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case REPORT

OPEN ACCESS

Intraduodenal hematoma presenting with small bowel


obstruction, pancreatitis, and subsequent obstructive jaundice in
a hemophiliac patient

Anas K. Gremida, Matthew Stotts, Bali Gill, Haripriya Maddur


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Intraduodenal hematoma (IDH) is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. IDH
usually results from blunt trauma to the abdomen.
Case Report: We report a case of a 24-year-old male with a history of hemophilia A who
presented with intraduodenal hematoma presenting with small bowel obstruction, pancreatitis,
and subsequent obstructive jaundice.
Conclusion: Spontaneous intraduodenal hematomas are rare clinical entity warrants high
index of suspicion in patients with underlying risk factors such as hemophiliac patients.

International Journal of Case Reports and Images (IJCRI)


International Journal of Case Reports and Images (IJCRI) is
an international, peer reviewed, monthly, open access, online
journal, publishing high-quality, articles in all areas of basic
medical sciences and clinical specialties.
Aim of IJCRI is to encourage the publication of new information
by providing a platform for reporting of unique, unusual and
rare cases which enhance understanding of disease process,
its diagnosis, management and clinico-pathologic correlations.
IJCRI publishes Review Articles, Case Series, Case Reports,
Case in Images, Clinical Images and Letters to Editor.
Website: www.ijcasereportsandimages.com

(This page in not part of the published article.)

Int J Case Rep Images 2015;6(1):3941.


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Gremida et al.

CASE REPORT

39

OPEN ACCESS

Intraduodenal hematoma presenting with small bowel


obstruction, pancreatitis, and subsequent obstructive
jaundice in a hemophiliac patient
Anas K. Gremida, Matthew Stotts, Bali Gill, Haripriya Maddur
Abstract

doi:10.5348/ijcri-201508-CR-10469

Introduction: Intraduodenal hematoma (IDH) is a


rare cause of small bowel obstruction. IDH usually
results from blunt trauma to the abdomen. Case
Report : We report a case of a 24-year-old male
with a history of hemophilia A who presented with
intraduodenal hematoma presenting with small
bowel obstruction, pancreatitis, and subsequent
obstructive jaundice. Conclusion: Spontaneous
intraduodenal hematomas are rare clinical entity
warrants high index of suspicion in patients
with underlying risk factors such as hemophiliac
patients.
Keywords: Spontaneous intraduodenal hematoma, Pancreatitis, Small bowel obstruction
How to cite this article
Gremida AK, Stotts M, Gill B, Maddur H.
Intraduodenal hematoma presenting with small bowel
obstruction, pancreatitis, and subsequent obstructive
jaundice in a hemophiliac patient. Int J Case Rep
Images 2015;6(1):3941.
Anas K. Gremida1, Matthew Stotts2, Bali Gill3, Haripriya
Maddur4
Affiliations: 1MD, Department of Internal Medicine, Saint
Louis University Hospital. Saint Louis, Missouri, USA; 2MD,
Department of Gastroenterology, Saint Louis University
Hospital, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA; 3MD, Department
of Internal Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center,
Chicago, Illinois, USA; 4MD, Department of Gastroenterology
at John Cochran VA Medical Center. Saint Louis, Missouri,
USA.
Corresponding Author: Anas Khalifa Gremida, MD,
Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University 3635
Visa Avenue, Saint Louis, MO, USA; Email: agremida@slu.
edu
Received: 29 September 2014
Accepted: 20 November 2014
Published: 01 January 2015

INTRODUCTION
Intraduodenal hematoma (IDH) is a rare cause of
proximal bowel obstruction. Traumatic injury is the
most common identifiable cause [1]. Risk factors for
spontaneous non-traumatic small bowel hematomas
include pancreatitis, bleeding disorders, anticoagulant
therapy, vasculitis and bleeding diathesis [24]. We report
an unusual case of small bowel obstruction, obstructive
jaundice, and pancreatitis caused by a spontaneous IDH
in a hemophiliac patient.

CASE REPORT
A 24-year-old male with history of hemophilia a
presented with abrupt onset of severe epigastric pain,
nausea, and coffee ground emesis. He had been noncompliant with his factor VIII infusion and endorsed
recent heavy weight lifting. There was no history of
direct trauma. On examination, the patients vitals were
within normal limits. He had hypoactive bowel sounds
and tenderness in his epigastric region with no rebound
or guarding. The rest of his physical examination was
unremarkable. His initial laboratory workup revealed
hemoglobin 8.1 g/dL, AST 13 u/L, ALT 10 u/L, alkaline
phosphatase of 45 u/L, total bilirubin 0.6 mg/dL, and
lipase level was of 1322 mg/dL. A computed tomography
(CT) scan of the abdomen revealed an intraduodenal
mass measuring 8.1x14x14 cm (Figure 1) extending
into the intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal spaces
with decompression of the distal small bowel loops and
abutting the head of the pancreas. The mass measured
40 HU on the Hounsfield scale which is consistent with
a hematoma. A more radiopaque mass in the center
with 60 HU reflects a central blood clot. The patient was
admitted to the intensive care unit for supportive care.
A nasogastric tube was placed for decompression and

International Journal of Case Reports and Images, Vol. 6 No. 1, January 2015. ISSN [0976-3198]

Int J Case Rep Images 2015;6(1):3941.


www.ijcasereportsandimages.com

Figure 1: Non-contract computed tomography scan of the


abdomen and pelvis showing a large intraduodenal hematoma
(8x14 cm) extending into the retroperitoneal space (yellow
asterisks).

packed red blood cells were transfused in addition to


factor VIII (Humate P) infusion.
On the third day of admission, after the patient was
hemodynamically stable, an EGD revealed a Mallory
Weiss tear near the cardia and a large hematoma in
the lumen of the duodenum. The patient continued
to be managed conservatively. On hospital day seven,
the patient was noticed to have new onset jaundice,
laboratory revealed a total bilirubin of 6.6 mg/dL (direct
bilirubin was 5.0 mg/dL), AST 33 u/L and ALT 42 u/L.
Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showed
biliary and pancreatic duct dilation which was likely
secondary to external compression from the duodenal
hematoma. With further conservative management and
factor VIII infusions, jaundice resolved with reduction of
the hematoma on serial CT scans.

DISCUSSION
Intramural duodenal hematoma (IDH) is a rare
cause of obstruction of the proximal gastrointestinal
tract. Blunt abdominal trauma is the most common
cause of IDH, a finding that has been attributed to the
duodenums relatively fixed location and its rich blood
supply [1]. While anticoagulation with warfarin is the
most common risk factor for spontaneous non-traumatic
intramural bleeding, other causes of non-traumatic IDH

Gremida et al.

40

include endoscopic biopsies, aneurysms, pancreatitis and


bleeding diathesis [24].
IDH was first described in 1838 by Mclachan in a patient
with pseudoaneurysm [5]. In 1908, Van Khautz reported
the first case of spontaneous intramural hematoma in a
hemophiliac patient [6]. Whereas traumatic small bowel
hematomas commonly happen in the duodenum, most
spontaneous hematomas tend to involve the jejunum [7,
8]. Our patient had no risk factors which could explain
why the bleeding occurred in the duodenum rather than
the jejunum. Even though pancreatitis can lead to an
intraluminal bleeding, it is very unlikely that pancreatitis
can cause such a large hematoma. The clinical presentation
of IDH is mostly abdominal pain. Subsequent vomiting
may indicate that the hematoma becomes obstructive.
Presence of jaundice should raise the suspicion of external
compression of the biliary tree, but could also result from
hematoma breakdown. Diagnosis of IDH relies largely
on clinical suspicion and radiographic studies. The CT
scan with contrast is the most useful diagnostic tool in
detection of intraluminal hematomas. Hounsfield units
scoring system is a quantitative scale used to describe
radiodensity and gives a clue about the nature of the
structures on CT scans. Freely flowing blood has a density
of 2045 Hounsfield units (HU), while blood clots are
more radiopaque and generally score between 45 and 70
HU [9]. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is a good
alternative when the enhanced CT scan is not possible,
typically showing the characteristic three-layered sign,
which is caused by the tendency of hemosiderin to deposit
into layers [10]. In hemodynamically stable patients
with IDH, the management is usually conservative,
which includes bowel rest, bowel decompression, and
correction of coagulopathy. Resolution of the hematoma
is usually expected within a few weeks which depends
on the size of the hematoma [8]. Surgical intervention
through laparoscopy or laparotomy is reserved for
hemodynamically unstable patients or in cases of
perforation or ischemia.

CONCLUSION
Spontaneous intraduodenal hematomas are one of
the rare causes of intestinal obstruction and pancreatitis
in a non-traumatic patients. High index of suspicion is
required in patients with bleeding tendency who present
with symptoms suggestive of high intestinal obstruction
or pancreatitis.

*********
Author Contributions

Anas K. Gremida Acquisition of data, Analysis and


interpretation of data, drafting the article, Revising
it critically for important intellectual content, Final
approval of the version to be published

International Journal of Case Reports and Images, Vol. 6 No. 1, January 2015. ISSN [0976-3198]

Int J Case Rep Images 2015;6(1):3941.


www.ijcasereportsandimages.com

Matthew Stotts Analysis and interpretation of data,


revising the article for important intellectual content.
Final approval of the version to be published.
Bali Gill Acquisition of data, drafting the article. Final
approval of the version to be published.
Haripriya Maddur Analysis and interpretation of data,
Revising the article critically for important intellectual
content, final approval of the version to be published

Guarantor

The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.

Conflict of Interest

Authors declare no conflict of interest.

Copyright

2015 Anas K. Gremida et al. This article is distributed


under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution
License which permits unrestricted use, distribution
and reproduction in any medium provided the original
author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. P

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