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Session 340

Functional Anatomy-Myofascial Slings

Anthony B. Carey M.A., CSCS, CES

Functional training is guessing without understanding functional anatomy. Myofascial slings

are windows into a deeper appreciation of true anatomical function.

They are literally the

link in connecting the interdependent parts of the body.

Understanding how they relate to

functional movement patterns allows for more effective program design.

Introduction

I. Characteristics of a muscle sling

  • A. Physiological components

    • 1. fascia-forms 50-60% of the mass of a muscle

  • 2. muscle

  • 3. tendon

  • 4. ligament

  • 5. bone/periosteum

  • B. Linkage creating slings-activated when the

ideal vector of pull are aligned

  • 1. fascial

  • 2. mechanical

  • C. Purpose

    • 1. Force transmission-serves as a conduit to transfer force across multiple segments

    • 2. Store elastic energy

    • 3. Maximizes stability with mobility-increased tension around joint without compression

  • II Tensegrity=tension integrity

Continuous tension is transmitted across all structures. An increase in tension in one of the members results in increased tension in members throughout the structure including those on the opposite side.

Session 340 Functional Anatomy-Myofascial Slings Anthony B. Carey M.A., CSCS, CES Functional training is guessing without

III. Examples of Major Myofascial Slings

  • A. Anterior oblique system

  • B. Posterior oblique system

  • C. Posterior longitudinal system

III. Examples of Major Myofascial Slings A. Anterior oblique system B. Posterior oblique system C. Posterior

Sling

Muscles

Posterior Oblique

Latissimus dorsi, contralateral gluteus maximus and the

Anterior Oblique

intervening thoracodorsal fascia (TDF) External oblique and contralateral internal oblique and the intervening anterior abdominal fascia, contralateral

Longitudinal

(to the external oblique) adductors of the thigh. Erector spinae, deep lamina of the TDF, sacrotuberous ligament, biceps femoris, peroneus longus

III. Examples of Major Myofascial Slings A. Anterior oblique system B. Posterior oblique system C. Posterior

IV. Examples of Myofascial Lines

Line

Structures

Superficial Back

Plantar fascia, Achilles tendon, gastrocnemius, hamstrings, sacrotuberous ligament, TDF and erector

Superficial Front

spinae Short and long toe extensors, anterior tibialis, patellar tendon, quadriceps, rectus abdominus, sternochondral fascia and sternocleidomastoid

Lateral

Peroneals, IT Band, hip abductors, TFL, gluteus maximus, lateral oblique abdominals, intercostals, SCM

V. Exercise Examples of Slings and Lines

  • A. Flexibility (requires a minimum of a third point of contact)

1.

Anterior Oblique System plus superficial front arm line

  • a. triangle with hand support

  • 2. Posterior Oblique System

    • a. sitting floor spinal twist

    • b. pigeon with opposite arm reach

  • 3. Posterior Longitudinal System

    • a. downward dog

  • 4. Lateral Line

    • a. lateral flexion with hip adduction away from wall-beginner

    • b. lateral flexion with hip adduction to wall + shoulder girdle=advanced

    • c. hip twist with overhead arm glide

  • 5. Anterior Line

    • a. Standing groin stretch with shoulder flexion

    • B. Strengthening-must first lengthen through the sling

      • 1. Anterior Oblique System

        • a. staggered stance push press (tubing/cable)

        • b. single arm chest fly with rotation tubing/cable)

        • c. kneeling wood chop (tubing/cable)

  • 2. Posterior Oblique System

    • a. staggered stance high row (tubing/cables)

    • b. staggered stance low row (tubing/cables)

    • c. single leg squat with cross-over reach (medicine ball/dumbbell)

  • 1. Anterior Oblique System plus superficial front arm line a. triangle with hand support 2. Posterior
    • 3. Posterior Longitudinal System

      • a. standing hip hinge-beginner

      • b. standing hip hinge-advanced (medicine ball)

      • c. backwards medicine ball throws

  • 4. Lateral Line

    • a. single leg overhead side-bend away from stance leg

    • b. side plank

    • c. lateral line tricep extension

  • Prepared by

    Anthony B. Carey M.A., CSCS, CES Function First

    acarey@functionfirst.com

    www.functionfirst.com