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Mimura Chikuho, Hope, detail, 2004, bamboo (madake), rattan, lacquer.

Courtesy of the Clark Family Collection, photo by Susan Einstein.

modern twist
All images courtesy of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture

Traveling Exhibitions

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Uematsu Chikuyu, Sound of Wind, 1991, bamboo (madake), rattan, lacquer. Courtesy of Alexandra & Dennis Lenehan, photo by Susan Einstein.

Modern Twist explores


the evocative, sensual,
and sculptural power
of contemporary
bamboo art.

amboo is a quintessential part of Japanese culture,


shaping the countrys social, artistic, and spiritual
landscape. Although bamboo is a prolific natural

resource, it is a challenging artistic medium. There


are fewer than 100 professional bamboo artists in
Japan today. Mastering the art form requires decades of
meticulous practice while learning how to harvest, split, and
plait the bamboo. Modern Twist brings 38 exceptional works
by 17 artists to U.S. audiences, displaying many of these
technically innovative and imaginatively crafted works for the
first time.

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 2

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Unlike the ceramist, for whom the


fires of the kiln play an important role in
the outcome, the bamboo artist bears
full responsibility for every step of the
creative process. Without splitting the
bamboo and working through each of
the various steps oneself, one cannot
get the feel of each individual bamboo
culm and thus know for what kind of
piece it will be best suited. And there
are no shortcuts in bamboothere is no
way to mechanize the process.
- Fujinuma Noboru, Modern Twist artist

In Japan, functional objects have been woven from bamboo


for thousands of years. The blossoming of bamboo as
a sculptural art form has religious and cultural roots. By
the 8th century, bamboo baskets filled with flowers were
incorporated into Buddhist ceremonies. Flower petals from
these baskets were offered to deities in sacred rituals.
During the 15th to 16th centuries, bamboo vases, tea scoops,
ladles, and whisks became important features of Japanese
traditions, such as flower arrangements (ikebana) and tea
gatherings (chanoyu and senchado).
Over the past century, the creativity and talent of bamboo
basket makers has elevated their status from artisan to
artist. These artists have redefined aesthetic conventions
as their creations have evolved from functional vessels to
increasingly sculptural objects.
Bamboo sculpture is a vibrant cultural art form. The artists
in Modern Twist have a deep respect for their medium,
celebrating the resilience, strength, and integrity of bamboo.

Sugiura Noriyoshi, Sailing, 2010, bamboo (madake), rattan. Courtesy of Eric and Karen Ende.

The exhibition is curated by Dr. Andreas Marks, head of the


Department of Japanese and Korean Art and director of The
Clark Center at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 3

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Honma Hideaki, Shore II, 1995, bamboo (madake), lacquer. Courtesy of Eric and Karen Ende.

Honma Hideaki, Mystery, 2000, bamboo (madake, menyadake). Courtesy of the Clark Family Collection,
photo by Susan Einstein.

I wondered if I might capture that spontaneous feel of nature in my baskets.


Because I am a farmer, I understand the smell of nature. I have a keen sense of
the seasons. Observing nature I obtain new themes for my baskets. The themes
I choose are usually bright and joyful. The beauty of bamboo, to me, is the way
it reveals a dynamic line in space. I honor traditional techniques, but I think the
development of new techniques is also very important.
- Katsushiro Soho, Modern Twist artist and Japans Living National Treasure

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 4

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Uematsu Chikuyu, Moon Rise on Autumn Fields, 2007, bamboo (nemagaridake), rattan, lacquer,
Japanese washi paper, hemp. Courtesy of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, photo by
Susan Einsein.

Tanabe Chikuunsai III, Squares and Circles, 2005, bamboo (yadake), rattan, lacquer. Courtesy of the Clark
Center for Japanese Art and Culture, photo by Forrest Cavale.

Ueno Masao, Swirl, 2004, bamboo (madake), rattan, lacquer, gold powder. Coutesy of Alexandra & Dennis
Lenehan, photo by Dennis Lenehan.

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 5

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

In a gentle wind, the bamboo moves freely.


It twists and turns and draws an arc in the sky.
The sense of life is intertwined like the silk of a
spiders web.
As a thin feeler reaching to receive heavenly
revelation,
The bamboo tries to capture the form it seeks.
The shapes of bamboo tell me what road I shall
take.
I follow it for a time, not knowing where it will
lead,
To a place where I did not expect to go.
It is unclear whether or not I will find new
possibilities there.
Still I cannot avoid being drawn to this
unknown realm.
The bamboo bounces off something trying to
suppress it,
Enjoying a moment of change like fireworks
shooting into the sky,
Being reborn through my hands.
- Nagakura Kenichi, Modern Twist artist
Excerpt from Nagakura Kenichi published by TAI Gallery, Santa Fe,
New Mexico, 2011

Matsumoto Hafu, Hanging Flower Vase, 2006, bamboo, lacquer. Courtesy of the Clark Family
Collection, photo by Forrest Cavale.

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 6

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Uematsu Chikuyu, Ascending to Heaven, 2007, bamboo (madake), rattan. Courtesy of the Clark Center for
Japanese Art & Culture, photo by Susan Einstein.

About the Curator

A specialist in Japanese prints, he is the author of Japanese

Dr. Andreas Marks is Head of the Japanese and Korean


Art Department and Director of the Clark Center at the
Minneapolis Institute of Arts. He is the former Director and
Chief Curator of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and
Culture in Hanford, California. Prior to this position he was
the Managing Director of an international exhibition and fair
organizer based in Germany with branches in the U.S., the
U.K., Australia, and China. He has a masters degree in East
Asian Art History from the University of Bonn, and a Ph.D.
from Leiden University in the Netherlands.
At locations like the Clark Center, Berkeley Museum of
Art, San Diego Museum of Art, Crow Collection in Dallas,
Dr. Marks has curated and co-curated 14 exhibitions on
various aspects of Japanese art including paintings, prints,
ceramics, weaponry, as well as works of bamboo.

Woodblock Prints: Artists, Publishers and Masterworks,


16801900 (520 ill., Tuttle, 2010), the only book on Asian art
history that CHOICE, the magazine of the American Library
Association, selected in 2010 as Outstanding Academic
Title. Dr. Marks is co-editor and co-author of Dreams
and Diversions: Essays on Japanese Woodblock Prints
(University of Washington Press, 2010). His Publishers of
Japanese Prints: A Compendium (576 pp., Hotei, 2011), is
the first comprehensive reference work on print publishers
from the 1650s to 1990s. His new book Fukami: Purity of
Form (172 pp., University of Washington Press, 2011) is
a retrospective of the celebrated Japanese ceramic artist
Fukami Sueharu.

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 7

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Bellevue Arts Museum


November 13, 2012 - February 3, 2013

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 8

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Bellevue Arts Museum


November 13, 2012 - February 3, 2013

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 9

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture


January 29, 2011 to March 19, 2011

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 10

modern twist

Contemporary
Japanese Bamboo Art

Tanioka Shigeo, Floating Island, 2008, bamboo (hobichiku, madake), rattan, lacquer. Collection of the
Clark Center for japanese Art & Culture, photo by Susan Einstein.

Specifications
Number of Works
38 bamboo works by 17 contemporary artists
Organized by
The Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, CA
Curator
Dr. Andreas Marks, Head of the Japanese and Korean
Art Department and Director of the Clark Center at the
Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Requirements
Moderate security, approximately 2,500 square feet
Fee
$19,000
Shipping
IA&A makes all arrangements; exhibitors pay outgoing
shipping within the contiguous US

Booking Time
12 weeks
Availability
November 2012 to January 2016, with the possibility for
extension
Publication
ISBN: 978-0-9662859-8-7
LCCN: 2012946294
Authored by Andreas Marks

Contact
Margalit Monroe
Asian Art Specialist & Senior Exhibitions Manager
margalitm@artsandartists.org

International Arts & Artists 9 Hillyer Court NW, Washington, DC 20008


Phone 202.338.0680 Fax 202.333.0758 www.artsandartists.org

| 11

KATSUSHIRO SH
(b. 1934)

Born to a family of farmers in Kuroiso City (Nasu Shiobara), Tochigi


Prefecture, Katsushiro began learning bamboo weaving at the age of 15
under the tutelage of Kikuchi Yoshii (dates unknown). The apprenticeship
lasted six years, during which time Katsushiro also took care of his
teachers child and house. In 1965 he started studying under Yagisawa
Keiz (19272006) and crafted commercial brooches and vases. Two
years later, his work was selected for the 7th Traditional Crafts New Works
Exhibition (Dent kgei shinsaku ten). In 1968 he shifted his practice away
from making bamboo accessories and began studying under Sait Bunseki
(19101991) who encouraged him to explore the aesthetic possibilities
of his chosen medium. In 2005, the Japanese government designated
Katsushiro Sh a Living National Treasure for his exceptional talent as a
bamboo artist.

Awards

Katsushiro Sh, Sunset Glow, 2003, bamboo


(susudake), lacquer. Courtesy of the Clark Family
Collection, photo by Forrest Cavale.

1967


1983

1997

1998


2005

Chairmans Prize and Encouragement Prize,


8th Exhibition of Traditional Art Crafts from Eastern
Japan (Higashi Nihon dent kgei ten)
Tokyo Governors Prize, 30th Exhibition of Japanese
Traditional Art Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten)
NHK Chairmans Prize, 44th Exhibition of Japanese
Traditional Art Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten)
Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon (Shiju hosho)
for his contributions to academic and artistic
developments, improvements, and accomplishments
Living National Treasure

Selected Collections
Agency for Cultural Affairs, Tokyo, Japan
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan
Nishinasu City Folk Museum, Japan
Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Fine Arts, Japan

FUJINUMA NOBORU
(b. 1945)

Fujinuma Noboru was born in Otawara, Tochigi Prefecture. He initially


worked as a graphic designer and photographer but in 1976 began an
apprenticeship under Yagisawa Keizo (19272006), as did Living National
Treasure Katsushiro Sh before him. Only a year later he was admitted to
the Traditional Crafts New Works Exhibition (Dent kgei shinsaku ten). In
1980, his work was selected for the 27th Exhibition of Japanese Traditional
Art Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten). At the same event in 1992, he won the
Tokyo Governors Prize with an artwork that is now in the collection of the
National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.
In 2011, the Art Institute of Chicago displayed a significant donation of
Fujinumas works, making him the first bamboo artist celebrated with a solo
exhibition at a major Western museum. In 2012, the Japanese government
designated Fujinuma Noboru a Living National Treasure.

Awards

Fujinuma Noboru, Spring Tide, ca. 1997, bamboo


(nemagaridake), lacquer. Courtesy of the Clark
Center for Japanese Art & Culture, photo by
Forrest Cavale.

1986

1992

2000
2004


2012

President of the Association Prize, 33th Exhibition of


Japanese Traditional Art Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten)
Tokyo Governors Prize, 39th Exhibition of Japanese
Traditional Art Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten)
Finalist, Cotsen Bamboo Prize
Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon (Shiju hosho)
for his contributions to academic and artistic
developments, improvements, and accomplishments
Living National Treasure

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
Denver Art Museum, Colorado
National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan
The British Museum, London, UK

MATSUMOTO HAF
(b. 1952)

Matsumoto Haf was born in Haneda, Tokyo. In 1972, he studied under


Iizuka Shkansai (1919 2004), who was the second bamboo artist
designated a Living National Treasure (1982) by the Japanese government.
After Matsumoto became independent of his master, he opened his own
studio in Tokyo, before moving in 1988 to his current location in Tateyama,
Chiba Prefecture. Matsumoto has given workshops in New York, San
Francisco, and Hawaii.

Awards
2004
2007

2008

Finalist, 3rd Cotsen Bamboo Prize


Newcomers Prize, 54th Exhibition of Japanese
Traditional Art Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten)
Tokyo Governors Prize, 48th Exhibition of Traditional
Art Crafts from Eastern Japan (Higashi Nihon dent
kgei ten)

Selected Collection
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California

Matsumoto Haf, Hanging Flower Vase, 2006,


bamboo (madake). Courtesy of the Clark Family
Collection, photo by Forrest Cavale.

HONMA HIDEAKI
(b. 1959)

Honma Hideaki was a soldier in the Japanese air force, until an accident
blinded him in one eye and forced him to resign from service. He learned
plaiting techniques from his uncleand adopted fathertalented bamboo
artist Honma Kazuaki. As a pupil, Honma spent several years simply
splitting and chipping bamboo before learning to weave. Now he is known
for employing a wide range of bamboo varieties using incredibly complex
weaves. He notably utilizes a mat weaving technique (gozame-ami), creating
long bands of plaiting, and attaches lengths of unsplit bamboo to the sides
of his sculptures using rattan.
Honma is greatly influenced by the secluded geography and remote beauty
of his home on Sado Island, located off the western coast of Honshu, the
largest of Japans four main islands. Drawing inspiration from the natural
environment, Honma has created a series of sculptures that reference the
sea. The result of meticulous planning, Honma will often make hundreds of
sketches when desgining his intricate bamboo sculptures. He often uses a
soft, pliable bamboo variety called menyadake, which is grown exclusively
on Sado Island. He is actively involved in the community and promotes
cultural activities such as tea ceremony and (taiko) drumming.

Awards
1991 Niigata Governors Prize, Niigata Contemporary Arts

and Crafts Exhibition (Gendai kgei Niigata kai ten)
1993 Encouragement Prize, Niigata Prefecture Exhibition
(Niigata-ken ten)
1994 Contemporary Craft Award, Japanese Contemporary

Arts and Crafts Exhibition (Nihon gendai kgei bijutsu ten)
1996 Niigata Prefecture Prize, Niigata Prefecture Exhibition
(Niigata-ken ten)

Selected Collections
Honma Hideaki, Mystery, 2004, bamboo (madake,
menyadake). Courtesy of the Clark Family
Collection, photo by Susan Einstein.

Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois


Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California

UENO MASAO
(b. 1949)

Ueno Masao first trained as an architect, but soon changed professions to


become a bamboo artist. His desire to work more closely with raw materials
was the impetus for Uenos career change. For one year, he was a live-in
student of Honma Kazuaki. Then Ueno went to Sado Island for further
study, and subsequently to Beppu in Kyushu. Since 1981 he has lived in
Kamogawa, Chiba Prefecture, southeast of Tokyo.
Utilizing his background in architecture, Ueno created a series of outdoor
projects in Thailand, Indonesia, China, and England where he spent six
months building a piece of wood and willow. These projects have earned
him international acclaim.
Ueno creates bamboo works known for their geometrical precision, which
he achieves using computer design software to formulate plaiting concepts.
His sculptures are often tinged with gold powder, which has become a
signature mark of his pieces, dynamically catching and reflecting light.

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts

Ueno Masao, Rotation of Ellipse Makes Two


Transparent Drums, 2004, bamboo (madake),
rattan, lacquer, gold powder. Courtesy of the
Clark Center for Japanese Art & Culture, photo by
Susan Einstein.

UEMATSU CHIKUY
(b. 1947)

In 1975, Uematsu Chikuy graduated from the Bamboo Craft Department


of ita Prefectural Beppu Technical Training School on Kyushu. Only one
year later he was selected for the 23rd Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Art
Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten), an incredible testament to Uematsus innate
artistic abilities. For nearly 15 years, Uematsu wove flower vases using
traditional techniques. However, in 1990 he decided to confine his output to
approximately one major sculpture per year. Living in near seclusion outside
of Tokyo, Uematsu has geographically and stylistically set himself apart from
other bamboo artists.

Uematsu Chikuy, Ascending to Heaven, 2007,


bamboo (madake), rattan. Courtesy of the Clark
Center for Japanese Art & Culture, photo by
Susan Einstein.

Uematsu Chikuys new, highly creative works are non-functional and


until 2007, were mostly designed to hang on a wall. After completing his
largest sculptural work, Ascending to Heaven (122 x 59 inches), Uematsu
decided to continue his themed composition through lines (sen ni yoru
ksei) series with the creation of smaller sculptures, such as Moon Rise on
Autumn Fields. Uematsu is undoubtedly a perfectionist, and his superior
craftsmanshipnot only with bamboo, but also with lacqueris reflected
in small and large pieces alike. Throughout the progression of Uematsu
Chikuys careerfrom traditional flower vases, followed by avant-garde
wall-hung sculptures, and then exquisitely scaled-down compositionsall of
the artists works are equally innovative and demonstrate his extraordinary
technical skills.

Awards
1976

1978

1981

Fukuoka Prefectural Governors Prize, 11th Western


Japan Art Crafts Exhibition (Seibu kgei ten)
Tamaya Prize, 13th Western Japan Art Crafts
Exhibition (Seibu kgei ten)
Asahi Newspaper Award, 2nd Exhibition of Traditional
Art Crafts by Young Artists (Seinen dent kgei ten)

Selected Collections
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
Oita Prefectural Art Center, Japan

NAGAKURA KENICHI
(b. 1952)

Nagakura Kenichi learned bamboo techniques from his grandfather, but


is mostly self-taught, which is very rare in the world of bamboo art. At the
age of thirty he had his first local solo exhibition. Following an unorthodox
approach to material, he uses roots and lacquer mixed with powdered
stone and clay in the creation of his innovative and unconventional
bamboo works.
Nagakura is known for developing a very distinctive scorched bamboo
aesthetic, as seen in his piece, The Clinging, Fire, which creatively
illustrates the effects of this element. He also incorporates driftwoodan
unusual material to use in bamboo artwith madake to make the hanging
sculpture, Round Web, Fan. Nagakuras most acclaimed works are
influenced by shapes found in nature.

Awards
2000 Grand Prize, 1st Cotsen Bamboo Prize

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
The Mint Museum, Charlotte, North Carolina

Nagakura Kenichi, Circle, 1990, bamboo (madake),


lacquer. Courtesy of the Clark Center for Japanese
Art & Culture, photo by Mochizuki Akira.

TANABE CHIKUUNSAI III

(b. 1940)

Tanabe Chikuunsai III is a third generation bamboo weaver from Sakai,


Osaka Prefecture. The eldest son of Chikuunsai II, he learned his skills at a
young age from his father and his fathers students, kub Shchikusai and
Tsukayoshi Tadayoshi. In 1964, he graduated with a degree in design from
Musashino Art University and in the same year was admitted to the Japan
Fine Arts Exhibition (Nitten). In the following year, his work was accepted
into the Japanese Contemporary Arts and Crafts Exhibition (Nihon gendai
kgei bijutsu ten). In 1969, he received the name Shchiku and in 1991
became known as Chikuunsai III.
In an attempt to distinguish himself from his father and grandfather,
Chikuunsai III began to recycle old samurai arrows in his art. Arrow bamboo
(yadake), named for its stiff, thin culms that were used to make arrow
shafts, became Chikuunsai IIIs medium of choice. Yadake is not malleable,
and the difficulty required to bend it lends itself to being used straight in art
works. Through this material, Chikuunsai III strives to uphold the traditional
style of the Chikuunsai family lineage, while also creating works that hold
modern appeal, like this sculpture.

Tanabe Chikuunsai III, Sun, Bamboo (yadake and


madake), rattan, lacquer, Courtesy of the Clark
Center for Japanese Art and Culture, photo by
Susan Einstein.

Chikuunsai I (18771937) founded the Tanabe family tradition of bamboo


basket makers. Now in its fourth generation, this family is represented in
the exhibition Modern Twist by Chikuunsai Is grandsons, Chikuunsai III and
Tanabe Yta, as well as Chikuunsai IIIs son Shchiku III.

Awards
1959
1965
1967
1968
1971

1973
1977
1986

Mayors Prize, Sakai City Art Exhibition (Sakai-shi ten)


Mayors Prize, Sakai City Art Exhibition (Sakai-shi ten)
Second Prize, All Kansai Art Exhibition (Zen Kansai bijutsu ten)
Third Prize, All Kansai Art Exhibition (Zen Kansai bijutsu ten)
Yomiuri TV Prize, Japanese Contemporary Arts and Crafts
Exhibition (Nihon gendai kgei bijutsu ten)
Mayors Prize, Osaka Craft Exhibition
Governors Prize, Osaka Craft Exhibition
Contribution Award, Sakai City

1998

Personal Achievement Award, Sakai City

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
The British Museum, London, UK
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Tokyo, Japan
National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan
Osaka City Crafts High School, Japan
Sakai City, Japan

TANABE YTA
(19442008)

Tanabe Yta was born into one of the most prestigious bamboo weaver
families of Japan. He is the second son of Tanabe Chikuunsai II and
younger brother of Chikuunsai III. At a young age he began learning
bamboo techniques from his father, and was sent to Musashino Art
University. However, he initially chose to study oil painting and only later
returned to bamboo, graduating in 1967. One year later, at the age of 24,
he gave himself the artistic name Yta. In 1976, he was selected for the
first time to present his works at the Japan Fine Arts Exhibition (Nitten).
As the younger son of Chikuunsai II, Yta was able to be much more
experimental in his art making. Roughly plaiting black bamboo, or
kurochiku, he created many visionary, unconventional works. He began
with vessel forms and progressed to topographical sculptures that
demonstrate not only the high level of his technical skills but also his
outstanding creativity.

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan

Tanabe Yta, Japanese Current I, 1987, bamboo


(kurochiku), lacquer. Courtesy of the Clark Center
for Japanese Art & Culture, photo by Forrest Cavale.

TANABE SHCHIKU III


(b. 1973)

Tanabe Shchiku III (also known as Tanabe Takeo), is the son of Modern
Twist artist Chikuunsai III. When his father retires, Shchiku III is expected
to become Chikuunsai IV, officially representing the fourth generation of
bamboo artists in his prestigious family lineage. The Tanabe family of basket
weavers is based in Sakai, Osaka Prefecture. His mother, Tanabe Mitsuko
(born 1944), is also a bamboo weaver, as was his uncle, Tanabe Yta.
Growing up learning the art of bamboo weaving, Tanabe Shchiku III first
trained under his father. He then went to Osaka City Crafts High School
(1991), followed by Tokyo National University of Arts (1999), and Oita
Prefectural Bamboo Art Crafts Training Support Center. Shchiku III is
unusual among Japanese bamboo weavers in that he is active outside Japan
as an ambassador for his art form, exhibiting and demonstrating in Australia,
Korea, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the U.S., and Switzerland.

Awards

Tanabe Shchiku III, Warrior, 2006, bamboo


(yadake, madake), rattan, lacquer. Courtesy of the
Clark Center for Japanese Art & Culture, photo by
Forrest Cavale.

1999 Newcomer Prize, Newcomer Exhibition in Sakai City


(Sakai-shi bijutsu shinjin ten)
2000 Labor Ministry Prize, All Japan Technical Exhibition
(Zenkoku sogo gino ten)
2001 Oita Governor Prize, Bamboo Craft Exhibition (Kurashi

no naka no chikukogei ten)
2001 Mayors Prize, Sakai City Art Exhibition (Sakai-shi ten)
2002 Yomiuri TV Prize, All Kansai Art Exhibition (Zen Kansai

bijutsu ten)
2004 Osaka Craft Exhibition Choice Award, All Kansai Art

Exhibition (Zen Kansai bijutsu ten)
2004 Sakai Art Association Prize, Sakai City Art Exhibition
(Sakai-shi ten)
2010 Bavarian State Prize, Working Area Braiding
(Bayerischer Staatspreis, Werkbereich Flechten)
2011 Asahi Newspaper Prize, 13th Exhibition of Traditional

Wood and Bamboo Art Crafts (Dent kgei mokuchi

ku ten)

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, Callifornia
Long Beach Museum of Art, California
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania
Seattle Art Museum, Washington
The British Museum, London, UK

TANIOKA SHIGEO
(b. 1949)

Tanioka Shigeo was born in Sumoto City, Hygo Prefecture. Inspired by the
work of Shno Shunsai (1904-1974), the first Living National Treasure
in the field of bamboo, Tanioka ended his career in advertising and
apprenticed himself to Tanabe Chikuunsai II at the age of 25. After 10 years
under Chikuunsai IIs tutelage, Taniokas talent allowed him to become a
fully independent bamboo artist. He was selected for the 38th Exhibition of
Japanese Traditional Art Crafts (Nihon dent kgei ten) in 1991.

Awards

Tanioka Shigeo, Asuka, 2002, bamboo (susudake),


wood (Japanese horse chestnut). Courtesy of the
Clark Family Collection, photo by Forrest Cavale.

1998

1999


2001

2002
2004
2004


2007

Director of the Agency for Cultural Affairs Prize, 8th


Traditional Art Crafts Wood and Bamboo Exhibition
Japanese Traditional Art Crafts in the Kinki Area
Prize, 28th Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Art
Crafts from the Kinki Area (Nihon dent kgei Kinki ten)
President of the Association Prize, 48th Japanese
Traditional Art Crafts Exhibition (Nihon dent kgei ten)
Finalist, 2nd Cotsen Bamboo Prize
Grand Prize, 3rd Cotsen Bamboo Prize
Nara Prefecture Education Committee Prize, 33th
Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Art Crafts from the
Kinki Area (Nihon dent kgei Kinki ten)
Nara Prefecture Education Committee Prize, 36th
Exhibition of Japanese Traditional Art Crafts from the
Kinki Area (Nihon dent kgei Kinki ten)

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Arts and Culture, Hanford, California
Craft Arts Hall in Shiga, Japan
Sakai City Museum, Japan

TANIOKA AIKO
(b. 1947)

Tanioka Aiko was born in Tokyo and is among the few women to have earned
recognition in the bamboo arts. In 1985, Aiko met Tanabe Chikuunsai III at
an exhibition and was so intrigued by his art that she accepted an invitation
from Chikuusani III to join his studio. For 15 years, she studied under his
tutelage, learning the Tanabe family traditions. She then met Tanioka Shigeo,
another student of Tanabe, who she later married.
Only since 2000, at the age of 53 years old, did she begin exhibiting her
works regularly and is therefore still considered an emerging bamboo artist.

Awards

Tanioka Aiko, Peaceful Mother Earth, 2003,


bamboo (madake), rattan, lacquer. Courtesy of the
Clark Center for Japanese Art & Culture, photo by
Susan Einstein.

2000 Chairmans Prize, Sakai City Exhibition


(Sakai-shi ten dehin)
2002 Osaka Education Committee Prize, 31th Exhibition

Japanese Traditional Art Crafts from the Kinki Area
(Nihon dent kgei Kinki ten)
2003 Chairmans Prize, Shinbi Art Crafts Exhibition
(Shinbi kgei ten)
2004 Hiramatsu Prize, Osaka Art Crafts Exhibition
(Osaka kgei ten)
2005 Nara Prefecture Education Committee Prize, 34th

Exhibition Japanese Traditional Art Crafts from the

Kinki Area (Nihon dent kgei Kinki ten)
2005 Sakai City Mayor Prize, Sakai City Exhibition
(Sakai-shi ten)
2007 Sakai Art Association Prize, Sakai City Exhibition
(Sakai-shi ten)
2011 Wood-Bamboo Participation Prize, 13th Exhibition

of Traditional Wood and Bamboo Art Crafts (Dent

kgei mokuchiku ten)

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California

HONDA SHRY
(b. 1951)

Honda Shry hails from ita prefecture on Kyushu, the southernmost of


Japans four main islands. In ita prefecture, the city of Beppu is the center
of bamboo production on Kyushu, and a high percentage of bamboo objects
used in daily life is produced in this area.
At the start of his career, Honda studied flower basket making, and
continued to produce these baskets for many years to earn a living.
Eventually, he felt restricted by the conventions of traditional ikebana
basketry. His current, wall-hung sculptures signify a new trajectory in
bamboo design, and demonstrate Hondas departure from his earlier focus
on functional vessels.
Inspired by nature, time, and spacetube-like, contorted forms have
become a staple in the evolution of Hondas personal sculptural style. He
helps nurture the careers of emerging bamboo artists, such as Mimura
Chikuh and Nakatomi Hajime, both represented in Modern Twist.

Awards
1981 Association Prize, 16th Exhibition of Japanese

Traditional Art Crafts from Western Japan
(Nishi Nihon dent kgei ten)
1986 ita Governors Prize, 21st Exhibition of Japanese

Traditional Art Crafts from Western Japan
(Nishi Nihon dent kgei ten)
2000 Finalist, 1st Cotsen Bamboo Prize
2002 Finalist, 2nd Cotsen Bamboo Prize
2004 Finalist, 3rd Cotsen Bamboo Prize

Selected Collections
Honda Shry, Undulation, 2005, bamboo
(madake), rattan. Courtesy of Alexandra and Dennis
Lenehan, photo by Dennis Lenehan.

Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California


Clark Center for Japanese Arts and Culture, Hanford, California
The Mint Museum, Charlotte, North Carolina
Museum of Arts and Design, New York, New York
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts

MIMURA CHIKUH
(b. 1973)

Mimura Chikuh originally planned to become a trombonist and even went


to conservatory in Germany. When he discovered his passion for bamboo,
Mimura moved to Kyushu and trained under Yufu Shhaku (b.1941). Yufu
gave Mimura the professional name of Chikuhwhich literally translates as
bamboo sproutand taught him a rustic basket-making style that utilizes
complete chunks of bamboo.
Mimura defies convention by avoiding Japans professional organizations
and public exhibition systems, preferring to remain an independent artist.
He emphasizes the natural beauty of bamboo in his evocative, sensual,
toffee-colored sculptures, and creatively incorporates bamboo stems and
roots into his open plaited works.

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania

Top: photo courtesy of TAI Gallery, Santa Fe, NM


Bottom: Mimura Chikuh, Hope, 2004, bamboo
(madake), rattan, lacquer. Courtesy of the Clark
Family Collection, photo by Susan Einstein.

NAKATOMI HAJIME
(b. 1974)

Nakatomi Hajime was a business student at Waseda University in Tokyo


before pursuing a career in the bamboo arts.
He went to Kyushu and studied at both the ita Prefectural Technical Institute
and the Beppu Advanced Industrial Arts and Technology Institute. While living
in Beppu, Nakatomi apprenticed with Modern Twist artist Honda Shry.
Through his sculptures, Nakatomi aims to honor traditional styles while
finding his own contemporary voice. Nakatomi has been exhibiting his works
internationally since 2003.

Selected Collections
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California
Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, Hanford, California
National Taiwan Craft Research Development Institute, Taiwan
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania
Racine Art Museum, Wisconsin

Nakatomi Hajime, Natural Prism triangle 20, 2007,


bamboo (torachiku), rattan. Courtesy of the Clark
Center for Japanese Art and Culture. Gift of Robert T.
Coffland and Mary Hunt Kahlenberg in honor of Bill
Clark's 80th birthday. Photo by Forrest Cavale.

SUGIURA NORIYOSHI
(b. 1964)

Sugiura Noriyoshi was 33 when he decided to train in the bamboo arts.


Like Nakatomi Hajime, Sugiura also studied in the Department of Bamboo
Arts at the ita Prefectural Beppu Technical College and the Beppu
Industrial Arts Institute. In 2003 he apprenticed under Watanabe Chikusei
II, and in 2005 he studied under the tutelage of Okazaki Chikuhsai II. He
lives and works on Kyushu. During the 2008 Oita National Sports Festival, a
flower basket by Sugiura was presented to the Emperor of Japan.

Awards
2004


2007


2007

2009


2010

2010

2011

Sugiura Noriyoshi, Sailing, 2010, bamboo (madake),


rattan. Courtesy of Eric and Karen Ende, photo by
TAI Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Oita Prefectural Governors Prize, 40th Living with


Bamboo Art Crafts Exhibition (Kurashi no naka no
chikukgei ten)
Oita Prefectural Governors Prize, 43th Living with
Bamboo Art Crafts Exhibition (Kurashi no naka no
chikukgei ten)
Oita Asahi Broadcasting Prize, 42nd Western Japan
Art Crafts Exhibition (Seibu kgei ten)
Oita Prefectural Governors Prize, 45th Living with
Bamboo Art Crafts Exhibition (Kurashi no naka no
chikukgei ten)
Design Prize (tawara Mayor Prize), 15th National
Bamboo Art Exhibition (Zenkoku chikugei ten)
Beppu Mayor Prize, 46th Living with Bamboo Art
Crafts Exhibition (Kurashi no naka no chikukgei ten)
Special Jury Prize, 16th National Bamboo Art
Exhibition (Zenkoku chikugei ten)

YONEZAWA JIR
(b. 1956)

Yonezawa was born and trained in ita Prefecture, the heart of bamboo
production on Kyushu. In 1989 he moved with his American wife to
Portland, Oregon, where he lived and worked for the following eighteen
years. His time in Portland exposed Yonezawa to American crafts, which
continues to significantly influence his work, even after his return to
Kyushu in 2007.
Yonezawa does not hesitate to integrate unorthodox material like
styrofoam and steel wire in his art in order to achieve the shapes and
forms he has in mind. His works show great diversity in size, ranging from
12 inches to 7 feet tall.

Awards

Yonezawa Jir, Crescent-shaped Flower Basket,


ca. 2000, bamboo (hbichiku), lacquer, metal.
Courtesy of the Clark Family Collection, photo by
Forrest Cavale.

1991


1993

1993

1993
1993

Jurors Award of Recognition, Basketry >From All


Directions, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts,
Gatlinburg, TN
Excellence in Craftsmanship, Ninth Celebration of the Arts,
Arts in Oregon Council, Salem, OR
Excellence in Craftsmanship, Content/Container, Textile
Arts Centre, Chicago, IL
WESAF/NEA regional fellowship alternate
Excellence in Craftsmanship, The Pacific Northwest
Contemporary Basketry Exhibit 91, Bumbershoot,
Seattle, WA

Selected Collections
American Craft Museum, New York, NY
Bellevue Art Museum, Washington
California Crafts Museum, San Francisco, California
Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, Wisconsin
City of Portland, Oregon
The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii
Corvallis Art Center, Oregon
Craft Alliance, St. Louis, Missouri
Long House Reserve, East Hampton, New York
Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington
The Mint Museum, Charlotte, North Carolina
Portland Art Museum, Oregon
Springfield Museum, Oregon