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PE

SI

K N E K AT I

1752

Table of Contents

SI

PEK

1752
2

Background

Chiefs Annual Report

Director of Operations Annual Report

Executive Finance Officer Annual Report

After School Program Annual Report

Sipeknekatik Gas Station Annual Report

16

Housing Department Annual Report

17

Health Centre Annual Report

25

Sipeknekatik Security Annual Report

26

Sipeknekatik Education

29

Lnu Sipuk Kinamuokkuom Annual Report

32

Operations and Maintenance Annual Report

34

Lands/By-Law Annual Report

36

Annual Recreation Report

39

Social & Social Development Annual Report

41

Sipeknekatik Economic Development Report

46

Sipeknekatik Employment and Training

47

Sipeknekatik Headstart Program/Tiny Tots Annual Report

49

Sipeknekatik Fisheries Annual Report

50

Sipeknekatik Wallace Hills Gaming Annual Report

53

Little Eagles Daycare

54

Consolidated Statement of Financial Position

55

Consolidated Statement of Operations

56

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

57

Statement of Remuneration for Chief and Council

58

Sipeknekatik Staff

N E K AT

IK

Background
Two years ago Chief and Council had mandated administration to arrange our first annual general
meeting. The purpose of this meeting was showcase the various programs and services that the band
offers to its members, while being more accountable by providing various presentations such as the
annual audit review. During these meetings Sipeknekatik program managers had booths set up to
provide information about the program and services offered. During these meetings refreshments
were served.
On September 10, 2015 Chief Copage published the following letter to band members on the
Sipeknekatik website:
Dear Band Members,
On behalf of the Chief and Council I am pleased to announce on October 8, 2015 we will be hosting
our 3rd Annual General Assembly at the Multipurpose Centre in Indian Brook First Nation. This will be
a terrific opportunity for band/community members and other community stakeholders re-discover
the types of program and services offered by Sipeknekatik and our partners. There will be some
door prizes and other types of gifts available for community members during this meeting that will
be drawn at the end of the audit presentation. The following is the tentative agenda for our meeting:
3:00pm

Opening Prayer

3:00pm 6:00pm

Sipeknekatik Booth Presentations


Sipeknekatik partner Booth Presentations

6:00pm-7:00pm

Sipeknekatik Audit Prestations

All band members and community members are encouraged to attend. If your name is drawn for a
prize you will need to be there in person to claim it. We look forward to seeing you all then.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Chiefs Annual Report


Prepared by Chief Rufus Copage
Dear Sipeknekatik [sa-beggin-egg ga-dee] Band Members:
As you may know, I have been re-elected for Chief and would like to thank all band members for
allowing me to continue to serve as your Chief. I strongly believe that as Chief, It is paramount that
I remain accessible to all band members and have made myself available to our band members
through all forms of communication (face-to-face, phone, email, Facebook, etc). I have tried my best
to attend as many community events as possible not only to make myself available to community
members but to show support and instill community spirit. I hope my consistent presence has made
a positive difference in your view.
I am especially pleased to report that our audited financial statements and our records now give
a true and fair view of our finances. I am pleased to share that we have lead ourselves out of CoManagement. I strongly believe our band has made huge strides in improving our transparency and
accountability. We are one of the few Bands in Nova Scotia that post our band council agenda in the
general public. Also our Chief and Council will continue to host community engagement sessions to
ensure band members are aware of our programs and services, while providing an our band with an
opportunity to learn from you band members how we can improve our administration.
Our fisheries operations continues to transition as professionalize how our band is engaged in the
fishing industry. We believe Chief and Council have created much needed employment opportunities
for our band members through our fisheries operations. I am pleased to share the band continues
its an overall objective to fish its own license whenever possible. In cases where we are unable to fish
the license by the band for the band we will release a request for proposals giving all band members
a chance to bid on these opportunities with the intension of creating fishing capacity within our band
membership.
During the past two years, we have begun our development of Wallace Hills and now have the
infrastructure in place to make huge improvements as our financial situation improves. I am pleased
to share with all band members that Sipeknekatik has received the ministerial order officially
designating Wallace Hills Indian Reserve. This means we can lease this land for commercial
development. During the next several weeks our Chief and Council have been working on structuring
our Economic Development Corporation, which will eventually be responsible for administering
our business interests such as commercial fisheries, point of sale business, while exploring other
economic development opportunities.
As Chief and Council, we had removed Sipeknekatik from the Mikmaq Rights Initiative (KMK)
because we felt our band and our band members are the most suited to have discussions surrounding
individual rights, access, and implementation. We have developed a Sipeknekatik process where the
individual band member comes first rather than the Chief and Council. This Sipeknekatik process
is still in development, and notices will be sent to all band members as things progress.
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Director of Operations
Annual Report
Prepared by Nathan W. Sack, Director of Operations
Until very recently Sipeknekatik did not have anything in place to clearly identify roles and
responsibilities of our band administration and our Chief and Council. Not having these roles did
cause much confusion within our administration. For example, administration staff at times would
act outside their mandate, and members of the Chief would be involved with lower administrative
functions. On September 24, 2013 our Chief and Council approved and adopted the Sipeknekatik
Band Accountability Framework. The accountability framework clearly outlines the roles and
responsibility of our Chief and Council and the roles and responsibilities of our Administration.
Overall, this governance model is being implemented and throughout the past two years this
transition has been challenging and successful. Chief and Council have made a commitment to stay
out of the day-to-day affairs of the band administration, and our staff are mandated to enforce and
follow the policies approved and established by our Chief and Council. Today I am pleased to report
that our Financial position continues to improve, and we more accountable to our band members
and stakeholders the we ever have been in the past. These administrative improvements are due to
the band commitment to our new governance model.
Chief and Council Responsibilities
Overall Chief and Council are responsible to govern the operations, setting direction and overseeing
the activities of the administration to ensure the programs and services are delivered to the band
membership in a fair, equitable, and efficient manner. Each Leader is accountable, individually and
collectively, to the members of the Sipeknekatik Band. For a more detailed description of Chief
and Council Roles and Responsibilities and our governance model please visit our website www.
sipeknekatik.ca.
Director of Operations/Administrations Responsibilities
My responsibility are to oversee the day-to-day operations of Sipeknekatik band, such as making sure
each of our Program Managers operates within their budgets, while observing the bands established
policies and procedures. I am accountable to the Chief and Council, while all managers and their
staff are accountable to myself. Simply explained metaphorically, Chief and Council are responsible
to provide administration directions to build a house by providing a plan. As administrators (staff)
we are responsible to use the plan provided to build and build that house.
Policy Development
There have been many challenges during the past few years developing and implementing many
of our established policies and procedures. These policies have been developed to ensure
Sipeknekatik as a government meets its fiduciary duty ensuring all band members are treated
equally while accessing Sipeknekatik programs and services. There have been times when the best
interest of all band members conflicted with the best interest of a few or the one band member.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Executive Finance Officer


Annual Report
Prepared by Matthew Horton, Executive Finance Officer
The Band continued to see improvements during the 2014/2015 fiscal year which runs from April 1,
2014 to March 31, 2015. Two of the major positives, which can be seen when looking at the audited
financial statements, include:

Net debt improved $882,404. Net debt is a figure that represents our financial assets minus our
financial liabilities (or our assets that are cash, or will quickly turn into cash, minus liabilities that
have to be paid with cash).
The Bands surplus (or net income) for the year before amortization was $1,136,727

Additional positive items to note include:



The Bands audit was submitted on time to AANDC for the third year in a row.
This is the second year in a row that the Band has had an unqualified audit report. In the past
the auditors were unable to give an opinion on the Tobacco and Fishing departments due to
poor internal controls, a lack of supporting documentation, and suspected misappropriation.
There has been significant improvement in these departments in all areas which has allowed the
auditors to properly audit the information and provide their opinion without qualification.
The Band purchased $100,000 of Guaranteed Investment Certificates (GICs) during the year
which were for the CMHC Maintenance Reserve (which is a requirement needed to be eligible
for future housing projects through CMHC). We currently hold $200,000 of GICs at March 31,
2015 for this purpose.
We also hold a $50,000 GIC in relation to the Due to minor band members liability which was
$822,758 at year-end. This relates to previous community disbursements being held-in-trust for
Band members who were minors when the disbursements were declared. An additional $61,500
was paid out to Band members who had turned 18 during the year. And $50,000 was purchased
for cash-flow purposes for December 2015.
There were capital additions of $270,833 during the year. These projects include permanent
improvements to what is now the Housing Building, a school bus, additional work on the well
and modifications to our fishing vessel.
The gaming facility in Hammonds Plains operated for a full year and generated almost $1,400,000
before expenses.
The principal portion of long-term debt (mortgages) decreased $239,329.

Concerns

Cash flow continues to be an issue at the Band. With a net debt of ($9,252,256) the Band has
numerous liabilities and arrears related to previous years (as well as current liabilities from current
operations) that need to be paid. While we continue to make progress and work with vendors, at
times it can be very challenging in terms of cash flow.
The Education department lost ($749,298) during the year which was a huge swing from the
surplus of $499,469 in 2013/2014. The majority of the loss is due to Post-Secondary Education
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

(PSE) as there was a significant increase in the number of people accessing the program.
A number of departments continue to run deficits. We will continue to look for ways to streamline
these departments in order to improve the financial health of the Band.

Going Forward



The forensic investigation report has been submitted to the RCMP and to insurance. We are
hoping that the costs associated with that project will be insignificant going forward. The issue is
not expected to be resolved during the 2015/2016 fiscal year.
Without new sources of revenue or additional cost cutting measures the financial progress of the
Band will continue to be slow.
The Band has fished its Snow Crab quota using its own Fishing Vessel Treaty Defender (summer
2014 and summer 2015). The intention is to also use this vessel to fish lobster licenses.
The Band has been allocated four new housing units by CMHC. Construction on the first two,
which will be duplexes, should begin soon. The second two were just recently allocated and
additional administrative work is required before they reach the construction stage (unfortunately
the Band had lost two houses recently due to an oil spill and a fire).
The Band was able to secure financing for an Excavator and Skid Steer. While this is a positive as
these machines will be put to good work on a number of different projects. The fact that vendors
are beginning to start doing business with us again is another more recent positive development.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

After School Program


Annual Report
Prepared by Jenny Howe, After School Program Manager
The After School Program/Suspension Support Program provides a caring, quite environment for
students from Grade Primary to Grade 9. The Programs are designed to assist with homework and
access to the internet for students who need to do research and school projects.
The After School Program/Suspension Support Program provides incentives for participating
students: daily snacks, pizza party and other holiday celebrations such as Halloween and Christmas
Parties.
Children who arrive at the After School Program/Suspension Support Program that do not have
homework are asked to read a book of their choice for 15 minutes, before they can play a game on
the internet or other activities. It is good to see the children come in and go right to the library and
look for a book, then ask me to time them.
Throughout the year, we have several different activities such as:




1. Movie Day Watching Walt Disney Movies, eating popcorn drinking juice.
2. Making squeeze balls made out of flour
3. Each month the children work on arts and crafts pertaining to the holiday of the month. The
classroom is decorated with their art work.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Sipekenkatik Gas
Station Annual Report
Prepared by Peter Adema, Sipeknekatik Business Ventures
This report is intended to provide both Council and Band membership a summary of activities of our
Gas bar.
From the Fuel Data Worksheet work sheet information related to fuel purchases, daily sales volume
per shift dip measures and purchase information such as volume and price. It is an excellent tool for
estimating our inventory balances.
Regular Fuel Puchases vs Sales in Litres
120,000.00
100,000.00
80,000.00
60,000.00
40,000.00
20,000.00
-

Apr-14

May-14

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan-15

Feb

Mar

Purchases 70,597.4 91,930.5 54,928.5 97,605.1 76,639.5 58,401.7 98,008.8 101,061. 83,066.0 89,896.7 53,243.3 71,566.7
68,088.6 88,147.0 47,423.4 101,153. 76,635.5 58,063.9 96,519.4 93,494.7 90,226.2 79,098.8 64,384.3 63,518.7

Sales

Purchases

Sales

Regular fuel purchases and sales varied monthly through out the first half of the year and normalized
somewhat over the balance over the latter half beginning in October 2014. After September Council
emphasized and Finance committed to allocating sufficient resources to the Gas Bar. The above
graph demonstrates that whatever the supply of regular gasoline, sales demand is more or less equal
to it. The ideal supply of regular gasoline is approximately one hundred thousand litres monthly.
Diesel Puchases vs Sales
10000
8000
6000
4000
2000
0
Purchases
Sales

Apr-14

May-14

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan-15

Feb

Mar

4441

4357

7313

4567

9185

4990.6

5000

5572.1

5600

7137.1

4575.68 4340.98 3462.26 3899.42 4481.4

5492.75 5613.99 7579.2


Purchases

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Sales

328.34 5843.72 5495.74 6918.93

Gas Bar diesel sales are strongest during the winter months reflecting demand for it from schools
bus and plow operations. There is however an increase in the number of vehicles requiring diesel
fuel. Due to the low volume sales of diesel there is a tendency to under supply diesel fuel in favor of
regular gasoline resulting lost sales.
Monthly vs Annual Sales of Regular Fuel in Litres 2014-15

4000
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec 14

Jan 15

Feb

Mar

Annual Daily Sales Average in Ltrs

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

2957.99

Monthly Daily Sales Average in Ltrs

2779.13

3092.88

2963.97

3612.62

2947.52

2977.64

3113.53

3169.31

3222.37

2628.36

2429.60

2443.03

The above graph illustrates the Gas Bar daily sales of regular gasoline above and below the annual
daily average. Daily averages are under during periods where fuel is under supplies. Note that both
averages are calculated net of days where no fuel is available for sale.
No Sales Days
15

Days

10

0
Number of Days

Apr-14 May-14
5

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

13.5

2.5

10.5

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan-15

Feb

Mar

3.5

2.5

Month
Number of Days

Represented here graphically is the number of days in which no regular fuel sales occurred. By far,
the majority of no sales days are due to a lack of inventory, equipment failures account for six of
these days. Note NSDs peaks at the end of each Quarter in line with the Bands cash flow and that
the final two Quarters are less dramatic and represents Finances commitment to maintaining a level
of inventory.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Tobacco Sales and Inventory Cost


$25,000.00
$20,000.00
$15,000.00
$10,000.00
$5,000.00
$-

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

15-Jan

Feb

Mar

Tobacco Revenue

$13,38 $13,51 $14,38 $19,12 $16,35 $13,75 $16,55 $13,09 $13,14 $12,71 $8,142. $8,490.

Tobacco Cost

$8,917. $11,86 $12,45 $9,470. $16,33 $11,74 $13,55 $11,42 $9,406. $10,47 $2,886. $8,096.

Net

$4,464. $1,648. $1,923. $9,657. $24.00 $2,018. $2,995. $1,668. $3,735. $2,244. $5,256. $394.0

Tobacco Inventory Movem ents


2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

15-Jan

Feb

Mar

Tobacco Inputs

1803

1416

1488

1144

1968

1136

1538

1320

1088

1200

352

952

Tobacco Output

1226

1228

1287

1730

1500

1249

1486

1157

1174

1145

722

784

Tobacco sales declined below the average for the year from February to March 2015. The graph
represents the number of packs purchased (added to inventory) vs. that which was sold. Our policy
is to purchase only what is needed to meet our demand for product. It should be noted that we have
yet to purchase our full quota to date.
Service hours:
7:am to 11:pm
7:am to 7:pm

Hours 448.00
$6,123.82
336
$4,963.02
Benefits 0.13
$796.1
$645.19

Total Wages
$6,919.92
$5,608.21

Savings

$1,311.70

The table above indicates the savings available (19%) after our hours of service had been reduced.
After a couple of scheduling experiments we settled on a 12 hour shift schedule, allowing four
employees full time hours while retaining two fill ins. Their typical pay period four days on, four off,
then three on and three off, providing an average eighty hours per pay period.
10

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

NSURB

Actual

Previous Benchmark Price

50.10

Change during pricing period

3.70

New Benchmark Price

53.80

Add: Forward Averaging


applied

-0.40

Add: Transportation
Adjustment

0.50

Add: Wholesale Margin

6.65

Wholesale Price

60.55

60.54

Add: Federal Excise Tax

10.00

10

Add: Provincial Motive Fuel Tax 15.50

15.5

Equals: Wholesale Selling price 86.05


(Rounded)

86.04

Minimum

Minimum

Add: Retail Margin

4.8

6.6

Add: HST (15%)

13.6

13.9

Equals: Pump Price

104.4

106.5

Base
Wholesale
Price

Fed
Excise
Tax

Prov Tax

Zone 1
Regular

60.5

10

15.5

Wholesale
Selling
Price

Self-Service

Full-Service

Min

Min

86

104.4 106.5

Max

Max

104.4 999.9

*Source: Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board


Our price is then the Full service price min. plus 3 cents

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

11

To demonstrate how price is determined an excerpt from the NSURB weekly publication of fuel
prices per Zone. As shown in the table above. We use the Full-Service price then add three cents so
that the final price of regular fuel for the week equals $1.074 for this example.
The following table is then calculated to provide the sales volume price per litre at $1.074 with Swipe.
1.3790

1.3790

1.15

1.3928

Amount

Reg

Reg

GST

Diesel

$5.00

$6.90

$6.90

$5.75

$6.96

$6.00

$8.27

$8.27

$6.90

$8.36

$7.00

$9.65

$9.65

$8.05

$9.75

$8.00

$11.03

$11.03

$ 9.20

$11.14

$9.00

$12.41

$12.41

$10.35

$12.54

$10.00

$13.79

$13.79

$11.50

$13.93

Volume

Price

Total

-NSIFTE

-HST

Swiped P MSITE/ltr HST/ltr

Net Price

38.522

$1.074

$41.37

$5.97

$5.40

$30.00

$0.779

Cost

Net Prft/
Loss

Rebate

$0.860

$(0.082)

0.155

$0.155

$0.140

Prft/Loss
$0.934

$0.073

So if the retail price per litre is $1.074 and Swipe is applied, the price after Swipe is actually $.779
and allows our customer to receive $1.379 dollar value volume of fuel.
Swiped Fuel Price vs Market vs Cost
$1.600
$1.400
$1.200
$1.000
$0.800
$0.600
$0.400
$0.200

ct
O

Se
p

Au
g

Ju
l

M
ay

$-

Full Service Market Price Regular Gas

Sw iped Price

Cost

Fuel Price Analyses worksheet; this worksheet provides information on the cost, sales price (swiped
and status) and most importantly the margin per litre for gasoline and diesel.
12

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Status Fuel Price vs Cost


$1.600
$1.400
$1.200
$1.000
$0.800
$0.600
$0.400
$0.200

Fe
b

Ju
n

M
ay

$-

FS Market Price

Status Price

Cost

Sw ipe Margin on Regular Fuel


$0.200
$0.150
$0.100
$0.050

ct
O

Au
g

Ju
l

M
ay

Se
p

$$(0.050)
$(0.100)
$(0.150)
$(0.200)
Before Rebate

After Rebate

Market vs. Swiped price of Diesel vs. Cost per litre


$1.600
$1.400
$1.200
$1.000
$0.800
$0.600
$0.400
$0.200
$May

Jun

Aug

Sept
Market Price Diesel

Oct
Swiped Price Diesel

Nov

Jan

Feb

Cost

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

13

Diesal Fuel Margin


Margin
Diesel
$0.200
$0.150
$0.100
$0.050

Fe
b

Ja
n

ov
N

ct

Se
pt

Au
g

$(0.050)

Ju
n

M
ay

$-

$(0.100)
$(0.150)
Before Rebate

After Rebate

You will note from January to March 2015 our margin on fuel fell dramatically as a result of the fast
paced decline in fuel prices. Note that on the average the wholesale price as stated by the NSURB
was 1 to 2 cents lower then the actual wholesale price provided by our supplier Irving Energy. My
practice in setting our price is to set it 3 cents above NSURBs weekly price publication for our zone.
Fortunately we purchase fuel on a weekly basis reducing the impact of aging inventory over weeks
while prices fell. Note that Swiped price is always less than our cost per litre of fuel which is not your
typical business model.
Sw iped Sales per Month
4500
4000
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0

Sw iped Sales

May

June

July

August

3266

1798

3675

2826

Septemb
Novemb Decemb
Februar
October
January
er
er
er 2014
y
2094

3262

4063

2516

2493

2060

March
2015
1823

The above chat was generated from NSIFTE Rebate Summary worksheet. The trend is downward
from January to March 2015 and possibly indicating our customers were getting a better deal at the
pumps as prices declined.

14

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Net Calulated vs. NSIFTE Rebate


$2,000.00
$1,500.00
$1,000.00
$500.00
ec
D

ov
N

ct
O

Ju
l

M
ay

Ju
n

$$(500.00)
$(1,000.00)
$(1,500.00)
$(2,000.00)
$(2,500.00)
$(3,000.00)
$(3,500.00)

As for the variations in NSIFTE Rebates the results when taken over a period of time are insignificant.
In fact as of our last Rebate payment ending March 30th, 2015, we owe the Province $289.19.
Gas Bar HST Summary Return for the Quarter ending March 31, 2015, by combining information
from our old Wiztec POS database and that of AMB. The resulting liability is $1,053.52 from sales
of fuel only. It should be noted that much of this liability is recoverable because the majority of the
liability is from fuel purchases from Band owned entities.
Completed and submitted for approval by the Province our Motive Fuel Retailer Permit
Renewal, due on February 28th. Approved.
Our new POS system was installed at February 25th 2015 with training being provided from AMB
on the 23rd of February. The process did not go as smoothly as expected. While our cashier staff
mastered their parts exceptionally well. A problem arose when our Supreme tank ran low (which was
the tank with fuel at the time of installation) and could not pump fuel from our Regular tank which
had fuel. Resulting in a couple of days where we could not sell our fuel.
We experienced fuel dispensing equipment failures prior to the Christmas holidays and noted that
the electrical cable running to the main tank are now on the ground and not secured like it should be.
Our Supreme tank dispensing pump has not worked since February and a replacement is needed.
Repairs have been done to pump 3 and it is back online.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

15

Housing Department
Annual Report
Prepared by Michael Paul, Sipeknekatik Housing Manager
The housing department was quite busy from April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015. With some major
projects starting and every day to day activities of dealing with our community of 340+ housing
units. The following is some of our projects and activities:
The housing department becoming more efficient with the construction/renovation of new
housing facility located at 341 meadow Rd.
Turning 3000 sq. /ft. of garage into 3000 sq. /ft. of office space and 1500 sq. /ft. of carpenters
workshop and tool shop and roughly 15000 sq. /ft. Of fenced secure area.
New housing Facility
Completed 4 RRAPS
Completed 1 medical RRAP
Completed 1 flooded basement repair
Completed 1 handicap extension
Church front step replacement and repair
Major Renovations





Little Eagles extension


New Housing Facility
Education Center, floors, doors and roof replacement.
Radio Station, ceiling repairs
Roof replacement (5)
Bathroom renovation (3)

Miscellaneous Work







Emergency roof repairs (3)


Gutter repair
Steps repair/replacement
Door repair/replacement
Window repairs / replacement
Plumbing repairs - average 19.5 calls/month
Electrical repairs average 15 calls/month
Carpenter repairs average 14.25 call/month

The plumbing, electrical and carpenter call are all averages from the past several months. On a
monthly basis the housing department answers around 50 calls per month.

16

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Health Centre Annual


Report
Prepared by Lorraine Etter, Sipeknekatik Health Director
We have had many exciting changes at the Health Centre since last years AGA. We have three family
practice Doctors working out of the office now. There is a Nurse Practitioner working collaboratively
with the Doctors and the Home Care program. Our Wellness Coordinator has been able to accomplish
a number of exciting opportunities for the youth in this community, the YMCA student exchange,
the youth moose hunt, etc. the Home Care team have been working diligently to help community
members maintain their health status and support them as needed. We did have WE Care in to the
community to provide an assessment on all the home and community care clients and the Assisted
Living Clients last fall. Their assessments were similar to most of our in-house assessment. The major
change in that program has been that all wound care clients are now being seen once a week by
either the Doctors or the Nurse Practitioner and a home care LPN, RN as available. This new practice
allows for changes in dressing orders to happen and take effect weekly, thus the client is getting upto-date wound care. The Addiction Prevention workers are very busy working with members of our
community. The changes in their activities since leaving the Eagle Nest are many. They have more
latitude to help our members, members families, and community activities. Brian Knockwood has
been very busy with his clients ensuring they receive the treatment, rehab, programs or information
they need.
Maternal Child Health worker has been busy this year providing Baby and Me, Growing Great Kids,
breastfeeding, infant massage and home visiting to new moms. Kay White has left proving footcare
in the Health Centre, but we have two LPNs that have their certification and training to provide
footcare in the clinic. They are available Tuesday and Thursdays, so make a call and come in. Primary
Care, which includes many pieces such as Communicable Disease Control, vaccinations, toddler and
child screenings etc. have been very busy this year providing various clinics, workshops and training
sessions throughout the year.
If you come in to the Health Centre you find it has changed, Philomena Simon has accepted a
different position here in the Heath Centre. She is now the Collaborative Practice assistant (medical
receptionist). The Health Centre Receptionist is now Susan Morrison (yes from the school). We are
proud to have them on board. In fact I am proud to work with such a dedicated hard working staff.
Staff have taken training on the new Personal Health Information Act, in order to maintain your
confidence that the information you give to any one at the health centre will keep your information
confidential.
I have been involved with many groups in the region on providing health care services to members
of Sipeknekatik. Some of those meeting have been on the principles of data collection and what
to do with the data, developing Nova Scotia Home and community care guidelines. The community
Health Board in Elmsdale which provides services to our community members and members at
large.

Home & Community Care

The Home Care Program continues to evolve and grow. Since the of Fall 2014, all clients were
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

17

reassessed by an outside agency as requested by First Nations Inuit Health Branch with the
assessments based on medical need. The majority of assessments indicated that clients were
receiving appropriate hours of care. No client saw an increase in their hours of service, although,
some saw decreased hours and sometimes the services were discontinued based on medical need.
As of today, there are 35 clients receiving direct care in their home by trained staff (CCA) and
another 20 clients receiving nursing care but not necessarily home support.
Direct care implies both personal care such as bathing, exercising and light housekeeping such as
sweeping, mopping and laundry. Other home support services may include meal preparation and
memory exercises such as list making and card playing.
The Home Care Nurses provide, on average, 200-250 home visits per month. These visits may provide
the following in home services: education on; medications, lifestyle, chronic diseases, exercises,
safety, nutrition; personal care; checking blood pressures, oxygen, lung sounds; Wound Care; and
Therapeutic Supports
Services are also provided in consultation with the Collaborative Practice Team located at the Health
Centre. The Home Care Nurses consult with the Doctors and the Nurse Practitioner and make joint
home visits with the team members when requested.

Mental Wellness

Mental Wellness Definition- a relative state of mind in which a person is able to cope with and adjust
to the recurrent stresses of everyday living in an acceptable way- in our community we have learned
that everyone is different and coping with everyday stressors can be changeling at times but its at
our best interest to find what works for everyone on an individual basis.
The Mental Health staff would like to welcome Brian Knockwood, he is the Prevention worker for the
Sipeknekatik Health Center.
The Mental health staff have successfully completed professional development training this year in
these areas:
Trauma Informed Harm Reduction
From Trauma to Wellness; powerful counselling techniques for front line workers
Assisting Individuals in Crisis
Self- Injurious Behaviour in Youth- Issues and Strategies
Transporting Dangerous Goods
Privacy 101
The Mental Wellness team has been extremely busy in the past year, delivering programs to fit the
needs of the community. These programs involve children, youth, adult and seniors. The Mental
Wellness program has delivered or sponsored:
Treatment Referrals i.e. detox/
methadone/programs
Youth Referrals to treatment facilities/
programs
Mini-Winter Carnival
Community dances
18

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

March Break activities


Peter and Mary Agnes Hockey
tournament
Easter Egg hunt
Mothers day breakfast
Student appreciation day

Remembrance day events


Fathers day fishing derby
Womens Wellness day
Youth Elder retreat
3rd Annual Stripped bass fishing derby
Community workshops: Leather
mittens, Aprons, Jingle dress making
Winter family fun activities
Baby winter photo contest
Seniors trip to Quebec
Summer games
YMCA Youth Exchange

Craving Change workshop


Aboriginal Awareness week
Hunter safety course
FAC Course
Youth moose hunt
St. Annes celebrations
Family fun days
Labor day activities
Community dances
Seniors Christmas Dinner & dance
Standard First Aid/CPR
Food Handlers Course

Thanks and for more information on any program that is offered through the Mental Wellness
Program, please feel free to contact:
Tina Nevin Mental Wellness Coordinator at tnevin@sipeknekatik.ca 902-758-2063

2014-15 Activity Report for Primary Health Care

The Health Promotion and Disease Prevention- Healthy Child Development program has 2
components: Healthy Child Development and Childrens Oral Health Initiative & Dental Therapy
Activities.
Healthy Child Development (cluster includes MCH and CPNP) aim to improve the health of mothers,
children and families, and support the development of children.
The activities completed this year include:
1) Capacity Building and Training

Orientation and on-going training activities attended by program staff


Type of Training Activity

Number of staff attending the Training


Nurse

Home Visitor

Privacy 101-

Cultural Safety

Dec3 and 4, 2014

Training-May7-8

Other

ADI Networking
Continuing Education

June3-5, 2014
Atlantic Nursing
Professional
Development
Oct7-9, 2014

2) Education, Information & Counselling


a) breastfeeding promotion, education and support is offered at prenatal classes, Baby and
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

19

Me parenting classes and one on one counselling. Last fiscal year there were 35 births in
the community,31 mothers initiated breastfeeding,17 breastfed for 2m, 11 breastfed for 4
months, 5 breastfed for at least 6 months;
b) drug/alcohol counselling and education is offered at one to one sessions and at prenatal
class. Glenda Carson, Clinical Nurse Specialist at the IWK presented Methadone and
Pregnancy to 16 prenatal clients and 9 support people;
c) education on FASD related behavior & strategies was offered at one to one sessions and
prenatal class. There were 23 prenatal clients and 16 support people that attended the
session;
d) peer mentoring initiatives are offered at Make the Connection and Baby and Me
parenting classes. Topics at Baby and Me included: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Childhood
Emergencies- First Aide, Reproductive Care, Effects of Smoking, Helmet Safety, Severe
Allergies, Child Sleep, Developmental Play- Developmental milestones, COHI Dental
Health, Speech and Language, Sun Safety, Car Seat Safety, Making Baby Food, Mumps
and Meningitis, Behavioral Management- Discipline Strategies, Childhood IllnessesInfectious diseases, Toilet Training, Cooking Class, Colic and Crying, Crafts(Baby Hand
Print Blanket), Home Safety, Poison Control, and Playground safety.
e) smoking cessation education is offered at prenatal and parenting class by James
Shedden, Mental Health & Addictions. There were 23 prenatal clients and 16 support
people that attended;
f) prenatal/postnatal health promotion, education & support: a total of 33 mothers attended
a series of 7 Prenatal Classes. Classes are offered three times a year and the next
scheduled class is to start again Oct 6, 2015;
g) one to one and group nutrition counselling/education offered in prenatal class (23
prenatal clients and 14 support people) ,and Baby and Me parenting class (9 mothers);
h) traditional/cultural teachings offered by the MCH Home Visitor: 1 session for drumming
(5 parents and 6 children) and 1 session for shawl dancing (7 parents and 9 children);
i) promotion of Mikmaq language at Baby and Me class: using the Mikmaq Pictionary
created by Curtis Michael.

Number of Group sessions and attendance


Topic or Focus
of Group
Session

# of
Sessions
held

Total Number of Participants


Parent/ Care- Elder Student / Young CHR/
Social
Giver
adult
Program Worker/
Staff/
CHN/
ECE
Teacher

Reproductive
Health

56

Pre-conception
information

56

Breast Feeding
Groups

25

20

19 mothers,
total 74
attendance

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Other

Topic or Focus
of Group
Session

# of
Sessions
held

Total Number of Participants

Pre-natal
Circles

21 classes
(a series
of 7
classes 3
times a
year)

33 moms,
24 support
people. Total
attendance
:159 moms/
87 partners

Parenting
Groups

25

19 moms
registeredtotal
attendance
74

Anaphylaxis
Presentation

Kindermusik

25
sessions

45
teachers
19 moms

Hand washing
presentation

17

86 PreK- Gr 6
. 4- Daycare
Readiness
Camps
20 Daycare

Infant
Massage- MCH
Home Visitor

10

2 parents
registered,
total 20
attendance

Prenatal yoga

Autism
Presentation

ASOR and
Preschool
Registration

11- AHSOR
14- Preschool

11- AHSOR
14- Preschool

Primary
Registration

9Sipeknekatik
9-LSK

9- Sipeknekatik
9-LSK

Primary
Readiness
Camp

Car Seat
Inspection
Clinic with IWK
and RCMP

21

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

21

Topic or Focus
of Group
Session

# of
Sessions
held

Total Number of Participants

Children and
Family Services
Act and team
meeting

28 staff
(7 Health
Centre, 7
Daycare,
14 MMF)

3) Access to Resources and Services


a) Vouchers for food given as door prizes at all prenatal classes and some Baby and Me
classes;
b) Supplies for breastfeeding given at postnatal visit to breastfeeding mothers and infant
supplies;
c) Referrals for access to screening & assessment services: Dental, Mental Health, Early
Intervention, Speech and Language, Hearing, Smoking Cessation, Diabetes Clinic,
Physician, OT, Nutritionist;
d) Labor and delivery support: All participants provided a hospital bag with supplies for
infant and parent;
e) Baby supplies: All participants in each prenatal class are given baby supplies like
breastfeeding pillow, maternity pillow, activity chairs, activity mats, and Toys R Us gift
cards. Postnatal mothers are given a standard Welcome Baby gift bag that includes:
towel, facecloths, book, toy, baby wipes, outlet covers, health kit, hand sanitizer, and 2
outfits. If participant attends at least 5 sessions out of 7 they are eligible for a car seat (5
lbs -66lbs). If they are unable to attend prenatal class, individual prenatal sessions are
offered or the home visitor can offer the Growing Great Kids Curriculum.
4) Outreach/Home visits
a) Peer mentors: Make the Connection and Baby and Me parenting class weekly;
b) Community Health Nurse: Post Natal Visits within 24-72 hr of discharge;
c) MCH Home Visitor: Home visits for Growing Great Kids curriculum within 1 week of CHN
visit;
d) Occupational Therapist: Home visits caseload 1, Sipeknekatik District School 3 hours a
week (5-6 children), and Sister Elizabeth Cody- LSK 3 hours a week (39 children).
e) Speech and Language: Sipeknekatik Elementary caseload 11, Sister Elizabeth Cody
caseload 10, and LSK caseload 8 children.

Number of families that received home visits from staff members


Position

Youngest child aged


0-6 months

Youngest child aged


7 months to 6 years.

Total

Community Health Nurse

27

27

Family Visitor

10

14

Other (specify)OT
22

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

5) Coordination of Services
a) Linking children and families to diagnostic services: Wellness Day activities for children
age 2 and 3 were completed June 19 ( 25 children). Primary Registration was completed
Feb. 5, 2014 at Sipeknekatik Elementary ( 9 children) and Feb. 12, 2014 at LSK ( 9
children). All children that attended these events were offered screening for: Vision,
Dental, Early Intervention, Speech and Language, Hearing, Immunization, Nutrition,
Healthy Development (Nipissing) and Mental Health;
b) Case management to improve access to services: see chart below;

Number of families that received on-going case management


Position Providing Case
Management

Youngest child aged


0-6 months

Youngest child aged


7 months to 6 years

Total

Community Health Nurse

11

20

Family Visitor

Nurse and Family Visitor


c) Coordination with other community based support services: We have established
partnerships with Early Childhood Intervention Services, as they have been permitted
to provide services to FN communities effective Dec. 2010. We have also established an
agreement with the DHA to provide Enhanced Home Visiting Services in the absence
of an Indian Brook Home Visitor. There is an agreement in principle with the CEHHA in
regards to Communicable Disease Control. There also has been several meeting with the
CEHHA, IWK and Colchester Hospital to discuss gaps in services with postnatal discharge
planning. The CHN participates in monthly public health meetings with the CEHHA Public
Health to address these issues.

Number of referrals staff made to the following programs/ services


Referrals to:

Number of referrals to
services within community

Number of referrals to services


outside community

Social Services
(e.g. Child Protection, Social
Assistance, Family Services,
Counselling, Child Care)
Mental Health

Health Programs/ Services


(e.g. Health Centre, Home
and Community Care, CPNP,
Treatment Services etc)

4- Adult Mental health


3- Family First
53 pre and postnatal
mothers for CPNP

3 prenatal for CPNP off reserve


1 physician referral for paeds
1 physician referral for
Developmental clinic

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

23

Referrals to:

Number of referrals to
services within community

Number of referrals to services


outside community

4 needed immunization
updated by CHN

Wellness Day: 4 dental, 9 vision,4


hearing,9 Early Intervention,3
speech, 5 OT, 2 Autism clinic

Child Development / Early


Intervention
Occupational Therapist

LSK Pre K-22 children


132 one on one visits
Primary-12 children
86 visits

Speech and Language

LSK Preschool- 10 children


LSK Primary- 8 children
Sipeknekatik Primary- 11
children

COHI

1) Provided data base of children 0-6 years to COHI worker;


2) Provided health education and promotion material to prenatal and postnatal groups;
3) Provided dental screening to children 0-7 yrs: AHSOR and Preschool Registration- 25
children, LSK Primary registration 9 children and Sipeknekatik Primary registration 9
children.
4) Trained one health staff and one community member to provide COH

Communicable Disease Control

a) Provided immunizations to infants, children and adults according to the Nova Scotia
Immunization Schedule: 36 immunization clinics were held for 31 children and 6 clinics
for 6 adults;
b) Liaison with DHA regarding mandatory reporting of Notifiable Disease, client records,
immunization coverage rate and revised immunization schedule based on missing and
incomplete immunizations;
c) Provided educational information on
CDC & immunization to clients;
d) Developed community based
project to increase uptake of routine
immunization and decrease incidence
of communicable disease. A Tracking
Tool has been completed to note
missing and incomplete immunizations
and a small amount of money was
approved by Health Canada CDC
proposal for a temporary Community
LPN to continue this project.
e) Chief signed Proclamation for
Immunization Awareness week: April
28 - May 2, 2014.
f) Provided Transport of Dangerous
Goods certification April 25, 2014 to 11
staff.

24

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Sipeknekatik Security
Annual Report
Prepared by Kevin Copage, Security Manager
Sipeknekatik Security would like to welcome you to the 2015 Annual General Assemble.
Our Security team has been working all year to help ensure a safer community for all our members.
We provide behind the scene Security for multiple Band held events throughout the year, as well as
nightly patrols and specific Band owned buildings. We are very pleased with the overall support we
have received from the community. I have received numerous reports from community members
over the year which has helped prevent damage and theft from the Band and its members. We have
had multiple events in the community this year. We have been pleased to provide assistance at these
events. Most notable this year would be our Pow Wow that went without incident all weekend.
Many have noticed the new uniforms our Security members have been wearing. I have received
numerous comments on the neat appearance of the new uniforms. They look less militant and allow
members to look more approachable; they are also more comfortable and portray a professional
look for our members.
We have made 2 new hires this year to allow better coverage of our community. We currently have
members in all gaming rooms and the Community Centre on a daily basis. We also provide at least
1 patrol person every night of the year. This member is there to provide emergency assistance to
anyone in need and to patrol all Band buildings to help prevent theft and damage. We also have
members at the Band office during business hours. The Gas Bar has a member there every night to
protect our gas station and its contents. LSK also has a member working there during School hours.
We were directed this year by Chief and Council to provide Security Services for our Hammonds
Plains Gaming Centre. We took over services in April of 2015. We are pleased to report the transition
went well. We currently have 4 members providing 24/7 coverage.
Sipeknekatik Security is proud to provide 17 full time jobs for our community members and look
forward to providing Professional Security services to our community in 2016.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

25

Sipeknekatik Education
Prepared by Velvet Paul, Sipeknekatik Education Director
Velvet Paul, Director of Education
Education Demography 2014 2015
Kindergarten 23
Primary to Grade 8
Grade 9 to Grade 12

295

184

Post Secondary 141


2014 2015 has been a productive year for the Sipeknekatik First Nation Education Department.
Students and staff have been collaborating with other First Nation communities and educational
organizations to develop, implement and part-take in numerous educational activities. Listed below
are some highlights of our 2013 2014 programming.
Websites: (www.sipeknekatik.ca) (www.lskschool.ca)
SEP This year we have continued to identify students with high needs and have improved upon our
classroom support programs, including re-examining our Learning Center programming along with
the development of a Life Skills program. The incorporation of outdoor activities, with a focus on
Mikmaw cultural approaches and practices has proven to be very beneficial.
Occupational Therapy with Speech & Language Summer Sessions for students who will be starting
Primary and Grade One, this program is focusing on preparing students with practicing skills that
they have obtained from their first year, in order to maintain their new knowledge throughout the
summer break. We will also provide parent information sessions including speech & language,
assessments and parental supports.
Autism Nova Scotia This is our 3rd year we have had the privilege to work with Autism Nova Scotia.
We had a full staff Professional Development provided by support workers, which included learning
strategies as well as classroom management strategies for children with autism. This will also be our
third year utilizing Autism Nova Scotia Summer Camp for our students.
Cultural Education Center Program CECP Focusing on cultural and traditional education, the
Sipeknekatik Education Department utilized the CECP to successfully provide cultural educational
activities for students and community members. Goals to increase the interest of Mikmaw culture,
tradition and language through camps and workshops with traditional teachings from elders from
Sipeknekatik First Nation, provided a holistic approach in combining educational lessons with the
culture of the Mikmaw people.

26

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

MEP The Math Enhancement Program has been a major contribution to our programming at
LSK School and Sipeknekatik Education Department, with a full time Math Tutor in the community
that works directly with students on an individual and group basis. Early intervention is key and
by focusing our resources on the elementary program, we are seeing measurable success. The
program has increased numeracy proficiency and is reflected in assessment and testing.
Elephant Thoughts
In collaboration with the Sipeknekatik Band Education Department, Elephant Thoughts returned to
the community of Sipeknekatik First Nation to build on the successes of last year. The 2015 program
was a great success and delivered a variety of innovative educational programs to the entire
community. Programs focused on positive community engagement and education for all students
and families.
Elephant Thoughts rehired a full time Instructor from the community who had assisted with program
delivery in the previous year, also hired 5 teen mentors that worked with us on a part-time basis. The
mentors assisted with after-school programming, evening community events, and several exciting
projects such as a year-end video and the completion of 5 Mikmaw storybooks featuring illustrations
by students from both LSK School and community elders.
Programs included a variety of hands-on, After School Science Workshops for students from the entire
community in Grade Primary to 6. We also had several Elephant Thoughts team members travel into
the community to provide in-class science programming for all grades and community members.
These programs emphasized healthy living and interactive education. We held several Community
Discovery Nights which brought parents, children, and Elders together to participate in activities
and presentations. Elephant Thoughts also ran a weekly Saturday Science Camp, which involved
both indoor and outdoor experiments, survival skill building, and group games. Additionally, the
program included a week long March Break Science Camp which focused on the adaptations of
birds, reptiles, and plants. In each of our programs, all participants, including parents were given
exciting take home items from the hands-on activities delivered.
Elephant Thoughts and the Sipeknekatik Education Department delivered 9 Community Discovery
Nights, 7 Saturday Science Camps, 48 After School Science workshops, 2 Basket-Making workshops,
and several in-school programs.
Love Program we are in our 6th year of participation with the Love Program that supports our youth
to learn advanced leadership and life skills while tapping into their creative abilities. In September
2015 LOVE will introduced its LOVE in the classroom program, which will further enhance their
support to our students.
Student Appreciation Day On June 25th, 2015 the 5th Annual Student Appreciation Day took
place at the LSK soccer field. Students of Sipeknekatik First Nation gathered to celebrate their
educational successes of the year. This event has proven to be successful bringing students, parents
and community members together in our beautiful school grounds.
MCG - Rines Brook (the bridge) Water Quality Restoration in Sipeknekatik First Nation, this project
will be of great benefit to our students and community. The clean-up of human-sourced debris in
the Rines Brook, also known by the community as the bridge, with education and training in waste
management and water quality monitoring improves our students understanding of the impacts
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

27

of household and industrial debris in our waterways. Sipeknekatik community members will also
get the opportunity to volunteer in these monitoring and restoration activities to improve Rines
Brook water quality, which is significant to the community as a whole. LSK School and community
members participated in a clean-up event, water quality monitoring, and educational activities run
by the Education Department and the MCG staff.
We are very pleased to collaborate with the Mikmaw Conservation Group, on this exciting and
important restoration project.
X-Chem Outreach Program X-chem is an outreach program sponsored by Saint Xavier University.
Goals are to inspire youth with the love of science. By using hands on presentations, students at LSK
had the opportunity to learn about chemistry and science through hands on experiments.
Dare Arts Sipeknekatik Education Department and LSK are proud to have been able to access the
Dare Arts Program that empowers students to unlock their inner artistic creative abilities encouraging
and promoting educational works of art.
PSE The BEd cohort will be finishing their practicum in December with a projected graduation rate
of twelve in May 2016, seven from Sipeknekatik, with one from Membertou, Eskasoni, Waycobah
and Potlotek First Nations.
The BA Cohort with Cape Breton University will begin its second year.

28

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Lnu Sipuk Kinamuokkuom


Annual Report
Prepared by Sarah Doucet
Overview
Lnu Sipuk Kinamuokuom is a Primary to grade 12 school located within the community. Students
are taught the Nova Scotia provincial curriculum, with the addition of Mikmaw language classes,
and subject content meets and often exceeds that of the Provincial Public School System. Mikmaw
cultures and traditions are embraced and followed daily throughout the school year.
Building
The school completed its seventh year of operation within the existing building during the 20142015 school year. The building is maintained and kept up to date in technology and security systems,
making it a technologically advanced and safe learning environment for all staff and students. The
resource room was relocated and the former space was remodeled into a Sensory/Calming Room
for students who require different needs throughout the day; this initiative has been a success. The
Sensory/Calming room will be further enhanced in the upcoming school year but has begun to be
utilized and allows us to have successes with a more diverse group of learners.
Staff
There are 59 full time staff members at LSK. Administration, teachers, educational assistants, kitchen,
security and custodial, each play an important role in the education of our students. In addition to
the full time staff we also have outside resources come in to deliver educational services to students
(Speech and Language, Occupational Therapy, EIBI, Elders, Early Intervention and Health Services).
Each service provided works in collaboration with staff to create better individualized programs for
our students.
Curriculum Development
LSK staff are committed to life long learning. Throughout the year staff are offered and encouraged
to seek out professional development opportunities. Continued staff educational development
enhances and improves teaching practices and programming. In addition to the regular classroom
teaching, LSK offers programs to meet students individual needs. Leveled Literacy, Math Mentoring,
Outdoor Education, Learning Center and Resource programs have been developed and help meet
the needs of students to promote success.
Mikmaw teachers have been working in collaboration with MK to develop outcomes and benchmarked
assessments for Mikmaw Language courses. Outcomes then will be added to Dadavan to help
teachers create their lesson plans throughout the school year.
The Learning Through Play program is starting in the upcoming 2015-2016 school year. In preparation
for the new style of teaching, the primary teacher has attended several professional development
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

29

days, inventory of the classroom was done, design of the classroom was changed, new furniture
and materials were ordered and the teachers desk was removed from the room. The new style of
teaching allows children to learn through various forms of structured play.
Parallel to the province, the primary and grade 2 teachers have attended the Nova Scotia Department
of Education Professional Development on the new P-3 Streamlined Curriculum. The new curriculum
will begin in September 2015 and has fewer outcomes and involves more integration of disciplines.
The report cards will also be changed to reflect the curriculum changes.
Extra-Curricular
Throughout the school year LSK offers a wide range of extra-curricular activities to the students.
Activities, groups and teams are developed to enhance learning by engaging students in activities
that they are interested in and encouraging them to try new things. Examples of extra-curricular
activities that were offered throughout the year, were a variety of team sports, intramurals, Dance and
Drama, Robotics, Girls Club, Computers for Schools.
Events
LSK is the host to numerous events. Staff and student, parent and community involvement help
make each event memorable. Examples of some of this years events: Nitap Day, Fall Fair, Treaty Day
Celebrations, Remembrance Day Ceremony, Christmas Concert, Winter Carnival, Science Fair, Show
Me Your Math, numerous dances, Prom and Graduation.
The graduating class of 2015 took the first LSK Grad Trip. The graduating class led by the Grade 12
Homeroom teacher raised enough to fly to Niagara Falls and spend five days of educational and fun
activities. The Red Road Project sponsored one day of activities and a community youth rep attended
the trip to help promote safe grad activities.
Communication
LSK offers a wide variety of methods to communicate with staff, students, parents and community
members. Traditional methods of personal telephone conversations and paper correspondence
are still used. In todays technologically advanced society LSK uses up to date correspondence via,
social media, internal emails, digital signage, call out system, web site, and an on-line news letter to
communicate.
Community Involvement
Staff and students are encouraged to involve community in school programming and events.
Elephant Thoughts offered programs in the school as well as to the community, which involved
hands-on learning activities. Annually LSK works in collaboration with the Sipeknekatik Education
Department to host Education Appreciation Day, which can be enjoyed by all community members.
Throughout the year many community members are asked to join classrooms and events to share
their traditional knowledge with the students. Community involvement is a valuable resource.

30

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Successes
Many student and staff successes have occurred this year. Two teachers have received Masters in
Education, which have resulted in an increase in certification for both. We have had students place in
Science Fair, Regional and MK Sporting Events. This year was the first year that LSK had the pleasure
of sending one of our students to the National Science Fair.
Future Goals
In the 2015-2016 school year we are working on the parent page set up through our student
information system (Dadavan). This will allow parents to have access to a variety of information
including attendance, marks and assignments.
LSK is looking at our current FNSSP plan and working on developing new school wide goals in
Math, Literacy, Mikmaw Language and Retention. Our new plan will be similar to the new school
improvement plans used by CCRSB. LSK is always looking at other ways to improve student learning
and communication with parents and community.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

31

Operations and Maintenance


Annual Report
Prepared by Steven Knockwood, Operations and Maintenance Manager
The Operations & Maintenance department has been going through many upgrades and changes
over the last few years. This year we have recently purchased new equipment hydraulic excavator
and multi terrain loader to aid in upcoming and ongoing projects. We have put this new equipment
to use as soon as it arrived with the demolition of the condemned building on Hollywood Drive. The
heavy equipment operator is currently working with the Housing department to prepare land for
foundations where new housing units will be built.
Department staff have attended training with the Circuit Rider Training Program in April and have
an upcoming training session in September. Staff members have also attended the annual training
conference held by the Maritime Provinces Water and Wastewater Association. Staff members
earned continuing education credits for attending, these credits aid staff members in maintaining
certification levels to qualify for writing provincial exams.
Stephen Knockwood has received his renewal certificates for waste water collection class I and
water treatment class II and the certificates are valid until April 2019. Rhonda Knockwood has also
successfully passed her Operator-in-training certification, this permits Rhonda to write certification
exams in one year.
Indian Brooks average water consumption for the month of August is 187.80 litres per person per
day. Production well #2 has pumped an average of 9.03 hours per day and the standpipe level has
averaged 91.24 ft. Total water production was 282,000 litres and average daily chlorine residuals at
the water treatment plant was 1.16 mg/L.
Community water samples by Health Canada are done monthly and sent out to test for bacteria in the
water supply. Bacteria water results from Health Canada for August came back satisfactory indicating
our water supply is safe for consumption. Samples are also taken from the New Ross community. The
Bacteria water results for New Ross came back satisfactory as well, indicating the water for New Ross
is also safe for consumption.
Will-Kare Paving & Contracting have been hired to patch holes this year. They have made repairs on
Poplar Street, Poplar lane, Tuff Street, Sesame Street, Hollywood Drive and Meadow Drive. With the
roads repaired, the operations staff have been working hard to get the new road signs up for any
road signs that have been damaged in the winter months or need replacing.
Community buildings staff have been very busy as well, handling upgrades for the Watergate Gaming
Facility including new wheelchair ramp and flooring. Upgrades and repairs for the Employment &
training office and repairs for the Multipurpose Centre and Education Centre.
The community garden has been planted with lots of great healthy vegetables such as lettuce,
cabbage, tomatoes, cayenne peppers, red and green peppers, kale and lots of herbs. Katrina has

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Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

recently had Kayla Thomas a dietician from CMM come out for a workshop to teach community
members some recipes using items grown in the community garden.
As Fall & Winter are around the corner Katrina has been working to organize a fall clean-up for
community members who were late getting items out for the spring clean-up. The fall clean-up will
be held at the end of September.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

33

Lands/By-Law Annual
Report
Prepared by Jason Mcdonald, Sipeknekatik By-law Officer
Definitions
ATR is a short-form generic term referring to proposal for Additions to Reserve or new reserve.
Addition to reserve or reserve addition means proposals for granting of reserve status to land
which is within the service area of an existing reserve community,
New Reserve means the granting of reserve status to land which is not within the service area of
an existing reserve/community;
AANDC Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
CESP Community Environment Sustainable Plan
LUPP Land Use Pilot Plan
Encumbrances Is a right to, interest in, or legal liability on real property that does not prohibit
passing title to the property but that diminishes its value.
WHPC Wallace Hill Planning Committee
Designated Lands the members of a First Nation have agreed to lease for the purposes set out in
the designation
CLM Certified Lands Manager
Lands Manager
In the past year, I have received my Certification in Lands Management level 1 and 2; I have been
working closely with the Band Lawyer and ANDCC and filling in the Lands issues and property gap
past, present and future that requires further Information or needs to be closed.
Role and responsibility







34

Creating a Lands Policy,


Working with The Housing Department on problem solving with private units,
Working with the Housing Department on future development,
Working closely with ANDCC on the preparation of the ATR of Mill Village
Help create bridges with any Encumbrances on lands held by Sipeknekatik,
Investigating any past permits, right a ways with Sipeknekatik and outside companies,
Creating a CESP

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

LUPP
LUPP is a program that is funded by ANDCC for the past 3 years with the intentions of
developing Wallace Hill, Hammonds Plain reserve for Sipeknekatik,
LUPP is to ensure each community have a strong foundation to direct future growth and
development.
With the creation of the LUPP Sipeknekatik has strengthen relationships with the Halifax
Municipality & County the Provincial & Federal Governments, Private Business and Land
Developer,
LUPP goal is to create Commercial Development, Industrial Activities, Housing , Resorts &
Tourism to generate future economic growth.
A working group was created WHPC to help Designate and develop the land in a more professional
manner to reassure that the communities interests are not left out.
Bylaw
In 2014/2015 I have been working with the band Lawyer on creating a smoking bylaw for
Sipeknekatiks community building and businesses. With the help of Sipeknekatik Operation and
Maintenance a littering bylaw is in its final stages.
Grass fire/Burning notice and bylaw were also created to protect the community and the band
Infrastructure. (Will be in effect the coming spring 2016 via sign and website).

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

35

Annual Recreation
Report
Prepared by Joan Paul, Recreation Manager
The Sipeknekatik Band Recreation Department has had an exceptional year, exceeding in many of
our yearly objectives. With a few new internal changes to our Recreation Department; encompassing
us with the ability and capacity to have positive progression by developing and delivering programs
that will meet the needs of all our community members.
The Band Recreation Manager has developed various recreational opportunities that run in full
operation from September to August, based out of the Sipeknekatik Multi Purpose Centre. We
designed the programs to serve our youth and community members in healthy positive outlets,
creating a vast interest in physical activity and sports, and building upon our youths potential, skills,
and confidence resulting in youth whom exhibit leadership qualities, aiding in the decreasing of
youth crime.
New to our on-going recreational programs was our Elementary Afterschool Rec Program, opened
to children in grades primary to five, Mondays through Thursdays. Our goal was to reduce and/or
eliminate afterschool sedentary periods by providing our youth with the opportunities to be active,
have fun, and create long lasting friendships, therefore building a stronger community for all.
Our Recreation Staff underwent extensive training in High 5 Sport; a program designed with the
youth in mind, trains individuals with the skills and confidence of how to positively interact with youth
in sporting events therefore, enhancing the experience of everyone involved and ensuring that all
youth activities are high quality assured sport programs.
On October 27th we held our 5th Annual Community Halloween Dance. With more than just over
two hundred people in attendance there were plenty of contests to enter into and prizes were
awarded. Our dance included a DJ, refreshments, candy bags and our Multi Purpose gymnasium
was decorated in accordance with the holiday theme, creating the maximum Halloween experience
resulting in another successful year.
Our most sought out fitness program was our eight (8) week Fall Fitness, taught by Jason Davis,
Certified Personal Trainer. Offered to approximately 15 women, of all various ages, many continue
their participation in programs offered in other fitness establishment located outside of Sipeknekatik
Community.
Our New Years Resolutions-Fitness 101 was specifically designed to capture the interest of
individuals into physical activity programs. In partnership with Jason Davis, Certified Personal Trainer,
our 2015 Fitness 101 composed of Cardio Training, Weight Training, and Kickboxing Fitness Program
for a six (6) week duration. One of our biggest successes is several of the participants continue to keep
fit by becoming involved in other physical endeavors in and outside the Sipeknekatik Community.
In our second year of partnership with the Mikmaq Project for Innovation (MPIC), the Band Recreation
Department, and Ski Wentworth, we were able to provide ten (10) Sipeknekatik youth, between the
36

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

ages of 13 to 25 years old, with the opportunity to become a member of the First Nation Snowboard
Team (FNST). The FNST program ran for eight (8) weeks and it equipped our youth participants
with the skills, knowledge, and experience to pursue careers as snowboard coaches. Five (5) youth
participants successfully completed the program and one youth participates gained employment as
a snowboard coach due to completing the program in the year 2014. All will be given the option to
remain in the FNST program and serve as mentors to future groups.
March Break Activity Fun Week 2015 was a huge hit! Serving approximately 75 youth, several
activities were accessible throughout the week and transportation and snacks were provided. The
purpose of the Activity Fun Week is to keep youth focused and active during downtime periods.
Our six (6) week Aboriginal Girls on the Move Program empowered young girls between the
ages of 7-13, with leadership skills by introducing girls to a variety of physical activity opportunities.
The program was led by youth mentors involved in leadership programs and certified instructors. A
success of the program was: our initial participant number was capped at 25 but due to the popularity
of the program we increased our maximum capacity to 33 girls.
SuperNOVA Day Camp is a science camp hosted by the Dalhousie University during June 29- July 3,
held within the Sipeknekatik Multi Purpose Centre gymnasium. Originally, capped at 15 participants
we were forced to increase our maximum participant capacity to 30 due to high interests rates.
Children between the ages of 7-12 year olds were able to experience with hands on science and
engineering applications and discovered how they work in our everyday lives. The last day was an
open house to parents and guardians; children participants were given the opportunity to personally
demonstration and explain their science experiments, making this a positive memorable experience
for all.
Our Rec Manager submitted an application for two (2) Automated External Defibrillators (AED)
and received approval on May 21, 2015. Since then, we have received AED training on June 27
which opened twenty (20) spots to our community members and residence of Sipeknekatik. The
AED equipment has been successfully delivered and installed within the Multi Purpose Centre and
are housed on both the main and second level.
Our Band Recreation Manager designed a six (6) week Summer Youth Softball Program, which
served 15 Sipeknekatik youth (4 females and 11 boys) between the ages of 8-12 year olds. Our
objective was to teach the fundamental skills of softball, introduce softball rules and regulations,
assisting youth players with valuing fitness for a lifetime, and assisting in development of character
in our ever growing youth population.
In collaboration between Truro Minor Football Association (TMFA) and the Band Recreation
Department we offered a Summer League Flag Football Program to Sipeknekatik youth, ages 7-12
year olds, held at the LSK Soccer Field for a four (4) week duration. We had 11 youth registered (10
boys and 1 female).
The Band Rec. Department Sport Education Assistance program is our most utilized program.
Serving approximately 325 youth, twenty (21) years and under. Each youth registered with the
Sipeknekatik Band are eligible to receive up to a maximum of $500.00, per fiscal year, which is
broken into 3 sections:
1. An organized sport not exceeding the amount of $300.00, once per fiscal year - April
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

37

1st to March 31 (If your childs sport should be a lesser value of $300.00, he/she is then
eligible to claim up until the value of $300.00 is reached).
2. Travel Assistance, not exceeding the amount of $100.00, once per fiscal year - April 1st to
March 31; eligible only for tournament or competition purposes.
3. Meal Assistance not exceeding the amount of $100.00, once per fiscal year - April 1st to
March 31; eligible only for tournament or competition purposes.
Our biggest success thus far has been the establishment of our Sipeknekatik Fitness Centre,
consisting of two parts: phase 1 - infrastructure and phase 2 - Fitness Equipment. All the groundwork
that went into the construction of the Fitness composed of:
Two office floors (located on the second floor) have been resurfaced
The main up-stairs floor has been resurfaced
The Band Recreation Departments main office has been relocated to one of the two side
offices, located on the second floor of the Multi Purpose Centre
A wall separating two rooms up-stairs of the Multi Purpose Centre has been demolished
and now houses our weight room
Two walls that separated two rooms and a hallway have all been demolished and now
house our Fitness Studio Room
Our gymnasium floor has been resurfaced and now displaces our new Sipeknekatik logo.
Installation of 16 Mirrors on the second level
Installation of 16 security cameras
Installation of surround sound equipment
14 Fitness strength training equipment pieces
7 Cardio Endurance Machines
8, 12 - foot benches, housed in our Multi Purpose Centre gymnasium
Our two (2) Basketball nets motors have been replaced and are now able to hoist up and
down
A Digital Message Board has been installed to the exterior of the Sipeknekatik Multi
Purpose Centre building and is in full operation after the Band Rec Manager received
training on the software
We anticipate the grand opening will be during our annual AGA in October 2015
Our Sipeknekatik Community Pools opened July 14, 2015 and ran for a seven (7) week duration.
Day to day operation was operated by our summer students. Our pool opened 7 days a week,
Monday through Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. for Employees to setup and close up). Admission was free this year due to allocating a pool budget in the Recreation
Budget by our Rec Manager.
Our Rec Manager has booked approximately two hundred and fifteen (215) booking request within
our Multi Purposes Centre Gymnasium.
The 2015 Annual Mikmaw Nova Scotia Summer Games were hosted in Millbrook First Nation on
August 18-23, 2015. Sipeknekatik had 170 athletes successfully registered within a vast variety of
sporting events offered. Transportation was provided to all Sipeknekatik band members needing
access to the Games. Also, we arranged to have a Sipeknekatik Refreshment Tent on location at
Millbrooks Summer Games Tent City, to serve our band members and athletes. Overall, Sipeknekatik
placed third and received a total Medal Count of: 28 Gold, 21 Sliver, and 22 Bronze. Congratulations
to all!
38

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Social & Social Development


Annual Report
Prepared by Sipeknekatik Social Department & Nathan Sack
This has been a very challenging year for the Social Department. The band has recently changed
accounting software, and this has had a drastic change on the day-to-day operation of our Social
Department. We have had our challenges during this transition period but remain confident that
moving our department to a digital format will increase efficiency, which will enable our staff to focus
more time and attention to our clients.
Our department is responsible to provide basic social assistance that includes overseeing programs
such as our social utility and heating program, home maintenance program, and providing basic
living allowance (ration).
We also administer Sipeknekatiks special needs program. This program is in place to ensure that our
band members with special needs have adequate resources. For example, band members that have
medical challenges can access this program to acquire medical equipment such as a hospital bed.
Our Special needs program is always a challenging to administer, as we do not receive adequate
funding to meet our band members diverse special needs.
As many of you know there pending decisions from the Justice System there may be drastic changes
to our Social Assistance program effective April 2016. If this is the case, then effective April 1, 2016,
the Sipeknekatik Income Assistance Program will longer be able to support children 17 years and
younger. As indicated by the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Sipeknekatik
will be forced to adhere to provincial social assistance rates and eligibility criteria for clients who live
on-reserve.
The following tables are the current social assistance rates offered by the Province of Nova Scotia:

Shelter Allowance (monthly)


Family Size

Rent or Own a Home

Boarding

$300*

$223

$570

$242

3+

$620

$282

* Up to $535 under certain circumstances

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

39

Personal Allowance (monthly)


Shelter Situation

Adult

Dependent child age 18


to 20

Dependent child to age


18

Rent, own home,


board

$255

$255

$133 *

In hospital 30 days or
more

$105

$105

Not applicable

In a residential
rehabilitation program

$81

$81

Not applicable

(Source: novascotia.ca/coms/employment/income_assistance/BasicAssistance.html)
We want to ensure all band members are aware of these upcoming changes and have sufficient
notice.

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Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Sipeknekatik Economic
Development Report
Prepared by David Nevin, Sipeknekatik Economic Development Officer
As development officer we are responsible development officer, review proposals, negotiating for the
band. To determines if businesses are viable and assist in obtaining funding for band members and
the band. Assist Entrepreneurs with business plans and pay up to 25% of the total cost of the business
plan. Obtain financing for entrepreneurs from mainstream lending institutions. When that is not
available we approach organizations such as: Aboriginal Business Canada, Business Development
Bank of Canada, and Ulnooweg Development Group as well as all aspects of development for the
community.

Land Use Pilot Project (LUPP)


The program activity Federal Administration of Reserve Land encompasses the Crowns statutory and
fiduciary obligations as the administrator of reserve lands held in trust for the use and benefit of First
Nations. Those obligations are fulfilled through the timely response to requests for land transactions
and activation of land and resource assets, additions to reserve, environmental protection performed
with due diligence which preserves the principles of communal use and benefit while meeting the
aspirations of First Nations in building safe, healthy and successful communities.
The LUPP for Sipeknekatik First Nation, was started approximately three years ago with the intention
of developing Wallace Hill to its fullest potential, while maintaining the integrity for Band members.
The ultimate goal is to create a means of generating revenue to back our dependency to the federal
government.
We have a sitting committee on LUPP that consist of Co-chair Chief Rufus Copage, Co-chair Belinda
Smith AANDC. The remainder of the committee consist of council members band staff as well
Department of Indian Affairs staff.

Economic Development Corporation


Through a variety of community consultations under the guidance of the LUPP committee, The
Sipeknekatik band will put out a request for proposals (RFP) to create a Development Corporation
to maintain all business activities of the band.
The Development Corporation will be governed by a Board of Directors (BOD) which should consist
of Professional i.e. Account, Lawyer etc. In addition to the people it should also consist of Band
Members such as: Elders, Youths, Members at large and Chief and council members.
One must remember that the Development Corporation should be at arms-length from the Chief
and Council to allow it to run properly.
The following defines the Terms of Reference for the Sipeknekatik First Nation (Sipeknekatik)
economic development program. We have broken the total project down into phases to assist
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

41

with funding arrangements as well as project management. Over time, we wish to tackle each of
these phases as an element of our economic development plan. It has been our experience and
recommendation that the natural course of events should be a planning process
Phase 1: Corporate Structure
Meet with Chief and Council and key management to confirm the current state and resulting tax,
liability and business requirements of the proposed corporate structure followed by structure and
governance. This can vary based on a case by case basis.
Review financial records and legal documentation as to the existing business and ownership
arrangements;
Draft a proposed legal structure which may or may not include: trusts, corporations and partnerships
as warranted and which will to the intent possible protect First Nation business assets from tax and
operational liabilities and to ensure that future business income is spent, reinvested or distributed
according to the desire of the First Nations membership;
At this phase we will require an outline of the high level roles and responsibilities of Chief and Council
as well as others as required (board of Directors Trustees, Senior Management etc); however, we do
not require detailed identification, selection and training of these individuals as these will occur in
subsequent phases
The proposed structure should be able to accommodate our needs as alluded to in the following
phase; however, no additional development would be required in this phase.
Review draft structure with Chief and Council; and, provide letter of direction to Sipeknekatik legal
counsel for review and execution.
Phase 2: Corporate Governance
In the second phase of our plan, we wish to expand on the corporate structure by putting the right
people and governance structures in place to: Ensure that professional business management and
First Nation politics each play the appropriate role within the structure; and,
Maximize the protection provided to First Nation assets from liabilities incurred in any of the First
Nations current and future business enterprises; and,
Provide Chief and Council comfort that the transition to the new model will be effective, that the
economic prosperity of the First Nation is well managed and that corporate governance bestpractices are sustainable;
In order to do so, we require:
The development of set criteria for each required element of the corporate structure. It is anticipated
that these may include but not be limited to: executive management, Board of Directors and Trustees;

42

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

The delivery of these criteria to Chief and Council and the membership so that there is a clear
understanding of the requirements of each position as so that individuals can begin to be identified
to fill these positions;
Assistance with the selection of key positions which may include but not be limited to: executive
management, Board of Directors and trustees;
Provide and deliver a training package for key roles which may include but not be limited to a Board
of Directors and Trustees
Phase 3: Business Development
In the final phase, we anticipate that the current state will have been properly realigned at this time.
Current businesses will operate within the new corporate structure and governance model. It will be
at this time that Sipeknekatik will be prepared to move forward into the future with a new streamlined
and effective governance and business model. To do so, we will require a renewed strategic plan
regarding business development to assist with capturing future economic opportunities and provide
an achievable road map that outlines initiatives best suited to assist the community with supporting
business and economic activity.
To accomplish this we require:
Development and facilitation of an economic and business development workshop to be attended by
the Economic Development Corporation management and Board. During this multi-day workshop
we would like to accomplish the following:
Develop a formal strategic plan for the organization,Vision, Mission etc. External and internal
environmental scans, Evaluation of our business opportunities and alternatives owing: Discuss
aspects of Sipeknekatiks current businesses
Whats working?
What requires improvement?
Discuss future business opportunities
Whats achievable?
What are we well-suited or well-positioned to be successful at.
Prioritization of opportunities
What should we take on tomorrow?
What is best left for another day.
Develop strategies to act on our opportunities.
Develop a corresponding implementation plan.
Publish and distribute the strategic plan.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

43

Gaming
With the opening in this past January, of Sipeknekatik Entertainment on our Wallace Hill Reserve, we
have open the door for the greater good of our Band and our people. We had opening ceremonies
on Jan. 17, 2104 to which the Chief and several council members attended. This was also attend by
several local media and a story was published in the Chronicle Herald, the story can be read at this
link http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/1180513-band-launches-gaming-centre.
We are located at 2283 Hammonds Plains road and our facility is open at 9 am to midnight daily,
with later hours on Friday and Saturdays. We close at 2 am those 2 nights. In March we hired a fulltime Manager, Owen Marr, to oversee the daily operations and maintenance of the facility. We also
employ 6 full-time staff and 3 part-time staff and hope to hire more staff as needed.
Each week we are growing as a business. We are currently looking for more ways to grow our business
so that we, the people of the Sipeknekatik Band, can benefit from the further development of the
Wallace Hills Reserve.
Any questions, regarding Sipeknekatik Entertainment in Wallace Hills can be directed to our
Managers, Owen Marr. He can be contacted at work 902-835-4489 or email at OMarr@sipeknekatik.
ca

September 2013-August 2014 Tobacco Shop Report


From September 2013 to August 2014 the tobacco shop has been busy with the rising number of
store owners, here in the community.
To date we now have twelve stores here in the community and one in New Ross.
The tobacco store has also had to increase the prices of our products four times since September of
2013 due to increase in the wholesale level.
Over the past months we have donated to a variety of different causes over the past months such as
culture ceremonies, sporting events, funerals, pow-wows, and community events as we have in the
past.
As of November 2013 the tobacco shop was ordered to sell product to Sipeknekatik Band members
only, as we are allotted quota for only our members.
The Tobacco Shop hours of operation are:
Monday-Thursday 8:00 A.M. - 3:30 P.M.
Friday 8:00 A.M. - 2:30 P.M.
With the exception of summer hours.

Band Programs

Craft Contributions:
This is a program to teach crafts people within the cottage industry on how to do remedial book
keeping. The amount of money varies but we try and keep the contribution around $250. The craft
44

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

person will be asked what material they purchased, what they made as well as how much money they
have made.
Equity Contributions:
This Program is to assist band members in getting in to business. The Sipeknekatik band provides
10% of the total cost up to $5000.00 to a financial institution on behalf of the borrower. This is to
allow the band member to borrow up to $50,000.00 from a lending institution, to get up and running
in their business.
Band Small Ventures:
The Entrepreneurs with Program provides access to business services , including: business assistance
(in Nova Scotia); and help to identify requirements for specialized equipment. Who is eligible?
Sipeknekatik Band Members that have aspirations of running their own business seeking funds under
$1000.00 and will be reimbursed at 50% of the total: meaning the maximum can be $500.00 paid
by the band (must have receipts paid in full before fund can be acquired). Entrepreneurs meeting
the following basic criteria may be considered for support through the Economic development
Program: have been unsuccessful in acquiring equipment for business from other sources.(Paid in
Full) will include Unemployed individuals and Social Assistant Recipients; have a little stating the
individuals intension.
Must reside in Province of Nova Scotia and be a member of Sipeknekatik Band. The program
provides Band members who are unable to obtain financing from a traditional financial institution
access to business loans. What can the program be used for? The types of projects supported by this
program include: starting small business; purchasing and applying new technology.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

45

Sipeknekatik Employment
and Training
Prepared by Angel Paul, Sipeknekatik Native Employment Officer
As you all know our previous Native Employment Officer, Mary Ellen Syliboy is no longer with the
band in this capacity as she was successful in securing a spot on Sipeknekatik Council during the
most recent election.
Sipeknekatik Employment and Training supports a skilled aboriginal workforce by improving
labour market outcomes for our First Nation community members through demand-driven skills
development, strategic partnerships and increased accountability through monthly reporting
practices. We develop and implement human resource development plans that are tailored to
meet the needs of our clients to assist them with preparing for and maintaining meaningful full-time
employment and or pursing other avenues of training to continue their education.
Adult Learning Program (ALP) is ongoing in Sipeknekatik . The program has eighteen
participants with students writing and phasing out of the program monthly. Instructor
Gordon Pictou states the class is doing well and all students are making sufficient
progress in the goal to obtain the Grade 12 Equivalency Certificate (GED)
Neo has been actively engaging with Industry Partners and Training Institutions across the
province to link more clients to Training and Employment Opportunities.
The back to school process has gone as smooth as can be expected with the addition of
the new NEO
Meeting with CMM representative to discuss the launch of the Skilled Workers Data Base
for employers and funding agencies to link them together with employees. Discussed
NEO Training in Database Management planned for October 2015
Plans to re implement the Job Finding Club Tuesdays and Thursdays 1-4pm at the Indian
Brook Employment Office.
Tyler Gould Program Director for MEBO has been in constant contact with NEO regarding
Up Coming Training Opportunities for community members. Ventilation Program with
12 applicants, Abengo Power Transmission Assembly Training with 4 applicants (Native
Women Specific) and Class 3 Certification Training with one Participant.
Created and maintaining a Sipeknekatik Employment & Training Facebook Page
Working on creating and recirculating the Sipeknekatik Employment & Training News
Letter for October 1, 2015
Accepting Resumes and Cover letters as application for the 26 week Construction
Labourer Training. Deadline for submissions is September 28, 2015. Poster has been sent
door to door in the community as well as being posted on the Sipeknekatik Facebook
Page. Clients have been coming in seeking and given assistance with updating and
creating Resumes.
We have currently entered into 4 Co-Sponsor Partnerships With: Nova Scotia Native
Womens Association, MEBO, Native Council of Nova Scotia and The Mikmaq Native
Friendship Centre.
The Summer Student Employment Program finished on September 4, 2015. We
Employed 63 Students in Two 4 Week Programs.
46

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Sipeknekatik Headstart Program/


Tiny Tots Annual Report
Prepared by Patsy Michael
This year were pleased to announce that we are officially open to offer services to parents & children.
Registration day was August 31, 2015. Regular school classes opened on September 4th, 2015, and
the Tiny Tots Playgroup opened on Thursday, September 10, 2015.
This year we have nineteen students attending A.H.S. class and Tiny Tots Playgroup. Every year the
enrollments have been increasing.
Aboriginal Head Start offers six components: Education, Culture & Language, Health Promotion,
Social Support, Nutrition, Parent/Family Involvement. Other programs that are offered 1) Change of
Seasons 2) Weekly Elder 3) Monthly Dads Program 4) Baby & Me and Make Connection 5) Mikmaq
Language Component each class 6) Cultural Celebrations 7) Fire Prevention 8) Safety.
Aboriginal Head Start will strive to improve the quality of life for all families through the provision of
positive, contemporary and traditional teaching. To instill in the children a sense of pride and desire
to learn and to foster emotional social development.
Aboriginal Head Start Program and Tiny Tots Playgroup has three employees.

Patricia Michael Program Co-ordinator

Marie Francis Mikmaq Teacher

Elizabeth Nevin Child Care Worker

We are located at 185 Sesame Street, at the Sipeknekatik Community Centre. For more information
please call us at 902-758-3945.
We are pleased to say that we had served over 63 children and 46 parents with A.H.S. class and Tiny
Tots Playgroup.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

47

Aboriginal Head Start Work Plan 2015-2016


September

October
Mikmaq Histroy
Month

November

December

January

Week 1

Open House
Getting
Acquainted

All About Me
(Mikmaq

My House

Winter

My Body

Week 2

Introducing routine
to Parent & Child

My Family

My
Community

Outdoor Play

Intro to
Alphabet
(on going)

Week 3

Intro to on-going
programs to
parents

Monthly Pot
Luck, Mikmaq
Celebration

Community
Helpers

Christmas
Concert

Into to
Numbers (on
going)

Week 4

Monthly Pot Luck


Open House

Halloween Party

Monthly Pot
Luck

February

March-Dental

April

May

June

Week 1

Into to Colors
(on going)

Feelings

Spring

Outdoor Play

Outdoor Play

Week 2

Into to Shapes (on


going)

Measurements

Easter

Mothers Day

Outdoor Play

Week 3

Valentines
Celebrations

March Break
Community
Activities

Volunteer
Week
Comm. Serv.
Providers

Animals and
Babies

Outdoor Play

Week 4

Monthly
Pot Luck

Monthly
Pot Luck

Monthly
Pot Luck

Monthly
Pot Luck

Picnic- BBQ

48

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Monthly Pot
Luck

Sipeknekatik Fisheries Annual


Report
Prepared by Brandon Maloney, Fisheries Manager
This past year in fisheries department has been very busy and productive. As Fisheries Manager, I
have met with Chief and Council numerous times to give updates on the employees, the seasons
and what it is required from this department. I have met with Department of Fisheries and Oceans
in regards to rules, regulations and stipulations that is required from everyone who has a license or
tags to fish. This is to help with the monitoring and governing this huge fishery. In collaboration with
other fishery organizations there is the Lobster Advisory Boards for the LFA35. I have stepped on the
boat and wore my captain hat. I have worked with the other captains, to ensure our employees are
treated respectfully and working to their full capability.
In the past, we received funding dollars from Aboriginal Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative
(AICFI) which is affiliated through Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs, the band now
owns a vessel, Treaty Defender. The boat is a great asset, and has done great in the lobster and snow
crab season. Also, through AICFI, the band has a software tool in Fishery Management System (FMS).
This software is being used with all First Nations in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. This program will
allow fishery manager to track different aspects of the fishery such as landings, gear, maintenance
and employees.
The fisheries department employs several fishermen/women who are members of Sipeknekatik. The
employees have worked the three main seasons, Snow Crab which started in April and has ended
July. The other two season are Lobster LFA35 which will commence October 15 and LFA33 and 34
will begin November 30. Our employees will be working on our vessel, but they will also be fishing
on other boats that have contracts with the band, so our people are protected. As for our fishermen,
there was three that have completed the Fishing Masters, Class IV. As for upgrades in training, there
was Marine Basic First Aid, there were six who attended and were successful. The Watchkeeping
Mate of a Fishing Vessel was another course that the six fishermen were successful in. The fisheries
department will be setting up another MED course soon.
The Food, Social and Ceremonial Fishery has been steady, have ordered tags and triplicate forms for
our band members to apply for tags for different lobster fishing areas. Members will receive between
three to 10 tags depending on the area. Even with the FSC fishery there are rules and regulations
that our people have to follow. Band members will receive a copy of the Sipeknekatik Band FSC
Lobster Fishery Management Plan and must follow the Deckhand Employment Strategy. Along with
the FSC fishery, the department was able to supply lobster for the powwow, Staff Appreciation Day,
St. Annes Festival. The department would like to say a big thank you to the team of fishermen who
delivered lobster house to house and was able to give out more to the community from the parking
lot of the band office.
I look forward to another busy and successful year with the upcoming seasons.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

49

Sipeknekatik Wallace Hills


Gaming Annual Report
Prepared by Owen Marr, Wallace Hills Gaming Manager
June 2014
- Septic issue #1 as per PCL Warranty work Sacks Excavation dug a hole to check out water
levels
- As O&M noticed water on our Septic Field
- Follow up work was done in Nov. 2014 by Tri Ex Construction. Pics sent to O&M for file.
- Upgrade Security system
- O&M also had a water conditioner installed on premise
Dec. 2014
- Safe upgrade done and installed by Kings Security and Locksmithing.
- Increased Brinks pickups to twice a week to reduce COH
Jan. 2015
- Sent rpts to CC.
- SWOT analysis done for Business Ventures
- Re addressed need for exhaust fans for removal of smoke
- Closed Jan 27 due to Blizzard
Feb. 2015
- Closed Feb 15 to Blizzard
Mar 2015
- 2nd issue with Septic field called plumber to fix snake it
- Called Carl Moore to dig up and find cause
- Pumped out first tank in Septic field
- O&M oversaw work (Larry Michael)
- Address exhaust fans with Mr. Michael
- Leak in roof due to excessive snow buildup
- Cleared Roof email attached
- Company recommended pitch roof to reduce snow stress and leaks due to snow
- Company was M.U. Rhino Renovations pictures sent to O&M of work
- Mar 18&19 closed due to Blizzard and no snow removal, Excavator brought
- Rented snow blower to clear walkway
- Banner/Sign put up when roof was cleared. Pics sent to Chief
- From Manager meeting I did analysis of Machines Sent recommendation to Finance to
remove 7 of the Blast terminals. This would result in savings of 50K a year and increase
our bottom line. Also machines are the less played machines.
- Donated empty bottle to local hockey team

50

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Apr. 2015
- Auditors in Apr. 1 appt at 9 am but didnt arrive til 10:30 and left at 11 am. First hour of
closure we had to turn away 14 customers.
- Started process for new Welcome Mat Branded with Sipeknekatik Logo from Canadian
Linen (2 mats rotated weekly)
May 2015
- Complete artwork and received Mats from Canadian Linen with Branded Logo
- Exhaust fans installed two in smoking section
- Sent updated reports of quarterly totals to DOO
June 2015
- Assembled hard copies of all financials for auditors to finance.
- Boxed reports and labelled. Included weekly rpts, receipts, invoices and deposits
- Locks installed on garbage bins, cardboard bin and baby barn storage shed
- Attended monthly HPWC HPPC and Managers meetings
- All personnel issued dealt with/through Human Resource dept.
Committee meetings done for summer to start back up in September 2015
July
- Started to plan for work assessments on staff with HR
- Staff appreciated day planned in Sipeknekatik, sent request to have Staff day out here in
HP and double as 1 yr. anniversary
- Planned not approved by council
- Plan for Customer appreciation day later in year
- July 20, first part of assessments done, still yet to do assessment on 3 staff (later in
summer)
- Posted for vlt clerk (part time / fill in) for HP
- Interviews held only 1 worker came for interview, person passed and was hired
- July 17, request for Deliveries by urban band members to have items delivered to HP for
tax purpose. No follow up to date from CC
- Contracts for current staff to be re done for extension
August
- DOO visited facility for day, was able to discuss what was needed to help maintain
building
- Coordinated with O&M manager to get items for building maintenance
- Showed DOO quarterly rpt that our revenues are increasing per quarter
- Talked with DOO for plan for Customer Appreciation Day, was told to make it happen
- Completed staff evaluations of remainder of staff
- Interviews for additional staff scheduled for end of Aug.
- Set aside $250.00 of weekly revenue for gift cards and promo materials for CAD
- Got gift cards, Sobeys, Tim Hortons, purchased sweaters, shirts and back packs
September
- Had interviews and hired 3 new workers. To be trained ASAP
- Ordered more Promo materials for CAD
Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

51

52

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Little Eagles Daycare


Prepared by Jenifer Sack, Daycare Manager
The Little Eagles Daycare center is a non-profit organization which is funded by M.E.T.S. It is open to
working parents, foster parents and secondary and post-secondary students. Open all year round.
Our principal goal is to provide a happy, healthy and stimulating environment for children between
the ages for 1 to 4 years; with a 20 seat maximum. Programs presents to the children are planned to
facilitate, stimulate and maximize intellectual, physical, social, emotional and cultural development.
The Daycare staff consists of:
Jennifer Sack manager
Blanche Francis child care
Christine Syliboy child care
Wendy Julian child care
Marlene Francis child care
Robyn Sack cook/ janitor
September to May is our busiest time of the year with all seats filled. We usually slow down over the
summer months.
This year we welcome two new workers to our team. We also had the pleasure of working with
Native Womens Association whom provided us with an E.C.E summer student for ten weeks. We
are currently working with M.E.T.S in hopes to set up a Snoezelen Room for special needs children.
There is an upcoming three day Daycare Director workshop in October which suggests possible
changes in the daycare programing, schedule and forms.

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

53

Consolidated Statement of Financial Position

54

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Consolidated Statement of Operations

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

55

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

56

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Statement of Remuneration for Chief and Council

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

57

Sipeknekatik
Staff
Reception
Sandra Julian, Front Desk Receptionist

Gas Bar
Peter Adema, Gas Bar Manager

Chiefs Office
Sipeknekatik Chief Rufus Copage
Deborah Maloney, Assistant to the Chief

Human Resources
Heather Knockwood, Human Resources
Manager

Administration
Nathan Sack, Director of Operations
Deborah Paul, Transcriber

Health
Loraine Etter, Director of Health

Aboriginal Head Start Program


Patsy Michael, Aboriginal Head Start Program
Coordinator
After School Program
Jenny Howe, After School Program Coordinator
Band Membership
Patricia Bernard, Band Membership Clerk
Bylaw Enforcement
Jason McDonald, Bylaw Enforcement Officer
Daycare
Jennifer Sack, Daycare Manager
Economic Development
David Nevin, Economic Development Officer
Education
Velvet Paul, Director of Education
Sarah Doucet, Principal of L`nu Spiuk
Kina`Muokuom
Employment and Training
Sheila Dorey, Employment and Training
Coordinator (acting)
Finance
Matthew Horton, Executive Finance Officer
Fisheries
Brandon Maloney, Fisheries Manager
Gaming
Lorrie Syliboy, Gaming Commissions
Representative/Gaming Manager
Owen Marr, Manager of Sipeknekatik
Entertainment
58

Sipeknekatik 2015 Annual Report

Housing
Michael Paul, Housing Manager
Operations and Maintenance
Stephen Knockwood, Director of Operations
and Maintenance
Rhonda Knockwood, Assistant Director of
Operations and Maintenance
Security
Kevin Copage, Security Manager
Social Development
Elizabeth Michael, Director of Social
Development
Recreation
Joan Paul, Community and Youth Recreation
Coordinator
Tobacco Store
Wayne Howe, Tobacco Store Manager

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