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http://en.wikipedia.

org/wiki/Malaysia_and_the_United_Nations
http://www.un.org.my/
History
Since the existence of the organisation, the Federation of Malaya has expressed an
interest and joined the United Nations on 17 September 1957. Following a merger
between Malaya, Singapore, North Borneo and Sarawak on 16 September 1963, it was later
renamed Malaysia. However, less than two years after the merger, Singapore expelled from
the federation and joined the United Nations by itself on 21 September 1965.
Malaysia's role in the United Nations
Malaysia played an active role within the organisation with the participation on almost
all of the peace-keeping missions conduct by the organisation such as on the Operation in
Congo, Protection Force in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Transition Assistance
Group in Namibia, Operation in Somalia, Mission in East Timor and Interim
Force in Lebanon.
Security council
Currently, Malaysia is one of the candidates for 2014 Security Council election.
Financial contribution
Malaysia contributes $7.9 million to the United Nations yearly budget in 2014.

WELCOME TO THE UNITED NATIONS ASSOCIATION OF MALAYSIA (UNAM)


We are a voluntary, independent, non-political, non-profit, non-governmental organization
that comprise of former ambassadors, diplomats, academicians, students and individuals who
subscribe to the ideals of the United Nations. UNAM achieves our objectives of sharing and
disseminating vital knowledge, data and information and promoting the work of UN through
seminars, dialogues, workshops, and forums held both nationally and regionally. Recently,
the UNAM Youth Circle was established, which serves as a platform to engage Malaysian
youth to be directly involved in the United Nations.
The United Nations Association of Malaysia is a voluntary, independent, non-political, nonprofit, non-governmental organization. UN Associations (UNAs) in UN member countries
have consultative status with the United Nations through the World Federation of UN
Associations, WFUNA. It serves as a voice of the people of the world other than government
representatives in the UN.
UNAMs elected Governing Council comprises of former Ambassadors, diplomats,
academicians, students and individuals who subscribe to the ideals of the United Nations.
Currently the 20-member Council is headed by former Minister of Foreign Affairs Tengku
Tan Sri Dato Seri Ahmad Rithauddeen with Dato Zainal Abidin as the Secretary-General.
UNAM achieves its objectives of sharing and disseminating vital knowledge, data and
information and promoting the work of UN through seminars, dialogues, workshops, and
forums held both nationally and regionally. Recently, UNAM established the UNAM Youth
Circle which strives to engage Malaysian youths, while serving as a platform for youths to be
directly involved in the United Nations.

Our Vision
A United Nations that is a powerful force in meeting common global challenges and
opportunities.

Our Mission
We work to build a better world by strengthening and improving the United Nations through
the engagement of people who share a global mindset and support international cooperation
global citizens.

Objectives

To support the UN and its development.

To foster interest among the people of Malaysia in the work of the UN and its
Agencies.

To promote friendship and understanding among different peoples and nations.

To promote the development of peaceful cooperation among nations.

To strive for the recognition of and respect for human rights and fundamental
freedoms.

To promote international cooperation in the social economy, educational, cultural


and political fields.

To promote research, information and education about the principles, activities


and potentialities of the UN and its Agencies.

THE Asean Summit will end tomorrow with Myanmar handing over the coming years
chairmanship of Asean to Malaysia. This is our countrys fourth time in that seat, but what
will be different in 2015 is that the role will partly overlap Malaysias membership in the
United Nations Security Council, which is for the next two years.
Malaysia will thus be uniquely positioned to be an influential voice in regional and global
affairs.
As the chair, Malaysias job is to lead and represent Asean. Next year is vital for South-East
Asia because it is meant to culminate in the creation of the Asean Economic Community
(AEC), a long-standing goal of regional economic integration.

To ensure that the AEC can be in place by Dec 31, 2015, there is much to do to resolve
outstanding issues and hammer out a framework acceptable to every member country. The
grouping also needs to formulate the post-2015 plans for the AEC.
In addition, steering Asean is all the more challenging now because of issues such as its
members maritime disputes with China, the pressure on Myanmar to speed up reforms, and
the regions relatively low productivity levels.
At the UN, Malaysia will be among the 10 non-permanent members who join the United
States, Britain, France, China and Russia on the Security Council.
The councils primary duty is to maintain international peace and security. This puts Malaysia
at the forefront of efforts to address threats to peace and to end hostilities. And there are
indeed many forces at play that may shatter global stability if the governments of the world
fail to work well together.
The Asean Chair and the Security Council membership are high-profile roles that come with
heavy responsibilities. There is no doubt that Malaysia has the experience and ability to helm
and contribute effectively.
At the same time, Malaysias prominence in these organisations means that all eyes will be on
us. As it guides Asean through this pivotal period and as it takes part in Security Council
decisions, the rest of the world will be paying attention to what Malaysia promotes and
endorses.
In particular, people will want to see if Malaysia practises what it preaches. In international
governance, consistency in policies and administration does wonders to a countrys
credibility. When a countrys actions match its words, those words will carry a lot of weight.
Yes, with such scrutiny, it is like living in a glass house, but it does not have to be a problem.
We should view it as an opportunity to showcase what the nation has achieved and
Malaysia has come a long way.
It is also a time to make sure that enough is done to fully align the implementation of policies
and plans with the intent behind them.
Malaysia has a big year ahead on the international front. As with most things, it all begins at
home.