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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY
DAR ES SALAAM ; TANZANIA

The college of medicine was inaugurated by the then Prime Minister of


India, Honourable Mr. I.K. Gujral on 17th September, 1997. Already seventy
doctors have passed out of the College and doing well in their profession.
Presently the College offers only M.B.B.S. Course equivalent to the M.D.
Course of Tanzania. Short courses for Laboratory Technicians, Pharmacy
Technicians and Premedical Courses will commence from Feb 2005. It is
contemplated to start the post graduate courses in Internal Medicine,
Anatomy, Physiology, Surgery, Ophthalmology and Paediatrics from Sep
2005. Fellowship courses in certain super specialties are likely to commence
from Sep 2006. The admissions are held in Feb and Sep every year.

Mission
To prepare students through regular professional courses in the fields
of medical and allied sciences for the degree of Bachelor of Medicine
and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS).
To be an additional supplier from the private sector of medical service
providers; key policy makers in medical services and
experts/specialists (with additional training) of medical services in
industries, public institutions and private institutions.
To be a catalyst in,
Ensuring that research priorities are responsive to the felt needs of the
community.
Spearheading prioritization of primary medical and health care for
the majority of the people.
Creation of demand for better medical services to the majority of the
rural and urban population, especially to the poorest communities
Vision

The College of Medicine is envisaged to be the centre of excellence of


medical and health knowledge advancement, expansion, transmission and
enhancement through training, research, outreach and public service.
STRUCTURE OF THE PROGRAM, M.B.B.S. COURSE:
i) The training is organized into 9 semesters. Each semester has 23
teaching weeks with two-week breather at the end of the semester in Feb
and 4 weeks vacation at the end of semester in Aug.
ii) The teaching week shall comprise of five days of eight working hours
each from Monday to Friday and four hours on Saturdays. The contact
hours for each week shall be 44 hours. This translates into 44 x 23 =1012
contact hours per semester.
iii) The teaching shall be organized into modules and units for each
semester. Each unit shall comprise of 20 contact hours in the form of
didatic lectures and 20 hours of practical/clinical or seminar classes.
There shall be a continuous assessment examination at the end of each
module. A university examination shall be held at the end of the semester
when the teaching in a subject has been completed.
iv) A one-year of internship shall be done after graduation. This will be
conducted in prescribed hospitals for such training by the Ministry of
Health.
The proposed scheme of training during the 9 semesters of the MBBS
training is organized into phases as follows;
i) Pre-clinical shall consist of semesters 1 5 during which the preclinical subjects of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology
including parasitology, development studies, pharmacology and pathology
shall be taught and examined. In addition community medicine, research
training in the form of epidemiology and biostatistics. A course in clinical
methods shall be carried out in order to prepare the students for their
clinical training.
ii) Clinical training comprises of semesters 6 through 9. Clinical training
shall be conducted during semester 6 and 7 comprising of 8 week

rotations in medicine, surgery, paediatrics and obstetrics and gynaecology.


Joint lectures in these subjects shall be given for 4 hours daily before the
students break to join their respective clinical assignment. A senior
rotation of 4 weeks in each of these subjects shall be held during semester
9.
iv) Semester 8 shall be devoted to public health and the medical and
surgical specialties of radiology, orthopaedics, anaesthesia, psychiatry,
dermatology and venereology, ophthalmology and ENT. There will be 2hour lectures daily in these subjects except ophthalmology and
orthopedics. There will be 4 weeks rotations in psychiatry, orthopedics
and public health, 3 weeks rotation in ophthalmology, 2 weeks rotation in
dermato-venereology and radiology and one-week rotations in ENT and
anaesthetics. In addition an elective period of 8 weeks shall be held at the
end of semester 8 during which the candidate will conduct field work and
shall write a research report before proceeding to the last semester.
The table below gives a summary of the courses for each semester.
Semester Course Name
Anatomy
Development studies
1
Research methods
Physiology
Biochemistry
2
Development studies
Research methods
Microbiology
Environmental health
Biostatistics/demography
3
Development studies
Forensic medicine/ethics
Pathology
Pharmacology
Medical sociology
4
Forensic medicine/ethics
Epidemiology
Community health
Management of diseases
5
Clinical methods
Orthopedics lectures
Ophthalmology lectures
Paediatrics rotation

Code
ANA100
DES100
EPR 100
PHY 200
BCH 200
DES 200
EPR 200
MIM 300
EPR 300
EPR 301
DES 300
FME 300
PAT 400
PHA 400
EPR 400
FME 400
EPR 401
COH 500
MAD 500
CLM 500
ORP 800
OPH 800
PED 600
3

Hours
550
80
30
395
341
60
45
427
100
80
60
30
349
180
120
100
50
345
188
190
75
50
352

Units
27.5
4.0
1.5
19.3
17.1
3.0
2.3
21.8
5.0
4.0
3.0
1.5
17.4
9.0
6.0
5.0
2.5
17.3
9.4
9.5
3.8
2.5
17.6

6 and 7

Medicine rotation
MED 600
Surgery rotation
SUR 600
Obstetrics/Gynaecology
OBG 600
Public health rotation
COH 800
Psychiatry rotation
PSY 800
Orthopedics rotation
ORH 800
Ophthalmology rotation
OPH 800
Dermatology rotation
DER 800
Radiology rotation
RAD 800
ENT rotation
ENT 800
Anaesthesia rotation
ANE 800
Forensic medicine
FME 800
Elective period
EPR 800
Medicine rotation
MED 900
Pediatrics rotation
PED 900
Surgery rotation
SUR 900
Obstetrics/Gynaecology
OBG 900
One year Internship in a Designated
Hospital

352
352
352
176
176
176
132
88
88
44
44
45
352
176
176
176
176

17.6
17.6
17.6
8.8
8.8
8.8
6.6
4.4
4.4
2.2
2.2
2.2
17.6
8.8
8.8
8.8
8.8

Two-hour lectures each day for 6 days each week. Therefore there will
be 240 hours of lectures for each semester. This covers the theoretical
teaching required.
The rotations in the specialty subjects are, 4-weeks rotations in psychiatry,
orthopaedics and public health, 3-weeks rotation in ophthalmology, 2weeks rotation in radiology, dermatology. 1-week rotations in ENT and
anaesthetics
MANAGEMENT OF THE PROGRAM.
1. ADMISSION REGULATIONS FOR MBBS COURSE.
1.0Duration of training.
1.1 The duration of the course is 4 years spread over 9 academic
semesters of 20 weeks each. These nine semesters of academic
training are divided into two phases. The Pre-clinical, and the Clinical
phase of training The degree is recognized by the Tanganyika
Medical Council.

1.2 At the end of 4 years, one year of compulsory rotary internship must be
undertaken in a recognized teaching hospital.
.
1.3 . Applications can be downloaded from our website www.imtu.edu
2.0 Eligibility for MBBS Course
2.1 At least two principal level passes or its equivalent in Advanced Secondary
School Examination (of National Level), or its equivalent.
2.2 Form VI of Tanzania or its equivalent qualifications as mentioned below with
Biology, Physics/ Mathematics and Chemistry.
2.3 Form IV of Tanzania, or candidates of O Level (Biology, Physics/Mathematics
and Chemistry) with Diploma in Clinical Officers / Medical Assistant / Dental
Assistant Courses, of a minimum of two years.
2.4 10+2 (ISCE, Intermediate Course)of India, with Biology, Physics and Chemistry,
7 + 5 of Botswana, with Biology, Physics and Chemistry (Physical Sciences) or
Level A of GCE (General Council of Education) of UK, with Biology, Physics
and Chemistry.

3. Examinations by Semester shall be conducted as shown below.


SEMESTER

COURSE

CODE

1. SEMESTER 1

Anatomy
Development studies
Research Methods

ANA 100
DES 100
EPR 100

2. SEMESTER 2

Physiology
Biochemistry
Development studies
Research methods

PHY 200
BCH 200
DES 200
EPR 200

3. SEMESTER 3

Microbiology
Environmental health
Biostatistics/demography
Development studies
Forensic medicine

MIM 300
EPR 300
EPR 300
DES 300
FME 300

4. SEMESTER 4

Pathology
Pharmacology
Medical Sociology

PAT 400
PAH 400
EPR 400
5

Forensic medicine
Epidemiology

FME 400
EPR 400

5. SEMESTER 5

Community Health
Management of diseases
Clinical methods
Orthopaedics lectures
Ophthalmology lectures

COH 500
MAD 500 (relevant modules)
CLM 500
ORP 800
OPH 800

6. SEMESTER 6-7

Medicine
rotation MED 600
Paediatrics
rotation PED 600
Surgery
rotation SUR 600
Obstetrics/Gynaecology rotation OBG 600

7. SEMESTER 8.

Ophthalmology
rotation
Public health
rotation
Pyschiatry
rotation
Orthopedics
rotation
Dermatology/STD
rotation
ENT
rotation
Radiology/Oncology rotation
Anaesthesia
rotation
Forensic medicine/ethics.

OPH 801
COH 800
PSY 800
ORP 801
DEM 800
ENT 800
RAD 800
ANE 800
FME 800

Elective period

EPR 800

Medicine
rotation
Paediatrics
rotation
Surgery
rotation
Obstetrics/gynaecology rotation

MED 900
PED 900
SUR 900
OBG 900

8. SEMESTER 9.

Final University Examinations. MED, PED, SUR and OBG

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS.
ANATOMY COURSE, ANA 100. 600 Hours.
OBJECTIVES
a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course the student should be
able to:

Describe the organisational structure and gross appearances of


the human body in health.
Identify different parts of the body, regionally, and systemically
Relate these parts spatially and functionally, to each other
Use medical/ anatomical terminology
Identify microscopically the various types of cells, tissues, and
organs
Describe the processes involved in the development of the
human the progression of this prenatal growth and
development, both spatially and temporally
Describe congenital malformations, and how birth-defects come
about
b). SKILLS. At the end of the course the student should be able to do
the following,
Identify grossly and microscopically the various tissues the
various cells and organs of the body in health
Use medical terminology in describing the various cells, tissues
and organs of the body.

The teaching of anatomy shall be organised as shown below.


Module Code Name

Lectures
Practicals/Seminars Total
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units

General
ANA anatomy,
101
genetics,
60
upper
and
lower limbs
Thorax,
abdomen,
60
ANA perineum and
102
pelvis
ANA Embryology
103
and histology
60

3.0

90

4.5

150

7.5

3.0

90

4.5

150

7.5

3.0

90

4.5

150

7.5

4
Total

ANA Head and neck


104
and
60
neuroanatomy
4
240

3.0

90

4.5

150

7.5

12.0

360

18.0

600

30

DEVELOPMENT STUDIES COURSE, DS 100. 80 Hours.


This will be a vertical program that will be conducted during semester 1, 2
and 3
OBJECTIVES
a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course, the student should be able,
Equip the student with an analytical framework for the study and
understanding of the process of social development and practical
development perspectives and how they influence the understanding
of health and ensuing practice for realisation.
Provide the student with a realistic understanding of economic and
socio-political consequences of constitutional independence and their
implications on health care policies, health care systems and medical
practices
Introduce students to and create awareness of the interrelationship
between general development policies, socio-economic development
and health. Inclusive in this will be issues of population, environment
and gender
To enable students to undertake comparative analysis of development
strategies and problems of developing countries and in the context be
conversant with the existing different understanding of health and
health carte policies.
Expose students to a framework of comparative development
strategies in developing countries through a critical comparative
analysis approach, thus enabling them to make rational explanations
of health situations and favourable health care systems seen in
different countries.

b). SKILLS. At the end of the course, the student should be able to,
Undertake a comparative analysis of development strategies and
problems of developing countries and in the context be conversant
with the existing different understanding of health care policies.
Acquire tools for analysis such as critical analysis as well as an
integrated approach for situating and analysing health in the
development process.
Enrich the bio-medical model of health development predominates in
understanding of health, enriched with grounding of health in its
wider context in conformity with primary health care approaches
advanced by the World Health Organisation.
Engage in a rational and productive manner in debate about the
development process of Tanzania and other countries, and in
particular social development as pertains to health and health care
strategies.

The course shall be organized as follows,


Module Code

Name

Lectures
Hours

DES
100

DES
200

DES
300

Total

Theoretical
and
practical
60
perspectives
of
development
Development
experience,
strategies
and 40
comparative
development trends
Health
care
systems in practice 40
and
Entrepreneurship
140

Total

Units

Seminars/
Discussions
Hours Units

3.0

20

1.0

80

4.0

2.0

20

1.0

60

3.0

2.0

20

1.0

60

3.0

7.0

60

3.0

200

10.0

RESEARCH METHODS COURSE. EPR 100. 30 HOURS.


9

Hours Units

10

This is part of vertical program made up of 5 modules in research methods


and scientific publishing that will be conducted during semester 1 (use of
computers), semester 2 (research methodology and proposal writing),
semester 3 (biostatistics and demography), semester 4 (principles of
epidemiology) and at the end of semester 8 there will be an elective period
of 8 weeks during which the student shall be required to carry out a project
and write a report before proceeding the last semester.

OBJECTIVES.
At the end of the course, the student should be able to,
Use the computer and internet to search for and download programs
and files
Perform literature search
Use the computer to prepare presentations
Communicate with other using e-mail and other internet resources.
The course shall be organised as follows,
Module Code

Name

Lectures

Total

Units

Practicals/
Demonstrations
Hours
Units

Computer uses in 10
research

0.5

30

1.5

40

2.0

10

0.5

30

1.5

40

2.0

Hours
1
Total

EPR
100
1

BIOCHEMISTRY COURSE, BCH 200. 341 Hours.

OBJECTIVES.

10

Hours Units

11

a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course, the student should be able to,
Describe the chemistry of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates and to be
able to recognise their basic structures
Describe cellular organisation at molecular level
Describe the structure and function of enzymes including clinical
applications of enzymology
Describe the principles of biological oxidation, oxidative
phosphorylation and thermodynamics
Describe processes in intermediary metabolism
Describe selected concepts in molecular biology
Describe the porphyrins and pigment metabolism
Describe mechanisms of hormone function and signal transduction
mechanisms.
b). SKILL. At the end of the course the student should be able to do the
following,
Describe gastric, thyroid, liver, renal and pancreatic function tests and
relate these to normal values.
Perform a qualitative test to identify proteins, sugars and lipids
The teaching of biochemistry shall be organized as follows during
semester2.
Module Code Name

Lectures
Practicals/Seminars Total
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units

Cell membranes,
BCH chemistry
of
201
carbohydrates,
50
lipids
and
prostaglandins,
Proteins,
Immunoglobulins,
enzymology,
BCH DNA
structure 50
202
and
function,
vitamins,
hormones.
Techniques
in
11

2.5

30

1.5

80

4.0

2.5

20

1.0

70

3.5

12

Total

biochemistry
Minerals,
radioactive
isotopes,
BCH biological
76
203
oxidation
of
carbohydrates,
lipids,
amino
acids.
Nucleic acids and
energy
metabolism,
BCH nutrition,
204
detoxification and 68
clinical function
tests
4
244

3.8

32

1.6

108

5.4

3.4

15

0.8

83

4.2

12.2

97

4.9

341

17.1

PHYSIOLOGY COURSE. PHY 200. 395 HOURS.


OBJECTIVES.
a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course the student is expected to be
able to:
Describe the various homeostatic and control systems and the way
they operate in the human body.
Enumerate the international system of units which describe mass,
volume, and concentration.
Describe the general physiology of the cell membrane; membrane
potentials in excitable tissues (example; muscle cells and nerves)
List the major constituents of body tissues, and describe the
composition and partitioning of body fluids.
List the composition of blood and describe the general functions of
blood; the formation characteristics and functions of different blood
cells.
List the major divisions of the circulatory system, and describe its
general organization, functions and the control of the cardiovascular
system.

12

13

Describe the functional anatomy of the respiratory system, the


mechanics of breathing, alveolar gas exchange and the control of the
respiratory system.
Describe the functional anatomy of the kidney, the renal mechanisms
of filtration, excretion and re-absorption, concentrating and diluting
mechanisms and the endocrine function of the kidney.
Describe the functional anatomy of the digestive system, the motility,
secretory, digestive, absorptive and endocrine functions of the
digestive system.
Explain the chemical nature of hormones, and describe how the
hormones are secreted, transported in plasma, their functions and how
they are metabolized and excreted.
Describe the organization of the nervous system and explain the
physiological functions, sensory and motor system, autonomic
nervous system; special senses.
b). SKILLS. At the end of the course, the student should be able to do the
following,
Perform haemoglobin concentration estimation, packed cell volume,
red cell and white cell counts
Perform ABO and rhesus blood grouping
Perform a clinical examination of respiratory tract including
respiration rate, artificial respiration and spirometry
Perform a clinical examination of the cardiovascular system including
blood pressure readings, pulse rate, heart sounds, jugular venous
pressure and electrocardiography
Perform a clinical examination of the nervous system including the
cranial nerves, reflexes, sensory and motor systems, visual acuity,
colour vision and hearing tests.

The teaching shall be organised as follows during semester 2.


Module Code Name

Lectures
Practicals/Seminars Total
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units

Cellular
physiology,
13

14

PHY
201

PHY
202

PHY
203
3
Total

nerve
and
muscle, blood, 85
and
cardiovascular
physiology
Gastrointestinal,
urinary
and 50
reproductive
physiology
Endocrine,
neuroand 80
special sensory
physiology
215

4.3

70

3.5

155

7.8

2.5

50

2.5

100

5.0

4.0

60

3.0

140

7.0

10.8

180

9.0

395

19.8

RESEARCH METHODS COURSE. EPR 200. 145 HOURS.


OBJECTIVES. At the end of the course, the student shall be able to,
Use research methods in collecting, analysis and in the presentation of
critical information to stakeholders and other audiences
Describe the physical, biological socio-cultural and environmental
factors that impact on health and disease
Identify the agencies and services that are available to families and
communities and the extent to which these meet the expectations and
needs.

The course shall be organized as follows during semester 2.


Module Code

Name

Lectures
Hours

14

Units

Practicals/
Demonstrations
Hours
Units

Total
Hours Units

15

EPR
200

Total

Research
methodology and 35
family
case
studies
35

1.8

110

5.5

145

7.3

1.8

110

5.5

145

7.3

MICROBIOLOGY COURSE, MIM 300. 437 HOURS.


OBJECTIVES:
a). KNOWLEDGE: At the end of the course, the student shall be able to:
1. State the infective micro-organisms of the human body and describe the
host parasite relationship.
2. List pathogenic micro-organisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites, fungi) and
describe the pathogenesis of the disease produces by them.
3. State or indicate the mode of transmission of pathogenic and
opportunistic organisms and their sources, including insect vectors
responsible for transmission of infection.
4. Describe the mechanism of immunity of infections.
5. Describe the methods of diagnosis of the various infections including
which clinical samples need to be collected, preserved and transported to
the laboratory for diagnosis.
6. Acquire knowledge on suitable anti-microbial agents for treatment of
infections and scope of immuno-therapy and different vaccines available
for prevention of communicable diseases.
7. Apply methods of dis-infection and sterilization to control and prevent
hospital and community acquired infections.
8. Recommend laboratory investigations regarding bacteriological
examination of food, water, milk and air.
9. Describe the life cycle of medically important parasites, the organs that
are commonly affected, pathogenicity and symptoms, endemicity and
epidemicity, methods of control of each parasite.
b). SKILLS: At the end of the course, the student shall be able to do the
following.
1.

Plan and interpret laboratory investigations for the diagnosis of


infectious diseases and to correlate the clinical manifestations with the
etiological agent.
15

16

Identify the common infectious agents with the help of laboratory


procedures and use anti-microbial sensitivity tests to select suitable antimicrobial agents.
3. Perform commonly employed bedside tests for detection of infectious
agents such as blood film for malaria, filaria, gram staining and Acid Fast
Bacilli AFB) staining and stool sample for ova and cysts.
4. Use the correct method of collection, storage and transport of clinical
material for micro-biological investigations.
The teaching of microbiology shall be organised as follows during
semester3.
Module Code

Name

MIM
302

General,
systematic and
diagnostic
82
bacteriology
and infectious
diseases
Immunology,
virology
and 63
mycology

MIM
303
3

Parasitology
and
applied 90
microbiology
235

MIM
301

3
Total

Lectures
Hours Units

Practicals/Seminars Total
Hours
Units
Hours Units

4.1

62

3.0

144

7.2

3.2

70

3.5

133

6.7

4.5

70

3.5

160

8.0

11.8

202

10.0

437

21.9

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND RESEARCH METHODS. EPR 300, EPR 400


AND EPR 800. 526 HOURS.
This course shall be taught during semester 3 (Environmental health and
family case studies, biostatistics and demography).
Semester 4
(epidemiology and medical sociology) and at the end of semester 8 (Elective
period).
OBJECTIVES.
a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course the student should be able to,

16

17

Use the basic principles of epidemiology in research and in planning


of health services
Apply epidemiological methods in assessing community health needs
Use research methods in collecting, analyzing and in the presentation
of critical information to stakeholders and other audiences
Of epidemiological methods in the control of major diseases of public
health importance
Describe the physical, biological, socio-cultural and environmental
factors that impact on health and disease.
Outline the demographic pattern of the country and appreciate the role
of the individual, family, community and socio-cultural millieu in
health and disease.
Describe the health information systems.
Translate healthy policy guidelines into action with more emphasis on
health
Identify environmental and occupational hazards and their control.
Apply the principles of health economics, health administration and
health education in mobilizing resources for the community.
b). SKIILS. At the end of the course, the student should be able to,
Collect, analyse and present simple community and hospital base data
applying biostatistical and epidemiological methods.
Diagnose and manage common health problems and emergencies at
the individual, family and community levels keeping I mind the
existing health care resources and in the context of prevailing sociocultural beliefs.
Be a team leader with other members of the health care team and
participate in the organization of the health care services and
implementation of national health programs.
Plan and carry out a simple research project or study of a health
problem in a community during the elective period and a written
report.
The teaching shall be organized as follows,

17

18

Module Code

Name

Environmental
health
and 20
family
case
studies

EPR 300

EPR
301

Biostatistics
and
demography

4.

5
Total

Lectures
Practicals/Seminars Total
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units
1.0

80

4.0

100

5.0

50

2.5

30

1.5

80

4.0

EPR
400

Principles of 30
Epidemiology

1.5

20

1.0

50

2.5

EPR
401

Medical
Sociology and 90
Health
Psychology

4.5

30

1.5

120

6.0

EPR
800
5

Elective Period

176

17.6

176

17.6

336

16.8

526

26.3

190

9.5

PATHOLOGY COURSE. PAT 400. 349 HOURS.


OBJECTIVES:
a). KNOWLEDGE: At the end of the course, the student shall be able to;
1. Describe the structure and ultra-structure of a sick cell, mechanisms of
cell injury, degeneration, cell death and repair and be able to correlate
structural with functional alterations.
2. Explain the patho-physiological processes that govern the maintenance of
normal homeostasis, their disturbances and the morphologic and clinical
manifestations associated with it.
3. Describe the mechanisms and patterns of tissue response to injury such
that he/she can appreciate the patho-physiology of disease processes and
their clinical manifestations.

18

19

4. Correlate normal and altered morphology (gross and microscopic) of


different organ systems in common diseases and the extent needed for
understanding of disease processes and their clinical significance
b). SKILLS: At the end of the course, the student should be able to:
1. Draw a rational scheme of investigations aimed at diagnosis and
management the cases of common disorders, and to be able to
collect the required specimens appropriately and transmit them to
the laboratory for analysis.
2. Describe the principles of technical procedures of the diagnostic
laboratory tests and interpret the results.
3. Carry out simple bedside tests on blood, stool, urine, other
biological fluids and pus swabs and interpret the results.
4. Be able to carry out a clinical or medico-legal autopsy
examination, collect appropriate samples for chemical,
toxicological or tissue examination and to write a detailed report
The course will be organized as shown below,
Module Code

Name

General
Pathology and 56
LymphoHaematopoietic
System
Systemic
Pathology 1
40
CVS, US, GIT,
HEP

PAT
401
2
PAT
402
3
PAT
403

Systemic
Pathology 2

Lectures
Hours Units

Practicals/Seminars Total
Hours
Units
Hours Units

2.8

53

2.7

109

5.5

2.0

70

3.5

110

5.5

60

3.0

70

3.5

130

6.5

156

7.8

193

9.7

349

17.5

RS, GS, CNS,


MSS, ES
Total

19

20

FORENSIC MEDICINE AND MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE. FME


300, 400 and 800. 190 HOURS.
This is a vertical program that will be taught during semesters 3, 4 and 8.
OBJECTIVES.
At the end of the course, the student should be able to,
Know the requirements of the law concerning the provisions for
registration of medical and dental practitioners
Know the duties of a registered medical or dental practitioner
Know the doctor-patient relationship, confidentiality of patient
information, the concept of a privileged communication and how this
may be divulged
Be able to explain the concept of consent to medical examination,
treatment, autopsy or participation in medical research including the
concept of informed consent and research involving minors or
prisoners.
Be aware of ethical issues relating to research on animals
Be able to identify legal issues regarding professional misconduct and
negligence and its consequences
Know the law concerning abortion and its implications, the rights of
the foetus vis--vis those of the mother
Know the ethical issues concerning treatment and care of mentally ill
patients
Be able to perform a medico-legal postmortem examinations
including ancillary investigations, take appropriate specimens and
write a detailed report
Understand the chain of custody of any evidence and be able to give
evidence including an expert opinion in court
Be able to interpret clinical or toxicological reports.

Module

Code

Name

Lectures

20

Practicals/
Demonstrations

Total

21

2.

3.

Hours

Units

Hours

Units

Hours Units

15

0.8

30

1.5

45

2.3

20

1.0

80

4.0

100

5.0

Medical
ethics 15
and toxicology
50

0.8

30

1.5

45

2.3

2.6

140

7.0

190

9.6

FME
300

Medical ethics

FME
400

Forensic
pathology

FME
800
TOTAL 3

PHARMACOLOGY COURSE. PHA 400. 180 HOURS.


OBJECTIVES.
a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course, the student should be able to;
Know the different dosage forms and routes of drug administration
Understand the pharmacokinetics & pharmacodyanamics of drugs.
Know the mechanisms of drug action doses and preparations,
therapeutic indications and contraindications & adverse drug
reactions of all important drugs.
Classify the drugs into different groups and understand the status
of drugs.
Have a sound knowledge of drug-drug and drug-food interactions
when drug combinations are used.
b). SKILLS. At the end of the course, the student should be able to do the
following,
(1) Interpret a graph showing the action of drugs on
Frogs rectus muscle
Frogs heart preparation
Isolated rabbit duodenum preparation
Isolated pig ileum preparation
Dogs blood pressure and respiration recording

21

22

Nictitating membrane of cat


(2) Prepare & Dispense a lotion, liniment, ointment, emulsion and
mixtures.
(3) Perform a bioassay of unknown solution on a suitable experimental
animal.
The teaching of pharmacology will be organised as follows,
Module

Code Content

1.

PHA
401

Gen. pharm
ANS
CVS
CNS

PHA
402

CNS
Endocrine
GIT.R.S
Kidney
Haematinics

PHA
403

Chemotherapy
Clinical
50
Pharmacology
Tutorial

PHA
404

Practical
Student
Seminars

2.

3.

4.

TOTAL 4

Lecture
Practical
Total
Hrs Units Hrs Units Hrs Units
40

2.0

40

40

2.0

40

2.5

50

2.5

50

2.5

50

2.5

50

2.5

180

130 6.5

9.0

CLINICAL METHODS COURSE CLM 500. 190 HOURS.


OBJECTIVES.
At the end of the course, the student should be able to do the following,
To present oneself properly to a patient before an interview or a
clinical examination
To take a relevant detailed medical history from a patient

22

23

To make a proper systematic physical examination of the patient and


to summarise the major findings
To formulate a clinical working diagnosis from the history and clinical
examination findings and to draw up a list of differential diagnoses.
To list which laboratory investigations that need to be carried out in
order to confirm the diagnosis and judge the patients prognosis.
The course shall be organized and taught during semester 5 as follows,
Module Code

Name

Lectures

CLM
501

Hours
Doctor
patient
relationship and 10
history taking

CLM
502

Physical
examination
the systems

CLM
503

Total

of 20

Examination of
Paediatric,
20
unconscious and
psychiatric
patient
50

Total

Units

Practicals/
Demonstrations
Hours
Units

0.5

40

2.0

50

2.5

1.0

60

3.0

80

4.0

1.0

40

2.0

60

3.0

2.5

140

7.0

190

9.5

Hours Units

COMMUNITY HEALTH COURSE. COH 500. 531 HOURS.


OBJECTIVES
(a) KNOWLEDGE.
to:

At the end of the course, the student shall be able

Describe the health care delivery system including rehabilitation of


the disabled in the country
Translate health policy guidelines into action with more emphasis on
Health Sector Reform

23

24

Outline the demographic pattern of the country and appreciate the role
of the individual, family, community and socio- cultural millieu in
health and disease.
Describe the health information systems.
Identify the environmental and occupational hazards and their control.
Apply the principles of health economics, health administration and
health education in mobilising resources for the community.
(b). SKILLS: At the end of the course the student should be able to do the
following:
Collect, analyse, interpret and present simple community and hospital
based data applying biostatistical and epidemiology methods
Diagnose and manage common health problems and emergencies at
the individual, family and community levels keeping in mind the
existing health care resources and in the context of prevailing sociocultural beliefs.
Be a team leader and interact with other members of the health care
team and participate in the organization of the health care services and
implementation of national health programs
The course in community medicine shall be orgsanised as follows during
semester 5.
Lectures
Module Code
1

Practical/Seminars

Total

Name
Hours

Units

Hours

Units

Hours Units

COM
501

National
programs

health
30

1.5

40

2.0

70

3.5

COM
502

Organisation
of
health services in 20
Tanzania

1.0

10

0.5

30

1.5

COM
503

Maternal and child 20


health services

1.0

60

3.0

80

4.0

24

25

COM
504

Nutrition

COM
505

Planning
management

COM
506

Noncommunicable
disease control

COH
800
7

Total

Public
rotation

15

0.7

40

2.0

55

2.7

30

1.5

40

2.0

70

3.5

20

1.0

20

1.0

40

2.0

176

8.8

176

8.8

286

14.3

531

26.6

and

health
135

6.8

MANAGEMENT OF DISEASES.
This course represents a series of theoretical lectures in each of the major
clinical disciplines of medicine (MED 602 = 52 hours), paediatrics (PED
601 and 603 = 66 hours), surgery (SUR 601 and 602 = 50 hours) and
gynaecology (OBG 601 = 20 hours) shall delivered during semester 5 as
follows,
Number Module
Code
1
MED
602
PED
2
601
3
4
5

PED
603
SUR
601

SUR
602
OBG
601

Total

Name

Hours Units

Cardiovascular and respiratory


system diseases
Growth, development, genetics
and neonatology, MCH, IMCI and
nutrition
Diseases of CVS, GIT, urinary,
nervous and IMCI
Principles of surgery, resuscitation
and disease of skin and musculoskeletal system
Diseases of the gastro-intestinal
system
Anatomy,
embryology
and
physiology of female genital tract,
pregnancy and childbirth

52

2.6

33

1.7

33

1.7

30

1.5

20

1.0

20

1.0

188

9.4

25

26

MEDICINE COURSE. MED 600


OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the medicine course the student shall be able to:
(1) Use the clinical methods of history taking, clinical examination and
contemplation to make provisional diagnosis of the common diseases
affecting the human person.
(2) Use the theoretical knowledge gained during the medicine course to
plan the necessary investigations and the management strategies for
the diseases occurring in his/her patients.
(3) Provide appropriate guidance and advice to patients on how best they
can participate in the effort of promotion of health and prevention of
disease both in the individual and in the community.
(4) Recognise the conditions and situations that constitute emergencies
and summon the necessary assistance to deal with them.
(5) Arrange referrals of patients to secondary and tertiary care health
facilities as may be necessary.
(6) Perform common bedside diagnostic procedures.

The course in medicine shall be organised as shown below during semester


6, 7 and 9. Theoretical teaching in the form of lectures will be done during
semester 5 (management of diseases), semester 6, 7 and 9 as daily lectures.
There will be two rotations of 8 weeks during semester 6 or 7 and a 4-weeks
rotation during 9.
Module Code

Name

Lectures
Clinical/Practicals Totals
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units

Infectious
diseases

36

1.8

Cardiovascular
MED and respiratory 52
system
602

2.6

MED
601

352

Gastrointestinal

26

17.6

27

MED
603

MED
604

MED
605

Total

and pancreas,
liver
and 58
biliary, urinary
and endocrine
system
Nervous
and
musculo55
skeletal system
Diabetes
mellitus,
nutritional and
metabolic
disease, blood, 50
geriatrics,
disaster
medicine and
critical care
251

2.9

2.8

176

8.8

528

26.4

2.5

12.6

779

39.0

This will be covered during semester 5 as management of diseases.


PAEDIATRICS COURSE. PED 600.
OBJECTIVES
a) KNOWLEDGE: At the end of the course, the student shall be able to:
Describe the normal survival, growth and development during foetal
life, neonatal period, infancy and childhood and to some extent
adolescence (age 5-15 years) and outline deviations thereof.
Describe the common paediatric disorders and emergencies in terms
of epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis,
rational therapy and rehabilitation.
State age related requirements of calories, proteins, nutrients like
minerals and vitamins, fluids, drugs etc. in health and disease.
Describe preventive strategies for common infectious disorders,
malnutrition, genetic and metabolic disorders, poisonings, accidents
and child abuse.
Outline national programs relating to child health including
Immunization programs.
27

28

b) SKILLS: At the end of the course, the student shall be to do the


following,
Take a detailed paediatric history, conduct an appropriate clinical
examination of children including neonates, make clinical
diagnosis, conduct common bedside investigative procedures,
interpret common laboratory investigation results and plan and
institute therapy.
Take anthropometric measurements, resuscitate newborn infants at
birth, prepare oral re-hydration solutions, perform tuberculin test,
administer vaccines available under current national programs,
perform venesection, start an intravenous saline and provide
nasogastric feeding.
Conduct diagnostic procedures such as lumbar puncture, liver and
kidney biopsy, bone marrow aspiration, pleural tap and ascitic fluid
tap.
Distinguish between normal newborn babies and those requiring
special care including care of pre-term and low birth weight
babies, provide correct guidance and counseling in breast feeding.
Provide ambulatory care to all sick children, identify indications
for specialized or in-patient care and ensure timely referral of those
who require hospitalization.
Be conversant with social and community children problems and
their management like HIV/AIDS orphans, street children, cerebral
palsy, mental deficiency etc.
Be able to recognize specialist cases for referral and where to refer
to e.g. recognition of endocrine cases like congenital adrenal
hyperplasia and refer to the right physician.
Deliver preventive, promotive, curative and rehabilitative services
to children both in the community and hospital as part of a team in
an integrated form with other disciplines in medicine and other
social and government departments.
The teaching of paediatrics and child health shall be organised as follows
during semester 6, 7 and 9.

28

29

Module Code

Name

Lectures
Clinicals/Seminars Total
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units

Growth
and
33
PED development,genetics
neonatology
and
601
nutrional
diseases,
MCH, IMCI

Infectious
disease,
HIV/AIDS,
41
dermatology/STDs and
immunological diseases

PED
602

PED CVS, GIT, Urinary, 33


nervous and IMCI
603

PED
604

Paediatric
oncology,
endocrinology
and 28
emotional/psychological
disorders

PED
900

Seminar presentations of selected topics

Total

135

1.7

352

17.6

176

8.8

528

26.4

2.0

1.6

1.4

6.7

663

Covered during semester 5 as management of diseases.


SURGERY COURSE. SUR 600.
OBJECTIVES.
At the end of the course, the student should be able to,
Take a medical history, make a physical examination to elicit
appropriate signs, formulate an appropriate diagnosis, request
appropriate laboratory and radiological investigations, carry out
the necessary tests and interpret them properly
Institute appropriate surgical or medical treatment and refer cases that
require specialist care
29

33.1

30

Be a team leader in the integrated approach to surgical care in the


community including teaching and supervision.
Contribute to research and continuing medical attention.

The teaching of surgery shall be conducted during semester 5, 6, 7 and 9.


Management of diseases will cover theory lectures for modules SUR 601
and 602. Daily lectures shall continue during semesters 6, 7 and nine
together with other clinical courses. There will a junior 8-weeks rotation
during semester 6 or 7 and a senior 4-weeks rotation during semester 9.
Module Code Name

SUR
601

Lectures
Clinical/Practical
Total
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units

Principles
of
surgery,
resuscitation,
diseases of skin 30
and
musculoskeletal
system

1.5

SUR
602

Disease
of
gastro-intestinal 20
system

1.0

SUR
603

Genitourinary
system
disorders

30

1.5

SUR
604

Endocrine,
breast, thoracic
cavity
and 40
hepato-biliary
disorders

2.0

6.

SUR
605

Paediatric
surgery

SUR
606

Trauma,
degenerative
and

20

2.0

40

2.0

30

352

17.6

176

8.8

31

cardiovascular
system
disorders.
Total

180

9.0

528

26.4

718

35.4

Covered as management of diseases during semester 5.


OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY COURSE. OBG 600.
OBJECTIVES.
At the end of the course, the student should be able to,
Acquire the right skills of history taking, examination including a
pelvic examination, and to formulate a n accurate diagnosis
Diagnose and treat appropriately common obstetric and gynaecologic
conditions, and recognise and refer those that need expert care.
Recognise and treat accordingly or refer, life threatening obstetric
cases
Apply preventive aspects of obstetrics, gynaecology and reproductive
health, including family planning methods.
The teaching shall be organised during semester 5, 6, 7 and 9. Theory classes
shall be given in semester 5 for module 1 OBG 601 as part of management
of disease. Other theory classes shall be given during the daily lecture
classes during semesters 6,7 and 9. There will be a junior rotation of 8 weeks
during semester 6 and 7 and a senior rotation of 4 weeks during semester 9.
During the rotations the students shall rotate in obstetrics in small groups..
Module Code Name

Lectures
Clinical/Practical
Total
Hours Units Hours
Units
Hours Units

Anatomy,
physiology,
embryology
OBG of
female 20
601 genital tract,
pregnancy
and childbirth

1.0
352

31

17.6

32

OBG Abnormal
602
obstetrics

50

2.5

OBG Gynaecology
603

45

2.3

3
Total

115

4.8

176

8.8

528

26.4

643

31.3

This will be covered during semester 5 as management of diseases.


OPHTHALMOLOGY COURSE, OPH 800.
OBJECTIVES.
(a). KNOWLEDGE: At the end of the course, the student shall have
knowledge of:
Be aware of the common problems affecting the eye
Know the principles of management of major ophthalmic emergencies
Describe the common systemic diseases affecting the eye
Describe the effects of local and systemic diseases on patients vision
and the necessary action required to minimize the sequel of such
diseases.
Describe the adverse drug reactions with special reference to
ophthalmic manifestations.
Know the magnitude of the problem of blindness Africa and its
principle causes
Describe the national program for control of blindness and its
implementation at various levels in Tanzania
Give health education for prevention of eye disease
Describe the role of health center and rural dispensary in organization
of eye camps
Describe the organization of primary health care and the functioning
of the ophthalmic assistant
Endevour to integrate
of the national program for control of
blindness with the other national health program in Tanzania.
Organise an eye bank.

32

33

(b) SKILLS. At the end of the course, the students shall be able to do the
following,
Take a pertinent history concerning general health and ocular status
Perform or assist in diagnostic procedures such as visual acuity
testing, examination of eye, schiotz tonometry, staining for corneal
pathology, confrontation perimetry, presbyopia and aphakia, direct
ophthalmoscopy and conjunctival smear examination at cover test.
Diagnose and treat common problems affecting the eye
Interpret ophthalmic signs in relation to common systemic disorders.
Assist during therapeutic procedures such as sub-conjunctival
injection, corneal conjunctival foreign body removal, carbolic cautery
for corneal ulcers, nasolacrimal duct syringing and tarsorraphy.
Provide first aid in major ophthalmic emergencies.
Assist to organize community surveys for visual check up.
Organize primary eye care services through primary health centers.
Use effective means of communication with the public and individual
to motivate for surgery in cataract and for eye donation.
Be a team leader by establishing rapport with his seniors, colleagues
and paramedical workers, so as to effectively function as a member of
eye care team.
The teaching of ophthalmology will be divided into parts. Theory classes
will begiven during semester 5 and there will be a clinical rotation of 3
weeks during semester 8 as follows,

Module Code Name

OPH

Lectures
Clinical/Practical Total
Hours Units Hours
Units Hours Units

Functional
anatomy and
physiology of
eye, refraction,

33

34

801

OPH
802

Total

disease
of 20
conjunctiva,
cornea
and
lids.
Community
ophthalmology
Cataract
management,
uveal tract and
vitreous,
glaucoma and
retina,
optic 30
nerve,
orbit
visual
pathways and
ocular
neoplasms.
Strabismus and
ocular surgery.
50

132

4.4

132

4.4

1.5

2.5

182

6.9

Theory classes given during semester 5.


PSYCHIATRY COURSE. PSY 800.
OBJECTIVES.
a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course, the student shall be able to:
Comprehend the nature and development of different aspects or
human behaviour like bio-psychosocial functioning, learning,
memory, motivation, personality and intelligence.
Recognize differences between normal and abnormal behaviour
Appreciate promotive and protective factors for mental health
as well as pre-disposing, precipitating and exacerbating factors
of mental disturbances.
Appreciate holistic approach to management of mental

disorders
Recognize clinical manifestations of the following common
categories of mental disorders and be able to manage them:
34

35

Organic mental disorders


Functional psychoses
Anxiety conditions
Personality disorders
Substance abuse disorders
Forensic psychiatry
Psychiatric disorders of childhood and adolescence
Interview the client and understand different methods
of communications in patient-doctor relationship
Define, elicit and interpret psychological symptoms and
signs.
Conduct a bio-psychosocial and diagnostic formulation
of assessed clients.
Diagnose and manage psychological disturbances such
as HIV VCT counseling, crisis management, drug,
alcohol and bereavement counseling.
b). SKILLS. At the end of the course, the student should be able to do the
following.
Elicit detailed psychiatric case history and conduct clinical
examination for assessment of mental status.
Define and classify psychiatric disorders
Identify and list biological, psychological and social factors that
influence mental illness presentation and course
Diagnose and manage psychological disturbances such as HIV
voluntary counseling and testing, crisis management, drug, alcohol
and bereavement counseling.
The teaching of pyschiatry shall be organised in the form of theory lectures
and a clinical rotation of 4 weeks during semester 8.
Module Code Name
1

PSY
800

Normal
and
abnormal
behaviour
and

Lectures
Hours Units

Clinical/Practical Total
Hours
Hours Units

50

176

2.5

35

8.8

226

11.3

36

mental
illness

EAR NOSE AND THROAT COURSE. ENT 800.


OBJECTIVES.
a). KNOWLEDGE.
At the end of the course, the student should be able to;
Understand the functional anatomy and organisation of the region
Describe the pathophysiology of common ear, nose and ear diseases
and emergencies
Suggest appropriate investigations and their interpretation
Assist or carry out minor surgical procedures like ear syringing, ear
dressings or nasal packing
Assist in certain procedures such as tracheostomy, endoscopies and
removal of foreign bodies.
b). SKILLS.
At the end of the course, the student should be able to do the following,
Examine and diagnose common ear, nose and ear problems including
pre-malignant and malignant conditions.
Manage ear, nose and throat problems at first level of care and be able
to refer when necessary.
Assist or carry out minor surgical procedures like ear syringing, ear
dressings, nose packs
Assist in certain procedures such as tracheostomy, endoscopies,
removal of foreign bodies and major procedures like tonsillectomy or
laryngectomy.
The course in oto-rhino-laryngology (ENT) shall consist of theory lectures
and a clinical of 1 week during semester 8.

36

37

Module Code

Name

Lecture Unit Practical/ Unit Total


Hour
Clinic Hr
Hour Unit

Diseases of
ENT 800 Ear, nose and throat 55

2.8

44

2.2

99

5.0

DERMATOLOGY COURSE. DEM 800.


OBJECTIVES.
a). KNOWLEDGE. At the end of the course, the student should,
Be able to recognise common dermatological symptoms and diseases
and manage them accordingly
Be able to recognise and treat sexually transmitted diseases
appropriately and refer those who need specialist care
Be able to collect appropriate clinical samples including biopsies,
transport them safely and appropriately to laboratory for examination
Be able to interpret laboratory results
Have knowledge concerning dermatological preparations and their
uses.
b). SKILLS. At the end of the course, the student should be able to do the
following,
Take an appropriate medical history and examine a patient with
dermatological diseases, formulate a diagnosis, make appropriate
laboratory investigations and institute the required management.
Collect appropriate laboratory samples and be able to interpret the
results
Give emergency treatment and refer patients who need specialist care
Determine the prevalence of dermatological illness in a community
and advise on appropriate strategies to reduce the burden of disease.
The teaching of dermatology shall be organised with theory lectures and a
clinical rotation of 2 weeks during semester 8 as follows,

37

38

Module Code
1

DEM
800

Name

Lecture Unit Practical/


Total
Hour
Clinical
Hours
Units Hour

Dermatology and
sexually transmitted 30
diseases

1.5

88

4.4

118

Unit
5.5

ORTHOPAEDICS COURSE. ORP 800.


OBJECTIVES.
(a). KNOWLEDGE:

At the end of the course, the student be able to:

Explain the principles of recognition of bone injuries and dislocation.


Apply suitable methods to detect and manage common infections of
bones and joints.
Identify congenital, skeletal anomalies and their referral for
appropriate correction or rehabilitation.
Recognize metabolic disease as seen in this country in Tanzania.
Explain etiogenesis, manifestations, diagnosis of neoplasm affecting
bones.
(b). SKILLS. At the end of the course, the student shall be able to:
Diagnose sprains and common fractures using appropriate clinical and
radiological means and manage uncomplicated fractures of clavicle,
Colles, forearm, phalanges etc.
Use techniques of splinting, plaster, immobilization etc.
Manage common bone infections, learn indications for sequestration,
amputations and corrective measure for bone deformities.
Advice aspects of rehabilitation for polio, cerebral palsy and
amputation.
Be able to perform certain orthopedic skills, provide sound advice of
skeletal and related conditions at primary or secondary health care
level.

38

39

The course in orthopedics shall be organised with theory lectures during


semester 5 and a clinical rotation of 4 weeks during semester 8 as
follows,
Module Code

ORP
800

Name

Lecture

Hour
Traumatology,
metabolic, congenital
and neoplastic disease 75
of bone, joints and
muscle

Practical/
Total
Clinicals
Unit Hours
Unit Hour Unit
3.8

176

8.8

251 12.6

Theory lectures given during semester 5.

RADIOLOGY COURSE. RAD 800.


OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the course, the student shall be able to:
Understand basics of x-ray production, its uses and hazards.
Recognise radiologic changes in bones and soft tissues in order to
diagnose fractures, infections, tumours and metabolic bone diseases.
Learn the principles and uses of various imaging techniques, including
isotopes, computerised tomography (C.T), ultrasound, magnetic
resonance imaging (M.R.I) and D.S.A.
Use basic protective techniques during various imaging procedures.
Take a detailed history, make physical examination, plan laboratory
and radiological investigations, formulate a diagnosis of malignant
disease and plan on management including, medical, surgical or
radiotherapy as appropriate.
The teaching of radiology shall be organized with theory lectures and a
clinical rotation of 2 weeks during semester 8 as follows,
Lectures

39

Practical/

Total

40

Module Code

Name

Hours
Diagnostic
radiology, imaging 30
techniques
and
radiotherapy

RAD
800

Clinicals
Unit Hours

Units Hours Units

1.5

4.4

88

118

5.9

ANAESTHESIOLOGY COURSE. ANE 800.


OBJECTIVES.
At the ends of the course, the student should be able to,
Examine patients to determine their suitability for surgery and
administration of anaesthetic agents
To determine appropriate anaesthjetic method suitable for each patient
To know the effects, side effects and unexpected effects of anaesthetic
agents and their management and methods of resuscitation.
To know and be able to use the EMO system and be familiar with
Boyles machine.
To be able to perform intubation safely.
The teaching of anaesthesia shall be conducted with theory lectures and a
clinical rotation of one week during semester 8 as follows.
Module Code

Name

ANE 800 Anaesthesiology

Lecture
Hour

Practical/
Total
Clinicals
Hour Unit
Unit Hour
Units

20

1.0

40

44

2.2

64

3.2