 minutes have
lapsed. The difference between the two
measurements is the cylinder drift. Cylinder
drift should not exceed specifications:
Tilt Drift (in 5 minutes with rated load, new truck):

Temperature
80F (26.7C)

Drift
0.256 in. (6.5 mm)

100F (37.8C

0.433 in. (11 mm)

120F (48.9C)

0.650 in. (16.5 mm)

NOTE
Put a drain pan under the truck at
the tilt cylinder position when
removing hydraulic lines.

2. Disconnect the hydraulic lines from the tilt


cylinders and cap the ends of the lines to
prevent contamination of the hydraulic
system.
3. Remove the tilt cylinder rod end hex head
screw and retainer that secures rod end to
upright rail.
4. Remove each tilt cylinder rod end by pulling
it off the upright attachment pin.
5. At the anchor end of the tilt cylinder, remove
both spring clip retainers from the ends of
the cylinder mounting shaft.
6. Drive the mounting pin from tilt cylinder
anchor end and frame mounting ears.
7. Remove the tilt cylinder from the truck.

32-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Tilt Cylinder Removal

OCTOBER 1995
Return

32-01-5

Tilt Cylinder Rod Removal


1. Fully loosen tilt cylinder rod end clamp bolt
and nut.
Remove the rod end from the tilt cylinder
rod. Count and note the number of turns
required for removal. This will aid initial
setting at installation. Keep the tilt cylinder
rod from turning with a wrench on the flat
position of the rod at the end of the threads.
2. Remove shim(s) and spacer(s) from tilt
cylinder rod. Note location and the number
of shims and spacers removed. This will aid
initial setting at installation.

2. Put the base end of the cylinder in a vise


equipped with soft jaws.
3. Remove the gland retainer and fastening
ring, from cylinder barrel. Refer to illustration
on next page.
4. Remove gland assembly, seals, rings, rod
and piston with spacer and piston seals.
5. Remove and discard all seals and rod wiper.
Install all new parts found in the seal kit.
6. Inspect mounting bushings located at both
ends of the cylinder. It will not be necessary
to remove them unless they are found to be
unfit for further service.

Tilt Cylinder Inspection


1. Carefully clean all parts in a Stoddard type
cleaning solvent and position them on a
clean work surface.

Tilt Cylinder Disassembly

2. Check the piston rod for damage. Look for


gouges, scratches, corrosion or evidence of
unusual wear. Minor surface damage can be
repaired by use of fine abrasion cloth or
stoning. Be extremely careful you do not
remove the chrome plating. Deeper damage
will require replacement of piston rod
assembly. Make sure the threads on the rod
are free of damage.

IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

1. Before disassembly, clean exterior of the tilt


cylinder in a Stoddard type cleaning solvent
to remove all contamination.
Be sure all hydraulic fluid has been removed
from the cylinder. Stroking the piston rod will
help force the fluid out.

32-01-6
Return

3. Check cylinder bore for any damage. Parts


with deep gouges or pitted surfaces will
require replacement.
4. Check threaded section of the cylinder
barrel to be sure the threads have not been
damaged.
5. Put a light coat of hydraulic fluid on all parts.
If parts are to be left out for a period of time
or overnight, they should be covered with a
clean cover.

OCTOBER 1995

Tilt Cylinder Assembly

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Ring, Back-up
Seal, Barrel
Lock, Gland
Seal, Gland
Spacer, Piston Rod
Seal, Piston
Rod & Piston, Tilt Cylinder
Plug, Port Fitting
Seal, Port Fitting Plug
Barrel, Tilt Cylinder
Gland, Tilt Cylinder
Packing, Gland
Wiper, Piston Rod
Ring, Gland
Retainer, Gland

32-01-7

Tilt Cylinder Assembly


1. Install new packing and rod wiper in the gland
assembly. The "lip" of the wiper must face
outward.
2. Install new gland seals, back-up ring and lock
ring on the gland assembly
3. Install new piston seals on the piston.
4. Apply clean hydraulic fluid to the piston rod
assembly. Coat the inside of the cylinder
barrel and gland assembly with clean fluid.
5. Carefully slide the spacer and gland assembly
onto the piston rod. Be sure the rod end does
not cut or nick the wiper or packing upon
installation.
6. Install piston and rod into cylinder barrel. Be
careful that the piston seals are not nicked or
cut on the edge of the cylinder barrel or when
sliding them over the groove within the barrel.
7. Next, install gland assembly into cylinder
barrel. Again, use care so the seals are not
nicked or cut upon installation.
8. Check installation by making sure the piston
rod assembly moves fairly easy within the
barrel assembly without binding.
9. Install gland fastening ring and retainer.

32-01-8
Return

Tilt Cylinder Installation


1. Install the same number of spacers removed.
Locate spacer(s) over the cylinder rod pushing
them up against the gland assembly.

IMPORTANT
If there were both split and solid
shims removed, be certain to
alternate them upon installation, i.e.
one split shim followed by one solid
shim. (There should be no more
than six shims per cylinder.)

2. Next, install the same number of shim(s)


removed. Refer to illustration in removal
procedure.
3. Install rod end onto cylinder rod the same
number of turns that were counted when
removing rod end from cylinder rod. Keep the
rod from turning by placing a wrench on the
flats of the rod next to the threaded area of the
rod.
4. Locate base end of tilt cylinder into the
mounting ears on the truck frame. Install
mounting pin and lock into position with spring
retainers.
5. Install cylinder rod end to upright and secure it
in position using the hex head screw and
retainer.
Torque cap screw to: 177-221 lb./in (20-25 Nm).

OCTOBER 1995

NOTE
O ring face seal fittings are used on
this truck. If you are unfamiliar with
this type connection, refer to Face
Seal
Fittings,
Assembly
Suggestions on next page before
making connections.

Install hose connection to cylinder port finger


tight.

Using two wrenches, tighten connection to:


10-12 lb./ft. (14-18 Nm).

6. Remove cap from the end of the hydraulic


hose to be connected first.

7. Connect remaining hoses in the same


manner as described.

8. Do Tilt Check and Adjustment, in this Group.

Inspect O ring seal in hose fitting to be sure


it is in place and not damaged.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

32-01-9

Face Seal Fitting


Use these general specifications if a specific torque
is not given for face seal connections.

1. Lubricate all O rings lightly with hydraulic


fluid.

Assembly Suggestions

2. Align the tube, or hose nut to the mating


fitting (or align the fitting to the port) and
check to see that the threads seat properly,
tighten finger tight, until it stops turning while
moving fitting or not lightly side to side to
prevent cocking, or thread damage.

Hydraulic Hose or Tube Installation.

IMPORTANT
Check to be sure the O ring face
seal is lubricated, seated and
properly retained in fitting groove.
See below. If the seal is missing or
not fitting properly in its groove, the
connection will leak.

32-01-10
Return

Using finger tips only, lightly snug fitting


or not with a wrench until it bottoms out
on the seat or port.

OCTOBER 1995

3. Using a pen or marker, mark a line on the


nut and extend onto the adapter (or
connector) as shown at A.
4. Hold connector with one wrench and tighten
the cap with a second wrench.
Rotate nut just one flat as shown at B.
5. Check for leaks in the hydraulic system.
Clean up any fluid spills.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

WARNING
Do not use your hands to check for
hydraulic leakage. Use a piece of
cardboard or paper to search for
leaks.
Escaping
fluid
under
pressure can penetrate the skin
causing serious injury. Relieve
pressure
before
disconnecting
hydraulic or other lines. Tighten all
connections
before
applying
pressure. Keep hands and body
away from pinholes and nozzles
which eject fluids under high
pressure.

32-01-11

Tilt Cylinder Adjustment


NOTE
Forward tilt cylinder adjustment
must be made before making the
backward tilt adjustment.

1. Raise the upright only to the height that will


allow the fork tips to clear the floor by a
small amount when tilted fully forward.
2. Starting from vertical position, slowly tilt
upright forward watching for any "racking"
or "twisting" motion as the upright moves to
the end of its travel.

IMPORTANT
If upright racks or twists, this
indicates unequal stroke of the tilt
cylinders rods. The rod length of
one cylinder is longer than the
other. To correct this condition, you
must shorten the cylinder rod that
has the longest length.

3. To shorten the cylinder stroke, loosen the


clamping fastener on the rod end. Rotate the
piston rod CLOCKWISE screwing the rod
inward into the threads of the rod end.
Tighten clamping fastener when finished
and go the following steps.
4. Slowly move upright to the full back tilt
position. Check to see if the tilt cylinders
bottom out" (stop) at the same time as the
upright reaches the full back tilt position. If
they do not, a "backward tilt adjustment"
must be made.
5. Move upright to the vertical position.
6. Slowly tilt upright backward until one of the
cylinders "bottoms out" against its rod
spacer or the cylinder gland.
7. Install rod shims to fill in space between rod
end and spacer or the gland of the other tilt
cylinder. Do not exceed six shims per side.
8. Check adjustment. Move upright to the full
forward and back tilt positions. If you still
have some racking, adjust as required.
9. Be certain the rod end clamping fastener is
torqued to 125-140 lb./ft. (170-190 Nm)
after completing adjustments.

32-01-12
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Tilt Cylinder Plumbing Installation

OCTOBER 1995
Return

32-01-13

Return

Group 33
SELECTOR SOLENOID VALVE

Selector Solenoid Valve ....................................................................... Section 1

OCTOBER 1995
Return

33-00-1

33-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Selector Solenoid Valve

Selector Solenoid Valve Description ............................................... 2


Selector Solenoid Valve Troubleshooting....................................... 2
Selector Solenoid Valve Removal .................................................... 3
Selector Solenoid Valve Repair........................................................ 3
Selector Solenoid Valve Installation ................................................ 3
Device Selector Solenoid Valve ....................................................... 4

OCTOBER 1995
Return

33-01-1

Selector Solenoid Valve Description


The selector solenoid valve is an electrically
operated hydraulic directional valve. The valve
incorporates hydraulic circuits to control lift, lower,
tilt and one auxiliary function.

NOTE
A device selector solenoid valve
may be joined to this valve to add
another auxiliary function.

33-01-2
Return

Selector Solenoid
Valve Troubleshooting
A problem with the selector solenoid valve will be
either in the electrical or hydraulic circuits. Use the
truck electrical or hydraulic circuits. Use the truck
electrical and hydraulic schematics to determine
which selector solenoid valve cartridge is faulty.
Because the solenoid and valve cartridges can not
be serviced internally, it will be necessary to replace
the defective cartridge to repair the valve.

OCTOBER 1995

Selector Solenoid Valve Removal

Selector Solenoid Valve Repair

IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT
Remove valve components only in a
clean, dust-free location, using clean
tools and equipment. Dirt or grit will
result in leakage or premature failure of
components. Cleanliness of hydraulic
circuit is extremely important to proper
operation and maintenance of system.

When
removing
or
installing
hydraulic lines and components, it
is necessary to prevent any dirt
particles
from
entering
the
hydraulic system. The smallest
particles are capable of severely
damaging the system.

NOTE

1. Lower carriage to the ground.

Items illustrated are the ONLY


service parts available for the
selector
solenoid
valve.
Disassembling solenoid or relief
valve cartridges will void the
warranty on the valve assembly.

WARNING
Secure upright to an overhead
hoist. Upright can tilt or carriage
can fall when hydraulic lines are
disconnected.

1. Clean outside of valve with a good grade


solvent and dry thoroughly.

2. Attach upright to an overhead hoist.


3. Turn key switch OFF and disconnect
battery.
4. Remove battery.
5. Remove two front
compartment cover.

covers

and

top

WARNING
Wear eye protection and protective
clothing when drying with air
pressure. Reduce air pressure to 30
psi (207 kPa). Debris removed with
air pressure can cause injury.

6. Air clean main valve and fittings.


7. Identify, tag, and disconnect wire leads

2. Remove and replace valve cartridges,


cartridge seals, and O rings as required.
Torque valve cartridges to 35-40 lbf./ft. (4754 Nm). Torque end plate fasteners to 5-7
lbf./ft. (6,8-9,5 Nm). Torque valve body
plugs to 15-20 lbf./ft. (20-27 Nm).

Selector Solenoid Valve Installation


1. Position selector solenoid valve in truck and
mount with valve fasteners.
2. Connect hydraulic lines to selector solenoid
valve.
3. Connect wire leads to valve cartridges.
4

Install top cover and two front compartment


covers.

at valve cartridges.

WARNING
Trapped hydraulic oil may create
pressure in lines. Carefully loosen
connections to relieve pressure.
Watch for any movement of the
upright.

8. Loosen and remove all hydraulic lines

from valve. Mark or tag each line as


removed to ensure correct position of
line at assembly. Cap ends of lines to
prevent contamination.
selector
solenoid
valve
fasteners. Remove selector solenoid
valve.

5. Connect battery and test selector solenoid


valve operation.

WARNING
Do not use your hands to check for
hydraulic leakage. Use a piece of
cardboard or paper to search for leaks.
Escaping fluid under pressure can
penetrate the skin causing serious
injury.
Relieve
pressure
before
disconnecting hydraulic or other lines.
Tighten all connections before applying
pressure. Keep hands and body away
from pinholes and nozzles which eject
fluids under high pressure.

9. Remove

OCTOBER 1995
Return

6. Check for leaks in the hydraulic system.

33-01-3

Device Selector Solenoid Valve


The device selector solenoid valve, if used, controls
a second hydraulic function.
The device selector solenoid valve is serviced like
the selector solenoid valve. Torque end cover
fasteners to [6,8-9,5 Nm] 5-7 lbf.ft.

33-01-4
Return

NOTE
Selector solenoid valve should with
device selector solenoid valve
attached. If device selector solenoid
valve is not used, an end plate is
attached to selector solenoid valve
instead.

OCTOBER 1995

Group 34
UPRIGHTS

Upright ................................................................................................... Section 1


Chain Inspection, Adjustment, and Replacement.............................. Section 2

IMPORTANT
Related service information is covered in Group 29, Hydraulic Pump, Sump
and Filter, Group 30, Hydraulic Control Valves and Group 32, Cylinders.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-00-1

34-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Upright

Upright Maintenance ......................................................................... 2


Triple Stage Upright .......................................................................... 2
Upright Rail Shim Inspection ....................................................... 2
Carriage Shim Inspection ............................................................ 4
Disassembly for Shim Adjustments ............................................. 4
Assembly For Shim Adjustment ................................................. 10
Lift Cylinder Drift Check .............................................................. 11
Hydraulic Cylinder Repair........................................................... 12
Standard (Two Stage) Upright ......................................................... 14
Upright Rail Shim Inspection ...................................................... 14
Carriage Shim Inspection ........................................................... 16
Disassembly for Shim Adjustments ............................................ 16
Assembly For Shim Adjustment ................................................. 20
Lift Cylinder Drift Check .............................................................. 21
Hydraulic Cylinder Repair........................................................... 21

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-1

Upright Maintenance
WARNING
Review all described procedure before
starting any maintenance or service
function. The procedures for checking,
maintaining, and adjusting uprights,
carriages, and forks involve movement
of the components. Always use
extreme caution. Failure to follow this
warning can result is serious injury.

Position the truck where the overhead height will


allow the upright to be raised to maximum height.
Block the steer wheels. Set the tilt at 0 degree
vertical and raise the forks to maximum height then
lower approximately 2 inches (50 mm). Turn key
OFF.
Use a "C" clamp to force the rollers to one side for
shim clearance. Refer to bold arrows on illustration
for clamp placement.

NOTE
Use a shim block under the "C"
clamp on the inside of channel rail.
Torque on the "C" clamp should not
exceed 20 lb./ft. (27 Nm).

Make sure there is enough overhead


clearance to raise upright to maximum
height.
Do not walk or stand under raised
forks.

For inspection, use an approved safety platform/


step ladder.

Do not reach through upright open


areas. Use only hardwood blocks which
are free from cracks and other visual
damage. These blocks must be square
on ends and not tapered or rounded.
Position blocks into the channel under
the rail where indicated.

Inspect shims and clearance at least every 500


hours of operation.
Check mounting fasteners.
Check for leaks at hydraulic connections.
Check for interference of hoses, chains, etc. during
lift operation.
Keep piston rods and tops of cylinders clean.
Always keep piston rods in retraction position when
not in use.
Lubricate lift chains. Refer to Group 34, Section 2,
for instructions.

Triple Stage Upright


Upright Rail Shim Inspection
Perform inspection before disassembly of upright.
Note the location and the number of shims to be
added at each of the rollers. Connect number of
shims can then be added in the next procedures.

34-01-2
Return

Measure the rails to roller clearance using feeler


gauges See Figure A1 for measuring locations.

Determine acceptance/rejection for each rail to


roller point from the listing in Chart. If shimming
is required, take the truck to a BT Prime-Mover
dealer repair shop. This service requires trained
and qualified maintenance personnel and the
use of an overhead hoist.
.
Clearance Acceptance/Rejection Chart
Checking
Seq.

Feeler
Gauge

Gauge will
Pass/Not Pass

Shimmed
Correctly

Shim
Qty.

0.020 in.
0.51 mm

Not Pass
Pass

Yes
Try Next Seq.

0
-

0.040 in
(1.02 mm)

Not Pass
Pass

Yes
Try Next Seq.

0
-

0.060 in.
(1.52 mm)

Not Pass
Pass

Yes
Try Next Seq.

2
-

0.080 in.
(2.03 mm)

Not Pass
Pass

No
Try 0.100 in.
(2.54 mm)

3
-

OCTOBER 1995

Triple Stage Upright and Carriage Shim Inspection Diagrams

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-3

Evaluation of shim requirements generally dictates


that a specific roller is acceptable until two shims,
0.040 in. (1.02 mm), are required. It is
recommended that the shims are split evenly within
one shim from side to side and that all the uneven
quantity of shims are on one side of upright.

Carriage Shim Inspection


Position carriage as shown in Figure "B1". Use a
"C" clamp to force the rollers to one side for shim
clearance measurement on opposite side.

IMPORTANT
Before application of the "C" clamp
to the carriage, remove the fork bar
thrust roller opposite the intended
"C" clamp position, if applicable.
Refer to balloon area of previous
illustration.

NOTE
Use a shim block under the "C"
clamp on the inside of channel rail.
Torque on the "C" clamp should not
exceed 20 lb./ft. (27 Nm).

Special Tools and Supplies Needed:


Miscellaneous Supplies
Safety platform or stepladder
3 #12 JIC female caps
3 #12 JIC male plugs
Drain pan
Quantity of roller shims
Sand paper
Approximately 6 ft. of 3/8"
equivalent strap with hooks.
6 - plastic wire ties
Cleaning rags

chain

or

Wood Blocks
1
1
1
1
1
4

4x4 - 6 in. (152 mm) long


4x4 - 12 in. (305 mm) long
4x4 - 14 in. (356 mm) long
4x4 - 2 ft. (610 mm) long
4x4 - 4 ft. 1219 mm) long
2x6 - 12 in. (305 mm) long

NOTE
Reference to "Left" or "Right" is
utilized relative to position of truck
operator in the seat.

Check shimming of center roller on six (6) roller


carriage by raising upright until carriage top rollers
are exposed from inner rails.
Measure the rail to roller clearance using feeler
gauges at points shown in Figure "B1". Refer to
previous clearance chart for shim tolerance.
Refer to next procedure for disassembly of upright
to add necessary shims.
Installation of side thrust roller with lock patch
requires torque of 55-59 lb./ft. (75-80 Nm).

Disassembly for Shim Adjustments


Shimming of the upright should be performed by
maintenance personnel in a properly equipped shop
with overhead hoist. Read through entire procedure
before beginning work.

34-01-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

After
shimming
requirements
have
been
established, the first step is removal of the carriage.
Set tilt to 0 degrees (vertical) and raise the forks a
minimum of 6 in. (152 mm). Place a good
substantial pallet under the forks.
Lower carriage and forks onto the pallet and
continue to lower until the carriage lift (center
mounted) Cylinder piston rod is completely
collapsed into the cylinder.

Remove the hydraulic hose connected to the


carriage lift (center) cylinder at top of divertor valve
block, located at the left side of the upright.
Plug hydraulic line with #12 plug and place a #12
cap on the divertor valve fitting and tighten both.
This will allow hydraulic raising of the upright
without extending the carriage lift cylinder.
As applicable on some models, remove upper
primary hose retainment bracket located on left
underside of top tie bar.

Turn key OFF. Place directional lever in neutral.


Block steer wheels.

CAUTION
Use care when pulling on carriage
chains to collapsed carriage lift
(center) cylinder. Avoid areas where
finger can be pinched. It may be
necessary to have anther person
move the control handle to the
lowering position while chains are
pulled to collapse cylinder.

Remove steer wheel blocks. Raise the upright until


the inner rail clears the rollers on the carriage.
Slowly back the truck away from the carriage.

Remove the cotter pins and pins from chain ends


attached to cylinder. Lay the chains over the
carriage.
Use a C clamp to clamp one fork to the pallet. This
will prevent the carriage from falling over after it is
removed from the inner rails.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-5

Make Carriage Shim Adjustments


1. Span inner rail with inside spanning tool.
Find the smallest distance between the rails.
Place one shim between the spanning tool
and the inner rail. Lock the tool in position.

4. Center carriage rollers within outer thrust


rollers
Place a scale on the carriage roller surface.
Measure the distance to the outer thrust
roller face. Repeat for the other carriage
roller. If measurements are unequal, move
shims from one roller to the other, as
required, to make measurements equal.

5. Square carriage rollers with a carpenters


square.
Place the carpenters square at the
outermost chamber of the upper and lower
rollers. Hold the square in place as shown.
2. Set outside spanning tool to match inside
spanning tool. Lock the tool in position.

3. Check outer thrust rollers for secure


mounting and bearing condition. Replace if
worn. Tighten to 55-59 lb./ft. (75-80 Nm)
and stake if loose.

6. While holding the square, measure from the


top face (lip) of the upper forkbar to the edge
of the square at A.

Measure at opposite end of square. If


measurements are unequal, add or remove
shims on lower roller shaft as required to

34-01-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

7. Span lower rollers. Add or remove shims on


the remaining roller to match the size of the
outside spanning tool.

8. Check opposite
squareness.

side

of

carriage

9. Check top roller clearance.


Place the square on the vertical centerline of
the carriage rollers. Clearance between the
square and the side surface of the top roller
must not exceed 0.0312 in. (0.79 mm), or
one shim.

for

Hold square as shown in step 5 and check


measurement. If not square within 0.0312 in.
(0.79 mm) return to step 5.

10. Adjust top roller clearance if necessary.


Remove Allen screw, lockwasher, and flat
washer. Add or remove shims on shaft.
Replace Allen screw, lockwasher, and flat
washer. Tighten screw securely.

Repeat step 9 (and 10 if necessary) for


opposite top roller.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-7

Make Upright Shim Adjustments


Position drive wheels of truck on raised supports to
provide a minimum of 5-1/4 in. (133 mm) under
upright outer rail. Set brake and block steer wheels.

The final lift cylinder is located on the right side of


the upright, loosen but do not remove the lower
support fastener(s).

NOTE
Make sure that upright tilt is still 0
degrees (vertical).

Hydraulically, raise the upright rails to remove both


blocks and the oil pan.
Lower the upright rails completely.
Raise upright high enough to place a 4 foot (1219
mm) length 4 x 4 block vertically into the
intermediate rail channel under the inner rail. On
opposite side, place a 2 foot (610 mm) long 4 x 4
block vertically into the outer rail channel under the
intermediate rail.
Remove fasteners on the carriage hose bracket
located near the left chain anchor.
Place an oil pan under the primary (center mounted)
lift cylinder.
Remove the bracket and carriage lift cylinder hose
and tube assembly at the base of carriage lift
cylinder. Use #12 plug in tube and #12 cap on
cylinder fitting to prevent dirt contamination. This will
prevent hose and tube damage when the rails are
lowered at a later time.

34-01-8
Return

NOTE
Top of the rails should be flash.

Attach chain or strap around the top tie bar of the


inner rails. With a hoist, raise the inner rail high
enough to insert a 14 inch (356 mm) block vertically
under the carriage lift cylinder base. Lower the hoist
until the carriage lift cylinder base rests securely on
the block.
From the rear of the upright, remove both lower
chain anchor fasteners located on both inner rails.
On same models, the left and right chains anchor
bolts are different lengths. Tag and identify anchor
bolts for installation later.

OCTOBER 1995

From the left rear of the upright pull, the left chain
anchor out and tie it to the top left outer tie bar area.
Remove the final lift cylinder rod fastener, located
on the intermediate rail top tie bar. Some models
may have two fasteners in the top of final lift cylinder
rod. In either case, the lift chain particularly covers
the cylinder rod fastener(s) and must be moved
over to remove fastener(s).

Remove the chain or strap from the inner rail tie bar
and attach it to the intermediate rail top tie bar.
Raise the hoist until the intermediate rail is high
enough to place a 12 inch (305 mm) long 4 x 4 block
vertically into the outer rail channel under the
intermediate rail. Then lower the intermediate rail
block. The primary lift cylinder must remain on the
block installed earlier.

Remove the final lift cylinder lower support


fastener(s) available from rear of upright.

Disconnect final lift cylinder return vent line from


one of two places:
From the front of upright, pry the lower part of final
lift cylinder over towards the center of the upright
and pull right lift chain anchor out from right rear of
the upright. Tie the right chain anchor to upper right
side of chain anchor bar adjustment area.

A. Disconnect under the floor board.


B. Disconnect from the upper end of
cylinder and lay the hose over the cowl.
Also, in this case, new tie straps will be
required upon installation.
Disconnect the final lift cylinder hose on the bottom
of the divertor block locator on the left side of
upright. Plug the hose and cap the fittings with #12
male and female fittings. Tighten both fittings.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-9

Remove chain or strap from the top tie bar


Attach the chain or strap around the final lift cylinder
just below its top retaining bracket. Lower the hoist
hook down in front of the upright and attach hook to
the chain or strap which is wrapped around the final
lift cylinder.

4. Also the outer rail upper rollers are now


exposed. Shim as needed.

Raising the hoist, detach the final lift cylinder upper


mounting bracket from the tie bar hook and out the
front of the upright. Lower the cylinder onto a pallet
or other adequate support.

B. To expose inner rail and intermediate rail


upper rollers:
1. With both rails resting on the floor, attach
the chain or strap around ONLY the
intermediate rail top tie bar.

IMPORTANT
Truck is now ready to expose the rail rollers for
shimming.
A. To expose the outer rail
intermediate rail lower rollers:

upper

and

1. Attach chain or strap around both the


inner and intermediate rail top tie bars
and hook hoist.

IMPORTANT
Check to assure that lift chains and
anchors will not catch, jam, or
interfere when raising and lowering
the rails.

2. Raise both rails with hoist and remove


the blocks from under the primary
cylinder and the intermediate rail.
3. Lower the rails to the floor which will
expose the lower intermediate rail
rollers. Adjust shim as needed.

NOTE
Both rails must be on the floor at
this time.

34-01-10
Return

Check to assure chain anchor


mounts are clear. Also, assure the
chain and anchors do not catch,
jam, or interfere when raising or
lowering the rails.

2. Raise the intermediate rail with hoist until a 2


foot (610 mm) long4 x 4 block can be
inserted horizontally, front to back across
the tie bars and under the top of the
intermediate rail tie bar.

NOTE
Inner rail must remain on the floor
during this procedure.

3. Lower the intermediate rail until the tie bar


rests on the block.
4. Intermediate rail upper and inner rail lower
rollers are now exposed. Adjust shim as
needed.

Assembly for Shim Adjustments


IMPORTANT
Make sure upright is vertical. Check
to assure that intermediate rail
lower tie bar clears the chain
anchor blocks.

OCTOBER 1995

With the chain or strap still around the intermediate


rail top tie bar, raise the intermediate rail and
remove the block from under the top tie bar. Lower
the intermediate rail to the floor.
Wrap chain or strap around both the inner and
intermediate rail top tie bars and attach to hoist.
Raise rails high enough to insert the 14 in. (356
mm) long 4x4 block under the primary lift cylinder
and the 12 in (305 mm) long 4 x 4 block under the
intermediate rail.
Lower rails onto blocks.
Install final lift cylinder. Wrap the chain or strap
around cylinder just below its top retaining bracket.
Hoist the cylinder and put cylinder into front of the
upright making sure the hydraulic hose connection
is toward the left side of the upright. Position the
cylinder upper mounting bracket on the tie bar hook.
Connect the final lift cylinder hydraulic hose to the
bottom of the divertor block located on left side of
upright.
Install the return vent line.
Use the truck hydraulic system to slowly extend the
final lift cylinder piston rod end, without raising rails
off block, to align with the intermediate rail top tie
bar mounting holes. Then install fastener(s) in top
tie bar into the end of final cylinder piston rod.

Install the bracket, hose and tube assembly at the


base of the carriage lift cylinder. Raise rails
hydraulically and remove both blocks.
Completely lower upright to adjust lift chains at the
right hand outer rail upper tie bar. Turn the adjusting
nuts on both chain anchors until both chains are
slack. Tighten the forward chain anchor nut until the
inner rail just beings to raise. Tighten the rear chain
anchor nut until both chains have equal tension.
Lock the jam nuts on both chain anchors using two
wrenches and a second person to hold the chains
anchor from turning. Recommended torque is 100130 lb./ft. (149-176 Nm).
Drive truck up to the carriage making sure the inner
rails are aligned with the carriage rollers. Check to
make sure that the upright is still 0 degrees
(vertical). Raise inner rail high enough to clear
carriage rollers, slowly move forward where the
upright inner rails will lower over the carriage rollers.
Lower the inner rail over the carriage. Check that
the final cylinder is fully collapsed. Install the
carriage chains. Install the carriage lift cylinder
hydraulic hose at the top of divertor valve block
located on the left side of the upright. If applicable,
install upper primary hose retainment bracket
located on left underside of top tie bar. Remove "C"
clamp from fork to pallet. Raise carriage and back
away.

WARNING
Do not use your hands to check for
hydraulic leakage. Use a piece of
cardboard or paper to search for leaks.
Escaping fluid under pressure can
penetrate the skin causing serious
injury.
Relieve
pressure
before
disconnecting hydraulic or other lines.
Tighten all connections before applying
pressure. Keep hands and body away
from pinholes and nozzles which eject
fluids under high pressure.

IMPORTANT
DO NOT remove 14 in. (356 mm)
block under carriage lift cylinder.

Use the hydraulic system again to raise


intermediate rails and remove the 12 in. (305 mm)
long block ONLY.
Fully lower the intermediate rail.

CAUTION
DO NOT reach through upright to
attach fasteners.

Install both lower lift chain anchors with fasteners


loose finger tight. Install final lift cylinder lower
mounting fasteners from rear of upright.

Check for leaks in the hydraulic system. Clean up


any fluid spills.
Check hydraulic oil in sump tank for proper level.
Load check the upright for proper operation.

Lift Cylinders Drift Check

Raise intermediate rails hydraulically to put tension


on chains and then tighten lower chain anchors.
Recommended torque is 50-55 lb./ft. (68-75 Nm).

Check cylinder drift with hydraulic fluid at operating


temperature of 110-130F (43.3-54.4C). Operate
lift function over relief to help warm the system oil.

Raise rails high enough to remove 14 in. (356 mm)


block from under carriage lift cylinder and install 4 ft.
(1219 mm) long block from under inner rail with a 2
ft. (610 mm) long 4 x 4 placed vertically under the
intermediate rail.

Make test load:

Lower the rails down onto the blocks.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Assembly weight on pallet equal to the weight


of the specified capacity of truck to be tested.

Load should not extend beyond pallet and be


stacked for stability.

34-01-11

Forks must completely engage load and be


adjusted as wide as possible to provide even
distribution of weight.

Remove cylinder gland with proper size spanner


wrench or equivalent tool. Pull the piston rod out of
the cylinder barrel and place it on a set of "V"
notched blocks.

To determine cylinder drift, it is necessary to install


a high pressure, positive shut off valve in the line
between the cylinder and the control valve.
Open the high pressure valve and raise the forks to
maximum lift height. Lower forks to the floor and
raise the test load above the floor 10-15 in. (254381 mm) with the upright vertical. Close the high
pressure valve. Mark the position of the forks on the
rail. After one minutes, check the position again and
measure the drift of the forks, if any.
If the drift exceed 1 in. (25 mm), the lift cylinders are
in need of repair. Open the high pressure valve and
lower the load to the floor.

IMPORTANT
Use extreme care that tools do not
make nicks and burrs on the
interior surface of the cap or the
exterior surface area of the piston.

Remove all packings and seals from the piston and


the cylinder cap.
After disassembly and cleaning, inspect cylinder
barrel and bore for cracks, pitting, scoring or other
irregularities that may require replacement of barrel.
Likewise inspect the piston and rod for nicks,
scratches, scoring or other defects that may require
replacement parts.

Hydraulic Cylinder Repair


Position cylinder on a work bench with adequate
support for safe and convenient disassembly. Two
sets of 4 x 4 "V" notched blocks are helpful. One set
for cylinder barrel and a second set for the piston
rod to prevent nicks and scratches from being
inflicted on the piston or rod.

IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

Clean entire cylinder to prevent dirt and other


contamination from entry into the cylinder during
assembly. Parts may be cleaned with solvent or
mineral spirits and dried completely. If petroleum
solvent is not available, use hydraulic fluid
compatible with fluid used in truck hydraulic system.

34-01-12
Return

Carriage Lift Cylinder


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Wiper
Seal, U-cup
Cap, Gland
O ring
Rod cylinder
Ring, back-up
Packing

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Ring, wear
Valve, flow control
Ring, back-up
Seal
Retainer
Barrel cylinder

OCTOBER 1995

IMPORTANT
Removal of material that produces a
notch, groove or out-of-roundness
may cause excessive leakage upon
beginning operation or at best a
shortened life.

Small imperfections inside the cylinder barrel, on


the piston or rod may be improved for acceptable
use by careful honing.
Use new parts as necessary. Always use new
packing kit listed in the parts manual which includes
all the seals, wiper rings, wear rings and O rings
necessary for the particular cylinder.

IMPORTANT
Installation of some parts require
special attention or tools. O rings
should be carefully installed to
prevent cuts or twisting. U-cup
seals should be installed with tools
shown at the end of this section.

Installation of U-cup seal into the gland cap requires


the use of a tool (See drawing at the end of this
Section to make tool). Close the tool handles to
insert the U-cup seal with the U-side (open side)
down. The tool has three pins. Place the tool so two
pins are on the inside of seal and one pin on the
outside of seal.

Pull the handles apart which will force the outside


pin to collapse the seal. Place the tool pins and seal
down into the top of the gland cap.

1. Wiper
2. Seal, U-cup
3. Cap, Gland
4. O ring
5. Bearing
6. Spacer
7. Rod cylinder
8. Ring, back-up
9. Seal, U-cup
10. Ring, wear
11. Barrel cylinder

Place the edge of the seal opposite the pins, into


the interior groove of the cap. Release tension on
the handles, then pull tool up which should allow the
remaining part of seal expand into the groove.

IMPORTANT
Check to be sure the seal is
inserted with the U-side toward the
cylinder barrel for proper seal
operation.

Final Lift Cylinder


IMPORTANT
Care should be utilized in the
installation of these parts to assure
that damage to any part does not
happen or go unnoticed. Dip all
packings, seals and rings in clean
compatible hydraulic oil prior to
reassembly.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-13

Installation of U-cup seal on the piston is


accomplished with the proper size piston cone and
seal driver tools (See drawings at the end of this
Section to make tools).
Place the seal on the cone end of the piston cone
tool with the U-side (open side) toward the point of
the cone. Now put the driver on the cone and tap
the driver until the seal is positioned on the wide
end of the cone tool. Position the wide end of the
tool over the bottom of the piston so the piston is all
the way into the countersink part of the tool.
Continue to drive the seal off the tool into the piston
groove.

Make sure there is enough overhead


clearance to raise upright to maximum
height.
Do not walk or stand under raised
forks.
Do not reach through upright open
areas. Use only hardwood blocks which
are free from cracks and other visual
damage. These blocks must be square
on ends and not tapered or rounded.
Position blocks into the channel under
the rail where indicated.

Perform inspection before disassembly of upright.


Note the location and the number of shims to be
added at each of the rollers. Connect number of
shims can then be added in the next procedures.
Position the truck where the overhead height will
allow the upright to be raised to maximum height.
Block the steer wheels. Set the tilt at 0 degree
vertical and raise the forks to maximum height then
lower approximately 2 inches (50 mm). Turn key
OFF.
Use a "C" clamp to force the rollers to one side for
shim clearance. Refer to bold arrows on illustration
for clamp placement.

NOTE
It may be necessary to let the seals set for 30
minutes so they will return to their original size.
After all seals and packings are replaced, Carefully
install piston into cylinder barrel so not to damage
seals. Install gland and torque to 50-60 lb./ft. (68-81
Nm).

Use a shim block under the "C"


clamp on the inside of channel rail.
Torque on the "C" clamp should not
exceed 20 lb./ft. (27 Nm).

For inspection, use an approved safety platform/


step ladder.

Install cylinder in upright.

Standard (Two Stage) Upright


Upright Rail Shim Inspection

WARNING
Review all described procedure before
starting any maintenance or service
function. The procedures for checking,
maintaining, and adjusting uprights,
carriages, and forks involve movement
of the components. Always use
extreme caution. Failure to follow this
warning can result is serious injury.

34-01-14
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Standard (Two Stage) Upright and Carriage Shim Inspection Diagrams

Measure the rails to roller clearance using feeler


gauges See Figure A1 for measuring locations.

Determine acceptance/rejection for each rail to


roller point from the listing in Chart. If shimming
is required, take the truck to a BT Prime-Mover
dealer repair shop. This service requires trained
and qualified maintenance personnel and the
use of an overhead hoist.

Checking
Seq.

Feeler
Gauge

Gauge will
Pass/Not Pass

Shimmed
Correctly

Shim
Qty.

0.020 in.
0.51 mm

Not Pass
Pass

Yes
Try Next Seq.

0
-

0.040 in
(1.02 mm)

Not Pass
Pass

Yes
Try Next Seq.

0
-

0.060 in.
(1.52 mm)

Not Pass
Pass

Yes
Try Next Seq.

2
-

0.080 in.
(2.03 mm)

Not Pass
Pass

No
Try 0.100 in.
(2.54 mm)

3
-

Evaluation of shim requirements generally dictates


that a specific roller is acceptable until two shims,
0.040 in. (1.02 mm), are required. It is
recommended that the shims are split evenly within
one shim from side to side and that all the uneven
quantity of shims are on one side of upright.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Clearance Acceptance/Rejection Chart

34-01-15

Carriage Shim Inspection

NOTE

Position carriage as shown in Figure "B1". Use a


"C" clamp to force the rollers to one side for shim
clearance measurement on opposite side.

Reference to "Left" or "Right" is


utilized relative to position of truck
operator in the seat.

IMPORTANT
Before application of the "C" clamp
to the carriage, remove the fork bar
thrust roller opposite the intended
"C" clamp position, if applicable.
Refer to balloon area of previous
illustration.

NOTE
Use a shim block under the "C"
clamp on the inside of channel rail.
Torque on the "C" clamp should not
exceed 20 lb./ft. (27 Nm).

Check shimming of center roller on six (6) roller


carriage by raising upright until carriage top rollers
are exposed from inner rails.
Measure the rail to roller clearance using feeler
gauges at points shown in Figure "B1". Refer to
previous clearance chart for shim tolerance.
Refer to next procedure for disassembly of upright
to add necessary shims.
Installation of side thrust roller with lock patch
requires torque of 55-59 lb./ft. (75-80 Nm).

Disassembly for Shim Adjustments


Shimming of the upright should be performed by
maintenance personnel in a properly equipped shop
with overhead hoist. Read through entire procedure
before beginning work.

After
shimming
requirements
have
been
established, the first step is removal of the carriage.
Set tilt to 0 degrees (vertical) and raise the forks a
minimum of 6 in. (152 mm). Place a good
substantial pallet under the forks and lower onto
pallet. Continue to lower until tension on chain is
removed.
Remove cotter pins and chain anchor pins from the
chain anchors located on lower rear side of fork
bars.
Use a C clamp to clamp one fork to the pallet. This
will prevent the carriage from falling over after it is
removed from the inner rails.

Special Tools and Supplies Needed:


Miscellaneous Supplies
Safety platform or stepladder
3 #12 JIC female caps
3 #12 JIC male plugs
Drain pan
Quantity of roller shims
Sand paper
Approximately 6 ft. of 3/8"
equivalent strap with hooks.
6 - plastic wire ties
Cleaning rags

Wood Blocks
1

34-01-16
Return

4x4 - 14 in. (356 mm) long

chain

or

Using truck hydraulic system, raise inner rail until


the upper carriage rollers are clear of the rails
Slowly back the truck away from the carriage.

OCTOBER 1995

3. Check outer thrust rollers for secure


mounting and bearing condition. Replace if
worn. Tighten to 55-59 lb./ft. (75-80 Nm)
and stake if loose.

Make Carriage Shim Adjustments


1. Span inner rail with inside spanning tool.
Find the smallest distance between the rails.
Place one shim between the spanning tool
and the inner rail. Lock the tool in position.

4. Center carriage rollers within outer thrust


rollers
Place a scale on the carriage roller surface.
Measure the distance to the outer thrust
roller face. Repeat for the other carriage
roller. If measurements are unequal, move
shims from one roller to the other, as
required, to make measurements equal.

5. Square carriage rollers with a carpenters


square.
2. Set outside spanning tool to match inside
spanning tool. Lock the tool in position.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Place the carpenters square at the


outermost chamber of the upper and lower
rollers. Hold the square in place as shown.

34-01-17

6. While holding the square, measure from the


top face (lip) of the upper forkbar to the edge
of the square at A.

8. Check opposite
squareness.

side

of

carriage

for

Hold square as shown in step 5 and check


measurement. If not square within 0.0312 in.
(0.79 mm) return to step 5.

Measure at opposite end of square. If


measurements are unequal, add or remove
shims on lower roller shaft as required to
make measurements equal.
7. Span lower rollers. Add or remove shims on
the remaining roller to match the size of the
outside spanning tool.

9. Check top roller clearance.


Place the square on the vertical centerline of
the carriage rollers. Clearance between the
square and the side surface of the top roller
must not exceed 0.0312 in. (0.79 mm), or
one shim.

34-01-18
Return

OCTOBER 1995

10. Adjust top roller clearance if necessary.


Remove Allen screw, lockwasher, and flat
washer. Add or remove shims on shaft.
Replace Allen screw, lockwasher, and flat
washer. Tighten screw securely.

Place a pan under the lift cylinders and disconnect


the hose and tube assembly at the base of each lift
cylinder. Use #12 cap and plugs to avoid dirt
contamination of the hydraulic system.

Remove lift chain anchor clamp straps from around


each lift cylinder.

Repeat step 9 (and 10 if necessary) for


opposite top roller.

Remove lift cylinder saddle block mounting


retainers located at the lower end of each lift
cylinder.

Make Upright Shim Adjustments


Position drive wheels of truck on raised supports to
provide a minimum of 5-1/4 in. (133 mm) under
upright outer rail. Set brake and block steer wheels.

NOTE
Make sure that upright tilt is still 0
degrees (vertical).

CAUTION
DO NOT reach through upright.

From the rear of upright, manually lift one cylinder


barrel enough to wrap a sling around and under the
cylinder mounting pins. Then use a second sling
thru the lift eye of lower sling and around the upper
part of the cylinder and attach to hoist. Take up the
slack.
Hydraulic raise inner rail. Place a 14 in. (356 mm)
long 4x4 block vertically into the outer rail and lower
inner rail onto the block. Turn key OFF.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Remove fastener in the top end of the lift cylinder


piston rod located on top of the inner rail top tie bar.

34-01-19

CAUTION

Adjust upright shims as needed.

Remove only the cylinder rod


fastener for the cylinder that has
been restrained by the sling strap to
the hoist. Leave opposite cylinder
fastened.

Piston rod should be collapsed into cylinder for


protection of the rod. It may be necessary to
manually collapse the piston rod into the cylinder
prior to removal of lift cylinder. Remove #12 cap at
bottom of cylinder to collapse piston rod. Install cap
again.
Upon removal of piston rod from top tie bar, take
note of shim(s) if any, on the piston rod. Check
where the piston rod was removed on underside of
tie bar for the possibility of shim(s) remaining in
counterbore. These shim(s) must be replaced in
exact quantity and on same side of upright as
removed.
Make note of cylinder position relative to hose
connection for assembly.
Carefully raise the lift cylinder out and up from the
rear of upright. Lower the cylinder onto a pallet or
other adequate support.

Assembly for Shim Adjustments


With chain or strap around top tie bar of inner rail,
raise the inner rail to insert 14 in. (356 mm) long 4x4
block vertically into the outer rail channel and under
the inner rail. Lower inner rail onto the block.
Wrap two straps round one of the lift cylinders; one
strap around the lower part under the mounting pins
and the second strap wrapped through eye of lower
strap and around upper part of cylinder.
Install shim(s) on piston rod same as removed.
Raise the cylinder for positioning at the rear of the
upright.
Bring the cylinder in under the top tie bar and guide
the cylinder rod up onto the counterbored hole on
under side of tie bar. Install fastener though top of
tie bar into the cylinder rod. Then provide slack from
hoist and manually guide the cylinder mounting pin
down into the saddle block mounting.

NOTE
Repeat preceding paragraphs for the opposite lift
cylinder.
Wrap chain or strap around top tie bar of inner rails
and raise a few inches to remove block from under
the inner rail.
Lower inner rail to floor so that top and bottom
rollers are exposed.

34-01-20
Return

Check
the
hydraulic
hose
connection in bottom of cylinder so
connection as aligned with proper
hose as removed.

Install the lift cylinder mounting retainer and torque


to 50-55 lb./ft. (68-75 Nm). Remove both sling
straps. Tighten rod fastener to top of tie bar and
torque to 125-140 lb./ft. (170-190 Nm).
Repeat preceding paragraphs for the opposite
cylinder.

OCTOBER 1995

Replace lift chain anchor clamp straps on both


cylinders.

Lift Cylinders Drift Check


Check cylinder drift with hydraulic fluid at operating
temperature of 110-130F (43.3-54.4C). Operate
lift function over relief to help warm the system oil.
Make test load:

Connect hydraulic hose and tube connections at


base of both lift cylinders.
Use truck hydraulics to raise inner rail and remove
block from under the inner rail.
Remove blocks from steer wheels and move truck
to the carriage for installation.
Position truck with inner rail raised to clear the top
rollers of carriage. Check to assure that tilt is still 0
degrees (vertical) and rails are aligned with carriage
rollers.

Assembly weight on pallet equal to the weight


of the specified capacity of truck to be tested.

Load should not extend beyond pallet and be


stacked for stability.

Forks must completely engage load and be


adjusted as wide as possible to provide even
distribution of weight.

To determine cylinder drift, it is necessary to install


a high pressure, positive shut off valve in the line
between the cylinder and the control valve.
Open the high pressure valve and raise the forks to
maximum lift height. Lower forks to the floor and
raise the test load above the floor 10-15 in. (254381 mm) with the upright vertical. Close the high
pressure valve. Mark the position of the forks on the
rail. After one minutes, check the position again and
measure the drift of the forks, if any.
If the drift exceed 1 in. (25 mm), the lift cylinders are
in need of repair. Open the high pressure valve and
lower the load to the floor.

Slowly lower the inner rail down onto the carriage


rollers. Be sure inner rail is completely lowered to
provide lift chain slack for assembly.
Put the chain into the chain anchors and secure with
the anchor pins. Use new cotter pins in the anchor
pins.
Remove C clamp from the fork and pallet.
Lift carriage and back away.

WARNING
Do not use your hands to check for
hydraulic leakage. Use a piece of
cardboard or paper to search for leaks.
Escaping fluid under pressure can
penetrate the skin causing serious
injury.
Relieve
pressure
before
disconnecting hydraulic or other lines.
Tighten all connections before applying
pressure. Keep hands and body away
from pinholes and nozzles which eject
fluids under high pressure.

Check for leaks in the hydraulic system. Clean up


any fluid spills.
If necessary, adjust chains. Refer to procedure in
Section 2.
Check hydraulic oil in sump tank for proper level.
Load check the upright for proper operation.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

Upright Cylinder Repair


The determining factor for cylinder repair are
variable depending on the environment of operation
relative to the amount of oil see page that is
acceptable.
After a reasonable break-in-period of new cylinder,
there should not be visual evidence of sagging oil
accumulation on the piston rod.
When oil accumulation is evident at the top of the
cylinder, it is recommended that the cylinder be
repaired. Examine the piston rod for scratches or
other damage that will cause accelerated wear of
the seals.

34-01-21

IMPORTANT

Position cylinder on a work bench with adequate


support for safe and convenient disassembly. Two
sets of 4 x 4 "V" notched blocks are helpful. One set
for cylinder barrel and a second set for the piston
rod to prevent nicks and scratches from being
inflicted on the piston or rod.

Care should be utilized in the


installation of these parts to assure
that damage to any part does not
happen or go unnoticed. Dip all
packings, seals and rings in clean
compatible hydraulic oil prior to
reassembly.

IMPORTANT
CLEANLINESS!
Perform
procedures in a clean environment.
Make sure all parts are cleaned
before disassembly and kept clean
during assembly.

Installation of some parts require


special attention or tools. O rings
should be carefully installed to
prevent cuts or twisting. U-cup
seals should be installed with tools
shown at the end of this section.

Clean entire cylinder to prevent dirt and other


contamination from entry into the cylinder during
assembly. Parts may be cleaned with solvent or
mineral spirits and dried completely. If petroleum
solvent is not available, use hydraulic fluid
compatible with fluid used in truck hydraulic system.
Remove cylinder gland with proper size spanner
wrench or equivalent tool. Pull the piston rod out of
the cylinder barrel and place it on a set of "V"
notched blocks.

IMPORTANT
Use extreme care that tools do not
make nicks and burrs on the
interior surface of the cap or the
exterior surface area of the piston.

Remove all packings and seals from the piston and


the cylinder cap.
After disassembly and cleaning, inspect cylinder
barrel and bore for cracks, pitting, scoring or other
irregularities that may require replacement of barrel.
Likewise inspect the piston and rod for nicks,
scratches, scoring or other defects that may require
replacement parts

IMPORTANT
Removal of material that produces a
notch, groove or out-of-roundness
may cause excessive leakage upon
beginning operation or at best a
shortened life.

Small imperfections inside the cylinder barrel, on


the piston or rod may be improved for acceptable
use by careful honing.
Use new parts as necessary. Always use new
packing kit listed in the parts manual which includes
all the seals, wiper rings, wear rings and O rings
necessary for the particular cylinder.

34-01-22
Return

LIFT CYLINDER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Spacer, piston rod


Piston
Ring, wear
Barrel, cylinder
Wiper

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Set, packing
Gland, cylinder
Bushing, gland
O ring
Rod cylinder

OCTOBER 1995

Installation of U-cup seal into the gland cap requires


the use of a tool (See drawing at the end of this
Section to make tool). Close the tool handles to
insert the U-cup seal with the U-side (open side)
down. The tool has three pins. Place the tool so two
pins are on the inside of seal and one pin on the
outside of seal.

Installation of U-cup seal on the piston is


accomplished with the proper size piston cone and
seal driver tools (See drawings at the end of this
Section to make tools).
Place the seal on the cone end of the piston cone
tool with the U-side (open side) toward the point of
the cone. Now put the driver on the cone and tap
the driver until the seal is positioned on the wide
end of the cone tool. Position the wide end of the
tool over the bottom of the piston so the piston is all
the way into the countersink part of the tool.
Continue to drive the seal off the tool into the piston
groove.

Pull the handles apart which will force the outside


pin to collapse the seal. Place the tool pins and seal
down into the top of the gland cap.
Place the edge of the seal opposite the pins, into
the interior groove of the cap. Release tension on
the handles, then pull tool up which should allow the
remaining part of seal expand into the groove.

IMPORTANT
Check to be sure the seal is
inserted with the U-side toward the
cylinder barrel for proper seal
operation.

It may be necessary to let the seals set for 30


minutes so they will return to their original size.
After all seals and packings are replaced, Carefully
install piston into cylinder barrel so not to damage
seals. Install gland and torque to 50-60 lb./ft. (68-81
Nm).
Install cylinder in upright.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-23

Seal Installation Tool

34-01-24
Return

OCTOBER 1995

U-Cup to Piston Installation tool

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-01-25

U-Cup to Piston Installation tool

34-01-26
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Chain Inspection, Adjustment, and Replacement

Periodic Inspection............................................................................ 2
Elongation ................................................................................. 4
Edge Wear ................................................................................ 4
Turning or Protruding ................................................................ 4
Cracked Plate ........................................................................... 4
Ultimate Strength Failure .......................................................... 5
Tight Joints................................................................................ 5
Chain Length Adjustments ............................................................... 5
Standard Upright Chain Length Adjustments............................ 6
Triple-Stage Upright (TSU) Chain Length Adjustment.............. 6
Chain Lubrication .............................................................................. 8
Chain Removal and Replacement .................................................... 8
General Guidelines ................................................................... 8
Lift Chains (Standard and TSUs) .............................................. 9
Carriage Chains (TSUs)............................................................ 9
Other Chain Service Notes .............................................................. 10

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-02-1

Chain Configuration - Standard Uprights

34-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Chain Configuration - Triple Stage Uprights

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-02-3

Periodic Inspection
Each 50-250 hours of operation (more Frequently in
severe or extreme environments), chains should be
inspected and lubricated. Inspection should focus
on the following:

Elongation
When a length of 12 in. (305 mm) of new chain has
elongated to a length of 12-3/8 in. (315 mm), it
should be discarded and replaced. It is important to
measure the chain in the section that moves over
the sheaves because it receives the most wear.
Measuring the chain near its ends could give an
erroneous reading as it would not have flexed as
frequently, if indeed at all, as nearer the middle of
the assembly.

flats are still incorrect alignment. Chains with


rotated/displaced heads or abnormal pin protrusion
should replaced immediately. Do not attempt to
repair the chain by welding or driving the pin(s) back
into the chain. Once the press fit integrity between
outside plates and pins has been altered, it cannot
be restored. any wear pattern on the pin heads or
the sides of link plate indicates misalignment in the
system. This condition damages the chain and
increases frictional loading, and should be
corrected.

Turned pins and abnormal pin protrusion.

Cracked Plates
Chains should be replaced when wear
exceeds 3% or when 12 in. (305 mm) of
chains is starched 3/8 in. (10 mm).

Edge Wear
Check the chain for wear on the links plate edges
caused by running back and forth over the sheave.
The maximum reduction of material should not
exceed 5&. This can be compared to a normal link
plate height by measuring a portion of chain that
dose not run over the sheave. Distorted or battered
plates on leaf chain can cause tight joints and
prevent flexing.

Worn contours and worn surfaces on the


outside links must not exceed 5% of new
link height.

Turning or Protruding Pins


Highly loaded chain operating with inadequate
lubrication can generate abnormal frictional forces
between pin and link plates. In extreme instances,
the torque could surpass the press fit force between
the pins and the outside plates, resulting in pin
rotation. When chain is allowed to operate in this
condition, a pin, or series of pins, can begin to twist
out of a chain, resulting in failure. The pin head
rivets should be examined to determine if the VEE

34-02-4
Return

The Chains should periodically be inspected very


carefully, front and back as wall as side to side, for
any evidence of creaked plates. If any one crack is
discovered, the chain(s) should be replaced. It is
important, however, to determine the cause of the
crack before installing new chain so the condition
dose not repeat itself.

Fatigue Cracking - Fatigue creaks are a


result of repeated cyclic loading beyond the
chains endurance limit. The magnitude of
the load and frequency of its occurrence are
factors which determine when fatigue failure
will occur. The loading can be continuous or
intermittent (impulse load).

Fatigue cracks generally run from the pin


hole toward the edge of the link plate
approximately 90 from the line of pull
Fatigue cracks almost always start at the link
plate pin hole (point of highest stress) and
are perpendicular to the chain pitch line.
They are often microscopic in their early
stage. Unlike a pure tensile failure, there is
no noticeable yielding (stretch) of the
material.

OCTOBER 1995

Stress-Corrosion Cracking - The outside link


plates, which are heavily press fitted to the
pins, are particularly susceptible to stress
corrosion cracking. Like fatigue cracks,
these initiate at the point of highest stress
(pin hole) but tend to extend in an arc-like
path between the holes in the pin plate.

Ultimate Strength Failure


This type of failure is caused by overloads far in
excess of the design load.

Broken plate caused by overload.

Tight Joints
Arc-like cracks in plates are a sign of
stress corrosion.
More than one crack can often appear on a
link plate. In addition to rusting, this
condition can be caused by exposure to an
acidic or caustic medium or atmosphere.
Stress corrosion is an environmentally
assisted failure. Two conditions must be
present: a corrosive agent and static stress.
In the chain, static stress is present at the
pin hole due to the press fit pin. No cyclic
motion is required, and the plates can crack
during idle periods. The reactions of many
chemical agents (such as battery acid
fumes) with hardened steel can release
hydrogen which attacks and weakens the
steel grain structure.
For this same reason, never attempt to
electroplate a leaf chain or its components.
The plating process releases hydrogen, and
hydrogen embrittlement cracks will appear.
These are similar in appearance to stress
corrosion cracks.

All joints in leaf chain should flex freely. Tight joints


resist flexure and increase internal friction, thus
increasing chain tension required to lift a given load.
Increased tension accelerates wear and fatigue
problems.

If lubrication dose not loosen a tight joint,


the chain may have corrosion and rust
problems or bent pins and must be
replaced.

Chain Length Adjustments

WARNING
An upright or
unexpectedly:

carriage

can

move

Do not walk or stand under raised


forks.

If a plated chain is required, consult PrimeMover. Plated chains are assembled from
modified, individually plated components
which may reduce the chain rating.

Keep clear of load and carriage

Corrosion Fatigue - Corrosion fatigue cracks


are very similar (in many cases identical) to
normal fatigue cracks in appearance. They
generally begin at the pin hole and move
perpendicular (90 degrees) to the chain
pitch line.

from moving parts of the upright.

Corrosion fatigue is not the same as stress


corrosion. Corrosion fatigue is the combined
action of an aggressive (dirty or abusive)
environment and a cyclic stress (not a static
stress alone, as in stress corrosion). This
fatigue is normal fatigue and is accelerated
by corrosion.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

when making
adjustment.

any

check

or

Keep your arms and fingers away


Block the carriage or upright when
working with the components in a
raised position.

Do not reach through open areas of


the upright.

Never attempt to move or align the


rails by hand. Use a pry bar.
Failure to follow these warnings can result
in serious injury.

34-02-5

Standard Upright Chain Length Adjustments


IMPORTANT
For all chain anchor adjustments:

Threaded chain anchors must be


left free to pivot in mounting hole.

Anchor cotter pin heads must be


to the inside of the upright.

Torque jam nuts to adjustment


nuts to 54 lb./ft. (73 Nm).
Make sure chain anchors are
secured so that no twist is evident
in the chains.

To adjust chain length on the standard upright use


the following illustration and procedures:

C. Turn the chain adjustment nuts until


clearance between forks and ground is
0.40-0.80 in. (10-20 mm).
2. Carriage roller position:
A. Raise carriage about 3.2 ft. (1m) and
apply a bead of grease from the bottom
approximately 3 inc. (75 mm) long on
inner rail in the area of the roller pattern.
B. Tilt upright fully back and completely
lower.
C. Raise carriage about 3.2 ft. (1 m) and
measure the distance from when the
center of the bottom carriage roller
stopped to the bottom edge of the inner
rail. Distance should be not less than
0.80 in. (20 mm) or chain length
adjustment is required.

IMPORTANT
The carriage stop must not be
allowed to contact the upright stop
under any circumstance during
normal operations.

3. Carriage stop-to-upright:
A. Lift upright to its full height and check for
clearance on the carriage safety stop.
B. If the carriage stop hits the upright stop,
adjust the chain anchor adjustment nuts
out until there is at least 0.12 in. (3 mm)
clearance between the stops.

1. Fork-to-ground clearance:
A. Put the upright in the vertical position.
B. Break the jam nuts loose on the chain
anchors.

If all three chain length requirements listed above


cannot be met, the tire diameter may be out of the
design range allowance. Also, excessive tire wear
will decrease carriage stop clearance.
Oversized tires will reduce the bottom carriage roller
engagement on the inner rail when the carriage is in
the lowered position. The fork-to-ground clearance
can deviate from the 0.40-0.80 in. (10-20mm)
allowance by a small amount if necessary to
maintain the safe 0.80 in. (20 mm) clearance of the
bottom carriage roller to the lower edge of the inner
rail.

Triple-stage Upright (TSU) Chain Length


Adjustments
Triple-stage uprights use two chain sets, one set for
carriage lift and one set for rail lift. Adjustment
anchors for the rail lift stage are located at the back
of the outer rail. Adjustment anchors for the carriage
lift stage are behind the carriage lift cylinder.
Carriage chain anchors are not intended for
adjustment.

34-02-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

For TSU rail lift chains, chain length must be


adjusted if the difference between the bottom of the
inner rail and the outer rail is greater than 0.40 in.
(10 mm).

To adjust the carriage lift chain on a TSU use the


following illustration and procedures:

For the TSU primary cylinder lift chain, the chain


length must be adjusted if:

The fork-to-ground clearance is less than


0.20 in. (5 mm) or more than 1 in. (25.4mm)
when the upright is vertical.

The center of the bottom carriage roller


comes within 0.80 in. (20 mm) of the bottom
edge of the inner rail.

The carriage safety stop hits the inner rail


stop at full lift height.

IMPORTANT
For all chain anchor adjustments:

Threaded chain anchors must be


left free to pivot in mounting hole.

Anchor cotter pin heads must be


to the inside of the upright.
Torque jam nuts to adjustment
nuts to 54 lb./ft. (73 Nm).
Make sure chain anchors are
secured so that no twist is evident
in the chains.

To adjust the rail lift chains on a TSU, use the


following illustration and procedures:

1. Fork-to-ground clearance:
A. Put the upright in the vertical position.
B. Break the jam nuts loose on the chain
anchors.
C. Turn the chain adjustment nuts until
clearance between forks and ground is
0.40-0.80 in. (10-20 mm).
2. Carriage roller position:
A. Raise carriage about 3.2 ft. (1m) and
apply a bead of grease from the bottom
approximately 3 in. (75 mm) long on
inner rail in the area of the roller pattern.
B. Tilt upright fully back and completely
lower.
C. Raise carriage about 3.2 ft. (1 m) and
measure the distance from when the
center of the bottom carriage roller
stopped to the bottom edge of the inner
rail. Distance should be not less than
0.80 in. (20 mm) or chain length
adjustment is required.

IMPORTANT
The carriage stop must not be
allowed to contact the upright stop
under any circumstance during
normal operations.

1. Put the upright in the vertical position.

3. Carriage stop-to-upright:

2. Break the jam nuts loose on the chain


anchors.

A. Lift upright to its full height and check for


clearance on the carriage safety stop.

3. Adjust the chain anchor adjustment nuts


until the bottom of the inner rail is within 0.10
in. (2.5mm) of the bottom of the outer rail.

B. If the carriage stop hits the upright stop,


adjust the chain anchor adjustment nuts
out until there is at least 0.12 in. (3 mm)
clearance between the stops.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-02-7

If all three chain length requirements listed above


cannot be met, the tire diameter may be out of the
design range allowance. Also, excessive tire wear
will decrease carriage stop clearance.

Chain Removal And Replacement


WARNING

Oversized tires will reduce the bottom carriage roller


engagement on the inner rail when the carriage is in
the lowered position. The fork-to-ground clearance
can deviate from the 10-20mm (0.40-0.80 in.)
allowance by a small amount if necessary to
maintain the safe 20 mm (0.80 in.) clearance of the
bottom carriage roller to the lower edge of the inner
rail.

The procedures for removing and


replacing chain sets involve hoisting
and blocking components.

Chain Lubrication

Do not reach through open areas

Like all bearing surfaces, the precisionmanufactured,


hardened-steel,
joint-wearing
surfaces of leaf chain require a film of oil between
all mating parts to prevent accelerated wear.

Failure to follow these warnings can


result in serious injury. See "Lifting,
Jacking, and Blocking" in group SA, for
safe blocking procedures.

Maintaining a lubricant film on all chain surfaces


will:

Minimize joint wear.

Improve corrosion resistance.

Reduce the possibility of pin turning.

Minimize tight joints.

Promote smooth, quiet chain action.

Lower chain tension by reducing internal


friction in the chain system.

Laboratory wear tests show 40W oil to have greater


ability to prevent wear than 10W oil. Generally, the
heaviest (highest viscosity) oil that will penetrate the
joint is best.
Whatever method is used, the oil must penetrate
the chain joint to prevent wear. Applying oil to
external surfaces will prevent rust, but oil must flow
into the live bearing surfaces for maximum wear life.

Do not walk or stand under raised


forks.

Keep your arms and fingers away


from moving parts of the upright.
of the upright.

General Guidelines

Chain Movement - Make sure that the chain


operating path is clear and that the chain
travels freely through its full range of
operation.

Lubrication - Assure that the chain is well


lubricated with the heaviest oil that will
penetrate the void between the link plate
openings and the pins.

Paint - Make sure the chain does not get


painted over at any time.

Protection - Where necessary, as a


protection from atmosphere or sliding wear,
the chain may be covered with a layer of
grease. It should be noted, however, that the
grease will have to be removed at a later
date for chain inspection and lubrication.

Chain Mountings - Double check to be sure


all chain fastening devices are secured and
all adjustments have been made to assure
uniform
loading
of
multiple
chain
applications. Check chain anchors and pins
for wear, breakage, and misalignment.
Damaged anchors and pins should be
replaced.

Sheaves - Sheaves with badly worn flanges


and outside diameter should be replaced.
This wear may be due to chain misalignment
or frozen bearings.

To prepare the chain for oiling, the leaf chain plates


should be brushed with a stiff brush or wire brush to
clear the space between the plates so that oil may
penetrate the live bearing area.
Oil may be applied with a narrow paint brush or
directly poured on. Chain should be well flooded to
be sure the oil penetrates the joint.
In locations difficult to reach, it may be necessary to
use a good quality oil under pressure such as an
aerosol can or pump pressure spray.

34-02-8
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Lift Chains (Standard and TSUs)


IMPORTANT
If a hose adaptation is used, the
hoses sheaves must be loosened
and removed to prevent the hoses
from stretching when the inner rail
for the TSU is lowered to access the
chain anchor pins.

To remove and replace the rail lift and/or carriage


chain set on standard and triple-stage uprights
(TSU):
1. Attach a hoist strap on the carriage of the
standard upright or inner rail of the TSU.
2. Lift the carriage or inner rail slightly to create
slack in the chains. Block the carriage or
inner rail up for safety.
3. Remove the chain anchor pins on the outer
rail and pull the chains off of the sheaves on
the inner or intermediate rails.

Triple-Stage Upright Lift


Removal from Inner Rail

Chain

5. Use the steps in reverse order to install the


lift chain set.
6. Perform the chain length adjustment and
chain tension check before returning the
truck to service.

Carriage Chains (TSUs)


1. Tilt the upright forward, lower it, and
completely collapse the primary cylinder to
create slack in the chains. The carriage may
also be lifted and blocked in position and the
primary cylinder completely collapsed to
create slack in the chains.
2. Remove the chain anchor pins from the back
of the primary cylinder. Pull the chains
through the chain sheave and lay over the
carriage load backrest.
4. Remove the chain anchor pins from the
carriage on the standard upright. For the
TSU, the inner rails must be lowered to the
floor to access and remove the chain anchor
pins.

Lift Chain Removal from Carriage

OCTOBER 1995
Return

34-02-9

3. Remove the chain anchor pins from the back


of the carriage.

4. Use these steps in reverse to install the


carriage chain.

Other Chain Service Notes

Use lengths of factory assembled chain. Do


not
build
lengths
from
individual
components.

Do not attempt to rework damaged chains


by replacing only the components obviously
faulty.
The
entire
chain
may
be
compromised and must be discarded.

Never electroplate assembled leaf chain or


its components. Plating will result in failure
from hydrogen embrittlement. Plated chains
are assembled from modified, individually
plated components.

Welding should not be performed on any


chain or component. Welding spatter should
never be allowed to come in contact with
chain or components.

Leaf Chains are manufactured exclusively


from heat treated steels and therefore must
not be annealed. If heating a chain with a
cutting torch is absolutely necessary for
removal, the chain must not be reused.

5. Perform the chain length adjustment and


chain tension check before returning the
truck to service.

34-02-10
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Group 40
SPECIFICATIONS

Specifications........................................................................................ Section 1
Data Plate............................................................................................... Section 2
Lubricants and Shop Supplies ............................................................ Section 3

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-00-1

40-00-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Section 1.

Specifications

Group 12 - Battery ............................................................................. 2


Group 16 - Motors.............................................................................. 3
Group 19 - Electrical Controls .......................................................... 3
Group 20 - Drive Axle ........................................................................ 4
Group 22 - Wheels and Tires ............................................................ 4
Group 23 - Brakes.............................................................................. 4
Group 26 - Steering System.............................................................. 4
Group 29/30 - Hydraulic System....................................................... 4
Group 32 - Tilt Cylinder ..................................................................... 5
Group 34 - Upright ............................................................................. 6
Group 40 - Specifications ................................................................. 7

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-01-1

Group 12 - BATTERY
Maximum Size and Rating
RCX 25/30C
RCX 30
RCX 35
RCX 40,45,50

36V
36V
36V
36V

18 cell, 11 plate
18 cell, 13 plate
18 cell, 15 plate
18 cell, 17 plate

27.0 kWh
32.2 kWh
37. 6 kWh
43.0 kWh

775 amp-hr@6 Hour rating


930 amp-hr@6 Hour rating
1085 amp-hr@6 Hour rating
1240 amp-hr@6 Hour rating

Fully Charged:
1.275 specific gravity (1.3010 Exide Load Hog)
Discharge:
1.120 specific gravity
Recommended Battery Fluid: Distilled water only
Battery Compartment Size
RCX
Length
Width
Height

RCX 25/30C
13.88 in
38.80 in
31.50 in

RCX 30
16.13 in
38.80 in
31.50 in

RCX 35
18.38 in
38.80 in
31.50 in

RCX 40,45,50
20.75 in
38.80 in
31.50 in

WIRE CODE
Color Code
Black
Brown
Red
Orange
Yellow
Green
Blue
Violet
Gray
White

40-01-2
Return

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Example
Wire no. 13 is a brown stripe on an orange wire.
Wire no. 33 is a solid orange wire.

OCTOBER 1995

Drive Motor

Steer Pump Motor

36V, 6.64in. diameter, series wound.

36V, 6.5 in. diameter, permanent magnet

Weight:

54 lb (24.5 kg)

Open Rating (60 Min.):

34.8V, 1600 rpm,


4.0 hp, 117 amps

Brushes:

Dimension

L 1.38 in. (35 mm)


W 1.26 in. (32 mm)
T 0.498in(12.65mm)
No. per holder: 1
No. per motor: 4

Grade

CM880

Worn Length

0.57 in (14.5 mm)


longest side.

Weight:

43 lb (19.3 kg)

Enclosed Rating (Continuous): 36.0V, 1220 rpm


0.9 hp, 27 amps

Brushes:

Dimension

L 1.13 in. (28.7mm)


W0.812in.(20.6mm)
T0.368in(9.35mm)
No. per holder: 1
No. per motor: 4

Grade

CM880

Worn Length

0.420 in.(10.65mm)
on longest side.

Brush Spring Tension (force per brash)


NEW:
27.6-30.7oz(782-870g)
WORN:

11.5-12.6oz(326-357g)

Brush Spring Tension (force per brash)


NEW:
33-38oz(935-1077g)
WORN:
16 oz. (453 g)

Group 19 - Electrical Controls

Hydraulic Pump Motor

Resistance values may range from 20,000 to


30,000 ohms, without problems.

36V, 7.15 in. diameter series wound.

Ground Test: Minimum Resistance

When below

20,000 ohms, further testing must be


conducted to repair problem.

Weight:

93 lb (42.2 kg)

Open Rating (15% Time):

33.4V, 1050 rpm


10.0 hp, 360 amps

Current Draw Valves: Warm Truck, 36- volt


fully charge battery.

Brushes:

L 1.38 in. (35 mm)


W 0.997in.(25.3mm)
T 0.548in(13.9mm)
No. per holder: 2
No. per motor: 8

Drive Motor - 1A Freewheeling (less power steering


motor idle current)

Dimension

@ Battery: 26 amps each motor


Power Steer Motor - Idle current @ Battery: 5-8amps

Grade

CM880

SCR CURRENT LIMIT: Cold Truck

Worn Length

0.57 in (14.5 mm)


longest side.

Drive Motor - 525-575 amps Motor Current


(Both Motor)

Brush Spring Tension (force per brash)


NEW:
33-38oz(935-1077g)
WORN:
16 oz. (453 g)

(250-350 amps Battery Current)

CREEP SPEED: 1.6 volts to 3.6 volts @ motor


1A PICKUP TIME DELAY: 1.5 Seconds

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-01-3

POWER STEERING TIME DELAY:


24 seconds

Group 25/26 - Steering System


Power Steering System Relief Pressure Setting:
1000 psi (6894.8 kPa)

FUSES:
Fuse

Rating

Function

1FU
2FU

500 amp
15 amp

Drive, Pump Motor


Control

CONTACTORS:

Recommended Power Steering Fluid:


Uses main hydraulic sump oil supply.
Steer Handwheel Turns:
Lock to Lock: 4.75 turns

Function

Rating

Coil Resistance

1A

150 amps

19.55 ohms

Recommended Hydraulic Fluid:

For.&Rev.

150 amps

19.55 ohms

Normal Temperature - Hydraulic Oil with anti-wear


additives.

Steering

100 amps

49 ohms

Group 29/30 - Hydraulic System

Cold Storage DC

100 amps

29 ohms

Pump

150 amps

20 ohms

Group 20 - Drive Axle


Recommended Oil Specifications:
90 Weight Engine Oil
Oil Capacity, Each: 5.72 qts.(6.5L)
Overall Ratio: 22.85:1 Reduction

Group 22 - Wheels and Tires


Drive Tire Size:
Cushion -

Pneumatic -

Steer Tire Size:

18x7x12.12 (RCX 25,30C,30)


18x8x12.12 (RCX 35,40)
18x9x12.12 (RCX 45,50)
18x7x8 16 ply (RCX25,30C,30)
18x9x8 ply (RCX 35,40)
Tire Pressure: 140 psi (970 kPa)
9x5 Dual Poly

Hydraulic Oil with anti-wear


additives

Sump Tank Capacity:

3.35 gal (14.93L)

Lift Relief Pressure settings:


RCX 25,30C,30,35:
2950-3050psi(20,340-21,029kPa)
RCX 40,45,50:
3150-2350psi(21,718-22,408lPa)

Cascade Uprights Only (55D and 60D):


2550-2600 psi (17582-17926 kPa)
Tilt and Aux. Relief Pressure settings:
RCX 25,30C,30,35

2000psi(13,790kPa)

RCX 40,45,50

2300psi(15,858kPa)

Group 23 - BRAKES
Brake System: Spring Applied, Hydraulic Released
Recommended Brake Fluid:
Heavy-duty hydraulic brake fluid.
Refer to Lubrication Chart in Group 01.
Master Cylinder:

40-01-4
Return

0.75 in diameter

OCTOBER 1995

Group 32 - Tilt Cylinders


Tilt Cylinder Diameter:

3.0 in. (76.2 mm)

Tilt Speed, Nominal:


Through 151 in. MFH

3.2 to 3.9 degrees/second

Above 151 in. MFH

2.4 to 2.8 degrees/second

Standard Tilt Angle:


HV Standard
8 degrees back / 5 degrees forward
HV Triple

Standard Lift Cylinder Drift Test


Check with the Hydraulic Fluid at operating
temperature 110 to 130F (43.3 to 54.4C).
To check for drift
Make test load:
- Assembly weight on a pallet equal to the
weight of the specified capacity of truck
to tested.
-

Load should not extend beyond pallet


and be stacked for stability.

Forks must completely engage load and


be adjusted as wide as possible to
provide even distribution of weight.

5 degrees back / 3 degrees forward

Tilt Drift (in 5 minutes, with rated load, new truck):

Temperature

Drift

80F (26.7C)

0.256 in. (6.5 mm)

100F (37.8C)

0.433 in. (11 mm)

120F (48.9C)

0.650 in. (16.5 mm)

Elevate carriage and test load 10 - 15 in.


(254-381 mm) and place upright in 1 back
tilt position.

Cylinder drift should not exceed 1 in. (25.4


mm) per minute.

Tilt Cylinder Drift Test


Check with the Hydraulic Fluid at operating
temperature 110 to 130F (43.3 to 54.4C).
To check for drift
Make test load:
- Assembly weight on a pallet equal to the
weight of the specified capacity of truck
to tested.
-

Load should not extend beyond pallet


and be stacked for stability.

Forks must completely engage load and


be adjusted as wide as possible to
provide even distribution of weight.

Elevate carriage and test load 12 - 15 in.


(305-381 mm) and place upright in full back
tilt position.

Cylinder drift should not exceed


specifications list above.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-01-5

Group 34 - Uprights
Upright Speeds:
Nominal performance for Upright at cut-off MFH
Check with hydraulic fluid at operating temperature 110 to 130F (43.3 to 54.4C).

2 Stage Lift Upright

3 Stage Lift Upright

Lifting
ft./min

Lowering
ft./min

RCX
25,30C,30

Loaded:

63

95

Empty:

101

RCX 35

Loaded:
Empty:

Loaded:

55

95

Empty:

101

80

Loaded:

N/A

N/A

Empty:

N/A

N/A

Loaded:

N/A

N/A

Empty:

N/A

N/A

RCX 40
RCX 45
RCX 50

Lifting
ft./min

Lowering
ft./min

Loaded:

60

85

80

RCX
25,30C,30

Empty:

93

85

59

95

RCX 35

Loaded:

56

85

101

80

Empty:

93

85

Loaded:

52

85

Empty:

93

85

Loaded:

44

60

Empty:

70

65

Loaded:

42

63

Empty:

70

65

RCX 40
RCX 45
RCX 50

Test Load: a capacity load evenly distributed on lift forks. (If a pallet is used, load should not
extend beyond pallet. Load Should be stacked to provide maximum stability.) Forks must
completely engage load and be adjusted as wide as possible to provide even distribution of
weight.

40-01-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Group 40 - Specifications
RATED LOAD CAPACITY AT LOAD CENTER:
RCX 25
2500 lbs @ 24 in (1134 kg @ 600 mm)
RCX 30C
3000 lbs @ 24 in (1360 kg @ 600 mm)
RCX 30
3000 lbs @ 24 in (1360 kg @ 600 mm)

RCX 35
3500 lbs @ 24 in (1590 kg @ 600 mm)
RCX 40
4000 lbs @ 24 in (1815 kg @ 600 mm)
RCX 45
4500 lbs @ 24 in (2041 kg @ 600 mm)
RCX 50
5000 lbs @ 24 in (2268 kg @ 600 mm)

NOTE:
Rated capacity applies when using uprights with maximum MFH up to and including:
Clear-View STD 151 in. (3835 mm) Clear-View TSU 152 in (3875 mm)

TRUCK WEIGHTS
Approximate, with typical upright:

25
8425

RCX Service Weights without load (pounds)


30C
30
35
40
45
8735
9055
9417
9752
10071

50
10686

Axle Loading
Front
With load (lb)
25
8911

30C
9975

30
35
40
45
50
25
30C 30
9987 10878 11731 12507 13673 2014 1757 2068

Front
Without load (lb)
25
4266

30C
4404

Rear
With load (lb)

30
4527

OCTOBER 1995
Return

35
4659

35
2040

40
2021

45
2064

50
2013

45
5257

50
5580

Rear
Without load (lb)

40
45
50
25
30C 30
4779 4814 5106 4159 4331 4528

35
4758

40
4973

40-01-7

Return

Section 2.

Data Plate

How to Read Data Plate..................................................................... 2


Battery Weight Chart ......................................................................... 4

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-02-1

How to Read Data Plate


IMPORTANT
If the truck is modified, capacity may be affected. Contact your Authorized BT PRIME-MOVER Dealer
for a new data plate showing the revised capacity.

40-02-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

1. Model Number
2. Type Construction: E, or EE.
3. Truck Serial Number
4. Truck Attachment if
Number)

any.

(Name

or

5. Upright back tilt


6. Truck Lifting Specifications. Specific
lifting capacity at listed load center and
maximum fork height.
7. Battery Weight: Refer to check on nest
page.
8. Battery Identification Number:
E 583 with cover, in uncovered
compartment.
EE583 with cover for use in Type EE
trucks
EO583
without
cover,
in
covered
compartment, for use in E or EE Trucks.
9. Scale weight of truck and attachment (if
provided), less battery - as shipped from the
factory.
10. Minimum battery weight
11. Nominal Battery Voltage: 36
12. Maximum Amp. hour capacity @ 6 hour rate:
700 for RCX 25 and 30C
840 for RCX 30
980 for RCX 35
1120 for RCX 40, 45, and 50

WARNING

DO NOT exceed maximum lifting


capacity specified on data plate.

Know location of Machine Serial Number


stamped in truck frame.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-02-3

Battery Weight Chart


Truck
RCX 25
RCX 30C
RCX 30
RCX 35
RCX 40
RCX 45
RCX 50

40-02-4
Return

Minimum
1280 lb.
(581 kg)
1590 lb.
(721 kg)
1885 lb.
(855 kg)
2175 lb.
(987 kg)
2454 lb.
(1116 kg)
1845 lb.
(837 kg)
2454 lb.
(1116 kg)

Maximum
2005 lb.
(909 kg)
2005 lb.
(909 kg)
2290 lb.
(1039 kg)
2645 lb.
(1200 kg)
3025 lb.
(1372 kg)
3025 lb.
(1372 kg)
3025 lb.
(1372 kg)

OCTOBER 1995

Section 3.

Lubricants and Shop Supplies

Lubricant and Shop Supplies ........................................................... 2


Lubricants ................................................................................. 2
Sealants .................................................................................... 4
Gasket Materials ....................................................................... 5
Threadlocks and Threadsealers ............................................... 6
Cleaners.................................................................................... 7

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-03-1

Lubricants and Shop Supplies


The following lists provide part numbers and descriptions of lubricants, sealants, gasket materials,
threadlocks and threadsealers, adhesives, cleaners, and miscellaneous shop compounds recommended for
servicing BT Prime-Mover industrial trucks. These products are available through your local BT PrimeMover dealer.

Lubricants
Transmission Fluid Specifically Recommended:
H200, H210 and H211
HR500 and HR600
TA-12 and TA-18
This product provides proper frictional characteristics, superior wear protection for gears, excellent
water tolerance to avoid excessive foaming and rusting within the system, good filterability, and low
temperature fluidity. These fluids meet CMHC MS-276A and the requirements for the following:
John Deere Quatrol Q-4
Allison C-3

Caterpillar TO-2
International Harvester Hy-Tran B-6

Abex Dennison HF-O Hydraulic


Fluid Specification
Special Purpose Transmission/Hydraulic Fluid
Increased demands for performance and protection of fluids used in equipment with common
hydraulic and transmission oil reservoirs have brought about the development of Clark Special
Purpose Transmission/Hydraulic Fluid. This quality product meets the service-refill requirements for
the following tractor manufacturers:
John Deere J20A, 303
Navistar B-6
Allis-Chalmers PF821

J.I. Case J1C143, TFD


Massey Ferguson 1138
White-Type 56

High-Performance Transmission Fluid


BT Prime-Mover High-Performance Transmission Fluid is made of selected, highly-refined base oils
blended with a specially-balanced additive combination. This product has outstanding hightemperature oxidation resistance, dispersancy, and detergency. It provides anti-corrosion and rust
protection, and is compatible with the various automatic transmission components such as
elastomeric seals and plastic parts. Its high-viscosity index permits use over a wide temperature
range by providing excellent low-temperature fluidity while retaining desired viscosity in hightemperature conditions. This fluid meets all of the requirements of the GM DEXTRON specification.
It is recommended for use in all types of automatic transmission for which DEXTRON products are
required.
Chain and Cable Lubricant
Chain and Cable Lubricant provides constant lubrication by penetrating chain links, and reduces
friction drags on sudden overloads. It also prevents dripping on slow or idle chains.

40-03-2
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Hydraulic Fluid
BT Prime-Mover premium anti-wear hydraulic fluid is tailored to meet the special requirements of BT
Prime-Mover hydraulic systems. BT Prime-Mover hydraulic fluid will not oxidize to form sludge and
guards against rust by plating all metal parts with a film that is impervious to moisture. It stands up to
high-heat ranges and pressure and protects precision-tuned parts against abnormal wear. Above all,
it is compatible with the chemistry of the seals, packings, and hoses so it cannot cause deterioration
of these vital components. Every hydraulic fluid formulated for BT Prime-Mover hydraulic systems
must pass strict tests complying the BT Prime-Mover specification MS-68 which calls for an antiwear additive plus many other properties. This fluid also meets the stringent requirements of
Denison HF-2 and Lee Norse 100-1 specifications.
Transmission/Converter Fluid
BT Prime-Mover transmission-converter fluid is compounded with the special properties required for
BT Prime-Mover torque converters and automatic transmissions. This superior fluid has been
developed to meet General Motors' DEXTRON II specifications and equals or exceeds all
requirements for Type A Suffix A automatic-transmission oil. Genuine BT Prime-Mover transmissionconverter fluid flows freely in low temperatures, yet resists high temperatures, pressure, and
oxidation while preventing corrosion and seal deterioration.
Super Heavy-Duty Brake Fluid
BT Prime-Mover Super Heavy-Duty Brake Fluid protects the vital metal and rubber components
found in your equipment's brake system. It is non-corroding and lubricates all metal parts while
keeping the rubber parts from shrinking or becoming brittle. To insure quality performance, Federal
regulations VV-H-91Oa Amendment I and SAE specifications 70R1, 70R3, and J70B are surpassed
by BT Prime-Mover Super Heavy-Duty Brake Fluid.
Anti-Seize
Lubricates to protect against galling, pitting, and corrosion on equipment subject to temperature
extremes (up to 2000F [1093C]) or in corrosive applications. Assures easy disassembly of
components. Use for wheel lug nuts and fasteners, upright and frame mounting bolts and in
corrosive environments.
Superlube Synthetic Lubricant With Teflon
Multipurpose lubricant for machinery and equipment. Compatible with other lubricants and is safe on
metal, rubber, plastics, wood, leather and painted surfaces. For cables, hinges, locks, linkages,
gears, and pulleys.
Lubriplate
A white grease for bearings, Lubriplate withstands high temperatures and increase the life of
bearings.
Spray Lube
Spray Lube is easy to apply to open gears and reaches hard-to-get places. It acts as a rust
preventive and does not drip off.
Innerslide Lubricant
This lubricant is a "dripless" grease, ideal for sliding tandems and fork trucks. Cuts greasing time,
prevents rust and provides constant lubrication to minus 60F (minus 51C).

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-03-3

Sealants
Battery Saver
Battery Saver preserves battery power by retarding acid action, preventing corrosion, and sealing
vibration cracks.
Spray-Kote
Spray-Kote renews, insulates, and protects. It seals electrical wires and keep them pliable while
preventing rust and corrosion. Resists extreme heat or cold and requires no pre-cleaning before use.
Conquer-3
Conquer-3 is a water dispersive and corrosion preventive that protects against oxidation. It displace
water and moisture, even from wet insulation, and leaves a protective film. Excellent for protecting
SCR control panels.
GE Silicone
Protects SCR's by weatherproofing and sealing while resisting chemicals, oils, and solvents.
Mechanical Paste Lubricant
Protects motor, solid state control cable and wire (screw-on type) connections against corrosion.
Dielectric Tune-Up Grease
Protects electric connections and wiring from salt, dirt, and corrosion. Extends the life of the bulb
sockets. Prevents voltage leaks around any electrical connection. Also prevents spark plugs from
fusing to boots. Use in extremely dusty, dirty, or corrosive applications.
Silicone Adhesive Sealant
General purpose, clear RTV indoor/outdoor sealant. Seals, bonds, mends, and secures glass, metal,
plastics, fabrics, vinyl, and weather-stripping. Protects electrical wiring. Waterproof and flexible. Seal
windows, electrical connections, vinyl top, and seams.
Mechanical Lubricant Kit
Excellent for cold storage applications. Protects control panel connections (contactor, drive and
steer), PL and DP plug connections, wire terminal screws against corrosion.

40-03-4
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Gasket Materials
Gasketmaker
Flexible, non-corrosive gasketing material for use on rigid machined flanges with less than .010 in.
(.255mm) gap. Use where "anaerobic" (cures in the absence of air) gaskets are specified. Seals
transmission cases, transsexual castings, water pumps, and other rigid covers and plates.
Gasket Remover
Quickly removes baked-on gaskets and all types of gasket adhesives. Prepares metal parts for new
gaskets and assembly. For all metal parts.
Ultra Blue
High performance, oil resistant RTV silicone. Low odor, low volatility. Eight times more flexible than
cork/composite gaskets and three times more oil resistant than other silicones. Forms in-place
gaskets on valve covers, oil pans, intake manifold and seals, timing covers, water pumps, and
thermostat housings. Use as a gasket dressing to upgrade conventional metal and pre-cut gaskets.
Hi-Temp TRV Silicone
For very high temperature applications. Replaces cut gaskets. Makes reliable formed-in-place
gaskets that resist cracking, shrinking, and migrating caused by thermal cycling. The temperature
range is -75F to 650F (-60C to 343C). Form in-place gaskets on valve covers, oil pans, intake
manifolds and seals, timing covers, water pumps, and thermostat housings. Use to coat pre-cut
gaskets to increase reliability.
Form-A-Gasket No. 2
Slow drying, non-hardening sealant designed for sealing cut gaskets and stamped parts. Allows for
easy disassembly if required. Use where sealing is more important than adhesion. Temperature
range is -85F to 400F (-65C to 204C). For valve-cover gaskets and oil-pan gaskets.
Form-A-Gasket No. 3
Slow drying, non-hardening sealant for close fitting machine surfaces. Temperature range is -65F to
400F (-54C to 204C). Use for sealing hoses and as a cut gasket dressing.
High Tack_ Spray-A-Gasket
Fast drying adhesive for holding gaskets in place during assembly and sealing. Remains effective
under extreme temperature of -65F to 450F (-54C to 232C). Holds and seals all felt, cork, metal,
paper, rubber, and asbestos gaskets.
Cooper Spray-A-Gasket
Fast drying, metallic-copper sealant helps dissipate heat, prevents gasket burnout and improves
heat transfer. Fills minor surface irregularities and seals instantly. Temperature range is -50F to
500F (-46C to 260C). For cylinder head gaskets, carburetor gaskets, exhaust manifold gaskets,
and other high-temperature applications.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-03-5

Threadlocks and Threadsealers


Loctite Nut Lock
Loctite Nut Lock turns ordinary nuts into vibration-proof lock nuts. It reduces assembly costs by
eliminating expensive lock nuts and prevents machinery from vibrating loose.
General Purpose Threadlocker
For locking and sealing smaller (1/4-3/4 in. [6-18mm]) threaded fasteners that will require removal.
Blue in color. For valve cover bolts, water pump bolts, oil pan bolts, or rocker-arm adjustment nuts.
Heavy Duty Threadlocker
For locking and sealing heavy-duty, large, or permanent threaded assemblies. Use with large studs
and fasteners (3/8-1 in. [9-24mm]. Red in color. Use on cylinder block studs, ring gear bolts, frame
bolts, and upright mounting bolts.
Pipe Sealant With Teflon
Seals plugs and tapered pipe threads instantly. Will not shrink or dry out and will not shred to
contaminate systems. For pipe plugs above (1/8 in. [3mm]), water pump plugs, fuel fittings, coolant
fittings, hydraulic system fittings.
Form-A-Thread
Makes reliable, permanent thread repairs without drill, taps, tools or inserts. Restores worn, stripped,
or damaged threads; effective up to 128 lb./ft. (174 Nm) of torque. Use for intake manifold bracket
fasteners, threads, water pump bolt threads, or front cover bolt threads.
Bearing Mount
"Anaerobic" adhesive helps restore the fit between replacement bearings in worn housings or worn
shafts. Fills clearance to .005 in. (.015mm) and will disassemble. Mounts and retains ball bearings in
housings or on shafts, roller bearings, plain bearings, and bushings.
Superbonder
Revolutionary thick no-run formula developed specifically for making fast heavy-duty repairs. For
metals, plastic, rubber, leather, paper, wood or cork. Use to repair broken or loose trim, dash panels,
and seat cushions.
Fast Cure Epoxy 45
Easy to use pre-measured epoxy mixer cups. Ideal for bonding glass, plastics, rubber and metal.
Bonds in 5-15 minutes. Use on loose trim, broken grilles, casting cracks, and holes.
Spray Adhesive
Dries clear with superior bonding strength. For permanent or repositionable applications. Resists
water, humidity, and heat. Used for attaching cloth, carpeting, sound insulation, and floor coverings.
Steel and Aluminum Epoxy
Gray epoxy adhesives for metals, concrete, and many plastics. When cured, can be drilled, sanded,
threaded, or filed. Resistant to fuels and solvents. Fills gaps and bonds trim. Use on casting cracks
and holes, auto trim, and ornaments.

40-03-6
Return

OCTOBER 1995

Loctite Weld - An Alternative To Welding


A 15-minute, 2-part adhesive and filler system that eliminates the need for welding or brazing. Once
cured, it can be drilled, sanded, filed, or painted. Use on aluminum, steel, brass, bronze, casings,
stampings, etc. Over 3000 psi (20,684 kPa) shear strength.
Loctite Weld Stix
Similar to Loctite Weld only in pre-measured ribbons. Sets in 5 minutes and cures fully in 1 hour. Fills
gaps to 2 in. (50mm) and is ideal for underwater applications. Use on aluminum, steel, iron, wood,
glass, masonry, ceramic, gas tanks, oil pans, and most plastics.

Cleaners
Penetrating Oil
An easy-to-use penetrating oil that cuts rust, paint, and grease and is effective on hot surfaces.
Saves time, labor, and broken parts; contains Moly.
Degreaser
This easy-to-use degreaser is water soluble, safe for paint, and does not rust.
Brake Cleaner
This brake cleaner provides fast, complete cleaning, removing oil, dirt, and grease, leaving no film. It
is non-flammable and can be used on brake parts, and electrical and ignition accessories. An
effective, thorough, safe, and economical parts cleaner.
Locquic Primer N
Degreases oil parts and speeds the curing of "anaerobic" products such as threadlockers, pipe
sealant, bearing mount, and gasket maker. Recommended for cold weather use and quick repairs.
Use with anaerobic products to speed assembly in all applications.
Brake and Parts Cleaner
Quickly dissolves and removes oil, grease, brake fluid, and oxidized oils. Dries fast without leaving a
residue and is non-corrosive.
Enviro-Safe Brake and Parts Cleaner
Environmentally safe formula. Biodegradable natural citrus solvents dissolve and remove oil and
grease from brake systems and metal parts. No CFC's or chlorinated solvents. Low toxicity.
Prussian Blue
Aids precision fitting of machined surfaces. Locates high spots on bearings, valves, gears, and other
close-to-tolerance components. Non-drying and easy to clean up.

OCTOBER 1995
Return

40-03-7

Return

Return

THE PRIME-MOVER CO.


3000 NORTH US HIGHWAY 61
MUSCATINE, IOWA 52761-5810

PROUDLY
Made in AMERICA

Return