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SCHEME OF PAPERS

B.A./B.Sc. Anthropology- Core Course


FIRST SEMESTER
Paper E 101:

Introduction to Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

SECOND SEMESTER
Paper-E 201

First Half :

Physical Anthropology and Social & Cultural


Anthropology
Physical Anthropology: Human Evolution

Second Half: Social and Cultural Anthropology: Social Institution


and Culture

Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

THIRD SEMESTER
Paper-E 301

First Half:

Physical Anthropology & Practical in Prehistory


and Technology
Physical Anthropology: Human Variation

Second Half: Practical in Prehistory and Technology

Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

FOURTH SEMESTER
Paper-E 401:

First Half:

Prehistoric Anthropology & Physical Anthropology


Practical
Prehistoric Anthropology

Second Half: Physical Anthropology Practical

Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

FIFTH SEMESTER
Paper-E 501

First Half:

Human Genetics and Physical Anthropology


Practical
Human Genetics

Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Second Half: Physical Anthropology Practical

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

SIXTH SEMESTER
Paper-E 601
First Half:

Field Methodology and Field Work based


Report
Field Methodology and Elementary Statistic

Second Half: Field work based Report

Marks 100
Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks: 50

B.A./B.Sc. Anthropology- Core Course


FIRST SEMESTER
Paper E 101: Introduction to Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
The course aims to help the students to understand the holistic perspectives and
integrative approaches of anthropology, not only amongst its four branches but also across a
wide variety of other disciplines.
Unit 1.1:

Fundamental of Anthropology:

Marks: 20
14 Lectures
Meaning and Scope of Anthropology, History and development
of
Anthropology, Branches of Anthropology: (a) Social-Cultural Anthropology,
(b) Physical Anthropology, (c) Prehistoric Anthropology, (d) Linguistic
Anthropology. Relationship of Anthropology with other disciplines: Life
Sciences, Social Sciences, Environmental Sciences and other Sciences.

Unit 1.2:

Fundamentals of Physical Anthropology

Marks: 20
14 Lectures
Definition, aim and scope of Physical Anthropology and its relationship with
other branches of Anthropology. A general study of human skeleton. Mans
place in the animal kingdom. Classification of mammals and their
characteristic features, classification of primates and their characteristic
features. Comparative study of the anatomical characters of apes and man.
Changes in the human skeleton due to assumption of erect posture and bipedal
locomotion.

Unit 1.3:

Fundamentals of Social-Cultural Anthropology

Marks: 20
10 Lectures
Definition, aim and scope of social cultural anthropology and its relationship
with other branches of anthropology. Concept of culture: meaning and
definition, material and non-material culture. Culture trait, culture complex,
culture area, culture centre.

Unit 1.4:

Fundamentals of Prehistoric Anthropology

Marks: 20
12 Lectures
Definition, aim and scope of pre-historic anthropology, and its relationship
with other branches of anthropology. Prehistory and Proto-history; Methods of
studying
prehistoric
anthropology:
Geological
(stratigraphical),
Palaeontological, Archaeological (typological) and Ethnographical. Tool
technology and tool type.

Unit 1.5:

Fundamentals of Applied Anthropology

Marks: 20
10 Lectures
Application of Anthropological knowledge in the field of administration,
health and education.
Knowledge of Anthropometry and Human Genetics for human welfare.
3

Recommended Reading:
1. Beals, Ralph L. Harry Hoijer
and Alan R. Beals (1977)
: An Introduction to Anthropology (5 th edition),
London. Collier Macmillan Publishers (Relevant
chapters 2,7,8,19).
2. Bhattacharyya, D.K. (1972) : Prehistoric
Archaeology,
Delhi,
Hindustan
Publishing Corporation (Introduction and relevant
chapters like 1 to 8).
3. Buettner-Janusch, John(1969): Origins of Man, New Delhi, Willey Eastern Pvt.
Ltd.
4. Das, Priyabala (1974)
: Prathamik Aboyabik Nritattwa (in Assamese)
Gauhati, Gauhati University Text Book Production
Corporation
(Relevant
chapters
like
8,9,10,11,12,13).
5. Das, B. M. (1971)
: Outlines of Physical Anthropology, Allahabad,
Kitabmahal (Relevant chapters like 1, 2, 3).
6. Herskovits, Mellville, J (1969): Cultural Anthropology, New Delhi, Oxford and
IBH Publishing Co. (Relevant Chapters like 1,3,4).
7. Hammond, Peter B. (1971) : An Introduction to Cultural and Social
Anthropology, New York, Macmillan.
8. Keesing, Roger, M. (1976) : Cultural
Anthropology,
A
Contemporary
Perspective, New York, Macmillan.
9. Kroeber A.L. (1948)
: Anthropology, Calcutta, Oxford and IBH
Publishing.
10. Sarkar, R.M. (1976)
: Fundamentals of Physical Anthropology, Calcutta,
Blackie (India).
11. Sharma, Tarun Chandra (1974): Prageitihasik Nritattwa (in Assamese). Part I,
Gauhati, G.U. Text Book Production Corporation.
12. Sharma, Tarun Chandra (1975):Pragoitihasik Nritattwa (in Assamese) Part II,
Gauhati G.U. Text Book Production Corporation.
13.Sharma, Harish Chandra (1980): Pragoitihasik Karikori Nritattwa (in Assamese),
Gauhati, G.U. Text Book Production Corporation.
14. Reddy, V. R. (1987)
: Elements of Prehistory.New Delhi.
15. Medhi B. K.and Ali
: Samajik Nritattar Shamved (Assamese).
16. Advice by Prof. B. Choudhury that General Anthropological book by Ember and
Ember should be included as reference book.
17. Duranti, Allessandro (ed.) (2006): A Companion to Linguistic Anthropology. 350
Main Street, Malden, Blackwell Publishing.
18. Srivastava, A.R.N. (2005):
Essentials of Cultural Anthropology. New Delhi.
Prentice-Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.
19. Basu Roy, Indrani:
Anthropology
20. Das, R.C.(2008):
Anthropology, Part I, Amrita Prakashan, Guwahati.
21. Haviland, W.J.:
Anthropology

SECOND SEMESTER
Paper-E 201 Physical Anthropology and Social and Cultural
Anthropology
First Half :

Physical Anthropology: Human Evolution

Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims to help the students to reconstruct the past of the mankind surveying
the available theories on the processes of human evolution with the help of accumulated
material evidences. Highlighting the anatomical peculiarities of the present day man, this
course would further compare the anatomical details with the non-human primates.
Unit 2.1:

General principles of organic evolution, concept of evolution


Lamarckism, Darwinism, and Synthetic theory.

Unit 2.2:

Evolution of primates: a general study of the following fossil


types Adapidae, Anaptomorphidae, Parapithecus, Propliopithecus,
Limnopithecus and Dryopithecinae.
Marks: 15
10 Lectures

Unit 2.3:

Evolution of man: the study of the following fossils remains to


understand the evolutionary stages of man: Australopithecinae
Homo erectus: Pithecanthropus and Sinanthropus
Homo neanderthalensis
Homo sapiens: Grimaldi, Chancelade, Cromagnon.

Second Half: Social and Cultural Anthropology: Social Institution and


Culture

Marks: 15
8 Lectures

Marks: 20
12 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course provides an overview of fundamental human institutions as well as the
basic concepts for understanding and explaining these institutions. The students are also
acquainted with the various socio-cultural anthropological theories.
Unit 2.4:

Marriage and Family definition, types, distinctive features


and functions.

Unit 2.5:

Kinship definition, terminology and its classification Kinship Marks: 10


usages.
6 Lectures

Unit 2.6:

Culture and society; and their relationship. Culture and


Environment relationship. Culture and language, Concept
of culture and personality, the role of culture in personality
formation.

Marks: 15
8 Lectures

Unit 2.7:

A general outline on various socio-cultural anthropological


theories with special reference to:

Marks: 25
10 Lectures

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Evolutionism: Classical and Neo Evolutionism


Diffusionism
Functionalism
Structuralism
First Half: Recommended Readings:
1. British Museum
: Hand of Evolution.
2. Buettner Janusch John (1969): Origin of Man. New Delhi, Wiley Eastern Pvt. Ltd.
3. Das, B. M. (1971)
: Outline of Physical Anthropology (Relevant
chapters like 4, 5)
4. Das, Priyabala (1976)
: Jiwasma Manav (in Assamese), Gauhati, G.U. Text
Book Corporation.
5. Howells, W. W. (1964)
: Mankind in the Making : The story of Human
Evolution, London, Mercury Books (Relevant
chapter like 1).
6. Hootan, E.A. (1965)
: Up From the Ape. Delhi, Motilal Banarasi Das.
7. Korn
: Human evolution.
8. Kraus, Bertum
: The Basis of Human Evolution.
9. Ashley Mortagu, M.F.
: Physical Anthropology.
10. Rastogy and Shukla
: Physical Anthropology and Human Genetics.
11. Sarkar, R.M. (1976)
: Fundamental of Physical Anthropology.
12. Sankalia, H.D.
: Old Stone Age Tools and Their Probable
Functions.
13. Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Notes and Queries
in Anthropology.
Second Half : Recommended Readings:
1. Ali Irshad and B.K.Medhi (1982): Samajik Nritattwa Sambhed (in Assamese),
Guahati G.U.
2. Beals, Ralph L. Harry Hoijer
and Alam R. Beals (1977) :
An Introduction to Anthropology (Relevant
chapters like 11 to 15 and 20).
3. Hoebel, E. Adamson (1958): Man in the Primitive World (2 nd Edn.) New York
Mc-Grow Hill Book Co. Inc.
4. Keesing, Roger, M. (1976) : Culture Anthropology A Contemporary
Perspective.
5. Majumdar, D.N. and (1961): An Introduction to Social Anthropology, Bombay,
T.N. Madan
Asia Publishing House.
6. Malefijit, Annemarie de Waal (1968): Religion and culture (An Introduction to
Anthropological study of Religion), London,
Collier Macmillan (Relevant chapters like 1,4,12).
7. Norbeck, Edward (1961) :
Religion in Primitive Society. New York, Harper &
Raw, Inc.
8. Piddington, R. (1960)
:
An Introduction to Social Anthropology, Vol. I,
London, Oliver and Boyd.
9. Lasker, G.W.
Physical Anthropology.
10. Banerjee, H.N.
An Introduction to Social and Cultural
Anthropology.
11. McIver and Page
Society: An Introduction.
12. Das R. C.(1989):
Prarombhic Nrittata (in Assamese), 2 nd Part,
Samudra Printers, Guwahati.
6

THIRD SEMESTER
Paper-E 301 Physical Anthropology and Practical in Prehistory and
Technology
First Half:

Physical Anthropology: Human Variation

Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course introduces the students to the racial variation as a product of complex
process of evolution and genetics.
Unit 3.1:

Human variation: climatic adaptation, ecological rules,


Adaptive strategies and adaptability.

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Unit 3.2:

Biological basis of human variation: mutation, selection,


hybridization and genetic drift

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Unit 3.3:

Modern concept of Race. Study of some racial criteria: stature,


skin colour, head form, nose form, face form, eye, ABO blood
group, dermatoglyphics.

Unit 3.4:

Major racial groups of the world their physical characters


and distribution. Racial classification of Human population
in India. H.H. Risley, B.S. Guha, S.S. Sarkar.

Second Half: Practical in Prehistory and Technology

Marks: 20
12 Lectures
Marks: 10
6 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
The course aims to help the students to study prehistoric tools as well as material
artifacts including pottery and other household implements in relation to cultural
development.
Group A

Prehistory:

Marks: 25
16 Lectures
Objective: Students should be able to identify the tool types they have studied
in the evolutionary sequence along with their techniques of manufacture.
Students are to undertake systematic drawing and description of the following
tool types illustrating morphological features, techniques, probable use,
probable age, manipulating, tool type etc.
1. Lower Palaeolithic 2 (two)
2. Middle Palaeolithic 2 (four)
3. Upper Palaeolithic 2 (two)
4. Mesolithic 2 (two)
5. Neolithic 2 (two)
Students shall maintain a Laboratory Note Book for which 5 marks are allotted

Group B:

Technology:

Marks: 25
14 Lectures

Objective: Study of implements, illustrative of material culture and


subsistence economy of the tribal and non-tribal communities with special
reference to North east India. Students are to systematically draw and describe
the following implements:
1. Hunting 2(two)
2. Fishing 2(two)
3. Agriculture - 2(two)
4. Basketry - 2(two)
The record of work is to maintained in Practical Note Book for which 5 marks
are allotted.
[The students may be exposed to various objects of material culture during
their ethnographic fieldwork]

First Half: Recommended Readings:


1. Boyd, W.C. (1950):
Genetics and the Races of Man. Boston: D.C. Heath.
2. Coon, S.C.; S.M. Garn and J.B. Birdsell (1950): Races: A Study of the Problems of Race
Formation in Man. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas.
3. Coon, S.C. (1962):
The Origin of Races. New York, K. Knopf.
4. Garn, S.M. (1969):
Human Races. Springfield, Charles C. Thomas.

FOURTH SEMESTER
Paper-E 401: Prehistoric Anthropology & Practical in Physical
Anthropology
First Half:

Prehistoric Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
The paper projects man as a cultural being in historical perspective. It also deals with
glimpses on origin and development of tool forms and technology. Handling of material
remains such as stone, bone and wooden tools, metal objects, pottery of different shapes,
function all help the students to understand the cultural evolutions through typo-technology.
Unit 4.1:

Geological Time Scale, Pleistocene period and its significance in prehistory.


Climatic Fluctuation during Pleistocene period: Glacial and Interglacial,
Pluvial and Inter-Pluvial.

Unit 4.2:

Prehistoric technology: tool type; tool technology and tool industry. Dating
Technique: Relative (Stratigraphical and Associated finds) and Absolute
(Radiocarbon and Potassium Argon).

Unit 4.3:

Prehistoric culture: Lower Palaeolithic, Middle Palaeolithic and Upper


Palaeolithic culture; Mesolithic culture, Lower Palaeolithic culture of Africa,
Europe and India.

Unit 4.4:

Neolithic Association of Geological Time Scale with Prehistoric culture,


Cultural Development, Indus valley civilization.

Second Half: Practical in Physical Anthropology

Marks 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
this practical course aims to strengthen the confidence of students to employ
appropriate instrument and techniques required for various measurements and observations.
Group A:

Somatometry and Somatoscopy

Marks: 20
14 Lectures

Somatometry: Candidates shall record somatometric measurements taken on 3 subjects:


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Maximum head length


Maximum head breadth
Horizontal circumference of head
Minimum frontal breadth
Breadth of bi-zygomatic arc
Total facial height
Upper facial height
Nasal height

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Nasal breadth
Stature
Sitting height vertex
Height tragus
Height acromion
Girth of thorax
Bi-acromial diameter
Weight

Indices to be calculated :
1. Cephalic Index
2. Nasal Index
3. Morphological facial Index
4. Morphological Upper facial Index
5. Relative sitting height Index
6. Breadth-height Index
7. Length-height Index
Somatoscopy: The following observations shall be made on 3 individuals:
1
2

3
4
5
6
7

8
9

Marks: 15
8 Lectures

Skin Colour
Hair on head
a) hair form
b) hair texture
c) hair whorl
Beard and Moustache quantity
Forehead slope
Supra-orbital ridges promience
Eye
a) eye-fold
b) eye-slit
Nose
a) nasal root
b) nasal bridge
c) nasal septum
Lips size
Face
a) frontal outline
b) prognathism
c) malar prominence

Group B: Osteology:

Marks: 15
8 Lectures

Drawing, Description and identification (side & position) of the following


bones of human skeleton:
Frontal, parietal, occipital, mandible, scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, pelvis,
femur, tibia and fibula.
First Half : Recommended Readings:
1. Bhattacharyya, D.K. (1972): Prehistoric
Archaeology,
Delhi,
Hindustan
Publishing Corporation (Introduction and relevant
chapters like 1 to 8).
2. Sharma, Tarun Chandra (1974): Prageitihasik Nritattwa (in Assamese). Part I,
Gauhati G.U. Text Book Production Corporation.
3. Sharma, Tarun Chandra (1975) :Pragoitihasik Nritattwa (in Assamese). Part II,
Gauhati G.U. Text Book Production Corporation.
4. Sharma, Harish Chandra (1980): Pragoitihasik Karikori Nritattwa (in Assamese),
Gauhati, G.U. Text Book Production Corporation.
5. Reddy, V.R. (!987)
: Elements of Prehistory, New Delhi.
10

FIFTH SEMESTER
Paper-E 501 Human Genetics and Physical Anthropology Practical

Marks 100
60 Lectures

First Half:

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Human Genetics

Objective:
The course is design to help the students to study the genetic aspects of human being.
Unit 5.1:

Elementary knowledge of Human Genetics: meaning, aim &


scope of Human Genetics.

Unit 5.2:

Biological basis of mans inheritance cell, cell division,


chromosome, gene DNA & RNA, Cell Divisions,
Linkage and crossing over, Mendels Laws.

Unit 5.3:

Methods of studying human genetics: twin method, Pedigree


method.

Second Half: Physical Anthropology Practical

Marks: 10
8 Lectures
Marks: 25
16 Lectures

Marks: 15
6 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims to familiarize the students with practical knowledge with respect to
Craniometry, Osteometry, Serology and Dermatoglyphics.
Unit 5.4:

Craniometry

Marks: 15
10 Lectures
The following direct linear measurements are to be taken on 3(three) human
skulls:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Unit 5.5:

Max. cranial length


Max. cranial breadth
Glabella-inion length
Minimum frontal breadth
Nasal height
Bizygomatic breadth
Bimastoid diameter

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

Bicondylar breadth
Nasion-prosthion line
Frontal chord
Parietal chord
Occipital chord
Length of foramen magnum
Height of ramus

Osteometry

Marks: 15
8 Lectures

The following measurements are to be taken on a pair of bone for each case.
Scapula

Anatomical breadth
Anatomical length
Length of axillary border
11

Humerus

Femur
Indices to be calculated:

Maximum length
Breadth of proximal epiphysis
Breadth of distal epiphysis
Least girth of shaft
Maximum length
Physiological length
Girth of the shaft
(1) Scapular index
(2) Caliber index

Unit 5.6:

Serology

Marks: 10
6 Lectures
Students are required to be acquainted with the slide/tile method of determine
blood grouping. They are to determine ABO blood grouping of 10 (ten)
individuals.

Unit 5.7:

Dermatoglyphics

Marks: 10
6 Lectures
Students are required to be acquainted with the technique of collection of
finger and palm prints and identification of finger type patterns by Galton and
palmar main line formula. They shall collect and analyze finger and palm
prints of 10 (ten) individuals.

First Half: Recommended Readings:


1. Buettner-Janusch, John (1969): Origins of Man, New Delhi, Wiley Eastern Pvt.
Ltd. (Relevant chapter like 2)
2. Comas, Juan (1960)
: Manual of Physical Anthropology, Springfield,
Illinois.
3. Neel, James, V. (1968)
: Human Heredity, Chicago, The Univ. of Chicago
& William J. Schull
Press.
4. Stern, Curt (1968)
: Principles of Human Genetics, Eurasia Publishing
House Pvt., New Delhi (Relevant chapters like
1,2,6,8,10-14,18,23).
5. Stein, Philip L. (1978)
: Physical Anthropology, New York. Mc.Grow Hill
& Bruce M. Powe
Book Co.
6. Das, B.M.
: Outlines of Physical Anthropology.
7. Strickberget
: Element in Human Genetics.
8. Das R. C. (2008)
: Anthropology, Part I, Amrita Prakashan, Guwahati.
9. Das R.C. (1985)
: Prarombhic Nrittata (in Assamese), 1 st Part, Arya
Book Stall, Guwahati.

12

SIXTH SEMESTER
Paper-E 601 Field Methodology and Fieldwork based Report

Marks 100

First Half:

Marks: 40
30 Lectures

Field Methodology and Elementary Statistic

Objective:
This course aims to impart theoretical knowledge on field methodology in
anthropology.
Unit 6.1:

Fieldwork tradition in Anthropology.

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Unit 6.2:

Observation, Interview, Schedule, Questionnaire, Genealogy,


Case study.

Marks: 10
8 Lectures

Unit 6.3:

Tabulation of data: Diagrammatic Representation frequency


distribution, histogram, polygon and pie diagram.

Marks: 10
8 Lectures

Unit 6.4:

Elementary Statistics: Measures of Central Tendency mean,


median and mode; standard deviation and standard error.

Marks: 10
8 Lectures

Second Half: Fieldwork based Report

Marks: 60

Objective:
The objective of this course is to expose the students to the actual field situation and
to help them verify the theoretical knowledge that they have gathered in their classroom with
respect to field methodology.
Part-A:

Field work based report

Marks: 50

Students are required to undertake ethnographic field investigations in rural


area (preferable a tribal village), under the guidance of teacher(s) at least for 7
days.
Each student shall carry out conducted fieldwork under the supervision of
teacher/s investigations independently and shall submit a report on the work
done covering the following:
1. Village plan and description.
2. Demographic outline (based on analysis of data with the help of household
survey schedule, the proforma of which is given in Annexure-I).
3. A brief description on the somatometric traits; somatoscopic observation
and morphological and behavioural traits of the people.
4. Any one of the following topic selected in consultation with the
supervising teacher(s).
a) Agriculture
b) Cottage industries
c) Village organization
d) Marriage
e) Lifecycle
13

f)
g)
h)
i)
j)

Fishing
Personal adornment
House types
Religion
Any other topics as suggested by the supervisor(s)

At least 7(seven) Field-Orientation lectures to be arranged for the students


before going to the field.

Recommended Readings:
1. Das, B.M. and Ranjan Deka
2. Srinivas
3. Vidyarthi and Rai
4. Beattlie, Andre
5. Pegu, N. C.
6. Taid, Tapu
7. Pegu, Indreswar
8. Bordoloi, B.N.; G.C. Sharma
Thakur

:
:
:
:
:
:
:

Practical Anthropology.
Caste in Modern India and Other Essays.
Tribal Culture in India.
Essays in Comparative Society
The Mishings of the Brahmaputra Valley.
Mishing Samaj aru Sanskriti (Assamese).

: Tribes of Assam, Vol. I, II & III.

14

SCHEME OF PAPERS

BA/B.Sc MAJOR COURSE

FIRST SEMESTER
Paper-M 101

Physical Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

SECOND SEMESTER
Paper-M 201

Social and Cultural Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

THIRD SEMESTER
Paper-M 301

First Half:

Prehistory and Practical in Prehistory and


Material Culture
Prehistory

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Second Half: Practical in Prehistory and Material Culture


Paper-M 302

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Culture

Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks 100
60 Lectures

FOURTH SEMESTER
Paper-M 401

Physical Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Human Evolution

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Second Half: Human Variation

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

First Half:

Paper-M 402
First Half:

Social Institution and Prehistoric Culture

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Social Institution

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Second Half: Prehistoric Culture

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

FIFTH SEMESTER
Paper-M 501

Applied Anthropology
15

Marks 100
60 Lectures

First Half:

Applied Physical Anthropology

Second Half: Applied Social and Cultural Anthropology

Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Paper-M 502

Human Genetics

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Paper-M 503

Theories in Social and Cultural Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Paper-M 504

Practical in Physical Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Paper-M 601

Indian Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Paper-M 602

Research Methodology and Elements of Data Analysis Marks 100


60 Lectures

SIXTH SEMESTER

First Half:

Research Methodology

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Second Half: Elements of Data Analysis


Paper-M 603

First Half:

Demographic Anthropology and Ecological


Anthropology
Demographic Anthropology

Second Half: Ecological Anthropology


Paper-M 604
First Half:

Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks 100
60 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Fieldwork based Report and Museum Method

Marks 100

Fieldwork based report

Marks: 80

Second Half: Museum Method

Marks: 20
10 Lectures

16

B.A./B.Sc. Anthropology- Major Course


FIRST SEMESTER
Paper-M 101 Physical Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
This course would help the students to identify linkages of physical anthropology with
the other branches of cognate disciplines. The course would equipped the students to
understand mans place in animal kingdom.
Unit 1.1:

Physical Anthropology: Its scope, history and development, its


relationship with other branches of Anthropology and other
cognate disciplines.

Unit 1.2:

Study of human skeleton: Identification, structure and function


of different bones of skeleton. Age and sex determination.

Unit 1.3:

Mans place in animal kingdom.


General characters of mammals its classification.
General characters of primates its classification.
Living primates: distribution and salient features Tupaioidea (Treeshrews), Lemuroidae, Tarsioidae, Lorisiidae,
Ceboidea and Cercopithecoidea.
Living Anthropoid apes: distribution and salient features
Gibbon, Orang utan, Chimpanzee, Gorilla.

Unit 1.4:

Marks: 25
12 Lectures
Marks: 25
10 Lectures

Marks: 25
20 Lectures

Comparison of morphological and skeletal characters of man and


apes with special reference to skull, dentition, vertebral column,
pelvis, femur and foot. Evolutionary changes in the human skeleton
due to functional adaptation.
Social behaviour of non human primates.
Marks: 25
18 Lectures
Recommended Readings:
1. Breneman, W.R.:
Animal Form and Function (Relevant chapters like
19 and 20).
2. Burnow, Victor (1975):
An Introduction to Anthropology, Vol.1. Physical
Anthropology and Archaeology, Homewood,
Illinois. The Borsey Press.
3. Buettner-Janusch John (1969): Origin of Man, New Delhi, Wiley Eastern Pvt. Ltd.
(Relevant chapters of part-I)
4. Das, B.M. (1971):
Outline Physical Anthropology, Allahabad, Kitab
Mahal (Relevant chapters 1, 5).
5. Dobzhansky, T. (1971):
Evolution, Genetics and Man, New Delhi, Anand
R. Kundaji (Relevant chapter like 13).
6. Downs, James F. (1969):
Human Variation, An Introduction to Physical
Anthropology. Beverly Hills (Calif.) Glencoe
Press.
17

7. Hottan, E. (1965):
8. Sarkar, R.M. (1976):
9. Stein, Philip L. and (1978):
Bruce M. Rowe
10. R.C. Das (2008):

Up From the Ape, Delhi, Motilal Banarassi Das


(Relevant chapters like 1 and 4).
Fundamentals of Physical Anthropology, Calcutta,
Blackie (India), (Relevant chapters like 1, 2, 3)
Physical Anthropology, New York, Mc-Grow Hill
Book Co.
Anthropology, Part I, Amrita Prakashan, Guwahati.

18

SECOND SEMESTER
Paper-M 201 Social and Cultural Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
This course emphasizes the strengthening of central focus of significant concepts in
social cultural anthropology. It farther introduces the various social institutions to the
students.
Unit 2.1:

History and development of Socio-cultural Anthropology


Aim and scope of Socio-cultural Anthropology. Its place in
Anthropology and its relation with other allied subject.

Marks: 20
8 Lectures

Unit 2.2:

Concept of society and basic characteristics of human society.


Meaning of Social organization and Social structure, Community. Marks: 20
8 Lectures

Unit 2.3:

Primitive religion- concept; theories of origin. Functions of


religion. Magic; Differences between magic and religion.
Religious specialist. Ancestor worship, Divination, Totemism,
Taboo, Mana.

Unit 2.4:

Unit 2.5:

Salient features of Primitive Economic System; Subsistence


economy and Barter system. Concept of Property, Types; and
patterns of ownership with particular reference to tribal society.
Concept of law and government in simple societies.
Informal means of social controls: folkways, mores, customs
and traditions

Recommended Readings:
1. Beals, Ralph L; Harry Hoijer
& Alan R. Beals (1977):
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Marks: 20
14 Lectures

Marks: 20
16 Lectures

Marks: 20
14 Lectures

An Introduction to Anthropology (Relevant


chapters like 1, 19).
Bose, N.K. (1971):
Tribal Life in India. New Delhi, National Book
Trust of India.
Evans-Pritchard, E.E. (1960): Social Anthropology, London, Cohen and West
(Relevant chapters like 1-2).
Keesing, Roger M. (1976):
Cultural
Anthropology.
A
Contemporary
Perspective, New York, Holt, Rinehart & Winston
(Relevant chapters like 13-15, 17-19).
Majumdar, D.N. and (1961): An Introduction to Social Anthropology, Bombay,
T.N. Madan
Asia Publishing House.
Piddington, Ralph (1960):
An Introduction to Social Anthropology, London,
Oliver and Boyd (Relevant chapters like
1,4,5,6,9,10).
19

7. Redfield, Robert (1960):


8. R. C. Das (1989):

The Little Community. Peasant Society and


Culture, Chicago, The University of Chicago
Press.
Prarombhic Nrittata (in Assamese), 2 nd Part,
Samudra Printers, Guwahati.

20

THIRD SEMESTER
Paper-M 301 Prehistory and Practical in Prehistory and Material Culture
First Half:

Prehistory

Marks 100
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
The course provides glimpses of the scope in understanding the origin, development
and distribution of mankind. It indicates the relevance of palaeoenvironment, chronology,
typo-technologies and culture-construct.
Unit 3.1:

Meaning and scope of prehistoric anthropology and its


Development. Prehistory, Protohistory and History.
Relationship of prehistoric anthropology with other branches
of anthropology.

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Unit 3.2:

Geological Time Scale. Pleistocene stratigraphy and climatic


changes, glacial and inter-glacial, pluvial and inter-pluvial phases. Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Unit 3.3:

Dating Method. Relative (Stratigraphy, Dendochronology and


associated finds) and Absolute (radiocarbon, potassium
argon, thermolumiscence)

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Unit 3.4:

Methods of studying prehistory: Geological, Palaeontological,


and Associated Finds.

Unit 3.5:

Studies of prehistoric technology tool technology, tool type and


tool industry. Mineral and rock types.
Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Second Half: Practical in Prehistory and Material Culture

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
Prehistory and material culture practicals would equip the students to understand the
meaning and use of stone tools, pottery, fossil material and all other artifacts of human
material culture.
Unit 3.6:

Students should be able to identify the tool types they have


studied along with techniques of manufacture. Students
are to undertake systematic drawing and description of the
following tool types illustrating techniques, probable use,
probable age, manipulation, tool type etc.
6. Lower Palaeolithic 4 (four)
7. Middle Palaeolithic 2 (two)
8. Upper Palaeolithic 2 (two
21

Marks: 20
20 Lectures

9. Mesolithic 4 (Four)
10. Neolithic 3 (three)
Students shall maintain a Laboratory Note Book for which 3 marks are allotted
Unit 3.7:

Study of implements illustrative of material culture and


Marks: 30
subsistence economy of the tribal and non-tribal
10 Lectures
communities with special reference to North east India.
Students are to systematically draw and describe the
following implements:
5. Hunting 2(two)
6. Fishing 2(two)
7. Agriculture - 2(two)
8. Basketry - 2(two)
The record of work is to maintained in Practical Note Book for which 3 marks
are allotted.

First Half : Recommended Readings:


1. Bhattacharyya, D.K. (1972)
: Prehistoric Archaeology, New Delhi.
2. Frank Hole and R. F. Heizer (1968): An Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology.
New York.
3. Leaky, L.S.B. (1960)
: Adams Ancestor, London, Methuen & Co.
4. Oakley, Kenneth P. (1963)
: Man the Tool Maker. London.
5. Reddy V.R. (1987)
: Elements of Prehistory. New Delhi.
6. Stuart Piggott, (1959)
: Approach to Archaeology. London, Panguin.
7. R. C. Das (1985)
: Prarombhic Nrittata (in Assamese), 1 st Part,
Arya Book Stall, Guwahati.

22

Paper-M 302 Culture

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
This course deals with the central concept of culture which distinguishes human from
other animal forms and differentiates between instinctive and acquired behaviour to be
understood in all its ramifications.
Unit 3.1:

Culture: Concept, definition and nature; material and nonmaterial culture

Unit 3.2:

Universal in culture, cultural value and cultural relativism.


Culture trait, culture complex, culture area, culture centre.

Unit 3.3:

Concept of culture and society, aspects of culture, Enculturation.

Unit 3.4:

Concept of culture and personality, Basic personality, modal


personality, culture and personality approach, role of culture
in personality formation. Culture and language; culture and
social change, concept of diffusion and acculturation, innovation
and planned change.

Unit 3.5:

The Tribe: concept, definitions, characteristics, classification


and geological distribution
Constitutional safeguard for the development of ST in India.

Marks: 20
10 Lectures
Marks: 20
10 Lectures
Marks: 15
8 Lectures

Marks: 25
20 Lectures

Marks: 20
12 Lectures

Recommended Readings:
1. Beals, Ralph L.
Harry Hoijet & Alan R.
An Introduction to Anthropology (Relevant chapters
Beals (1977):
like 1,19)
2. Hammond, Peter B. (1971) : An Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology,
London. Collier Macmillan Ltd.
3. Herskovits (1969) :
Cultural Anthropology, New Delhi, Oxford & IBH
publishing Co. (Relevant chapters like 6,19,21,24,25).
4. Kessing Roger (1976) :
Cultural Anthropology. A Contemporary Perspective
(Relevant chapters like 8, 10, 11).
5. Kroeber, A.L. (1948) :
Anthropology. Calcutta, Oxford and IBH Publishing
Co.
6. S. Raymond & C.R. Decorse : Anthropology. A Global Perspective, Fifth Edition,
Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
7. Srivastav, A.R.N.
: Essentials of Cultural Anthropology, Prentice Hall of
India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

23

FOURTH SEMESTER
Paper-M 401 Physical Anthropology
First Half:

Marks 100

Human Evolution

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims to help the students to reconstruct the past of the mankind surveying
the available theories on the processes of human evolution with the help of accumulated
material evidences. Highlighting the anatomical peculiarities of the present day man, this
course would further compare the anatomical details with the non-human primates.
Unit 4.1:

Unit 4.2:

Unit 4.3:

Concept and theories of Evolution: General principles of


organic evolution. Theories of organic evolution, Lamarckism,
Neo Lamarkism, Darwinism, Neo Darwinism and Synthetic
theory.
The meaning of Primate, Origin and Evolution of primates:
a general study of the following fossil types- Adapidae,
Anaptomorphidae, Parapithecus, Propliopithecus and
Dryopithecinae.
Origin and evolution of hominidae:
Australopithecine
Homo erectus
Homo neanderthalensis
Homo sapiens: Grimaldi, Chancelade, Cromagnon.

Second Half: Human Variation

Marks: 15
11 Lectures

Marks: 15
11 Lectures

Marks: 20
8 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course introduces the students to the racial variation as a product of complex
process of evolution and genetics.
Unit 4.4:

Biological basis of human variation: mutation, selection,


hybridization and genetic drift.

Unit 4.5:

Concept and definition of Race Race, Culture & Society,


Race & Racism
Mechanism of race formation
Criteria for racial classifications: skin colour, hair, eye, stature,
head, face, nose, blood groups, dermatoglyphics (finger and palm
only). Major human races and their important sub-division,
their distribution and characteristic feature.
Marks: 20
11 Lectures

24

Marks: 15
8 Lectures

Unit 4.6:

Racial classification: A critical study of classifications made


by H.H. Risley, B.S. Guha and S.S. Sarkar. Racial elements in
India with special reference to North East India.

Marks: 15
11 Lectures

First half : Recommended Reading:


1. Breneman, W.R. :
Animal Form and Function (Relevant chapters like
19 and 20).
2. Buettner-Janusch John (1969): Origin of Man, New Delhi, Wiley Eastern Pvt. Ltd.
(Relevant chapters of part I).
3. Burnow, Victor (1975):
An Introduction to Anthropology. Vol. 1. Physical
Anthropology and Archaeology, Homewood,
Illinois, The Borsey Press.
4. Das, B.M. (1971):
Outlines of Physical Anthropology, Allahabad,
Kitab Mahal (Relevant chapters 1 to 5).
5. Dobzhansky, T. (1971):
Evolution, Genetics and Man, New Delhi, Anand
R. Kundaji (Relevant chapter like 13).
6. Downs, James F. (1969):
Human Variation. An Introduction to Physical
Anthropology, Beverly Hills (Calif.) Glencoe
Press.
7. Hootan, E. (1965):
Up From the Ape, Delhi, Motilal Banarassi Das
(Relevant chapters like 1 & 4).
8. Sarkar, R.M. (1976):
Fundamentals of Physical Anthropology, Calcutta,
Blackie (India), (Relevant chapters like 1, 2, 3).
9. Stein, Philip & (1978):
Physical Anthropology, New York, Mc-Grow Hill
Bruce M. Rowe
Book Co.
10. Sarkar, R.M.:
Fundamental of Physical Anthropology (3-5),
Calcutta, Blackis India.
11. R. C. Das (2008):
Anthropology, Part I, Amrita Prakashan, Guwahati.
12. R. C. Das (1985):
Prarombhic Nrittata (in Assamese), 1 st Part, Arya
Book Stall, Guwahati.
Second Half: Recommended Readings:
1. Boyd, W.C. (1950):
Genetics and the Races of Man. Boston: D.C. Heath.
2. Coon, S.C.; S.M. Garn and J.B. Birdsell (1950): Races: A Study of the Problems of Race
Formation in Man. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas.
3. Coon, S.C. (1962):
The Origin of Races. New York, K. Knopf.
4. Garn, S.M. (1969):
Human Races. Springfield, Charles C. Thomas.

25

Paper-M 402 Social Institution and Prehistoric Culture


First Half:

Social Institution

Marks 100
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course provides an overview of fundamental human institutions as well as the
basic concepts for understanding and explaining these institutions.
Unit 4.1:

Family definition; types and distinctive features; functions,


changing trends.

Unit 4.2:

Marriage definitions; forms (monogamy, polygamy);


Regulations of marriage (exogamy, endogamy). Ways of
acquiring mates, preferential marriage (cross-cousin marriage,
parallel cousin marriage, sorrorate, levirate, widow inheritance);
marriage payments (bride-price, dowry); changing trends.

Unit 4.3:

Kinship a general outline, terminology and usages, changing


trends.

Unit 4.4:

Rules of descent, inheritance and succession with particular


reference to simple societies. Unilineal descent groups
(lineage, clan, phatry and moiety) definition, types and
functions.

Second Half: Prehistoric culture

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Marks: 15
10 Lectures

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Marks: 15
8 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims at showing history and development of various prehistoric cultures
in India and Europe.
Unit 4.5:

Concept of culture in prehistory. Sequence of prehistoric


culture.

Unit 4.6:

Palaeolithic cultures of India and Western Europe: characteristics


and distribution. Palaeolithic Art of Europe.
Marks: 10
8 Lectures
Mesolithic cultural development in Northern Europe and India.
Ecological. background of Mesolithic cultures in Europe.
Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Unit 4.7:

Unit 4.8:

General characteristics of Neolithic culture. A brief outline


of Neolithic cultural development in India and NE India.
Megalithic culture Type and distribution. Indus Valley
Civilization characteristics, chronology and causes of decline.

26

Marks: 10
6 Lectures

Marks: 20
10 Lectures

First Half : Recommended Reading:


1. Beattie, John (1968):
Other Cultures, New York, The Free Press.
2. Bidney, David (1964):
Theoretical Anthropology, New York, Columbia
Univ. Press.
3. Bohannan, Paul (1963):
Social Anthropology, New York, Holt, Rinehart &
Winston Inc.
4. Childe, Gordon V. (1951):
Social Evolution, London, Watts & Co. (Relevant
chapter 1)
5. Harris, Marvin (1968):
The Rise of Anthropological Theory, New York,
Thomas Y. Crowell & Co.
6. Kapadia, K.M. (1977) :
Family and Marriage in India. Calcutta, Oxford
University Press (Relevant chapters like 6-13).
7. Lowie, Robert, F. (1966) :
The History of Ethnographical Theory, New York,
Holt, Rineart & Winston (Relevant chapters like
1,6,7,9,19-23).
8. Mair, Lucy (1975):
An Introduction to Social Anthropology, London,
Clarendon Press.
9. Malefijit, Annemarie (1968) : Religion and culture (An Introduction to
Anthropological Study of Religion), London.
Collier-Macmillan Ltd. (Relevant chapters like
1,4,9,11,12).
10. Murdock, G.P. (1949) :
Social Structure, New York. The Macmillan Co.
(Relevant chapters like 1-3, 6,7).
11. Maniers, R.A. &
David Kaplar (1968):
Theory in Anthropology. A source Book. London,
Routledge & Kegan Paul.
12. Norbeck, Edward (1961):
Religion in Primitive Society, New York. Harper &
Row, Inc.
13. Radcliffe-Brown A.R. (1959): Structure and Function in Primitive Society.
London, Cohen & West.
14. Ross, A.D. (1961):
The Hindu Family in its Urban Setting, Canada,
The Univ. of Toronto Press.
Second Half : Recommended Readings:
1. Bhattacharyya, D.K. (1978) : Emergence of Culture in Europe. New Delhi.
2. Bhattacharyya, D.K. (1990) : Outline of Indian Prehistory. Hindustan Pub. Co.
(India), Delhi.
3. Chakravarti, Dilip, (2000) : India : An Archaeological History, Oxford University
Press.
4. Childe, Gordon (1951)
: Man Makes Himself, London, Watt and Co.
5. Sankalia, H.D. (1974)
: Prehistory and Protohistory of India and Pakistan,
Poona, DCPRI.

27

FIFTH SEMESTER
Paper-M 501 Applied Anthropology
First Half:

Marks 100

Applied Physical Anthropology

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims to provide a background relating to mans physiological and
structure-function adjustment with its immediate background and also the human genetic
variability along with its body constitution, age, sex etc.
Unit 5.1:

Unit 5.2:

Aim and scope of Applied Physical Anthropology.


Applications of anthropometry in industries (clothing,
Foot-wares, defence equipments, furniture), sports and health.
Application of human genetics medico-legal fields, genetic
screening and genetic counseling.
Anthropological demography and population problems.

Second Half: Applied Social and Cultural Anthropology

Marks: 25
15 Lectures

Marks: 25
15 Lectures
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course provides some illustrations on application of social-cultural
anthropological knowledge specially theory and matters for the welfare of humanity and to
offer solutions to the problems.
Unit 5.3:
`
Unit 5.4:

Unit 5.6:

Definition, meaning, scope of applied social cultural


anthropology. Action anthropology.
Anthropology and problems of development in the spheres
of health, education and agriculture with special reference to
tribal and other backward communities of India.
Concept of disaster management and displacement.
Anthropological perspective and rehabilitation, policies and
programmes in natural and man-made disaster.

Recommended Readings:
1. Agarwal, S.N.
2. Bonnet, John, W.
3. Burnett, H.G.R. (1969)
4. Coma, J. (1969)

Marks: 20
8 Lectures

Marks: 20
11 Lectures

Marks: 10
11 Lectures

: Indias Population Problem


: Introduction : Planned change Perspective,
Human Organization. 18 : 2-4, 1959.
: Anthropology
in
Administration.
Blackwell
Scientific Publications, Oxford.
: Manual of Physical Anthropology. Springfield,
Illinois.
28

5. Elwin, Verrier
6. Foster, G.M.
7. Hassan, K.A.
8. Lorimer, P.
9. Nag, Moni
10. Nair, L. P.
11. Spicer, E.H. (Ed.)
12. Swedland, Alan, C.(1976)
13. Tax, Sol (1953)
14. Vidyarthi, L.P. (1968)

: Report on the working of the M.P.T.C.


: Traditional Cultures : Impact of Technological
changes
: Cultural Frontier of Health in Village India
: Culture and Fertility
: Cultural Factors in Fertility : A Cross-Cultural
Study
: Studies in Applied Anthropology
: Human Problems in Technological changes
: Demographic Anthropology. Dubunquo : Win C.
Broan Co.
: Action Anthropology, American Indigena 12: 10319.
: Applied Anthropology in India, Kitab Mahal,
Allahabad.

29

Paper-M 502 Human Genetics

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims to orient the students to the theoretical advances in human genetics
and population dynamics in an evolutionary context.
Unit 5.1:

Unit 5.2:

Unit 5.3:

Unit 5.4:

Aim and scope of human genetics. History and development


of human genetics. Methods of studying human genetics: Twin
method, pedigree method. Cell Biology: Structure of cell,
chromosome, concept of gene, DNA, RNA, cell division
mitosis and meiosis.
Mendelian principles of heredity, single factor inheritance,
sex linked traits, multiple allelism, Human blood group system
ABO, MN and Rh, polygenic inheritance in man.
Population genetics: Definition, Breeding population, HardyWeinberg law, Genetic equilibrium. Mating pattern
consanguinity, inbreeding and miscegenation.
Man, heredity and environment. Influence of heredity and
environment on stature, weight, skin colour and head form.

Marks: 25
18 Lectures

Marks: 25
16 Lectures

Marks: 25
14 Lectures
Marks: 25
12 Lectures

Recommended Readings:
1. Buettner-Janusch, John (1969): Origins of Man, New Delhi, Wiley Eastern Pvt.
Ltd. (Relevant chapter like 2)
2. Comas, Juan (1960)
: Manual of Physical Anthropology, Springfield,
Illinois.
3. Neel, James, V. (1968)
: Human Heredity, Chicago, The Univ. of Chicago
& William J. Schull
Press.
4. Stern, Curt (1968)
: Principles of Human Genetics, Eurasia Publishing
House Pvt., New Delhi (Relevant chapters like
1,2,6,8,10-14,18,23).
5. Stein, Philip L. (1978)
: Physical Anthropology, New York. Mc.Grow Hill
& Bruce M. Powe
Book Co.
6. Swedlund Alan C. (1976)
: Demographic Anthropology, Dubuque, Lowa
(USA), & George Armelages W.C. & Brown Co.

30

Paper-M 503 Theories in Social and Cultural Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
This course will provide the students a general theoretical orientation with respect to
the development of social and cultural anthropological theories.
Unit 5.1:

Cultural evolution: Unilinear, Neo evolution

Unit 5.2:

History and development of social and cultural anthropological


thoughts.

Unit 5.3:

A general outline on various socio-cultural anthropological


theories with special reference to:
Evolutionism: (Classical and Neo Evolutionism)
Diffusionism
Functionalism
Structuralism

Unit 5.4:

Major contributions of the following:


E.B. Tylor
L.H. Morgan
Malinowski
Radcliffe Brown
Levi-Strauss

Recommended Readings:
1. Bidney, David (1964):
2. Bohannan, Paul (1963):
3. Childe, Gordon V. (1951):
4. Harris, Marvin (1968):

Marks: 25
10 Lectures
Marks: 25
10 Lectures

Marks: 25
20 Lectures

Marks: 25
20 Lectures

Theoretical Anthropology. New York, Columbia


University Press.
Social Anthropology. New York, Holt, Rinehart &
Winston Inc.
Social Evolution. London, Watts & Co. (Relevant
Chapter 1).
The Rise of Anthropological Theory. New York,
Thomas Y. Crowell & Co.

31

Paper-M 504 Practical in Physical Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims to equipped the students to master the laboratory techniques in
Osteology, Craniometry, Osteometry, Somatometry and Somatoscopy, Serology and
Dermatoglyphics.
Osteology

Marks: 10
Note Book: 2

Drawing, Description and identification (side & position) of the following


bones of human skeleton:
Frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, mandible, scapula, humerus, radius, ulna,
pelvis, femur, tibia and fibula.
Somatometry and Somatoscopy
Somatometry: Candidates shall
measurements on 4 individuals:

Note Book: 3
take

the

following

somatometric
Marks: 10

The following measurements shall be taken on 4 individuals:


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Maximum head length


Maximum head breadth
Horizontal circumference of head
Minimum frontal breadth
Breadth of bi-zygomatic arc
Total facial height
Upper facial height
Nasal height
Nasal breadth
Stature
Head height

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

Sitting height vertex


Height tragus
Height acromion
Height radiale
Height stylion
Height dactylion
Height illiospinale
Height tibiale
Height spherion
Bi-acromial diameter
Weight

Indices to be calculated:
8. Cephalic Index
9. Nasal Index
10. Morphological facial Index
11. Morphological Upper facial Index
12. Relative sitting height Index
13. Length-height Index
14. Breadth-height Index
Somatoscopy: The following observations shall be made on 4
individuals:
1
2

Skin Colour
Hair on head
d) hair form
e) hair texture
f) hair whorl
32

Marks: 10

3
4
5
6
7

8
9

Beard and Moustache quantity


Forehead slope
Supra-orbital ridges promience
Eye
c) eye-fold
d) eye-slit
Nose
d) nasal root
e) nasal bridge
f) nasal septum
Lips size
Face
d) frontal outline
e) prognathism
f) malar prominence

Craniometry
(i)

Marks: 20
Note Book: 3

The following direct linear measurements are


skulls.
1
Max. cranial length
11
2
Max. cranial breadth
12
3
Glabella-inion length
13
4
Nasion-inion length
14
5
Minimum frontal breadth
15
6
Maximum frontal breadth
16
7
Bizygomatic breadth
17
8
Biauricular breadth
18
9
Bimastoid diameter
19
10 Nasion-prosthion line
20

to be taken on 2 (two) human


Frontal chord
Parietal chord
Occipital chord
Frontal arc
Parietal arc
Length of foramen magnum
Breadth of foramen magnum
Bicondylar breadth
Breadth of ramus
Height of ramus

(ii)

Direct angular measurements on 2 (two) human skulls


1. Facial profile angle
2. Metopic angle
3. Nasal profile angle

(iii)

The following Linear and angular measurements on sectional Drawing on


skull (craniographic contour) are to be taken on 2 (two) human skulls
1. Basion Bregma height
2. Nasion inion line
3. Metopic angle
4. Nasal profile angle
5. Facial profile angle
6. Alveolar profile angle
Osteometry
The following measurements are to be taken on a pair of bone
for each case.

Clavide
Scapula

Anatomical breadth
Anatomical length
Length of axillary border
33

Marks: 20
Note Book: 3

Humerus

Radius
Ulna
Femur
Tibia
Fibula

Maximum length
Breadth of proximal epiphysis
Breadth of distal epiphysis
Least girth of shaft
Maximum length
Physiological length
Least girth of shaft
Maximum length
Physiological length
Least girth of shaft
Maximum length
Physiological length
Girth of the shaft
Maximum length
Physiological length
Circumference of shaft
Maximum length
Maximum diameter in the middle
Circumference in middle

Indices to be calculated: (1) Scapular index, (2) Caliber index


Serology

Marks: 15
Note Book: 3

Students are required to be acquainted with the preparation of normal saline


solution, preparation of red cell suspension in normal saline for blood
grouping and determination of ABO and Rh blood grouping of 10 (ten)
individuals by slide/tile method.
Dermatoglyphics

Marks: 15
Note Book: 3

Students are required to be acquainted with the technique of collection of


finger and palm prints and identification of finger type patterns and
formulation of palmar main line. They shall collect and analyze finger and
palm prints of 10 (ten) individuals.

34

SIXTH SEMESTER
Paper-M 601 Indian Anthropology

Marks 100
60 Lectures

Objective:
This course focuses on the critical examination of Indian society and culture.
Unit 6.1:

India as a bio-socio-cultural entity.

Unit 6.2:

Racial, ethnic, religious and linguistic elements in Indian


Population.

Unit 6.3:

Caste system in India meaning, salient features, theories of


origin, merit and demerit, caste in modern times and changing
trends.

Unit 6.4:

Constitutional provisions for SC & ST and Other Backward


Classes. Principle of equity and secular Trends.

Unit 6.5:

History of Anthropology in India, Pioneers in Indian


Anthropology, Contributions of scholars and administrators:
S.C. Roy, Elwin, N.K. Bose, B.S. Guha, D.N. Majumder and
L.P. Vidyarthi.

Marks: 15
8 Lectures
Marks: 20
10 Lectures

Marks: 20
12 Lectures
Marks: 20
14 Lectures

Marks: 25
16 Lectures

Recommended Reading:
1. Bose, N.K. (1971)

: Tribal Life in India, New Delhi, National Book


Trust of India.

2. Bose, N.K. (1977)

: Culture and Society in India, Bombay, Asia


Publishing House (Relevant chapters like 10-13).

3. Borkotoky, Satyen (1969)

: The Tribes of Assam, New Delhi, National Book


Trust of India.

4. Choudhury, M.N. (1980)

: Tribes of Assam Plains, Gauhati, Directorate of


Welfare of Plains Tribes and Backward Classes,
Govt. of Assam.

5. Dube, S.C. (Ed.) (1977)

: India since Independence, New Delhi, Vikas


Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.(Article by T.K.
Oommen on Scheduled Caste and Scheduled
Tribes).

6. Furer-Haimendorf,
Christoph Vol (1962)
7. Hutton, J.H. (1969)

: The Apa Tanis and their Neighbours. London.


Routledge and Kegan Paul.
: Caste in India, Bombay, Oxford Univ. Press.
(Relevant portions out of parts II and III).
35

8. Karotemprel, S.(ed.)(1984)

: The Tribes of North-East India, Calcutta, Firma.

9. Ranade, Eknath (Ed.)(1972): Hill India (Vivakananda Kendra Patrika, Vol. I,


No.2) (Article by Annada Bhagabati on Tribal life
in N.E. India, pp. 218-223).
10. Redfield, Robert (1960)

: The Little Community. Peasant Society and


Culture, Chicago, The Univ. of Chicago Press.

11. Sharma, B.E. (1984)

: Planning for Tribal Development, New Delhi,


Prachi Prakashan (Relevant chapters like 1 and 2
and tables).

12. Sharma T.C. and (1980)


D.N. Mazumdar (Ed.)

13. Srinivas, M.N. (1978)


14. Shyama Chaudhury, N.K
& M.M. Das (1973)

: Eastern Himalayas. A study on Anthropology and


Tribalism. New Delhi, Cosmo Publications
(Relevant chapters like 4. Pp. 23-62).
: Caste in Modern India and other Essays, Bombay,
Media, Promoters (Relevant chapters like 1,10).
: The Lalung Society. A Theme for Analytical
Ethnography. Calcutta, Anthropological Survey of
India.

15. Thapar, Romesh (Ed.(1977) : Tribe, Caste and Religion in India, New Delhi,
The Macmillan Co. of India Ltd.
16. Thakur, Pankaj (Ed.) (1982): Indias North-East. A Multi-Faceited View,
Tinsukia, Prakash Publishing House (Relevant
pages like 126-142 and Article on Tribal Situation
in N.E. India by D.N. Mazumdar).
17. Tribal Research Institute

: Tribes of Assam.

18. Vidyarthi, L.P. (1977)

: The Tribal Culture of India, Delhi, Concept


Publishing B.K. Rai House (Relevant chapters like 2-4).

36

Paper-M 602 Research Methodology and Elements of Data Analysis


First Half:

Research Methodology

Marks 100
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course will focus on ethnographic tradition in anthropology to strengthen the
knowledge of research process, research methods and research designs, tools and techniques
of data collection, statistical analysis and tabulation.
Unit 6.1:

Fieldwork and Field work traditions in Anthropology

Unit 6.2:

Methods of data Collection: Observation, Interview, Schedule,


Questionnaire, Genealogy, Case study.

Unit 6.3:

Tabulation of data and preparation of tables. Diagramatic


Representation: Histogram, Frequency Polygon and Pie diagram. Marks: 15
10 Lectures

Second Half: Elements of data analysis

Marks: 10
8 Lectures
Marks: 25
12 Lectures

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course introduces the students to the basic statistical measurements and also the
art of report writing.
Unit 6.4:

Unit 6.5:

Elementary statistics Measures of central tendency (mean,


median and mode) Measures of dispersion (standard deviation
and standard error).
Report writing: Chapterization, citation of references and
preparation of bibliography.

Recommended Readings:
1. Ahuja Ram (2001):
2. Ghosh, B.N. (1992):

Marks: 25
16 Lectures
Marks: 25
14 Lectures

Research Methods. New Delhi, Rawat Publications.


Scientific Method and Social Research. New Delhi,
Sterling Publishers Private Ltd.
3. Kothari C.R. (2004):
Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques. New
Delhi: New Age International Pvt. Ltd.
4. Royal Anthropological Institute: Notes and Queries in Anthropology. Sixth Edition.

37

Paper-M 603 Demographic Anthropology and Ecological Anthropology


First Half:

Demographic Anthropology

Marks 100
Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Objective:
This course aims to focus on the dynamics of demography and population policy in
India.
Unit 6.1:

Definition, Nature and Scope of Demographic study.

Marks: 10
5 Lectures

Unit 6.2:

Sources of Population Data: Population census, registration


of vital events, sample surveys.

Unit 6.3:

Population structure: underdeveloped, developing and


developed nations.

Unit 6.4:

Components of demographic change: Fertility, Mortality,


Migration.

Unit 6.5:

Population Policy in India

Marks: 10
4 Lectures

Second Half: Ecological Anthropology

Marks: 50
30 Lectures

Marks: 10
8 Lectures
Marks: 10
5 Lectures
Marks: 10
8 Lectures

Objective:
The course aims at providing the students with a conceptual framework for analyzing
human situations, problems and issues under various ecological settings.
Unit 6.6:

Concept of Ecology: Human Ecology; Ecological Zones of the


world; habitat, culture and environment. Man nature relationship. Marks: 25
16 Lectures

Unit 6.7:

Ecology and adaptation in terms of biology and culture with


special reference to altitude; hot and cold climatic conditions.

Recommended Readings:
1. Bhende, A. and T. Kanitkar (1991):
2. Bogue, Donald (1969):
3. Car Sanders, A.M. (1972):
4. Cox, Peter R. (1970):
5. Hansraj (2006):

Marks: 25
14 Lectures

Principles of Population Studies. New Delhi:


Tata McGraw.
Principles of Demography. New York: John
Wiley and Sons.
The Population Problem A Study of Human
Evolution. Oxford: Clarendron Press.
Demography. Cambridge: University Press.
Fundamentals of Demography with Special
Reference to India. Surjeet Publications, Delhi.

38

Paper-M 604 Field Work based Report (compulsory) and


Museum Method

Marks 100

First Half:

Marks: 80

Field Work based Report

Objective:
The course is designed to make the student carry out independent research in the
planning of the projects proposal, data collection, data analysis and report writing, using
conventional and scientific methods at various stages of the field dissertation. The course
aims at capacity building of the student in taking up independent research programmes.
Students are required to undertake ethnographic field investigations in rural
area (preferable a tribal village), under the guidance of teacher(s) for two
weeks.
Each student shall carry out conducted fieldwork under the supervision of
teacher/s investigations independently and shall submit a report on the work
done covering the following:
5. Village plan and description.
6. Demographic outline (based on analysis of data with the help of household
survey schedule, the proforma of which is given in Annexure-I).
7. A brief description on the somatometric traits; somatometric observation
and morphological and behavioural traits of the people.
8. Any one of the following topic selected in consultation with the
supervising teacher(s).
a) Agriculture
b) Material culture (Dress and ornaments, house type, fishing and
hunting implements and basketry)
c) Social institution (Family, marriage and kinship)
d) Economic life
e) Life cycle
f) Village organization
g) Magico-religious life
h) Fair and festival
i) Any other topics as suggested by the supervisor(s)
* At least 7(seven) Field-Orientation lectures to be arranged for the students before going to
the field.
Second Half: Museum Method

Marks: 20
10 Lectures

Objective:
The course is aimed to familiarize the students with basic methods of preservation of
various cultural artifacts.

Classification of Museum specimens, cleaning, treatment and preservation of


Museum specimen by different methods.
1. Bamboo, wooden and bone objects
2. Fabric materials.
Students shall maintain a Laboratory Note Book for which 5 marks are allotted.

39