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This Monkey’s Gone to Heaven—

If the Devil is Six xiS si liveD eht fI


.neveS si doG neht then God is Seven.
.degnahc evah sgnihT

Editor and Designer Christina Arce


2008

text from This Monkey’s Gone to Heaven—


If the Devil is Six then God is Seven.
From Emigre Magazine #65. – Published October
2003
by Elliott Earls

.esor eht ffo si moolb ehT


Things have changed.
stempel schneidler std

The bloom is off the rose.


table of contents
stnetnoc fo elbat

6-7 stempel schneidler std light


&
stempel schneidler std light italic

8-9 stempel schneidler std roman


&
stempel schneidler std italic

10-11 stempel schneidler std medium


&
5
stempel schneidler std mediun italic

12-13 stempel schneidler std bold


&
stempel schneidler std bold italic

stempel schneidler std black


14-15 &
stempel schneidler std black
italic

16 stempel schneidler std


information
.esor eht ffo si moolb ehT

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ? ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( )
light 8/9.6
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ? ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( )
light 10/12

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ? ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( )
light 12/15

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ? ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( )
light 14/17

EHT
The bloom is off the rose. light italic 16/20
Type design has lost its urgency,
and has regained its soul. In the mid to late
90s I was working completely alone in a
windowless studio, and traveling extensively.
Routinely, I would find myself conducting
workshops and lectures at American design
schools. These alternating frames of solitude
and activity left me with an uncanny feeling.
It was as if I were watching time-lapse pho-
tography of the graphic design field in flux.
This perspective, however warped, made
it quite easy to put a finger on the pulse of
design in America.
light 9/11
7

It seems as if there is always one idea


or medium that is inescapable. Everywhere you
turn, there it is. In the mid to late 90s, one of
those ideas was type design. Type design was
viewed as THE shortcut to graphic design
fame, and everybody wanted a piece of the
action. Invariably, I obliged the students and
would conduct a letterform design workshop.
light italic 10/18
Here’s what I’ve learned. roman 22/26.4

Here’s what I’ve learned. roman 20/24

Here’s what I’ve learned. roman 18/20

Here’s what I’ve learned. roman 16/21


Here’s what I’ve learned. roman 14/12
roman 10/10
I’ve come to acknowledge their shortcomings.
No longer do designers lust for the quick
buck and easy fame that a signature font
will bestow. The reasons are legion and
almost irrelevant. The more interesting
question becomes: what did we learn
from this episode?
roman 10/10

.denrael ev’I tahw s’ereH


9
Things have changed.
italic 13/13 I learned that the craft of drawing
by hand is still a most valuable
asset when it comes to designing
fonts, and that computer tricks are
a poor substitute for intent. I know
what I’m talking about because I
was there, and I did inhale, happi-
ly indulging in the so-called typo-
graphic computer “experiments”
of the 90s.
roman 8/13
When one is giving birth to a
font not spawned directly from
an existing model, what is need-
ed most is the establishment of
a biological discourse between
looking and drawing
— between retina and cortex
medium 12/15

the mind must be quieted.


medium italic 12/7

I stress that this process, in order to be successful, is non-


linguistic. The hand moves, the mark changes, and the eye responds.
The eye, and how it relates to mark making, or more accurately,
how it responds to the mark made, is the most important thing.
meduim 8/12

trust not the mind, but the retina.


meduim 14/17
?
While making marks on paper, the
internal non-linguistic dialog between
retina and cortex may go something
like this:
medium italic 11/15

medium 115/16

meduim italic 8/14 How thick?

How black?
meduim italic 9/14
11
meduim italic 10/14 How thin?
meduim italic 11/14 Thinner?
meduim italic 12/14 Thicker!
meduim italic 13/14 Bigger!
meduim italic 14/14 Blacker!
meduim italic 15/14 Smaller!
meduim italic 16/14 Whiter!
meduim italic 17/14 Grayer?
meduim italic 18/14 Closer?
meduim italic 19/14 Farther!
meduim italic 20/14 Tighter?
meduim italic 21/14 Too tight!
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
It was the 80s. bold 28/34

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
We were young, upper middle class, ultraconservative
8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Catholic boys and girls and we had a paucity of
8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 fashionable role models.
8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 bold italic 8/11
8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
I should point out that these
1

stages of development and refinement, the process


light 30/36

As the letterform progresses through successive


young women wore heavy blue
eyeshadow regardless of their
complexion or eye color. Because 1 light italic 30/36

becomes increasingly optical. meduim 15/12


1
at that historical moment it was
an established scientific fact that roman 30/36

if one wore enough blue eye-


shadow, the eye would look blue!
bold italic 10/18
1 italic 30/36

1 medium 30/36

13
1 meduim italic 30/36

1 bold 30/36

9 8 7 6 1 bold italic 30/36

1
! 1
black 30/36

black italic 30/36


black italic 25/11 M u s i c

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !
@@@@@@@@@ @
# # # # # # # # #

#
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
%%%%%%%%% %
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
&&&&&&&&& &
* * * * * * * * * *
( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( (
) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) (
)

.pu k*@f eht kcab ,lleW ”?nigeb uoy od erehW“ “ .yas uoy raeh I ”!tiaW
c i s u M
is the appropriate metaphor. In
music, rigorous study of repertoire, theory,
and physical application is what allows the
musician the improvisational freedom to
move the listener. Musical instrument per-
formance represents the perfect synthesis of
theory and practice. Theory is study under-
stood and finally applied.
black 8/11
But the essence is
that theory
You must trust yourself, and work by feel.
(or thinking) black 15/17 15
Rely on the totality of your experience. Rely

is forgotten on your history to guide you. Think through


in the moment of performance.
black 10/12
the body. Arrive on the beautiful shores of

naivete and anti-mastery only after toiling in

the fields of mastery.


black italic 8/22

Wait!” I hear you say. “ “Where do you begin?” Well, back the f@*k up.
black italic 10/12
F. H, Ernest Schneidler, type desginer and teacher, designed
Schneidler Old Style in 1936 for the Bauer foundry.
The Stempel Schneidler, a completely reworked and tuned
font family made by D Stempel AG in Frankfurt, is a fine,
legible text font that also works well in display.
One of Schneidler’s more unique features is its question marks.

stempel schneidler std


Stemple Schneidler is based on the typefaces of Venetian
printers from the Renaissance period and possesses
their grace, baut, and classical proportions.
Humanist [Venetian] faces are like a handwritten italic
form- named after the first roman type faces that appeared
in Venice in 1470.These types have a small x-height,
moderate contrast between strokes, and an acute
‘angle of stress’ and do not lend themselves to modern
desgin treatments of type such as reverse or stipple.
The style prints best on an unsized stock in black or brown ink.