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New Dynamic English

Instructors Guide
Introduction & Overview

The Smart Way to English

Version 2.5

Copyright 1998-2013, DynEd International, Inc.


http://www.dyned.com

October, 2013

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Table of Contents
Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 3
Course Content .................................................................................................................... 3
Placement and Levels ......................................................................................................... 4
Completion Percentage....................................................................................................... 5
Intelligent Tutor.................................................................................................................. 6
The Shuffler Level ............................................................................................................. 6
Syllabus .............................................................................................................................. 6

Scope and Sequence, Level 1 .............................................................................................. 8


Scope and Sequence, Level 2 .............................................................................................. 10
Scope and Sequence, Level 3 .............................................................................................. 12
Scope and Sequence, Level 4 .............................................................................................. 14
Instructor's Guide ................................................................................................................ 16
Combining Classroom and Directed Study ......................................................................... 16
General Classroom Guidelines ............................................................................................ 17
Directed Self-Study Guidelines ........................................................................................... 17
Classroom Preparation and Follow-up ................................................................................ 19
Listening Focus Assignments ............................................................................................. 19
Student Follow-up and Extension ...................................................................................... 20
Practice Exercises ............................................................................................................... 20
Classroom Presentation and Extension Activities .............................................................. 21
Review Exercises ............................................................................................................... 21
Video Interaction Units ...................................................................................................... 21
Mastery Tests ..................................................................................................................... 21

Using the Software .............................................................................................................. 22


Control Bar ......................................................................................................................... 23
Pull-down Menus ............................................................................................................... 23
Records Manager................................................................................................................ 23
Documentation ................................................................................................................... 23

Verb Markers....................................................................................................................... 24
Student Learning Path ......................................................................................................... 26
Sample Study Plan............................................................................................................... 27
Index .................................................................................................................................... 28

Course Content

Introduction
New Dynamic English is a four-part series for beginning through advanced-level students of spoken
English. Created by experienced teachers and based on classroom-proven instructional strategies, New
Dynamic English maximizes the effectiveness of multimedia by focusing on the key skill necessary to
acquire language: listening. Each level of the course is built around listening comprehension activities
based on short presentations in context, followed up by a variety of exercises that focus on grammar, oral
fluency development, reading and writing. The language presented and focused on in the course provides
the basis for extended classroom work, where the emphasis is on personalization, extension, and
localization of the content. In this way, the language comes alive and gains relevancy to students of
different ages and backgrounds.
The language at each level has been carefully chosen to extend and reinforce previous lessons. The aim
throughout is to facilitate long term acquisition. All language is presented in contexts which can be
linked and extended into the lives and experience of the learners. The language models are spoken
naturally, but are contextualized and sequenced to ensure optimum comprehensibility at each level.
DynEd's unique interactive program enables students to work at their own pace, with instant access to
repetition and comprehension aids such as translation, on-screen text, glossary support, and Mastery Tests.
Students record their own voices and compare their recordings with the native speaker models provided in
the course. This helps input the language, and prepares students for the Speech Recognition tasks that
have been integrated into many of the follow-up exercises. There are also Mastery Tests, Help Screens,
and an on-line Study Guide to help students focus on key points. A Records Manager is available to
teachers for managing class records and is necessary for unlocking the Mastery Tests.
Finally, the Interactive Video lessons at the end of each level provide a personal touch to the course that
gives students a sense of real communication. An interesting and varied cast of characters appears
throughout the course and illustrates the use of the target language in several situations, including use of
the telephone and simple social situations. The Video lessons also serve as a model for classroom roleplays, class video projects, pair work, and other extension activities that can make the learning of English
both effective and fun.
The interactive multimedia material in this course represents a significant advance over traditional
language laboratory materials. As with any new set of tools, however, teachers and students alike need to
develop techniques and strategies for using it effectively. This Instructor's Guide contains suggestions
for using New Dynamic English in the classroom and guidelines for directing self-study.

Course Content
New Dynamic English comes in eight modules that can be installed on a network (with a network license)
or used locally. Each module, in turn, is divided into five units. Individual units are referred to
throughout this guide by course Module and Unit number. Thus "2(4)," refers to Module 2, Unit 4.
New Dynamic English contains a variety of lesson types. The main body of the course is in the
Presentation Units. Some of these units, such as Names and Places, Jobs and Family, Planning Ahead,
and Life Choices, introduce characters and present different kinds of information about their lives and
experience. The language models in these units prepare students to communicate about their own lives
and experiences in increasing detail as the course progresses.
Other Presentation Units, such as Our World, Energy Sources, and Epidemic, present information and
language about subjects of general interest, such as basic needs, the seasons, the environment, pollution,
and global health issues. These units develop a more generalized vocabulary and develop the ability to

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

understand and express a range of important language concepts. This provides the necessary foundation
for students who will need to communicate about a wide range of subjects and who wish to use English
for further content-based studies. By the end of Module 8, students should be prepared to listen to and
read about the news, summarize a presentation, give instructions, participate in decision making, talk on
the telephone, take notes, and express their feelings and thoughts about most daily activities with a
reasonable degree of oral fluency.
The Presentation Units include follow-up lessons that focus on information questions, grammar, and oral
fluency development. These follow-up lessons should be done on a regular basis and will prepare
students for the Mastery Tests. In the Review Exercises unit of each module, students complete dictations,
fill-ins, and speech-practice tasks that help to reinforce and in-put the language from the previous
Presentation Units. These review exercises provide an overview of the entire module. They should be
done on a regular basis once the three Presentation Units have been completed.
As students study each lesson, their progress is monitored and assessed by the program. Each time a
student answers a question by clicking on a word or picture, records a sentence, completes a fill-in,
speech recognition or other activity, the program updates the students Study Records and assesses the
quality and level of study. The complete Study Records for all students are stored in the Records
Manager (see Records Manager Guide) for easy access and analysis by the teacher.
In all levels of New Dynamic English, care has been taken to design exercises that require comprehension
and critical thinking. Fill-in exercises, for example, require the student to choose an answer according to
context and meaning, as well as correct grammatical form. This differentiates our approach from drill
and practice programs, where students are tested on the rote learning of rules or routines, and where
language comprehension may not be required. Our focus on meaning is consistent with our assumption
that language learning is best facilitated when the language is both comprehensible and is in-put through
tasks that require the learner to process the language in sequenced stages, from recognition and
comprehension to production, review, and acquisition.

Placement and Levels


A computer adaptive Placement Test is available to help place students into the course. For detailed
information about the test and placement levels, please see the Placement Test Guide. Once the program
is underway, the Completion Percentage and Mastery Tests will help determine when to promote students
to a higher level. It is important to note that access to both the Placement Test and all Mastery Tests is
controlled by the teacher through the Records Manager. The Records Manager keeps Study Records and
is used to unlock the tests. It is strongly recommended that teachers become familiar with the Records
Manager, without which the full benefit of the course will not be possible. At a minimum, teachers
should know how to set up their class in the Records Manager, view student records and test scores, and
lock or unlock various lessons and tests.
New Dynamic English consists of four levels. Level 1 is for beginner or "false-beginner" learners with a
0-400 word spoken vocabulary and with little or no knowledge of basic grammar. Level 2 is for preintermediate learners with a useable 400-900 word spoken vocabulary and who can use well-formed short,
simple sentences to communicate basic ideas. Level 3 is for intermediate learners with a 900-1,500 word
spoken vocabulary and a fair mastery of English grammar in limited contexts. In Level 4, the course
emphasizes the communication of abstract relationships, critical thinking, and the development of main
and supporting ideas. This level is appropriate for advanced English language learners with a 1,5002,500 word spoken vocabulary and a need to express more complex ideas. Level 4 prepares students for
further studies in specific content areas, such as business, a school curriculum, and courses in basic
technology. Level 4 is also well designed to help prepare students for standard language examinations. It

Course Content

is recommended, however, that specific test preparation courses for tests such as the TOEFL, TOEIC, and
Cambridge examinations should also be used once Level 4 has been completed.
When evaluating level and pacing, it is important to realize that a students level varies according to skill
area. In general, the receptive skills, listening and reading, are at a higher level than the productive skills,
speaking and writing. If a students receptive skills are well ahead of their productive skills, then it is
important to spend more time with activities that develop the productive skills. For example, a student
with good listening comprehension should spend more time on focus exercises and activities that use
Speech Recognition. Role plays and other classroom activities would also be appropriate. On the other
hand, for students who have a low level of listening or reading comprehension, it is important to focus
more on developing their comprehension first, which means more repetitions, more time for review, and
more comprehension exercises before working on the productive skills. Where lack of comprehension
leads to frustration and embarrassment, the use of supplementary materials such as elementary readers,
picture dictionaries, or supplementary texts is advised before moving ahead in the course or asking the
student to produce language in public situations that cause discomfort.

Completion Percentage
Many students feel ready to stop an activity when they understand it. However, the learning of a second
language should be approached as a skill to be acquired, and not merely an understanding of grammar
rules and vocabulary. This is especially true for listening and speaking skills where there isnt time to
search ones memory in the midst of a conversation. The development of communicative competence
requires considerable focused practice through a cycle of preview, comprehension, practice, and review
and this over an extended period of time.
The Completion Percentage is shown in the Study Records and in some courses by icons
that
appear in the Module menus. It indicates how thoroughly a student has studied and practiced each lesson.
An 80~100% Completion Percentage means that the student has completed the recommended amount of
study for a lesson or group of lessons. See the chart below for an explanation of the symbols shown in
the column next to the Completion Percentage. These symbols indicate the Completion Percentage levels
and Mastery Test scores in a graphical way.
Completion
Percentage
0

Symbol

Mastery Test
Scores
0

1-79

1-79

80-99

80-89

100+

90+

Symbol

To assist students in reaching the goal of communicative competence, the Completion Percentage sets
completion goals based on the following study activities: sentence repetitions, sentence recording
attempts, speech recognition attempts, use of the glossary, and the number of questions which are
answered correctly.
The program counts each time a student completes one of the above activities or tasks. The accumulated
data is analyzed and scored according to the length of the lesson, the number of sentences and questions
in a lesson, and the kinds of activities that are appropriate in that lesson.
To reach the desired level of mastery of the materials provided within DynEds courses, and to attain an
80% or more Completion Percentage, students should go through each section of a lesson, first by
previewing it, then by focusing on the details and structure of the language, then by practicing and

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

recording the language, and then by reviewing it several times over an extended period of time. If this
process is completed, the vocabulary and language structures will be successfully acquired (not just
memorized short term), and the Completion Percentage will indicate that the student is prepared to take
the Mastery Test for that unit or lesson. To adjust the Completion Percentage targets for a class, please
see the Records Manager Guide.

The Intelligent Tutor


Please note that in the Records Manager, the relationship between the Study Time and the Completion
Percentage for a lesson will indicate which students are using their time more or less effectively. For
example, if a student has studied a lesson for 5 hours and has a 50% Completion Percentage compared to
an average Completion Percentage of 70% for other students who have studied the same lesson for 5
hours, it suggests that the student has not been studying effectively and may need coaching. An analysis
of the data in the Records Manager will enable the teacher to provide detailed feedback to help the
student improve the quality of study. A student who has consistently not used the microphone, for
example, is not recording or monitoring their speech, which is an important task for many lesson types.
To save teachers time, DynEds Intelligent Tutor has been developed to comb through the data and
provide useful summaries to the teacher, both for individual students and for the class as a whole. For
more information on the Intelligent Tutor, please see the Records Manager Guide.

The Shuffler Level


A unique feature of DynEd courseware is the Shuffler. As a student answers questions and completes
activities, the "Shuffler Level" rises or falls, from 0.0 to 3.0, and the computer adjusts the depth or
difficulty of the lesson accordingly. Additional sentences, more vocabulary and more difficult
comprehension questions, even new characters, are introduced. In this way, the lessons begin to open up
as the student shows increased success with the material. Generally, students should study a lesson until a
Completion Percentage of at least 80% is attained.
In Module 1, Unit 1, for example, the student will hear the sentence "Max is from San Francisco." In the
second or third time through the lesson, however, the student may also hear the alternate form, "Max
comes from San Francisco." At the higher levels students will find out more about Max, Kathy and Pierre
and the languages they speak. This dynamic nature of the program also helps maintain student interest
even as they go through a lesson several times.

Syllabus
The language in New Dynamic English is introduced and developed according to a spiral, concept-based
syllabus where meaning, grammar, and communicative need are woven together. Care has been taken to
focus on the concepts communicated most frequently in English (such as point of time, duration,
frequency, causality, and negation) and on the grammatical structures with the most generative power to
communicate these concepts. This careful sequencing of communicative content and language structures
makes New Dynamic English effective as the core material for a classroom-based English course over
several semesters, or for the directed self-study of motivated individuals. The modular design of the
course also allows it to be used with other teaching materials or linked to a standard curriculum already in
place. The elements of New Dynamic English have been selected and arranged to fit well with the content
and organization of many widely-used textbooks. The Index at the back of this Guide is useful for
locating specific units where structures and concepts are introduced and reinforced throughout the course.
Throughout the program, all language is presented in contexts that can and should be linked and extended
into the lives and experience of the learners. This is done most effectively in the classroom, where
students can make oral presentations, ask and answer questions, summarize material, work in pairs, and
engage in conversation about a range of topics. (See Combining Classroom and Directed Study)
6

Course Content

Concept-based approach
The language sequence of the course moves from basic, concrete information, which includes concepts
such as frequency and duration, to complex information including concepts such as causality, the passive,
and degrees of certainty. At the highest level, students learn the syntax necessary to express abstract
information and logical relationships, such as conditionality and the logical relationships between ideas
and events. This sequence is designed to be in resonance with how the brain organizes and structures
language.
Concepts that are introduced early are recycled throughout the course using increasingly complex and
varied grammatical structures and vocabulary, always in context. Thus in an early unit that focuses on
ones daily schedule, students will encounter the concept of point of time expressed in simple structures
like today... or in an hour... In later units this same concept is expressed with structures such as an
hour after he arrived...or after visiting with her friend... In a unit on energy sources , the passive
voice is introduced in sentences such as electricity is produced by hydroelectric power plants.
This concept-based approach ensures that students learn the key structures necessary to communicate
different types of information, from simple to complex. The traditional overemphasis on memorizing
lists of vocabulary items and situational phrases is inefficient and ineffective for most learners. Without
the ability to understand and use syntax to hold the language together, students will be severely limited in
what they can communicate effectively.

Spoken Language Orientation


The language orientation of the course is toward International English spoken in a consultative style as
opposed to more casual styles which are more divergent and less universal. The course is designed to
prepare speakers of English to use the language in a variety of circumstances, and especially to
communicate with others outside their local community. This is necessary if we are to prepare them to be
mobile in an ever increasing global environment. Some lessons feature speakers with different accents,
but always with care taken to avoid local variations that render the language unintelligible as a tool for
international communication.

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Scope and Sequence, Module 1


Module 1, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

Personal information: name, where from,


languages spoken, nationality
Introductions (Hi, my name is)
Countries and cities of the world
Relative location (here, left, right)
Demonstratives (that, this)
Pronouns (personal, possessive)
be, do, Contractions, Negation
Subject-verb agreement
Present Simple tense (She speaks Spanish.)
Yes/No and Wh- question formation.

Students learn to give and


elicit basic information about
themselves and others.

2. Jobs and Family


Richard Chin
Sara Scott
Henry Thornton
Word Practice
Questions

Presents the jobs, families and living


arrangements of three characters.
Extends personal information: age, spelling
of name, job, salary, marital status.
Present Simple verbs: have, live, work, etc.
Subj/Verb/Object (He teaches science.)
Object Pronouns (him, her)
Adjectives and Prepositions of Location

Students learn to ask and


answer basic questions about
each other in an interview
format.

3. Numbers and Time


One to One Hundred
Time

Numbers 1-100
Clock times and fractions
Telephone numbers

Prepares students for later


units which use time and
numbers.

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops fluency and reading skills.

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as Subject-Verb agreement.

1. Names and Places


Hello, Max and Kathy!
Where is France?
Who Speaks English?
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Builds recognition of simple


words and phrases in context.
Introduces the most basic
structures in English.

Introduces useful verbs and


daily vocabulary.

5. Video Interactions w/SR Shows basic introductions, greetings, and use Language review.
Introductions
of the telephone.
At a Party
Students may interact with the actors through Provides a model for roleAt an Office
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
plays.
Telephone
Interview
Hot Seats

Scope and Sequence

Scope and Sequence, Module 2


Module 2, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

1. Family Schedule
The Harris Family
Bob and Sandras
Schedules
Collette and Johns
Schedules
Questions
Focus Exercises

Family relationships (father, mother, etc)


Days of the week and weekly schedule
Time and Duration (when and how long)
Frequency (every day, on Mondays)
Means (by bus, drives his car to work)
Time expressions (after dinner, at night)
Prepositions of Place and Time
Sequence (before, after)
Subj/Verb/Object: (She practices the violin.)
Adverbs of Frequency (usually, never)

Students learn how to ask and


answer questions about their
daily routines.

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Seasons
Times of Day
Weather
Times of Life
Types of People
Matrix Game

Introduces basic vocabulary in five subject


Students learn to describe the
areas: seasons, times of day, weather
conditions, times of life, and types of people.
phases of life and the basic
conditions in which people
Adjective and Adverb phrases
live out their lives.
Word relations/analogies (hot is to cold as
summer is to what?)
Indefinite/Definite Reference
Superlatives (the coldest time of year)

3. Likes and Dislikes:


A Survey
Food and Sports
What Can You Do?
Video Hot Seats w/SR

Classification (what kind, such as)


Adverbs of Manner (how well, well, a little)
Quantification (a lot, some, any)
Ability (can/cant, know how to)
Useful phrases (lets see, for example, I
mean, not really)

Students learn to express


personal preferences and
abilities.
Presents an interview about
favorite foods, sports, hobbies
and other interests.

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

Provides language practice


and review activities.

Focuses on specific times,


frequency, and duration of
habitual activities that make
up daily life.

5. Video Interactions w/SR Presents language useful for making an


Short videos illustrate the use
Telephone: Lets Meet
appointment, suggestions, and using the
of the language with a variety
on Thursday
telephone for business.
of characters.
Business Telephone
Students may interact with the actors through Provides models for classroom
An Interview
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
role-play and interviews.
Hot Seats

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Scope and Sequence, Module 3


Module 3, Unit

1. Daily Activities
Kathys Schedule
Dianes Schedule
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Main Learning Points

Verb tenses: past, present, and future (ate,


Students learn to give and
got up, started, cooked, is eating, is going to
elicit basic information about
interview, is going to work late)
their daily routines, in the past,
Time phrases (this morning, an hour ago, in
present, and future.
an hour, later this afternoon)
Time Sequence (then she worked on, after Presents the lives of two
women, one working as a
the interview shes going to)
Yes/No and Wh- question formation with past journalist, and the other as a
mother in the home.
tense and future (be going to).
Short answers (Yes, she did. No, she didnt.) Extends basic vocabulary, for
both work and at home.
Pronunciation: /d/ called, /t/ cooked

Amount/Quantification (enough, plenty, not


enough, the third, one of)
Cause/Effect (They died out because...
Polluted air makes us sick.)

Conditional Relations (Without water there


2. Our World
would be no life; if we were closer...)
Our Planet, Earth
Air, Water, and Pollution Comparison (-er than)/ Superlatives (-est)
Reason (They died out because...)
Questions
Focus Exercises
Reference (one of; one form of life)
Relative Pronouns (that, where, which) one
of eight planets that travel around...
there: existential (there isnt enough)

3. Locations
City Locations
City Quiz
Spatial Relations

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Comments

Students learn to express basic


needs, energy, food, water,
our relationship to the
environment, pollution, and
the conditions for life to exists
Introduces more complex
ideas that will be developed in
Modules 6~8.

Asking for directions (Where is the?,


Where can I buy some?)
Directions (north, south, east, west)
Location/Prepositions of Location (on the
corner, across the street, in front of)
Shapes (triangle, circle, square)
Spatial Relations (near, on, under, on top of,
inside, to the left of, etc)

The Spatial Relations lesson


focuses on how to describe
how objects are arranged in
relationship to each other.

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as verb tenses, time phrases,
and logical connectors.

5. Video Interactions w/SR


Telephone: Arranging to
Requests, Suggestions, Negative Questions
Meet
Are You Going to Class? Asking for directions
Asking for Information
Ordering at a restaurant
At a Restaurant
Hot Seats

10

Students learn the names of


useful businesses and how to
specify street locations.

Language review.
Provides a model for roleplays.
Fluency development

Scope and Sequence

Scope and Sequence, Module 4


Module 4, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

1. Planning Ahead
Departure
Choices
Meeting a Friend
Questions
Focus Exercises

Adverb phrases/clauses (when he lands in


London, whenever they get together)
Students learn to talk and
Conditional (If he leaves on Saturday, hell
answer questions about travel,
arrive on Sunday. If hes tired)
Degrees of Certainty, Modals (will, may, can, future plans, and choices.
will probably, if he leaves)
Students learn how to give
Future (going to, will, may, can)
reasons for their choices.
Infinitive (tried to buy, takes ten hours to fly
from, decide how to get, to go by taxi)
In the context of a man
It is to express Condition or State
planning a trip, the focus is on
Noun phrases as the Subject (one way to get
future time, contingencies, and
from the airport, one of his best friends)
degrees of certainty.
Reason/Result (so hes going to get a
discount, Hes going because)

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Things to Eat
Things to Drink
Things to Read
Things to Listen to
Colors
Matrix Game

Amount/Quantification (some, most, a few,


many, much, lots)
Comparison (-er than)
Students learn to describe
Countable/Uncountable (a steak, some
things they like.
vegetables, a piece of cake)
Reference (one, the other, these, else, besides
Students learn how to express
the radio, one kind of meat)
their preferences.
Preference (would rather, like better, prefer)
Word relations (Grass is to green as lemon is
to yellow.)

3. Biography: Einstein
The Early Years
The Later Years
Focus Exercises
Questions

Expressing Change (he became interested in,


got married, he graduated in)
Dates (1879, 1900, 1902, etc)
Students learn to talk about
Duration (during that period, throughout his
their life history, important
life, until his death, for more than 20 years)
dates, and periods.
Past time, Past tense (showed, published,
made, said, wondered, won, died, etc)
Presents the life history of
Why, How, and That clauses
Albert Einstein.
Time Sequences (two years later, after
graduation, shortly after that, by this time)

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

Provides language practice


and review activities.

5. Video Interactions w/SR


Students learn to use the
Making an appointment, confirming
Business Telephone
telephone for simple business
information, and using the telephone
Friendly Advice
Students may interact with the actors through transactions.
At a Restaurant
Provides models for role-plays
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
An Interview
and interviews.

11

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Scope and Sequence, Module 5


Module 5, Unit
1. On a Trip
A Paris Vacation
Todays Activities
Florence and Beyond
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

2. Energy Sources
Our Energy Needs
What about the Future?
Questions
Focus Exercises

3. Directions
City Directions
City Quiz
Spatial Relations

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Main Learning Points

Comments

Past, present, future events and experience


In the context of a trip to
Europe, this unit introduces
Present Perfect tense (she has had..., they
the Present Perfect tense.
have kept in touch, she has never been)
Duration (been, for, since)
Students focus on the
Future time and Modals (be going to, will,
difference between the past
may, look forward to V(ing))
Conditional (she would do the writing, if they tense to express a singular
event and the present perfect
go together, it could be)
to express a state or
already, yet, ever
experience.
Yes/No and Wh- question formation with
Present Perfect and Past tenses.
Cause/Effect (As the supply decreases, the
price will increase. Oil spills cause)
Classification (such as, some of the ways we
get energy, fossil fuels include coal, oil)
Conditionals (if the temperature rises, if it
gets into the environmentetc.)
Degrees of Certainty (will increase, can
convert, there may even be..)
Noun phrases (many kinds of wildlife, the
energy of falling water)
Passive voice (is converted, are produced,
must be limited, is used, are being cut)
Purpose (We need energy for heat. We need
energy to run our factories).
Giving Directions (turn right at the
intersection, cross the street, etc.)
Distance (too far, not far enough, one block
east, two doors down)
Location (on the same block as, on the
opposite side of the street)
Spatial Relations (upper left-hand corner,
second from the left in the top row)
Gap-filling and Speech Recognition
exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops fluency and reading skills.

This unit focuses on global


issues, such as Global
Warming.
Students learn important
vocabulary and concepts
useful for talking about basic
science.
This uit follows up 3(2) Our
World.

Prepares students for giving


and following directions.
This unit follows up 3(3)
Locations.

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as the Present Perfect tense.

5. Video Interactions w/SR


Polite language for solving a problem over
Language review.
How Much Are the
the telephone and for buying something.
Provides a model for roleTickets?

Students
may
interact
with
the
actors
through
plays.
Business Telephone
Speech
Recognition
(SR)
activities.
At a Restaurant (1)
Hot Seats
12

Scope and Sequence

Scope and Sequence, Module 6


Module 6, Unit

1. Life Experience
Making a New Life
A Path to Success
A Troubled Past
Questions
Focus Exercises

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Occupations
Places to Go
Ways to Travel
Things to Wear
Feelings
Matrix Game

3. Comparisons
Price and Quality
Three Sisters
Country Data
Four Cities
Focus Exercises

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Main Learning Points


Present Perfect/Past tenses contrasted
Passive voice (was rejected, was arrested)
Gerund/Infinitive (enjoys teaching, decided
to study, likes living in England)
Change (she became a model, hes getting
older, their relationship got better.)
Reason/Purpose (for a personal reason, a
grant to study, arrested for stealing)
Time Sequence (at the same time, a year
later, before that, since then, he still lives)

Comments
Students learn to talk about
their past experiences and
hopes for the future.
This unit contrasts the lives of
three characters.
This unit extends and follows
up 5(1) On a Trip.

Adverb clauses/phrases (when they are


happy, when someone is rude to them)
This unit focuses on subject
Compulsion, have to (I only go when I have
areas that are often in daily
to. You have to put on your socks.)
conversations.
Word relations/analogies (Driver is to bus as
pilot is to airplane.)
Students should extend the
Gerunds/Infinitives (I prefer flying. The
vocabulary given here, for
fastest way to travel is to go by airplane.)
example by interviewing each
Countable/Uncountable Amounts (many
other.
people, some people, a lot of education, a
pair of gloves, most people)
Adjective clauses/phrases (which was made
in 1920, the second most expensive)
Students learn to ask
Approximation (approximately 5,400 miles;
information questions and
about 7,400 miles; just over)
make different kinds of
Asking about price/product information
comparisons, such as for
(How much is the newest one? When was it
product comparison.
made? Which one has the best?)
Comparison (-er than, -est, as good as, better People, products, and places
than, the most expensive one)
are contrasted.
Countable/Uncountable (how many more,
how much more, how much taller)
Physical Description, Temperature, Distance
Gap-filling and Speech Recognition
exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

Provides language practice


and review activities.

5. Video Interactions w/SR Presents polite language useful for doing


Students learn how to solve
Telephone Conversation
business over the telephone.
problems over the telephone.
Flight Information
Students may interact with the actors through Provides models for role-plays
At a Restaurant (2)
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
and interviews.
Interview: Job Experience

13

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Scope and Sequence, Module 7


Module 7, Unit
1. Life Choices
Harrys Accident
Joans Challenge
Joes Cafe
Sandras Dilemma
Question Practice w/SR
Focus on Conditionals

Main Learning Points


Conditionals: Contrary-to-fact, Present, and
Future (if, unless, had)
Logical Relations between events (because,
even though, not unless, if, had to)
Past Habitual (used to, could, would)
Cause/Effect Sequences and Relations
Modals (will, would, might, could) in
conditionals
Necessity, have to, in Conditionals
Passives (hadnt been injured)
Wh- questions and making Conditionals.

Comments

Students learn to make


predictions and suppositions
based on real and contrary-tofact conditions.
Develop language for decision
making, linking events, and
for giving reasons.

2. Epidemic
Our Changing Lives
Fighting Infections
The Adaptability of Life
Preparing for Our Future
Sentence Reordering

Classification and Exemplification (such as,


Students learn to listen for the
other kinds of, one type, another example)
main ideas or for specific
Present Perfect tense to express Result (have
information in a presentation.
made it easier)
Students learn how to link and
Potentiality and Past Ability (can/could)
organize sentences in a
(you can still live, an epidemic could...)
presentation.
Logical Relations and Sentence Connecting Develops vocabulary related
(therefore, these, also, as a result, another)
to health and other global
Adjective clauses (which, that)
issues.
Passives w/Perfect tenses, be used+infinitive

3. Space and Time


Sequences
Presentation
Speaking Practice w/SR
Space Game
Time Game

Specification (neither of them, on either side, Students learn to follow


one of them)
instructions involving
conditions and sequences.
Conditional Action (not unless, if, so that)
Focuses on spatial
and Problem Solving
relationships, time sequences,
Qualifiers if, except for
conditional action, and
Past Perfect tense (still hadnt arrived)
specification/exception.
Time Sequence (by the time that, not until,
Features click and drag games.
when, while, as, adverb clauses, etc.)

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review grammar and vocabulary
with a special emphasis on Conditionals.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

5. Video Interactions w/SR Making Requests, Giving Advice,


Telephone for Business
Speculating, and Use of the Telephone for
Telephone Invitation
business.
Interview with an Actor
Negative Questions (cant you come) and
Dinner Conversation
Tag Questions (you can, cant you?)
Hot Seats
Students develop oral fluency through
Speech Recognition activities.

14

Reviews the language of Units


1-3, focusing on key points
such as conditionals, verb
tenses, and modals.
Students learn how to make
polite requests, suggestions,
and refusals over the
telephone and in a friendly
conversation.

Scope and Sequence

Scope and Sequence, Module 8


Module 8, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

1. The Secret Code


Setting a Trap
The Suspects
The Investigation
Guilty or Not Guilty?
Focus Exercises

Adverb and Noun clauses (that someone had Students examine evidence
gotten in, when the files were opened)
and draw conclusions as they
Past Possibilities (may have opened the
try to solve a mystery.
drawer)
This unit follows up 7(1)
Past Conditionals (if she went to the office,
which also focuses on
Conditionals.
she couldnt have)
Modals and Degrees of Certainty and Logical Important language for
problem-solving, and for
Necessity (must have, could have, may have)
giving reasons.
Making Conditionals and Past Inferences

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Historical Figures
A World Timeline
News Events
Great Accomplishments
Regions of the World
Matrix Game

Vocabulary related to global issues, history,


trends and news events
Extends vocabulary in subject
Adjective, Adverb and Noun clauses (She
areas necessary for academic
succeeded to the throne when she was 17
and general studies.
years old.)
Adjective phrases (Winner of the Nobel
Oral and written follow-up
Peace Prize, Nelson Mandela)
assignments build presentation
Gerunds and Infinitives (with some parts
skills.
getting no rainfall, too hot for matter to exist)

Citing Evidence, Reason, and Argumentation


(according to, given the fact that, it has been
Students learn to analyze an
well established )
argument.
3. UFOs: For and Against Logical Necessity, Degrees of Certainty
(impossibility, unlikely, must accept the fact,
Presentation
This innovative lesson focuses
not unreasonable, might have)
For or Against?
on the building of arguments
Speculations, Implied Conditionals (it would
Drakes Equation
and counter arguments.
mean that..., they might have discovered)
Rulers and Clocks
Qualification and Logical Connectors
Sentence Reordering
Builds note-taking and
(however, even if, this means, just, only, on
summarization skills.
the contrary, otherwise, as a result)
Sentence Ordering and Pronoun Reference.
(it, this means, this, as a result, such a)
4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review grammar and vocabulary
with an emphasis on Conditionals and
Inferences.
Develops fluency and reading skills.

5. Video Interactions w/SR


Giving Advice, Speculating, and Use of the
Telephone for Business
Telephone.
Friends on the Telephone
UFO Interview
Implied conditionals
Press Conference

15

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as Conditionals, Verb Tenses,
and Modals.
Provides a model for roleplays and for being
interviewed.

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Instructor's Guide
This guide provides content information about New Dynamic English and is intended to assist teachers in
integrating the lessons into an overall teaching plan. Detailed lesson descriptions and an index show the
key topics, structures, vocabulary and verbs used throughout the course. This information shows how the
units within the series have been sequenced and organized so that language acquisition is optimized. It
also allows for coordination of each unit with other courses and lesson plans.

Organization
The Instructors Guide is organized by Level, Module, and Unit. For each of the presentation units, it
contains:
- Language Content: Lists topics, goals, and key Learning Points for the unit with examples.
- Classroom and Language Extension Activities: Provides classroom teaching suggestions and activities.
- Key Sentences: Provides a partial transcript of the language of each lesson in the unit.
- Focused Listening: Provides Listening and Follow-up Tasks which may be assigned as homework.
- Practice Exercises: Handouts which may be done as homework or in class.
In addition, Module Summaries provide a cumulative vocabulary count and a list of verbs, both regular
and irregular, used in that module. The Index is intended to assist teachers in coordinating New Dynamic
English with other teaching materials and is useful for determining which units within the series contain
specific structures or topics.

Combining Classroom and Directed Study


In general, students need the direction and support of a teacher. A classroom provides important
opportunities to extend and reinforce the language provided in the courseware. It also allows students to
make oral presentations and participate in group and pair work. These kinds of activities are important in
language learning and help to motivate students to continue on a regular basis. Few students studying on
their own are able to make significant progress, and most dont know how to use their time most
effectively when studying a language. Just as for a music student or an athlete, some kind of coaching is
necessary.
Another important point is that language study must be frequent and intensive to show results. The
combination of classroom study with directed self-study organized around a well-designed syllabus
provides, therefore, a most powerful and effective approach.
In an intensive program, students meet in a classroom situation several times a week and use the
courseware for four or more hours per week, usually in sessions of 25~50 minutes at a time. In less
intensive programs, a student might attend a class just once a week, or every other week, and use the
courseware for an additional 3 or 4 hours per week. In both cases, classroom work and courseware
should be coordinated so that a students practice relates directly to classroom activities. Suggestions
about how to do this for each unit are included in this Instructors Guide.
For very low-level students, shorter, more frequent sessions are particularly effective since they are so
dependent on the language models provided for them and they can easily become exhausted. For these
students, meeting in a class two or three times a week for 20~30 minutes, followed up by daily sessions
on the computer of 25~40 minutes can be very effective. Frequent meetings with a teacher at this stage is
important because so much material is new, including the sounds and basic patterns.
For higher-level students, classroom sessions and computer sessions can be longer. Students can handle
much more language at a time because they have a foundation, and their language tasks can take much
more time and allow for more creativity. Reading and writing assignments also become increasingly
16

Classroom Guidelines

important. As a result, the frequency of classroom sessions can be less, but the length of a single class
should be longer. Meeting once a week for an hour or an hour and a half, for example, can be effective if
followed up by daily courseware sessions of 30~45 minutes and short reading/writing assignments based
on the courseware. Examples of these kinds of assignments are included in each of the Instructors
Guides for each course.
For students who are expected to work on their own, with little teacher or class contact, progress will be
much slower. However, for motivated students, this program will provide them with the best chance to
learn English in a reasonable amount of time, provided they study on a regular basis.

General Classroom Guidelines


New Dynamic English has been used successfully in a wide variety of classrooms, both as the main
course material and as a supplement. When used as the core material for a class, teachers may present
and discuss portions of each lesson in class through use of a large monitor, and follow this up with pair
practice, role-plays, and oral or written assignments that personalize and extend the lessons. Ideally,
students should then work on the course individually, with frequent study sessions that move from
comprehension to mastery and acquisition. Frequent review is essential. This provides the opportunity
for intensive practice, which leads to optimum results.
If the program is being used to supplement another curriculum, teachers may use the Index in this guide
to locate the appropriate units in New Dynamic English which focus on or illustrate the required language.
One very effective way of using the courseware in a classroom situation is to divide the class into groups.
While one group is working on computers, another group is working with the teacher, and a third group is
working on follow-up written assignments. After 15~20 minutes, the groups rotate.
In self-access learning centers, or when students need to use the course in a self-study mode, it is
important to provide both initial and periodic orientation to the students about how best to study a
language, in particular stressing the importance of repetition and review. In addition, regular assignments
and mastery-tests should be given to keep students focused and motivated. Whenever possible, students
should meet with a teacher or in small groups so that they can make oral presentations or participate in
role-plays. Written assignments are also useful in extending the language and building vocabulary.
The New Dynamic English record-keeping program tracks student progress and details which lessons
have been studied, for how long, and in what detail. If possible, teachers should review these records to
determine how thoroughly the student is going through each lesson, and in which sequence.

Directed Self-Study Guidelines


Effective and frequent practice is the key to language acquisition. Short, frequent sessions are generally
more effective than infrequent sessions, however long, because of fatigue and other factors that lead to
inattention, boredom and a passive state of mind. The greater the frequency, the less total time is required
to move from one language level to another. Ideally, students should go through the lessons five or more
times per week in 25~50 minute sessions each day. They key point is to stay focused, but in different
ways, so that the learners mind is alert and involved.
Students should also try not to rely on text support when starting a new lesson. Once the text is
displayed, the listening process is completely changed. It is therefore essential that students not use the
text support button until they have tried several times to listen to each sentence, since this is what they
will encounter in real communication. This is especially difficult for students used to studying languages
the traditional way, so it may be necessary to place them at a lower level at first if they find it too difficult.
If they rely on text support, their listening comprehension will not develop as quickly.

17

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

The amount of time and effort required in a lesson varies, depending on level, language background, and
whether the course is used as the main course or as a course supplement. However, the most effective
way to go through a unit is to go through sections of the presentation lesson several times and in different
ways. (See Student Learning Path). Generally, students should go through each section in the following
ways:
(1) Preview, where they gain an overview of the content, without looking at the text;
(2) Comprehension, where they try to understand in increasing detail, first without looking at the text,
and then using the text only verify their listening;
(3) Study and Analysis, where they look at the text, check the glossary and generally try to understand
the grammar and all vocabulary items;
(4) Shadow & Record, where they say or paraphrase each sentence without using the text, record it and
compare it with the model;
(5) Review, where they go over the sentences that they have studied; and
(6) Intermittent Review, where they periodically return to the lesson to check their mastery of the
material.
It is generally better to work on the course material in small chunks spread out over several days, rather
than spending a large amount of time on one day. For a class meeting once or twice a week, the time
spent in class should be followed up by the students working on their own, three, four, or five times a
week in 25-50 minute study sessions. In this way, the combination of classroom and self-study work will
result in rapid progress.
One advantage of using two or more courses in parallel, such as New Dynamic English and The Lost
Secret is that a 45-minute study session can be divided into 2 sessions of 20~25 minutes each. This keeps
students effectively engaged for a longer period of time because the variety and change in focus help keep
interest and motivation high. In each 45-minute session, students move in phases from preview to
comprehension to study/practice/record to review to intermittent review, and then shift to the other course
and repeat the same sequence. By alternating between these practice phases, the students avoid
exhaustion and fatigue, and are refreshed by the change in activity type and degree of concentration.
Another important advantage of using courses in parallel is that each course provides additional review
and extension of the target language in the other course. This synergy between courses reduces the total
study time which would be required if each course were used separately.
Note: To develop listening comprehension, it is very important that students not rely on text support.
If the text is visible, the listening process is completely altered. Therefore, students should not use
the text support button until after they have listened to each sentence several times. If the material is
too difficult to be used in this way, students should work with less advanced material or review
previous material. This point is reinforced by the Intelligent Tutor.

18

Classroom Guidelines

Classroom Preparation and Follow-up


Before beginning a lesson, it is useful to prepare students with a pre-listening activity. These are listed in
the Classroom and Language Extension Activities section for each unit. For example, before beginning
the unit on the life of Albert Einstein, (Module 4, Unit 3), which focuses both on the events in his life and
the past tense, the teacher may ask students to name some famous people or scientists and to say what
they did. The teacher can then present orally some of the sentences that the students will encounter in the
unit, for example by focusing on one or two of the Learning Points which are listed at the beginning of
each unit. These points can be written on the board and discussed, and students can practice saying
sample sentences or creating their own examples. The amount of classroom time taken to do this may
vary from 5 to 20 minutes each class period, but it is time well spent in preparing students for intensive
work on their own in the lab or at home.
After finishing a lesson, it is important to review. Students should be able to ask and answer general
comprehension questions about the lesson, and should be able to give a short oral or written summary of
the lesson.
Once the lesson has been reviewed, the next step is to personalize and extend the language. In the
Einstein unit, for example, students should be asked to prepare an oral or written report about their own
life history, or the life of another famous person. In this way, the language from the lesson becomes the
basis for real communication about information that really matters to the student.

Listening Focus Assignments


Language is a skill that is acquired over time, through comprehension, practice and repetition. For this
reason, students should be encouraged to listen to the presentations in New Dynamic English several
times, moving from general comprehension in the first stage to detailed analysis of the text and consulting
the Glossary in the next stage. Each time they go through the lesson, students should use the Listening
Focus assignments (see below) to direct their attention to different aspects of the language. Finally,
students should shadow each sentence in the presentation, by pausing after each sentence and saying it
silently before going on to the next sentence. This very powerful technique is used by many excellent
language learners. Students may also choose to speak each sentence aloud, record it, and then play it
back so that they can compare it with the program. Taken together, this step-by-step process in-puts the
language and prepares students for the Questions, Focus Exercises and Review Exercises that follow-up
many of the Presentation lessons in each unit.

Listening Focus
The Listening Focus assignments for each unit are listed in this Guide. (For students working on their
own, the Students Study Guide has an abbreviated version.) These assignments help focus the students
attention each time they go through a lesson on their own. Students can be assigned one or two Listening
Focus assignments at a time, with the understanding that the language they are focusing on will be used
and followed-up in classroom activities. This helps keep the students on task.
Note: Since the language and questions in each lesson adjust automatically in response to student
performance, the language content which is required by the more advanced focus tasks may not appear
until their Shuffler Level is at least 1.5 or 2.0. Therefore, it is important to complete the Listening Focus
tasks in order, and to reach a high Shuffler level before beginning the more advanced Listening Focus
tasks.

19

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Student Follow-up and Extension


Follow-up tasks and assignments may be oral or written and are extremely important for the active
involvement of the students and for the overall success of the course. They may involve the whole class,
small groups, pairs or individual students, depending upon the classroom situation and the level and needs
of the students. Follow-up tasks are listed in the Focused Listening section and also in the Classroom and
Language Extension Activities section of each unit.
The use of follow-up tasks varies. For a low-level class, for example, the teacher may do some of the
tasks in class, such as having the class repeat basic sentences from a lesson, first as a class, and then in
pairs. At a slightly higher level, the class might instead draw on the collective memory of the class to
reconstruct the information in the lesson and answer comprehension questions about the material and the
characters involved. The Key Sentences summaries are useful for developing additional questions and
example sentences for in-class focus and also for testing purposes. Key facts, names, dates, or even
simple pictures can then be put on the board to serve as a basis for classroom discussion. (If the school
has an over-size monitor or projector connected to a computer, individual screens from the program itself
can be used for this purpose.) Students can then work in pairs to practice presenting the information, with
students taking turns asking and then answering questions.
Small group and paired practice generally works best when the time allowed is five minutes or less. If
more time is needed, have students switch groups or partners to keep things moving. When they feel
secure, they can present to a larger group or to the entire class.
Once students are familiar with the language of the lesson, the content should be extended and
personalized. See the Classroom and Language Extension Activities for each unit for suggestions. When
presenting a family schedule, (Module 2, Unit 1), for example, students can compare typical schedules for
families in different countries or from different cultural backgrounds. In the unit about Albert Einstein,
(Module 4, Unit 3), for example, an excellent follow-up task is to have students present four or five
important dates from their own life or from the life of another famous person. This kind of activity shows
students how useful the language of a lesson can be when applied to their own lives and needs.
At higher levels, tasks and assignments can be longer and more complex. Supplementary materials and
reading materials are highly recommended as a way to develop additional vocabulary. In class, have
students paraphrase and explain the content of a lesson or parts of a lesson. For example, the teacher may
say or play a complex sentence from a lesson, and ask: Whats another way of saying this? or What
does this mean? or Is that an argument for or against? Not only is this difficult, but it ensures that
students fully understand the meaning and syntax of the language in the lessons. If these kinds of
activities are done in class, it encourages students to focus on the meaning and syntax at a deeper level
when they are using the courseware on their own. Processing the language in this way helps to input the
language so that it is acquired.

Practice Exercises
The written Practice Exercises are designed to coordinate with the Listening Focus activities and serve as
written reinforcement of the language presented in the unit. These exercises help students focus on and
remember the key language forms and vocabulary that have been introduced. They are short and simple
to do, and should be done quickly. They are not intended to be tests, though they can easily serve as
sample test questions for 5 minute mini-quizzes that can be used as another means to follow-up each
lesson. The Practice Exercises can be assigned as follow-up activities for in-class work or as homework.
Students should also be encouraged to write their own exercises, based on the language extension work
done in class. Instead of asking Wh- questions about Max or Kathy (Module 1, Unit 1), students may ask
about each other or about imaginary characters that they make up.

20

Classroom Guidelines

Classroom Presentation and Extension Activities


This Guide contains suggestions for classroom activities designed to help students focus on key points,
and also to extend, personalize, or localize the language from the unit. These activities put students into a
more active role where they can use the language and make it come alive for them. This is where the
teacher and classroom play an extremely important role, and where the combination of multimedia and
teacher-directed classroom work becomes most effective. Completion of these activities is one of the
main goals of each unit. It is a powerful means of motivation and reinforcement that encourages
creativity, self-awareness, and critical thinking.

Review Exercises
The Review Exercises, Unit 4 in each module, includes dictations, fill-in exercises, and speech practice
exercises, all based on the first three units of the module. The Review Exercises give students a chance to
get an overview of the previous material, and focus once again on some of the main points. These
exercises should be done frequently, even as the student moves ahead to the next module. They also
provide an excellent review for students who are placed at a higher level. Higher-level students can
quickly review these lessons and then take the Mastery Tests for these units while they begin their study
on the next module. Of course, in the case of higher-level students doing a quick review, the Completion
Percentages for the reviewed units can be disregarded.

Video Interaction Units


The Video Interaction Unit, Unit 5 in each module, provides another means to review and extend the
language presented in Units 1-3. The videos provide valuable illustrations of how the language is used in
various situations, including the telephone, at a restaurant, and getting information. In the interactive
mode in each video, students may interact with the actors by using Speech Recognition (SR) to input their
responses. This helps to improve oral fluency, and it gives students a sense of what it is like to interact
with real people. The videos also include important conversational language structures useful for making
suggestions, requests, and ordering at a restaurant.
The video scenes have been designed so that they can serve as an example of a role-play between two or
more students. Teachers may choose to go over several of the videos in class and follow them up with
role-plays or student-made productions. This is an excellent way to review and extend the language of
each module, and provides an interesting and useful change from the normal lesson pattern.

Mastery Tests
The Mastery Tests for each unit should be taken after students have studied and reviewed all the lessons
in the unit and until they are confident that they can understand and use the language with ease. In order
to enable students to take a Mastery Test, the teacher must use the Records Manager to unlock the test.
Once a test is taken, it will automatically lock again to prevent students from taking the test several times
in succession. In general, students should score at least 85% on the Mastery Test and get an 80% or more
Completion Percentage for each lesson to successfully complete the unit. If this is done, students will
take great strides in acquiring the target language (both syntax and vocabulary) as opposed to short-term
memorization, which will quickly fade.
Generally the class average for a test should be 90 or greater. For grading purposes the scores might
translate as follows:
96~100 = A or Excellent
85~89 = C or Satisfactory
0~79
= F or Not Pass

90~95
80~84

= B or Good
= D or Unsatisfactory Pass

Students who score less than 80 are advised to practice and review the relevant lessons for several study
sessions before taking the test again. If the class average is less than 90, the teacher should require a
higher Completion Percentage before allowing students to take the tests. Please see the Testing and
Evaluation Guide for more detailed information about the Mastery Tests.
21

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Using the Software


New Dynamic English has been designed for ease of use by students and teachers. Nevertheless, before
students begin to study on their own, it is essential to introduce the basic functions of the program and to give
suggestions about how best to study. For additional information, including how to install and start each course,
please consult the Users Guide and the Records Manager Guide.

The DynEd Control Bar


The Control Bar is always active on screen when students are using a DynEd course and allows students to use
comprehension aids and study tools at any time. The Control Bar displays the following buttons:
Click on the Exit button to exit a lesson or to return to a menu at any time.
Click on the Pause button to pause the program at any time. When the program is paused, this
button becomes the Play button. To take the program off pause, click on the Play button.
Click on the Repeat button to hear a sentence repeated. Students should be encouraged to listen
several times to each sentence and to speak along with the program. Since clicking on the Repeat
button automatically pauses the program, students can give themselves more time to answer a
question by using the Repeat button. To take the program off pause, click on the flashing Play button.
Click on the ABC button to see the written text of each sentence and to access the Glossary.
Generally, students should bring up the text only when they are having difficulty understanding
what is said or when they are ready to study the vocabulary or grammar of the sentence. Please
note that in some lessons, such as the Dictations, the ABC button is disabled.

Glossary: Once the text is displayed, students can click on highlighted words to get help or additional
information and examples from glossary screens. In bilingual versions of New Dynamic English, these screens
often provide translations as well as grammatical information and example sentences. The Glossary can also
be accessed from the Options pull-down menu.
Bilingual versions of New Dynamic English include a Translation button. This helps reduce
frustration and ensures comprehension, especially at the beginning level. As students study, they will
find it less and less necessary to use the translation function.
Click on the Speech Record button to record your voice and again to stop the recording.
Then click on the Playback button to listen to the recording. Students can compare their
voices with the native speakers by using the Repeat button. This feature gives students the
opportunity to improve their pronunciation, intonation, and fluency, while developing their listening skills and
language awareness.
Click on the Rewind button to go back in the program one frame at a time, for example to hear a
previous sentence.
The Fast-Forward button allows students to move ahead in the program one frame at a time. When it
is used, the text is displayed for each sentence. Please note that students may not fast-forward
through an exercise or comprehension question. The program will pause until the question is answered.

22

Using the Software

Pull-down Menus
The DynEd pull-down menus are at the top of your screen: Options, Speech, and Help. The Options pulldown menu allows you to see Study Records, to access the Glossary and change Level settings (volume, pause
length, and shuffler level). The Speech pull-down menu gives instructions for using Speech Recognition. The
Help pull-down menus provide access to Documentation (Study Guides and Users Guide) and Help Screens,
which provide instructions for how to do each lesson, as well as Study Tips.

Study Records
The Student Records indicate the total amount of time a student has spent in each lesson, their scores and their
shuffler levels achieved. The score represents the percentage of correct responses given in the lesson, or the
final total achieved in a game. Student Records are stored either on the hard disk or on the network. When
students use the program, they should remember to log in so that their records are kept.

Glossary
The Glossary provides an alphabetical list of the glossary screens available for each level of New Dynamic
English. The Glossary can be accessed through the Pull-Down menu or through the highlighted text whenever
it occurs in a lesson.
Levels
This allows the user to set the levels of the following controls:
Volume: The Volume settings enable the user to control the volume of the course audio, as well as for sound
recorded using the Voice Record feature.
Pause Length: The language of New Dynamic English is natural language spoken at a normal pace. Students
can, however, adjust the amount of time between each sentence. A longer pause gives students more time to
process the sounds they have just heard and to access comprehension aids (repeat, translation, text on) if
necessary. A shorter pause more closely approximates natural speech and provides more of a listening
challenge.

Help Screens
The Help screens and on-line Documentation can be accessed through the Help pull-down menu at the top of
the screen. For bilingual versions, the Help screens are available with native language support.

Speech Recognition
Help screens for Speech Recognition are available through the Speech pull-down menu at the top of the screen.
Detailed instructions are also available in the Study Guide.

Records Manager
DynEds Records Manager is an award-winning tool for teachers and administrators that keeps and manages
student and class records. It is required for Mastery Tests, for locking and unlocking lessons, and for assessing
detailed study activities. For detailed information on installing and using the Records Manager, please refer to
the Records Manager Guide, which can be accessed by clicking on the DynEd Documentation icon or in the
Help pull-down menu at the top of the screen in any course.

Documentation
The Users Guide, Records Manager Guide, Placement Test Guide, and other documentation are available as
on-line PDF documents. Click on the DynEd Documentation icon or go to the pull-down Help menu in any
course and click on Documentation to access these documents. Updated versions are available at DynEds
website, www.dyned.com.

23

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Verb Markers
The verb markers referred to in this course are the following:
1. V(d)

lived, ate, came, was, had, went

2. modal

will, shall, may, can, must, had better, should, ought

3. have+V(n)

has lived, has eaten, has been

4. be+V(ing)

is living, is eating, is going

5. be+V(n)

is eaten, is sold, is converted

Each marker has a specific meaning or a range of meanings that are determined by the other words around
it and by the context. For example, V(d) indicates past or unreal (It rained yesterday; He wishes he had a
new car.); be+V(ing) indicates an ongoing process in time (She is living in London this year.); and be+V(n)
indicates the passive voice (It is converted into electricity.). The following chart gives examples of the
notations which are used throughout the course and in the Glossary:
V

V(d)

V(ing)

V(n)

be

was/were

being

been

work

worked

working

worked

speak

spoke

speaking

spoken

eat

ate

eating

eaten

Verb markers can be used individually, or they can be used together to make new verb forms. For example,
if we apply marker 1, V(d), to the verb eat, we get: He ate dinner. If we apply marker 4, be+V(ing), we get:
He is eating dinner. If we use markers 1 and 4, V(d) + be+V(ing), we get: He was eating dinner. If no
marker at all is used, we have the simple present tense: He eats dinner at 6:00.
When markers are used together, the marker with the lower number comes before the marker with the
higher number. For example, if marker 3: have+V(n) and marker 5: be+V(n) are used together with the
verb sell, marker 3: have+V(n) comes before marker 5: be+V(n).
3+5

have+V(n)-->be+V(n) has been sold (correct)

5+3

be+V(n)-->have+V(n) be had sold (incorrect)

It is also incorrect to use a marker more than once in the same predicate. For example:
1+2+3

V(d)-->modal-->have+V(n)

would have made (correct)

1+2+1+3

V(d)-->modal-->V(d)-->have+V(n)

would had made (incorrect)

Many of the most important verb structures in English can be understood with these markers. Some
examples using combinations of verb markers are:

24

Verb Markers

1+2

V(d)-->modal

could go, might come, would sell

1+3

V(d)-->have+V(n)

had gone, had come, had sold

1+4

V(d)-->be+V(ing)

was going, was coming, were selling

1+5

V(d)-->be+V(n)

was made, was eaten, were sold

3+4

have+V(n)-->be+V(ing)

have been living, has been selling

3+5

have+V(n)-->be+V(n)

have been eaten, have been sold

2+3+5

modal-->have+V(n)-->be+V(n)

must have been given, may have been sold

1+2+3+5

V(d)-->modal+have+V(n)-->be+V(n)

might have been given

1+3+4

V(d)-->have+V(n)-->be+V(ing)

had been waiting

1+3+5

V(d)-->have+V(n)-->be+V(n)

had been given

1+4+5

V(d)-->be+V(ing)-->be+V(n)

was being given

3+4+5

have+V(n)-->be+V(ing)-->be+V(n)

has been being watched

25

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Student Learning Path


Many students feel ready to stop an activity when they understand it. However, that is when real language
learning begins. Language skills such as listening and speaking need to be mastered through practice.
To help students practice effectively, teachers should instruct and coach the students about how to go
through the lessons in New Dynamic English, not once or twice, but multiple times. The following
learning sequence is recommended:

Preview
Comprehension
Focused
Practice
Review
Intermittent
Review

1. Preview, where they gain an overview of the lesson and general meaning without using the text;
2. Comprehension, where they understand the content in increasing detail and repeat each sentence as
many times as is necessary;
3. Language Focus, where they check the text and glossary entries as needed. At this stage, students
focus on the grammar and structure of the sentences., as well as new vocabulary;
4. Language Practice, where they say or paraphrase each sentence, record it and compare it with the
model;
5. Review, where they regularly go over the sentences that they have previously practiced;
6. Intermittent Review, where they periodically return to the lesson to confirm their mastery of the
material.
In addition to effective practice, students need to use their study time so that they are fully engaged. This
means breaking up the time into shorter time segments, generally 4-6 minutes long, and varying the kind of
activities they are working on in a study session. Students should not, for example, spend 30 minutes
previewing one day and then 30 minutes reviewing another day. The activities need to alternate in each
session. In addition, students neednt spend the entire study period on one lesson, but should do several
lessons in parallel.
See the Sample Study Plan below for an example of how a student might study in a sequence of five 20-30
minute periods. Note that Units 1, 3, and portions of Unit 5 are studied concurrently. These units will be
reviewed as the students move on to Unit 2, the Review Exercises, and the rest of Unit 5. When the
Completion Percentages reach 80% or more, the students will take the Mastery Tests. Frequent review is
highly recommended and has proven to be very effective in building both comprehension and fluency.

26

Index

Sample Study Plan


20~30 minutes per session

Listening Focus Speaking Focus Review Mastery Test


Session Session Session Session Session
1
2
3
4
5

Lessons

Module 1, Unit 1
Hello, Max and Kathy!
Where is France?
Who Speaks English?
Question Practice w/Speech Recognition
Focus Exercises
Mastery Test

Module 1, Unit 2
Richard Chin
Sara Scott
Henry Thornton
Word Practice
Questions
Mastery Test

Module 1, Unit 3
One to Ten
Ten to One Hundred
Time
Mastery Test

Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice

Video Interactions w/SR


Introductions
At a Party
At an Office
Telephone
Interview
Hot Seats

In the lessons marked listening, the student will preview and then move on to comprehension. In the
lessons marked speaking, the student will listen and then record several sentences and use the playback
button to listen to their speaking in comparison with the model voice. The Question Practice, Focus
Exercises, and the Review Lessons should be done on a regular basis, with the student paying attention to
developing fluency and confidence. In the SR lessons, the students voice is automatically recorded, so
students should use the playback button to listen to what they said. It is important to confirm that students
know how to use the record, playback, and Speech Recognition features of this program. The teacher
should use the Records Manager to check that students are using these features as instructed. The Records
Manager and Intelligent Tutor keep track of every time a student uses each button, so it is easy to monitor
student practice sessions. This allows the teacher to give specific, constructive feedback to students about
how to improve their study sessions. For detailed instructions, please see the Records Manager Guide.

27

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Index
Notation:
Each Level of New Dynamic English is denoted by a roman numeral: I, II, III, and IV.
Within each column, the following notation is used to differentiate which Level, Module,
and Unit is being referred to.
1
2(3)
1(3), 2(3)
1(1-3,5)

Sequencing:

means Module 1, all Units


means Module 2, Unit 3
means Module 1, Unit 3 and Module 2, Unit 3
means Module 1, Units 1 through 3, and Unit 5.

Generally sentences become longer and more complex throughout the series. The index
indicates which units contain a good sample of the listed concepts, topics, and structures.
To find a detailed description of the contents of each unit, please check the Table of
Contents and then go to the appropriate unit specified.

Index: New Dynamic English

1-2

3-4

5-6

-Aa/an/the see Articles


Ability ................................................................................... 2(3)
Accomplishments .................................................................. 8(2)
Adjectives good, high, low, busy .......................................... 1(2), 2(2)
Adjective clauses/phrases which was made in 1920 ........... 2(2); 6(3); 7(2), 8(2)
Adverb clauses/phrases when flowers bloom ..................... 2(1,2); 3(2), 4(1); 5(2),6(2); 8(1,2)
Adverbs of frequency always, sometimes ............................ 2(1); 3(1); 6(2)
Adverbs of manner well, badly, a little ............................... 2(1,3)
Advice, giving ........................................................................ 7(1,5 Video)
after + V(ing) after arriving/leaving ..................................... 2(1); 5(1), 6(1)
ago: ten years ago .................................................................. 3(1); 5(1,2), 6(2)
Age ......................................................................................... 1(2), 2(1); 6(3)
Agent (by) killed by acid rain ............................................... 3(2); 6(1)
already .................................................................................... 5(1)
Amount some, many, few, none, a lot, not any ................... 1(2), 2(2,3); 3(2), 4(2); 5(2), 6(2)
any ......................................................................................... 1(1); 5(1), 6(1)
Appointment, making an ..................................................... 2(5 Video); 4(5 Video)
Appositives see Adjective phrases
Approximation about/approximately/just over .................... 6(3)
Area ....................................................................................... 6(3)
Argumentation ...................................................................... 8(3)
Articles a, an, the ................................................................. 1(2), 2(1,2)
28

7-8

Index

as: Hot is to summer as cold is to winter ............................... 2(2)


as: works as a journalist ........................................................ 5(1), 2(1)
Asking:
about personal information .............................................. 1(1,2,5 Video)
about price: ...................................................................... 6(3)
about product information ............................................... 6(3)
for directions.................................................................... 3(3,5 Video); 5(3)

-Bbe/am/is/are ............................................................................ 1
been has been ....................................................................... 5(1), 6(1)
before/after see Sequence
before has been there before ................................................. 3(1)
by:
(means): by bus, by train ................................................. 2(1); 3(1)
(agent/passive) ................................................................. 5(2), 6(1)

-Ccan/can't ................................................................................. 2(3); 3(2)


Cause/Effect .......................................................................... 3(2); 5(2); 7(1) see Logical Relations
Certainty, degrees of............................................................. see Degrees of Certainty, Modals
Change become, get + adjective .......................................... 2(3); 3(2), 4(1,3); 6(1)
Choice .................................................................................... 4(1); 7(2)
Chronology life history........................................................ 4(3); 6(1); 8(2)
Cities ..................................................................................... 1(2); 6(3)
Classification what kind of, things like, such as .................. 2(2,3); 3(2) 4(2); 5(2); 7(2)
Clock times ............................................................................ 1(3), 2(1)
Clothing things to wear ........................................................ 6(2)
Colors ..................................................................................... 4(2,3)
Cohesion ................................................................................ see Sentence Connecting, Sentence Ordering
Comparison ........................................................................... 2(2); 3(2), 4(1,2); 6(3)
Comparing amounts earn more than, costs more ............... 6(2,3)
Comparing things ................................................................. 2(2); 3(2); 6(2,3)
Comparatives longer, heavier, much larger than ................ 3(2); 6(3)
Compulsion have to .............................................................. 6(2); 7(1)
Conditional action................................................................. 7(3)
Conditional relationships ..................................................... 3(2), 2(1); 5(2); 7(1,2,3), 8(1)
Conditionals .......................................................................... 2(1); 3(2), 4(1,2); 5(1,2), 6(1,2);
29

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

likely/unlikely/unreal/imaginary ..................................... 7(1,2,3), 8(1)


Contractions I'm, you're, she's, he's, we're .......................... 1
Conjunctions and, but, or, so............................................... 1,2(2); 4(1) see Logical Relations
Cost/Money costs $2,000 .................................................... 6(3)
could you? (request) .............................................................. 6(2,3)
Countable/Uncountable amounts ........................................ 4(2,3); 5(3), 6(2,3)
Country names ...................................................................... 1(1); 4(3); 5(1), 6(1,3); 8(2)

-DDaily events ........................................................................... 2(1); 3(1);


Dates 1879, 1900, etc. .......................................................... 4(3); 6(3); 8(2)
Days of the week ................................................................... 2(1); 4(1)
Debate see Argumentation
Decisions decided to, because .............................................. 4(1); 6(1); 7(1)
Defining what you mean ...................................................... 2(3); 4(1)
Degree second most expensive, least expensive .................. 6(3)
Degrees of certainty will, may, can, probably .................... 4(1); 5(2); 7(1), 8 (1) see Conditionals,
......................................................................................... Logical Relations, Modals
Demonstratives that, this, these........................................... 1(1,2), 2(2)
Describing conditions it's + adjective/it + verb................... 2(2); 4(1); 5(2)
Descriptive phrases see Adjective phrases
Description, physical ............................................................ 6(3)
Designation this, that, he, to me, John, John's ..................... 1(1-3), 2(1,2)
Directions north, south, across the street ............................. 3(3); 5(3)
Distance miles, inches, feet, half a block ............................. 3(1,2); 5(3), 6(3)
do/does:
(as a verb): What does he do?......................................... 2(1)
in negation ....................................................................... 1(1,2,5 Video)
in questions...................................................................... 1(1,2)
Drink, Things to ..................................................................... 4(2)
Duration for an hour, from 2:00 until 3:00, since................. 2(1); 3(1), 4(1,3); 5(1), 6(1)
during during that trip.......................................................... 4(3); 6(1)

-Eeither/neither.......................................................................... 6(3); 7(3)


-er than ................................................................................... 2(1); 3(3); 6(3)
even though ........................................................................... 7(1) see Logical Relations
ever ......................................................................................... 5(1) 6(1)
30

Index

Energy sources We get the energy that we need ................. 3(2); 5(2)
Environmental issues ............................................................ 5(2); 8(2)
Exemplification ..................................................................... 7(2)
Experience has been to Paris twice, has written .................. 5(1), 6(1); 7(1)
Expressions (See contents for each lesson) ......................... 1(1,2,5 Video), 2(2); 3(1,2) 4(1,2,3); 5(1,3)

-FFamily relationships son, wife, sister, daughter .................. 1(2), 2(1)


Famous people ...................................................................... 8(2)
Feelings/emotions sad, happy, angry, afraid........................ 6(2)
Following directions ............................................................. 5(3); 7(3)
Food ....................................................................................... 2(3); 4(2)
for:
(beneficiary): work for the post office ............................ 2(1,2); 3(1,2)
(duration) ......................................................................... 2(1); 3(1); 5(1), 6(1)
(goal/destination): leave for school ................................ 2(1); 3(1)
(reason) ............................................................................ 6(1); 7(1)
for/since ........................................................................... 5(1), 2(1); 7(1)
Frequency always, sometimes, once a week, etc. ................ 2(1,2); 3(1), 4(1)
Fractions (half, quarter) half past one.................................. 1(3)
from...until ............................................................................. 2(1); 4(3)
Future going to, will, present simple ................................... 3(1), 2(1); 5(1); 7(1)
Future Plans .......................................................................... 3(1), 2(1); 5(1), 6(1), 7(1)

-GGeographical terms .............................................................. 8(2)


Gender ................................................................................... 1(1,2), 2(2)
Gerunds:
V(ing) .............................................................................. 2(1,3); 5(1,2), 6(1,2); 8(2)
infinitive .......................................................................... 6(1,2); 8(2)
get to + place: get to school .................................................. 2(1)
get + adjective........................................................................ 3(1), 2(3); 6(1)
Global warming .................................................................... 5(2)
going to: they are going to meet her ..................................... 3(1,2), 4(1); 5(1,2)
Greetings

hello, hi .............................................................. 1(1,2,5 Video)

31

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

-Hhave: has a high salary, has a son .......................................... 1(2)


have+V(n) (present perfect) ................................................ 5(1,2), 6(1)
have to: has to leave .............................................................. 3(1), 4(1); 6(1,2); 7(1)
Height (feet/inches).............................................................. 6(3)
Historical Figures ................................................................. 8(2)
Hobbies .................................................................................. 2(3)
how about ............................................................................... 1(1)
how (clauses) ........................................................................ 4(3)
how far: How far is it from X to Y?...................................... 6(3)
how long (duration) ............................................................. 2(1); 3(1), 4(1) see Duration
how long/how many times ..................................................... 5(1,2), 6(1) see Frequency
how (means): How does she get to school? ......................... 2(1); 3(1) see Means
how well (manner)................................................................ 2(3); See Manner

-IJKImperatives/Requests ........................................................... 4(2,3); 5(3)


Indefinite/Definite reference ................................................ 2(2)
Indirect speech he said the flight was full ........................... 4(1,3)
Inferences .............................................................................. 8(1)
Infinitive (to V) ..................................................................... 2(2); 4(1); 5(1), 6(1,2); 8(2)
Infinitive + V(ing)

to go shopping/to go dancing ............... 6(2)

in order to .............................................................................. 6(2); 8(2)


Intensification very, too ...................................................... 1(2), 2(3)
interested/interesting ............................................................. 2(1)
Introducing self (personal information) ................................ 1(1,2, Video)
Itinerary ................................................................................ 5(1)
it is (to express condition): it's cold today ........................... 2(2); 4(1)
it is + adjective....................................................................... 4(1)
it is + adjective + to: it is important to get ............................ 4(1); 6(1)
it takes + duration: it takes an hour...................................... 2(1); 3(1) 4(1)

-LLanguages.............................................................................. 1(1)
Likes and dislikes.................................................................. 2(3) 4(2)
like: like so many cities in Europe ........................................ 5(1,2)
listen (to), Things to .............................................................. 4(2)
32

Index

Location left, right, on the corner, middle of the block ....... 1(1); 3(3); 5(3); 7(3)
Locatives here, there, on the right, between, at .................... 1(1), 2(1,2); 3(2,3); 5(3); 7(3)
Logical Relations so, therefore, since, instead of ................ 2(2); 3(2), 4(1); 7(1,2), 8(1,3)
Logical necessity must, could ............................................... 8(1,3)
look forward to ...................................................................... 4(1); 5(1)

-MManner well, badly, fairly well ........................................... 2(3)


Means by car, by bus, How does she ................................... 2(1); 3(1)
Modals can, will, may ........................................................... 2(3); 3(2), 4(1); 5(1,2),
......................................................................................... 7(1), 2(1)
Modals could, would, w/conditionals ................................... 5(1,2), 7(1), 8(1) see Conditionals
must ....................................................................................... 3(2); 5(2)

-NNames What is your name? .................................................. 1(1,2)


Nationality ............................................................................. 1(1,2)
Nature and the world around us ............................................. 2(2); 3(2); 5(2); 7(2)
Necessity ............................................................................... 7(1) see Modals, Logical Relations
Needs water, air, energy. ...................................................... 3(2); 5(2)
Negation

isn't, aren't, don't .................................................. 1(1,2,5,6)

Negative Questions cant you come? .................................. 4(5 Video); 7(5 Video)
never: has never been to ........................................................ 5(1)
News events ........................................................................... 8(2)
Noun clauses/phrases the one on the left ............................ 2(3); 4(1); 5(2), 6(3); 8(1)
Noun plurals man/men, country/countries .......................... 1(1)
Numbers 1-100 .................................................................... 1(3)

-OObject pronouns me, him, her, them .................................. 1(2), 2(3)


Object, Direct/Indirect It gives us heat .............................. 3(2), 4(2)
Occupations teacher, doctor ................................................ 1(2), 2(1); 3(1); 6(2)
Ordering, at a restaurant ..................................................... 3(5 Video)
Ordinal numbers second, third ........................................... 3(2); 6(3)

-PPassive.................................................................................... 3(1), 4(3); 5(2), 6(1); 7(1,2)

33

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

w/modals: will be forced, etc. ......................................... 7(1)


Past conditionals ................................................................... 8(1)
Past habitual used to, would ............................................... 7(1)
Past perfect tense .................................................................. 7(1,3)
Past possibilities may have, might have .............................. 8(1)
Past time ................................................................................ 3(1,2), 4(3); 5(1)
Past tense ............................................................................... 3(1,2), 4(3); 5(1)
irregular verbs ................................................................. 3(1,2), 4(3); 6(1)
future contrasted .............................................................. 4(1)
present perfect contrasted ................................................ 5(1), 6(1)
People physical descriptions ................................................ 2(2); 6(3)
Personal experience .............................................................. 4(3); 5(1), 6(1), 7(1)
Personal history .................................................................... 4(3); 6(1)
Personal information ............................................................ 1(1,2), 2(1); 4(3)
Personal pronouns: I, he, she, we, they ............................... 1(1,2,5)
Physical description .............................................................. 2(2); 6(3)
Place and direction ............................................................... 3(3); 5(3)
Places of business bank, hotel, post office .......................... 3(3); 5(3), 6(1)
Places to go disco, zoo, sports stadium ................................ 6(2)
Planning ahead ..................................................................... 4(1); 5(1); 7(1)
Population ............................................................................. 6(3)
Possessive adjectives my, her, his, our, their ....................... 1(1,2)
Possessive nouns their son's, John's, etc. ............................. 2(1)
Potentiality ........................................................................... 7(2), 8(1)
Preference.............................................................................. 2(3); 4(2)
Prepositions ........................................................................... 1(1,2), 2(1)
of location: in, at............................................................. 1(1,2), 2(1); 3(3); 5(3)
of direction: from, to ...................................................... 1(1), 2(1); 3(2,3); 5(3)
of time: at, in, for, from .................................................. 2(1)
of place ............................................................................ 2(1); 3(3); 5(3)
Present continuous
progressive ...................................................................... 1(2), 2(3); 3(1)
passive ............................................................................. 5(2)
Present perfect: have+V(n) ................................................. 5(1,2), 6(1); 7(2)
past tense contrasted ........................................................ 5(1), 6(1)
passive: has been arrested................................................ 6(1); 7(1)
Present simple verbs ............................................................. 1(1,2); 5(1,2,3)
Price it costs $2,000 ............................................................. 6(3)
34

Index

Pronouns personal, possessive ............................................ 1(1,2) see Object Pronouns


Pronoun reference ................................................................ 8(3) see Sentence Connecting
Product information ............................................................. 6(3)
Purpose to, in order to, so that ............................................. 3(1); 5(2), 6(1)

-QQuality ................................................................................... 6(3)


Qualification however, only, except, unless ........................ 5(2); 7(3), 8(1,3)
Quantification see Amount
Questions:
are/is, what, who, how old, whose ................................... 1(2), 2(1)
with do/does .................................................................... 1(1,2)
about duration: How long does it take? .......................... 2(1); 3(1), 4(1,3)
about location: where is .................................................. 3(3); 5(3)
about manner: how well can you .................................... 2(3)
about means: how? how does he get.............................. 2(1); 3(1)
about number: how many ............................................... 3(2)
about past, present and future .......................................... 3(1), 4(1); 5(1); 7(1), 8(1), 8(2)
about time: how long, when, what time .......................... 2(1); 3(1), 4(1,3)

-RRead, Things to ...................................................................... 4(2)


Reason because, so............................................................... 3(2), 4(1); 5(1,2), 6(1)
......................................................................................... 7(1), 8(1,3) see Logical Relations
Reference a, an, the, other, the other, another ...................... 2(2); 3(2), 4(1); 6(2,3), 7(3)
Reflexive herself/himself...................................................... 5(1)
Relative pronouns who, what, that, which ........................... 3(2), 4(1,3); 5(2); 7(3) 8(2)
Request/Imperatives ............................................................. 3(5 Video), 4(2,5 Video); 6(2)
Result so ............................................................................... 4(1); 5(2); 7(1)

-SSchedule ................................................................................. 2(1); 3(1), 4(1); 5(1)


Science terms heat, light, energy, immune, etc. .................. 3(2), 4(3); 5(2); 7(2), 8(2,3)
Seasons of the year ................................................................. 2(2)
Sentence Connecting/Ordering ........................................... 7(2), 8(3)
Sequence first, last, before, after ........................................... 1(2,3), 2(1); 3(1), 4(3); 6(1); 7(3)
Shapes triangle, circle, square .............................................. 3(3)

35

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

Short answers No, he doesn't/ Yes, he does ........................ 1(1); 3(1)


should: should have turned right ........................................... 5(3), 6(1)
since/for ................................................................................. 5(1), 6(1)
Size feet, inches, square miles, area ..................................... 6(3)
so + adjective + that: so busy that ........................................ 3(1); 5(1)
so that +purpose .................................................................... 3(1)
Spatial relations near, on, under, inside .............................. 3(3); 5(3); 7(3)
Specification ......................................................................... 7(3)
Speculations it would mean that .......................................... 8(1,3)
Spelling first and last names ................................................ 1(3, Video)
Sports ..................................................................................... 2(3); 6(2)
still: Are they still in Paris? ................................................... 3(3); 5(1), 6(1)
Street directions .................................................................... 3(3); 5(3)
Subject/Verb/Object pattern He likes his job. .................. 1(2), 2(1,3)
Subject-verb agreement I come/She comes ....................... 1(1,2,5 Video)
such as ................................................................................... 2(3); 3(2); 5(2)
Suggestions ............................................................................ 2(5 Video)
Superlatives hottest, best, etc. ............................................. 2(2); 3(2); 6(3)
supposed to ............................................................................. 5(1)
Suppositions let's assume, if he leaves ................................ 3(2), 4(1); 5(2); 7(1), 8(1)

-Ttake a + noun: take a bus; take a bath .................................. 2(1); 3(1)


Tag questions you can, cant you? ...................................... 7(5 Video)
Temperature 21 degrees Celsius......................................... 6(3)
Telephone numbers .............................................................. 1(3,5 Video)
Telephone Expressions ......................................................... Video Lessons, all levels
there (existential)................................................................... 3(2,3), 4(1); 5(2), 6(2)
this/that/these as pronouns and adjectives .......................... 1(1,2), 2(2)
Time phrases at night; in the morning; after+V(ing) ........ 2(1,2); 3:(1), 4(1,3); 5(1), 6(1)
Time questions about time/duration ..................................... 2(1,2); 3(1), 4(1,3); 5(1) see Sequences
Timeline (of the world) .......................................................... 8(2)
Times ..................................................................................... 1(3), 2(1); 3(1)
Times of day .......................................................................... 2(1,2); 3(1)
Times of life ........................................................................... 2(2); 4(3)
Time Sequence ..................................................................... 4(3); 6(1); 7(3)
Timetable ............................................................................... 4(1)
to (purpose): in Paris to attend ............................................. 2(1); 5(1,2), 6(1)
36

Index

too ......................................................................................... 2(3)


Transportation ...................................................................... 6(2)
Travel/travel itinerary .......................................................... 4(1); 5(1)

-Uunless...................................................................................... 7 (1,3), 8(1)


until ........................................................................................ 3(1), 4(3); 5(1); 7(3)
used to: it used to belong to ................................................... 5(1), 6(1); 7(1)

-VVerb tenses contrasted ......................................................... 3(1,2), 4(1); 5(1,2), 6(1)


......................................................................................... 7(1), 8(1)
V(d) ........................................................................................ 3(1)2; 5(1)
V(d) be+V(n).......................................................................... 6(1); 7(1)
V(ing) prefer flying, don't like going to ............................... 2(1,3); 3(1); 5(2), 6(2)

-Wwant + infinitive..................................................................... 1(2); 2(1,3); 5(1)


was/were ................................................................................. 3(1,2); 7(1)
Weather conditions ............................................................... 2(2)
wh- questions
with present simple verbs be and do ................................ 1(1,2), 2(1,2)
with past tense ................................................................. 3(1), 4(3)
with future/past ................................................................ 4(1)
with present perfect ......................................................... 5(1), 6(1)
with passive ..................................................................... 6(1,3)
with conditionals ............................................................. 7(1), 8(1)
why (clauses) .......................................................................... 4(3)
wish + conditional wishes he could ..................................... 6(1); 7(1)
Word relations hot/cold, tall/short, etc................................ 2(2); 4(2); 6(2)
would [V(d) will]: was afraid he would lose ......................... 3(2); 6(1); 7(1)
would like + infinitive would like to have ........................... 6(1); 7(1)
would rather ........................................................................... 4(2); 6(2)

-XYZyes/no questions
with present simple .......................................................... 1(1,2), 2(1,2)

37

Instructors Guide: New Dynamic English

with past tense ................................................................. 3(1,2)


with present perfect and past ........................................... 5(1,2), 6(1)
with conditionals ............................................................. 7(1), 8(1)
yet: Have they arrived yet? .................................................... 5(1)

38

New Dynamic English


Level 1: Modules 1&2

Instructors Guide

The Smart Way to English

Version 2.5

Copyright 1998-2013, DynEd International, Inc.

http://www.dyned.com

October, 2013

New Dynamic English: Instructors Guide

Table of Contents
Scope and Sequence, Level 1............................ 3

Module 2 Lesson Map .......................................43

Introduction to Level 1...................................... 5

1. Family Schedule ...........................................44


Learning Points .......................................... 45
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 46
Key Sentences ........................................... 48
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 50
Practice Exercises ....................................... 52

Module 1 Lesson Map ...................................... 6


1. Names and Places ........................................ 7
Learning Points .......................................... 8
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 9
Key Sentences ............................................ 11
Focused Listening ...................................... 13
Practice Exercises ....................................... 15

2. Matrix Vocabulary ........................................55


Learning Points .......................................... 56
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 57
Key Sentences ........................................... 59
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 61
Practice Exercises ....................................... 63

2. Jobs and Family ........................................... 20


Learning Points .......................................... 21
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 22
Key Sentences ........................................... 24
Focused Listening ...................................... 25
Practice Exercises ....................................... 27

3. Likes and Dislikes ........................................68


Learning Points .......................................... 69
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 70
Key Sentences ........................................... 72
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 73
Practice Exercises ....................................... 75

3. Numbers and Times ..................................... 32


Learning Points .......................................... 32
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 33
Key Sentences ........................................... 35
Focused Listening ...................................... 36
Practice Exercises ....................................... 37

4. Review Exercises .......................................... 79


Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises

4. Review Exercises ......................................... 39


5. Video Interactions w/SR ............................... 80

Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises

Telephone: Lets Meet on


Thursday
Business Telephone w/SR
An Interview w/SR
Hot Seats w/SR

5. Video Interactions w/SR .............................. 40


Introductions
At a Party, At an Office
Telephone, Interview
Hot Seats w/SR

Module 2 Summary ........................................... 81


Answer Key ...................................................... 82

Module 1 Summary........................................... 42

Scope and Sequence, Level 1

Scope and Sequence, Module 1


Module 1, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

Personal information: name, where from,


languages spoken, nationality
Introductions (Hi, my name is)
Countries and cities of the world
Relative location (here, left, right)
Demonstratives (that, this)
Pronouns (personal, possessive)
be, do, Contractions, Negation
Subject-verb agreement
Present Simple tense (She speaks Spanish.)
Yes/No and Wh- question formation

Students learn to give and


elicit basic information about
themselves and others.

2. Jobs and Family


Richard Chin
Sara Scott
Henry Thornton
Word Practice
Questions

Presents the jobs, families and living


arrangements of three characters.
Extends personal information: age, spelling
of name, job, salary, marital status.
Present Simple verbs: have, live, work, etc.
Subj/Verb/Object (He teaches science.)
Object Pronouns (him, her)
Adjectives and Prepositions of Location

Students learn to ask and


answer basic questions about
each other in an interview
format.

3. Numbers and Time


One to One Hundred
Time

Numbers 1-100
Clock times and fractions
Telephone numbers

Prepares students for later


units which use time and
numbers.

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops fluency and reading skills.

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as Subject-Verb agreement.

1. Names and Places


Hello, Max and Kathy!
Where is France?
Who Speaks English?
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Builds recognition of simple


words and phrases in context.
Introduces the most basic
structures in English.

Introduces useful verbs and


daily vocabulary.

5. Video Interactions w/SR Shows basic introductions, greetings, and use Language review.
Introductions
of the telephone.
At a Party
Students may interact with the actors through Provides a model for roleAt an Office
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
plays.
Telephone
Interview
Hot Seats

New Dynamic English: Instructors Guide

Scope and Sequence, Module 2


Module 2, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

1. Family Schedule
The Harris Family
Bob and Sandras
Schedules
Collette and Johns
Schedules
Questions
Focus Exercises

Family relationships (father, mother, etc.)


Days of the week and weekly schedule
Time and Duration (when and how long)
Frequency (every day, on Mondays)
Means (by bus, drives his car to work)
Time expressions (after dinner, at night)
Prepositions of Place and Time
Sequence (before, after)
Subj/Verb/Object (She practices the violin.)
Adverbs of Frequency (usually, never)

Students learn how to ask and


answer questions about their
daily routines.

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Seasons
Times of Day
Weather
Times of Life
Types of People
Matrix Game

Introduces basic vocabulary in five subject


Students learn to describe the
areas: seasons, times of day, weather
conditions, times of life, and types of people.
phases of life and the basic
conditions in which people
Adjective and Adverb phrases
live out their lives.
Word relations/analogies (hot is to cold as
summer is to what?)
Indefinite/Definite Reference
Superlatives (the coldest time of year)

3. Likes and Dislikes:


A Survey
Food and Sports
What Can You Do?
Video Hot Seats w/SR

Classification (what kind, such as)


Adverbs of Manner (how well, well, a little)
Quantification (a lot, some, any)
Ability (can/cant, know how to)
Useful phrases (lets see, for example, I
mean, not really)

Students learn to express


personal preferences and
abilities.
Presents an interview about
favorite foods, sports, hobbies
and other interests.

4. Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

Provides language practice


and review activities.

Focuses on specific times,


frequency, and duration of
habitual activities that make
up daily life.

5. Video Interactions w/SR Presents language useful for making an


Short videos illustrate the use
Telephone: Lets Meet
appointment, suggestions, and using the
of the language with a variety
on Thursday
telephone for business.
of characters.
Business Telephone
Students may interact with the actors through Provides models for classroom
An Interview
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
role-play and interviews.
Hot Seats

Introduction to Level 1

Introduction to Level 1
New Dynamic English, Level 1 (Modules 1 & 2), introduces students to English. The main focus is on
understanding and expressing basic information about oneself and the natural framework within which we
live and describe our lives, such as times of day, the seasons, and weather conditions.
In the first lessons, students develop basic listening comprehension. The emphasis is on presenting
language in short phrases rather than isolated words, since isolated words seldom occur in real
communication. Text and Glossary support provide additional examples and explanation.
The use of icons throughout is especially important for students who are unable to read. These icons
serve to support the students memory and also provide a framework for showing concepts and phrases.
Once the language is introduced and basic comprehension is achieved, a limited number of exercises
require students to read simple words and short phrases. These exercises help reinforce oral
comprehension and provide another form of language input. The record feature, along with the Speech
Recognition (SR) exercises, allow students to practice speaking. In this way, we proceed from listening to
speaking and reading -- and the three skills reinforce each other. The Classroom Activities and Practice
Exercises provide additional written activities as well, but these should not overwhelm the student. They
should be fun and easy to do. Their purpose is to reinforce and follow up, not frustrate.

Content for Level 1


The material presented in Level 1 provides the basis for 40-60 hours of study, depending on the language
background of the students, which may vary considerably.
This estimate assumes that the language presented in each level is used as a model that is systematically
extended and personalized in classroom activities and follow-up assignments as suggested in this manual.
The usual order is as follows:
1. Preview each lesson with a focus on general comprehension.
2. Analyze and practice the language in each lesson with a focus on the key language structures.
3. Extend and personalize the content of each lesson via student generated language, including roleplays, pair practice, written exercises, and group activities.
4. Review on a regular basis, (at least until the Completion Percentage is 80%) and then test.

General Language Specifications for Level 1


New Dynamic English Level 1 develops a useful spoken vocabulary of over 500 high-frequency words
that provide students with the ability to understand and communicate basic information about themselves.
Level 1 covers basic language structures required to understand and express basic personal information
and provides a foundation for preintermediate work. In addition, the video lessons provide useful
language models for the telephone and for other social situations.

Detailed Language Specifications for Level 1


The language focus for Level 1 is on the basic verb and phrase structures of English, as well as the
construction of Wh- and Yes/No questions.
Key language structures include personal, possessive, and object pronouns, verb-subject agreement, the
verb be, negation, the use of do, the present tense, prepositional phrases for expressing time and place,
and adjective and adverb phrases . Please see the Scope and Sequence for Level 1 and the Learning
Points at the beginning of each unit for additional information and examples. The Index is also helpful in
locating where specific topics or structures are presented or developed in the course.

New Dynamic English

Module 1 Lesson Map


Unit 1: Names and Places
Hello, Max and Kathy
Where is France
Who Speaks English?
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Unit 2: Jobs and Family


Richard Chin
Sara Scott
Henry Thornton
Word Study
Questions

Unit 3: Numbers and Time


One-Ten
Eleven-Twenty
Ten-One Hundred
Time

Unit 4: Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Speech Quiz

Unit 5: Video Interactions w/SR


Introductions
At a Party
At an Office
Telephone w/SR
Interview w/SR
Hot Seats w/SR

Module 1: Unit 1, Names & Places

1. Names and Places


Hello, Max and Kathy; Where is France? Who Speaks English? Question Practice;
and Focus Exercises
Lesson 1 introduces the most basic structures in English. It is intended for beginners, with or
without basic reading skills, and also for students who have some knowledge of English but whose
listening ability is underdeveloped. Topics include giving and asking for personal information
(name, place of origin, gender, and languages spoken) and talking about different countries and
nationalities.
The Question Practice lesson reinforces the language of the unit. It focuses
on Wh- questions and the use of do in questions with who and where.
Though most of the questions do not require the ability to read, a number of
comprehension activities help students see the relationship between spoken
and written words. Students who need to develop their reading skills should
use the record feature together with the ABC button to practice reading
aloud the text throughout the lessons.
In the Focus Exercise lesson students practice constructing sentences by arranging words in the
correct sequence. As in all lessons, the Help screens provide instructions if needed.
Goals:
To be able to understand short phrases spoken at near normal speed.
To be able to read and understand short words, such as yes, no, name, and does.
To be able to identify themselves in English.
To be able to ask and answer simple Who, Where, and Yes/No questions regarding basic identity.
Objective 1:
Objective 2:
Objective 3:
Objective 4:

To understand that in English there is subject verb agreement.


To be able to use demonstrative and personal pronouns with the verb be.
To be able to express negation with do and be.
To be able to use do when asking a Yes/No question.

New Dynamic English

Learning Points
be
I am from New York. He is from Paris. They aren't from France. France is in Europe. Who is from
France?
contractions (I'm, you're, she's, he's, we're, they're)
He's from France. Shes from New York. Were not from France.
demonstratives (that, this, these)
This is Max. Who is that/this? That/this is Pierre. This is a map of Europe. Whats this?
do with questions and negation
Does she speak English? No, she doesn't. Where do they come from? They don't come from France.
Who doesnt speak Japanese? I dont speak French.
negation with be and do
He isn't from Japan. She doesn't speak Spanish. They don't come from France. They aren't from France.
Im not from the US. I dont come from the US. He doesnt speak Japanese. Hes French, not
American.
personal pronouns (I, he, she, we, they)
I come from San Francisco. She comes from New York. They come from the US. They dont come
from France. Im from Paris, France. Shes from New York.
possessive adjectives (my, your, his, her)
What is your/her/his name?
prepositions (in, from, of)
He's from France. It's in California. Here is a map of France. Paris is in France. Where does he come
from? Where is she from?
subject-verb agreement
I am/come from France. She is/comes from New York. They are/come from the US. This man speaks
English. I speak two languages.
wh- questions (what, where, who, which)
Where does she come from? What is your name? Who comes from France? Which of these three people
comes from France?

Module 1: Unit 1, Names & Places

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation (Day 1, 10-15 minutes)
Begin with Hello, Max and Kathy. Present the first part of the lesson in class. Focus on the first few
sentences only, and have the class practice repeating each sentence. Point out that each sentence has a
subject and a verb. Introduce the personal pronouns: I, you, he, she, my, your, his, and her.
Step 2: Oral Practice (5 minutes)
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice the following dialog: Whats your name? My name
is.... Whats his name? His name is .... Whats her name? Her name is ...
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice (Day 2, 10-15 minutes)
Review the first few sentences. Focus on subject/verb agreement with come from, be and pronoun
contractions (Im, hes, shes).
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice introducing Max, Kathy, and each other.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice (Day 3, 10 minutes)
Introduce Where is France? Focus on negation with do and be. Then
focus on location: in, on the left, between (North America and Europe),
and the names of countries.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice introducing Pierre. How
is Pierre different from Max and Kathy?
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice (Day 4, 10 minutes)
Introduce Who Speaks English? Focus on the verb speak and question formation (Yes/No and Whquestions).
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions about Max, Kathy, Pierre,
and each other.
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.

Follow-up
Once the presentation lessons of the unit have been presented, introduce the Question Practice and Focus
Exercises lessons. Students should do these on their own, in the lab or at home, regularly. As homework,
assign the Practice Exercises. Then, once students attain an 80-100% Completion Percentage, have them
take the Mastery Test.

New Dynamic English

Language Extension
Once the lessons have been introduced, have the students personalize and extend the language with two or
more of the following classroom activities. If further preparation is necessary, have the students work in
pairs or groups first.
Classroom Activity 1: Introductions
From Unit 5, view the first two video interaction lessons, Introductions and At a Party. Have students
work in small groups of 3-5 to practice introducing each other.
Classroom Activity 2: Writing Practice
Write the name of a man on one side of the board and the name of a woman on the other side (or on two
different sheets of butcher paper). Invite students to come to the board and write sentences about the two
characters. Ask students to comment on similarities and differences between the two (e.g., Max and Kathy
are American. Max comes from San Francisco but Kathy comes from New York. She doesnt come from
San Francisco). Write ten questions and answers, such as: Which one comes from ...? Where does ...
come from...? Is the person on the left a man or a woman? What language does the person on the right
speak? What country does ... come from? Is ... French? Does ... speak Chinese? Does ... come from
Brazil?
Classroom Activity 3: Places around the World
Post a map of the world in the classroom. Ask students to point out their home country or city on the map.
Practice the English names of cities and countries of the world. Write the names of the continents across
the top of the board and elicit from students countries located on each continent. Write the countries in list
form under the correct continent. When the lists are fairly full, practice pronunciation by having the class
repeat the countries out loud. What languages are spoken in each country?
Classroom Activity 4: Crazy Questions
Model and then have students practice asking questions that will elicit negative answers. For example,
"Are you from the moon? Does Sakae come from Mexico? Does Pierre come from Japan? Is this
woman's name Max? Is the US president from Argentina?"
Classroom Activity 5: They, They, They
If possible, pair students with similar nationalities, languages, gender. Have one pair interview another
pair. Have pairs report back to the class about the pair they interviewed using plural affirmative and
negative sentences, e.g., They aren't girls. They don't come from San Francisco. They speak Japanese, but
they dont speak English.
Classroom Activity 6: Whats that? Its mine!
Take objects, such as textbooks, and give them to each student. Review possessive pronouns, and have
students work in groups to practice the following: Whats that? Its a book. Is it yours? Yes, it is.
Its my book. Is that your book? Then have students exchange books so that the answers become: No,
it isnt. This is her book, not mine. No, it isnt. This is (names) book.

10

Module 1: Unit 1, Names & Places

is a woman. Her name is Kathy. The person on the


right is a man.

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)


Hello, Max and Kathy

Where is France?

This is Max. Hello, my name is Max. Max comes


from/is from the United States. Yes, thats right. I
come from/Im from the United States.

Hello. My name is Pierre. I come from Paris,


France.
Here is a map of France. France is in Europe. Paris
is in France.

This is Kathy. Hello, my name is Kathy.


Kathy comes from/is from New York. I come
from/Im from New York.

This man is from France, which is in Europe.

This is Pierre. Pierre comes from France. Hes


French. He doesnt come from/isnt from the United
States. My name is Pierre. I come from/Im from
France. I dont come from/Im not from the United
States.

Max comes from San Francisco, California. San


Francisco isnt in Europe. San Francisco is in
California.
Here are two men. The one on the left comes from
the United States.
Hello, my name is Max, and I come from the United
States.
The one on the right comes from Europe. His name
is Pierre. I come from Paris, France.

What is your name?


My name is Kathy. What is your name?
My name is Max.
Max?
Yes, thats right. My name is Max.
Where do you come from, Max?
I come from/am from San Francisco.
San Francisco?
Yes. San Francisco, in California. How about
you?
I come from/Im from New York.

This is our world. Where is France, Kathy?


Look. This is a map of the world, and here is
Europe. The US is here. The Atlantic Ocean is
here, between the US and Europe.
Oh, I see. Where is New York?
Its here. New York is in the US.

Who is that?
His name is Pierre.
Does he come from the United States?
No, he doesnt. He comes from/is from France.
Hello, my name is Pierre. I come from/Im from
Paris, France. I dont come from/Im not from the
United States. Im French, not American.

Who Speaks English?


Hello. My name is Kathy. I come from New York.
I speak two languages: English and Spanish.
Here are four countries: the US, France, Japan, and
Australia. In these two countries, people speak
English. In Japan, Japanese people speak Japanese.
In France, French people speak French.

Max and Kathy come from/are from the US. They


dont come from/arent from France. Max comes
from San Francisco, and Kathy is from New York.
Thats right. Kathy and I dont come from France.
Were not from France.
Yes, thats right. I come from/Im from New York.

I speak French and English. I dont speak


Japanese.
This man speaks French, but he doesnt speak
Japanese. This woman speaks Japanese, but she
doesnt speak French.

Pierre comes from/is from France. He doesnt come


from/isnt from the US.
I come from/Im from France. I dont come from
the US. Im French, not American.

What languages do you speak?


I speak two languages: English and Spanish. I don't
speak Japanese.

Here are three people, two men and a woman. The


person on the left is a man. The person in the middle

Look. Whats that?

11

New Dynamic English

I dont know. What is it?


Maybe its a UFO.
Thats ridiculous. I dont believe in UFOs.
Greetings. My name is Zork. I come from very far
away.

Focus Exercises
I [come][from] San Francisco.
[Im] [from] San Francisco.
Pierre [comes] [from] France.
He [doesnt] [come] [from] the United States.
He [isnt] [from] the United States.
She [doesnt] [come] [from] Paris.
They [dont] [come] [from] France.
They [are] [not] from France.
I [dont] [come] [from] France.
[France] [is] [in] Europe.
Max and Kathy [are] [from] the US.
San Francisco [isnt] [in] Europe.
The [person] [in] the [middle] is a [woman].
The [person] [on] the [right] is a [man].
In France, [French] [people] [speak] French.
In [Japan], [Japanese] [people] [speak] Japanese.
I [speak] two [languages]: English [and] Spanish.
Kathy [speaks] English [and] Spanish, [but] she
[doesnt] [speak] French.
The [one] [on] the [left] [comes] from Europe.
The [one] [on] the [right] [comes] from the US.

Comprehension Questions
Who is this? Who is this woman?
Where does Max come from? Where is Max from?
Does Kathy come from New York? Is Kathy from
New York?
Where do Max and Kathy come from? Where are
Max and Kathy from?
Does Max come from France or does he come from
the United States? Is Max from France or is he from
the United States? Who is from France? Who comes
from France, Max, Kathy or Pierre?
Which man comes from the US? Which one isn't
from Europe? Which person is a woman?
Does Zork come from your country?
Where is San Francisco? Where is France?
In which country do people speak Japanese? Does
Kathy speak French? What languages do you speak?
Do you speak a European language? Do you speak
Japanese? Which part of the world do you come
from? Are you Japanese?
Question Practice
Who is this?
Where do Kathy and Pierre come from?
Who are these three people?
Who comes from/is from the US?
Where do Max and Kathy come from?
Where are Max and Kathy from?
Who doesnt come from France?
Who isnt from the US?
Where does Pierre/Max come from?
Where do you come from?
Where are you from?
Does Pierre come from the United States?
Which person is a woman?
Which man comes from the US?
Does Kathy come from New York?
Is Kathy from New York?
In which country do people speak Japanese?
Does Kathy speak French?
Which part of the world do you come from?
Which man comes from the United States?
Who comes from the United States?

12

Module 1: Unit 1, Names & Places

Focused Listening

Focus 3

Focus 1

Review Hello, Max and Kathy and focus on Where is


France? Listen to each sentence several times. If
necessary, use the ABC button to look at the text. Click on
the highlighted words to study the Glossary examples.

Focus on Hello, Max and Kathy. Listen to each sentence


several times. If necessary, use the ABC button to look at
the text.

Language Focus

Goal
Preview and orientation: Students will comprehend

Contrast be from and come from, personal pronouns, plural


(they, we), subject/verb agreement, and negation with do
and be:
He doesnt come from France.
He isnt from France.
They dont come from France.

and become familiar with the basic sentence patterns of


the unit and be able to repeat some of the phrases.

Student Follow-up
1. Repeat short sentences from the lesson: This is Max.
Hello, my name is Max. What is your name?
2. Write down a number of short sentences from the
lesson.

Listening Task
Listen for words that indicate location: between, in, on the
left.

Focus 2

Goals
Students will be able to use do and not to express

Review Hello, Max and Kathy. Listen to each sentence


several times. Use the ABC button to look at the text.
Click on the highlighted words to study the Glossary
examples.

negation.
Students will be able to use in and between to express
relative location.

Student Follow-up

Language Focus

1. Introduce yourself and two classmates. Use do and not


to express negation.
2. Write three sentences in the third person (She comes
from New York. He is from... Pierre is French.)
3. Do Practice Exercises C and D.

demonstrative pronouns (this, that), personal pronouns,


subject/verb agreement, and contractions

Listening Task
Notice the difference between sentences beginning with I
and sentences beginning with a name or 3rd person
pronoun: I come from San Francisco. He comes from San
Francisco. Kathy is from New York.

Focus 4
Review Where is France? and focus on Who Speaks
English? Listen to each sentence several times.

Goals
Students will be able to introduce each character (name

Language Focus

and place of origin) in both 1st and 3rd person.

Students will be able to specify a person or object with

Note how not is used with do, is, am, are, and the verb
speak.

this or that.
Students will be able to use the personal pronouns I,
he, and she.

Listening Task
Listen for the names of countries, cities, nationalities, and
languages spoken.

Student Follow-up
1. Introduce Max, Kathy and Pierre:
This is Max. He comes from San Francisco.
San Francisco is in California.
2. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Goals
Students will be able to give a complete introduction of
Max, Kathy and Pierre.
Students will be able to use basic negative
constructions.
Students will be able to introduce themselves (name,
place of origin, languages spoken).

13

New Dynamic English

Student Follow-up
Student Follow-up

1. Ask and answer questions about all three characters:


Which person isn't American? Who isnt from the US?
Which person is a woman? Which person isnt a
woman? Does Max come from New York? Does
Pierre speak Japanese? Is Zork from our world?
2. Make a list of five countries, the languages spoken in
each, the nationalities, and the location.
3. Write three negative sentences: Pierre doesnt come
from the US. Kathy isnt from France. Japan isnt in
Europe.
4. Introduce yourself: My name is... I am from... I
speak... I dont speak...
5. Do Practice Exercises E and F.

Focus 5
Review all three lessons. Try saying each sentence and
recording yourself. Compare your recording with the
native speaker.

Language Focus
Oral fluency development and language input.

Listening Task
Focus on the questions. Notice the difference between
Yes/No questions and Wh- questions.

Goals

Students will be able to ask and answer simple Yes/No


and Wh- questions about themselves and their
classmates.

Student Follow-up
1. Write five Yes/No questions, and their answers.
2. Write five Wh- questions, and their answers.
3. Do Practice Exercises G and H.

Focus 6
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently.
Do the Question Practice and Focus Exercise lessons
everyday until your Completion Percentage is 80-100%.
Then take the Mastery Test.

14

Make a short oral summary of this unit.


Give a 30-second oral introduction of yourself.
Write a two-paragraph description of yourself or a
classmate. Include nationality and languages
spoken.

Module 1: Unit 1, Names and Places

Practice Exercises

1(1) Names and Places: Exercise A


Make a sentence with these words.

Example:

Max / name / my / is

My name is Max.

1.

is / Kathy / name / my _______________________________________________

2.

come / New York / from / I ___________________________________________

3.

Max / is / this _______________________________________________________

4.

from / comes / San Francisco / he ______________________________________

5.

from / comes / New York / Kathy ______________________________________

1(1) Names and Places: Exercise B


Circle the correct word.

Example:
1. Max

This

is, am Max.

come, comes

from San Francisco.

2. "Hello. My name is, am Max."


3. "I come, comes

from San Francisco. "

4. Kathy come, comes

from New York.

5. She come from, comes from

New York.

15

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

1(1) Names and Places: Exercise C

Change each sentence to a sentence with she or her.

Example: "I come from New York."

She comes from New York.

1.

"My name is Kathy." ___________________________________________________

2.

"Im from the US." _____________________________________________________

3.

Kathy is from New York. ________________________________________________

4.

"Im a woman, not a man." _______________________________________________

5.

Kathy is a woman, not a man. ____________________________________________

1(1) Names and Places: Exercise D


Answer the questions.

Example: Where is Max from?

Max is from San Francisco.___

1.

Where does Max come from? ____________________________________________

2.

Where is Kathy from? __________________________________________________

3.

Who comes from New York? ____________________________________________

4.

Who is from San Francisco? _____________________________________________

5.

Which person is a woman? ______________________________________________

16

Module 1: Unit 1, Names and Places

Practice Exercises

1(1) Names and Places: Exercise E


Fill in the blank in the sentence with isnt or doesnt

Example: Max comes from the US. He doesnt__ come from France.
1. His name _____________ Bob; his name is Max.
2. Pierre is from Paris. He _____________ come from the US.
3. Kathy speaks English. She _____________ speak Japanese.
4. Zork comes from far away. He _____________ from our world.
5. Pierre is French. He _____________ British.
I 1(1) Names and Places: Exercise F
Make these sentences into negative sentences using dont, isnt, or doesnt.

Example:

Max is from New York. __Max isnt from New York.__

1.

Kathy is from Paris. ____________________________________________________

2.

"I come from the US." __________________________________________________

3.

Pierre is American. _____________________________________________________

4.

Kathy speaks French. ___________________________________________________

5.

"I speak Japanese." _____________________________________________________

17

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
I 1(1) Names and Places: Exercise G
Circle the correct word.

Example:

Max

come, comes

1. Max and Kathy come, comes


2. Max and Pierre is, are
3. Kathy and Max

5. He doesnt

English.

from France.

come, comes

6. Kathy and Max

from the US.

men.

speak, speaks

4. Pierre come, comes

from San Francisco.

from the US.

is, are not from Europe.

7. Kathy doesnt

speak, speaks

French.

8. Pierre doesnt

come, comes

from Japan.

9. They

am, is, are both from the United States.

10. They

dont, doesnt

speak Japanese.

1(1) Names and Places: Exercise H


Match each part of a sentence on the left with the rest of the sentence on the right.

Example:

h. What

____h____ is your name?

a. What is

1. _____ come from Europe.

b. Where do

2. _____ are you from?

c. Where

3. _____ is Kathy.

d. My name

4. _____ doesnt speak French.

e. Im not

5. _____ you come from?

f. She

6. _____ your name?

g. They dont

7. _____ from the US.

18

Module 1: Unit 1, Names and Places

Practice Exercises
1(1) Names and Places: Exercise I
Read each answer ("A"), then write the question ("Q").

Example:

Q. Who __comes from France?__


A. Pierre comes from France.
Q. Where _do you come from?___
A. I come from New York.

1Q.

Who _____________________________________________________________

A.

That is Kathy.

2Q.

Where ____________________________________________________________

A.

Im from San Francisco.

3Q.

Where ____________________________________________________________

A.

San Francisco is in California.

4Q.

Who ______________________________________________________________

A.

Kathy comes from New York.

5Q.

Where _____________________________________________________________

A.

They are from the United States.

6Q.

What ______________________________________________________________

A.

They come from Brazil.

7Q.

What ______________________________________________________________

A.

He speaks French and German.

8Q.

Does ______________________________________________________________

A.

No, she doesnt. She doesnt speak German.

19

New Dynamic English

2. Jobs and Family


Richard Chin, Sara Scott, Henry Thornton, Word Practice, and Questions
Lesson 3 extends the treatment of personal information from Unit 1 to include occupation, age, the
spelling of ones name, marital status, family relationships, and where one resides. Three characters
are introduced: Richard Chin, Sara Scott and Henry Thornton. A particular emphasis is on
introducing useful verbs, the simple present tense, adjectives and daily vocabulary. Toward the end
of each lesson there are also short interviews. These are also followed up in the Video Interaction
Unit, which provides a model for a role-play.
The Word Practice lesson focuses on the reading of key words
from the lesson. Click on each word to hear it. Click on Quiz
for random selection of items which is scored.
The Questions lesson presents a series of comprehension questions
about the characters from the lessons. These questions should not
be attempted until the other lessons have been completed.
Once students are able to ask and answer questions about these
three characters, the focus should move to extending the ability of
students to describe their own situations.
Goals:
To be able to understand short sentences spoken at near normal speed.
To be able to read and understand short sentences using contextual clues.
To be able to give basic information about themselves in English.
To be able to ask and answer simple Who, What, Where, and Yes/No questions about their living
situations.
Objective 1:
Objective 2:
Objective 3:
Objective 4:

To be able to understand and use sentences where there is subject verb agreement.
To be able to understand how an adjective describes something.
To be able to differentiate between the subject and the direct object of a sentence.
To be able to understand sentences which use adverbs to express amounts.

20

Module 1: Unit 2, Jobs & Family

Learning Points
adjectives
his first name, his family name, a good teacher; a high salary; a low salary; his salary isnt very good, a
small apartment; they live on the fourth floor, an expensive house; a large hospital, the apartment is large
and comfortable; an expensive house, his rich parents; her older sister; her younger sister; He isnt very
popular with women. Hes married. Hes single. She wants to be a great dancer.
family relationships
wife, husband, son, daughter, older sister, younger sister, parents. He and his wife have a son. His
parents are rich.
have
She has a high salary. He doesnt have much money. He has a son.
negation (doesnt, isnt)
He doesnt have much money. He doesnt work hard. She isnt married.
object pronouns (him, her)
He likes her. She doesnt like him.
possessive adjectives (their, his, her)
His salary is low. Their son is five years old. Her boyfriend is a pilot. She lives with her older sister.
present simple
teach; like; have; live; write; work. She lives in an expensive apartment. I teach science and math.
She works in a large hospital.
questions about self and others
are/is; what; who; how old; where; whose; does. Who works in a hospital? Is Henry married? How
old is he? Whose sister is a dancer? Do you like your job? Are you a student?
spelling
first and last names
subject/verb/object pattern
He likes his job. He teaches science. I write stories. What do you teach?
pronunciation
third person (s): /z/ He has a son. /s/ He likes her.
amount/quantification (much, a lot)
not much money; has a lot of money

21

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of the Richard Chin lesson in class. Focus on the first few sentences only, and have the
class practice repeating each sentence. Stress the fact that each sentence has a subject and a verb. Introduce
the idea of spelling and lead the class in spelling aloud some names or words. Talk about the difference
between first and last names, and how this varies in some countries.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice the following dialog: Whats your name? My name
is.... Whats your first name? My first name is... How do you spell that? M A X etc. How about
your family name? How do you spell your family name? My family name is ...
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Review the first few sentences. Focus on subject/verb agreement and family relationships. Make a list of
family relationships: father, mother, sister, brother, son, daughter, etc. Have students practice talking about
their family relationships: Do you have a sister? Yes, I do. I have one sister. How old is she? My
sister is 18 years old.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Focus on occupations and housing. Note the use of direct objects and prepositions in key sentences. Make a
list of common occupations and places to live: teacher, banker, doctor, salesperson, policeman; city, country,
downtown, suburb, etc. Have students practice talking about the occupations of people in their family or
friends, where they live and with whom they live.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice
Focus on adjectives and nouns. Make a list of common objects and adjectives used to describe them. Then
have students work in groups to come up with their own lists of adjectives and their opposites. Each group
can then present their list to the class.
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4, Listening Focus 5, and Listening Focus 6 in the lab or at home.
Step 10: Presentation and Oral Practice
Focus on the Interview and Hot Seats lessons in Video Interactions Unit 5, and have students practice roleplaying the situations.

Follow-up
Once the presentation lessons of the unit have been completed, do several of the Classroom Activities listed
below and have the students complete the Word Study and Questions lessons. As homework, assign the
Practice Exercises. When they get an 80-100% Completion Percentage, give them the Mastery Test.

22

Module 1: Unit 2, Jobs & Family

Language Extension
Classroom Activity 1: Information Charts
Across the top of the board or a large piece of butcher paper, write the following categories: First name,
Family name, Age, Occupation, Marital status, Housing. Review with the class the meaning of each
category word filling in the appropriate information about yourself.
Example
First name
Family name
Age
Occupation
Marital status
Housing
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Laura

Jones

28

teacher

single

small apartment, with friend

Elicit from students information about the characters, Richard Chin, Sara Scott, Chris Scott, and Henry
Thornton and invite students to come up and fill in the information under each category. Using the chart,
have students ask questions about each character and answer in complete sentences.
Classroom Activity 2: Paired Interviews
Divide the class into pairs or groups of three. Have students interview each other and fill in the information
for the following categories: name, age, occupation, marital status, housing, family members. When this is
finished, invite several students to stand up and present the information about the persons they interviewed.
Classroom Activity 3: Who is this Person?
Post a large picture of a person the students have not seen before. Have students generate as many questions
as they can about this person. Write the questions on the board. Then answer the questions, either with real
facts, or with made-up, creative answers provided by the class.
Classroom Activity 4: Family Album
Ask students to bring photos of family or friends, or cut out pictures of families from magazines. Have
students orally introduce these people to a small group or to the whole class. Encourage members of the
groups or class to ask questions.
Classroom Activity 5: Match Game
Post a large piece of butcher paper prepared with a large grid of 20 squares on a bulletin board. Write one of
the antonyms introduced in the lesson in each of the squares in random order (large, small; high, low; old,
young; good, bad; comfortable, uncomfortable; rich, poor; married, single; expensive, inexpensive; men,
women; popular, unpopular). Cover each of the words with a separate sheet of paper or index card. Number
the cover sheets from 1 to 20.
Divide the class into four teams and let each team call out two numbers at their turn. Uncover the words
under the numbers. If the two squares are matching antonyms, the team gets a point and another turn. If the
words do not match, recover them and let the next team take a turn. When all the matches have been
uncovered, the team with the highest number of points is declared the winner.

23

New Dynamic English

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)

Henry Thornton

Richard Chin

This is Henry Thornton. His first name is Henry.


His family name is Thornton.

This is Richard Chin. His first name is Richard,


R I C H A R D. His family name is Chin, C H I N.
He is thirty years old.

Henry is a businessman. Hes thirty-five years old.


He doesnt work hard, but he has lots of money. His
parents are rich. He has a large house. Its a very
expensive house.

Richard is a teacher. He teaches science and math.


Richard is a good teacher, and his students like him.
Unfortunately, his salary is low. He doesnt have
much money.

Henry is single. Henry isnt married, but he is in love


with somebody. He likes a woman named Chris.
Unfortunately, she doesnt like him. In fact, Henry
isnt very popular with women.

Richard is married. He and his wife have a child, a


son. Their son is five years old. He and his family
live in a small apartment in a large apartment
building. Their apartment is on the fourth floor.

Henrys interview:
K: Excuse me, but may I ask you a question?
H: Sorry, not right now. Im busy.

Richards interview:
Kathy: Excuse me, may I ask you a question?
Richard: Sure, what is it?
K: Are you a teacher?
R: Yes, I am.
K: What do you teach?
R: I teach science and math.
K: Where do you teach?
R: I teach at a small college. How about you?
What do you do?
K: Im a writer. I write stories. Now Im writing
about you. Is that okay?
R: Sure, I dont mind. Good luck.

Comprehension Questions
Who is a doctor? Is she a good doctor?
Who works in a hospital? Who has rich parents?
Who teaches in a college?
Does she have a sister? Where does Saras sister
live? Whose sister is a dancer?
Who is Chriss sister? Who lives with Chris?
Who is married? Which of these three people is
married?
Is Henry married? Is he a teacher? Is he popular
with women?
Do Henrys parents have a lot of money? Are his
parents rich?
Who has a lot of money but doesnt work hard?
Who lives in an expensive house? Where does
Richard live?
Who has a low salary? Whose salary is low?
How old is he? Does he have children? How old is
their son?
Are they both writers? Who is she writing about?

Sara Scott
This is Sara Scott. Her first name is Sara. Her last
name is Scott.
Sara is a doctor. Shes twenty-eight years old. She
works in a large hospital. Shes a good doctor, and
she works hard. She has a high salary.
Sara isnt married, but she has a boyfriend. Her
boyfriend is a pilot. She lives in an expensive
apartment. Her apartment is large and comfortable.
She lives with her younger sister, Chris. Chris is a
ballet dancer. Shes twenty-four years old. She loves
to dance, but she has to practice hard every day. She
wants to be a great dancer someday.
K:
S:
K:
S:
K:
S:

Do you have a job? Do you get a good salary? Do


you like your job?
Are you a student? Do you study hard? Do you do
your best?
Word Practice

Saras interview:
Excuse me, but may I ask you a question?
Sure, what is it?
Are you a teacher?
No, Im not. Im a doctor.
Thank you.
Youre welcome.

teacher, student, school, doctor, hospital, office,


apartment, house, son, daughter, friend, family,
sister, brother, parents, high, low, salary, money,
large, small, expensive, inexpensive, single, married,
rich, poor, first, last

24

Module 1: Unit 2, Jobs & Family

Student Follow-up

Focused Listening
Focus 1

1. Write three sentences about Richard, Sara, and yourself


using the verb be.
2. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Listen to all three lessons. Listen to each sentence several


times. If necessary, use the ABC button to look at the text.

Focus 3
Review all three lessons. Listen to each sentence several
times. Use the ABC button to look at the text. Click on
the highlighted words to study the Glossary examples.

Listening Task
Learn the names and ages of the characters in the lesson.
Practice spelling their names.

Language Focus

Goals
Students will be able to identify the characters and

have, simple present, family relationships

spell their names.

Listening Task

They will be able to distinguish between "first name"

Focus on Sara and Henry. Listen for and record sentences


(or parts of sentences) that tell what Sara or Henry has or
does.

and "family name".


Students will be able to spell their own names in
English.

Sara has a boyfriend. She works in a large hospital. She


has a high salary. She lives in an expensive apartment.

Student Follow-up
1. Spell the names of the characters.
2. Dictation: Write the names of the characters as the
instructor spells them.
3. Dictate the spelling of your name to a classmate.

Pay special attention to the |s| or |z| sound at the end of the
verbs (lives, works, has).

Goals
Students will be able to introduce and answer questions

Focus 2

about all three characters.

Students will be able to talk about the characters using

Review all three lessons. Listen to each sentence several


times. Use the ABC button to look at the text. Click on
the highlighted words to study the Glossary examples.

active verbs and the verb have.

Students will be able to use vocabulary of family


relationships.

Language Focus

Student Follow-up

be, simple present, articles (a, the). Note that articles are
only used with nouns, or in front of an adjective which
describes a noun (a high salary).

1. Write about two or more of your family members.


2. Compare Richard and Sara: He has a low salary. She
has a high salary. He lives in a small apartment. Her
apartment is large and comfortable.
3. Compare Richard and Henry.
4. Do Practice Exercises C and D.

Listening Task
Focus on Richard and Sara. Listen for sentences with the
word is and practice saying them. Notice that the subject
of the sentence can be either the proper noun or the
pronoun he or she:

Focus 4
Review all three lessons. Record each sentence and
compare your recording with the native speaker. Focus on
the occupations of each character and focus on the
interviews.

Richard is a teacher. He is thirty years old. He is


married.

Goals

Students will be able to introduce Richard and Sara and


describe them using the verb be.
Students will be able to use be to talk about age: He is
thirty years old.
Students will be able to use the indefinite article a
before a noun (He is a teacher) but not before an
adjective (He is married).

Language Focus
asking questions, negation, and occupations

Listening Task
Listen for and record sentences with dont/doesnt or isnt.
He doesnt have much money. He doesnt work hard. He
isnt very popular with women.

25

New Dynamic English

Goals

Students will be able to interview each other about


their occupations.
Students will know the names of common occupations.

Focus 6
Focus on the Questions lesson. Practice saying each
question. Record yourself.

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of five occupations and indicate what they
do or where they do their job.
Bankers work in a bank. Salespeople sell things.
Nurses work in a hospital. Writers write books. Pilots
fly airplanes, etc.
2. Do Practice Exercises E and F.

Language Focus
Questions with adjectives or amounts.
Who lives in an expensive house? Are his parents rich?

Goals

Students will be able to make Wh- and Yes/No


questions with adjectives.
Students will be able to ask and respond to questions
about their occupation and family relationships.

Focus 5
Review all three lessons. Then do the Word Study lesson.
Focus on the spellings and sounds of each words. Record
the word and its spelling.

Student Follow-up
Write down five questions and then interview two
classmates about occupations and family relationships.

Language Focus
antonyms, nouns and adjectives, spelling

Focus 7

Goals
Students will be able to make sentences with adjectives

Language Focus
Language Mastery

and their antonyms: high/low, rich/poor,


expensive/inexpensive, large/small.
Students will be able to correlate negative
constructions with antonyms: Henry isnt married.
Hes single. Richard doesnt have a lot of money. His
salary is low. His apartment isnt large. Its small.
Students will be able to read and spell aloud simple
words.

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently. When your Completion
Percentatge is 80-100%, take the Mastery Test.

Student Follow-up
Student Follow-up

Make a list of five objects and two adjectives to


describe each object. For example: book (expensive,
good), tree (tall, green), building (large, small), car
(expensive, compact), house (large, small).

26

Make a short oral summary of this unit.


Give a 30-second oral introduction of yourself,
including information about your job and family.
Write a two-paragraph description of yourself or a
classmate. Include job and family information.

Module 1: Unit 2, Jobs & Family

Practice Exercises
1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise A
Read the sentences about Richard. Fill in the correct words from
the list.
Chin
teacher
low
son
five years
first

married
thirty years
Richard
apartment
fourth
science

Example: His first name is Richard.

1. His family name is _________________


2. Richard is __________________ old.
3. He is a __________________.
4. His salary is __________________.
5. He is __________________.
6. He and his wife have a __________________.
7. They live in an __________________
8. Their son is __________________ old.
9. Their apartment is on the __________________ floor.
10. His __________________ name is Richard.

27

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise B
Read the paragraph about Sara. Fill in the blanks.
Use the words in the list below.

work
have
live
are
Example: She

is

works
has
lives
is
a doctor.

Sara Scott is a doctor. She _____________ in a large hospital. Shes a good doctor, and
she _____________ hard. She _____________ a high salary. She _____________ in a
large apartment. She and her sister, Chris, _____________ together. Sara isnt married,
but she _____________ a boyfriend. Her boyfriend _____________ a pilot.

Read the paragraph about Chris. Fill in the blanks.


Use the words in the list below.

want
practice
live
love
are

wants
practices
lives
loves
is

Chris _____________ a ballet dancer. She _____________ with her older sister, Sara.
They _____________ in a large, comfortable apartment. Chris _____________ to dance.
She _____________ hard every day. She _____________ to be a great dancer someday.

28

Module 1: Unit 2, Jobs & Family

Practice Exercises

1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise C

Fill-in the blanks with the correct form of the verbs in parentheses.
Example: Henry (be, not)

isnt

popular with women.

Henry (be) ____________ a businessman. He (have) ____________ a lot of money, but


he (work, not) ______________________ very hard. He (be, not) __________________
married, but he is in love with somebody. He (like) ____________ a woman named
Chris. She (be) ___________ a ballet dancer. Unfortunately, she (like, not)
________________ him. Henry (be, not) ____________ very popular with women.
1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise D
Make the sentences below into negative sentences. Use dont, isnt, or doesnt.
Example:

Richard is a businessman. Richard isn't a businessman.


Richard has a lot of money. Richard doesn't have a lot of money.

1. Sara is married. ____________________________________________________________


2. Sara is a teacher. ___________________________________________________________
3. Henry works hard. __________________________________________________________
4. Chris likes Henry. ___________________________________________________________
5. Henry teaches science and math. _______________________________________________

29

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise E


Match the words with their opposites.
Example:

x. left

right

a. rich

1. _______ single

b. inexpensive

2. _______ poor

c. high

3. _______ uncomfortable

d. married

4. _______ expensive

e. large

5. _______ low

f. comfortable

6. _______small

g. popular

7. _______ new

h. old

8. _______ unpopular

1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise F


Cross out the incorrect word and write the correct word.
low
Example: Richard has a high salary.
1. Richard is a doctor.
2. Richard and his wife have a daughter.
3. Sara lives in a small apartment.
4. She lives with her brother, Chris.
5. Henry lives in an expensive apartment.
6. Henrys children are rich.
7. Henry is married.

30

Module 1: Unit 2, Jobs & Family

Practice Exercises
1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise G
Look at the sentences. If the two sentences have a similar meaning, write "S".
If they have a different meaning, write "D".
Example:
Richard doesn't live in a large apartment. S

He lives in a small apartment.

1. Richard is single. ______ Richard is married.


2. Richard doesn't have much money. ______ His salary is low.
3. Henry's parents are rich. ______ Henry's parents aren't poor.
4. Chris lives with her older sister, Sara. ______ Sara lives with her younger sister, Chris.
5. Richard isnt a popular teacher. ______ Richards students like him a lot.

1(2) Jobs and Family: Exercise H


Read each answer ("A"), then write the question ("Q").
Example:

1.

Q. Where does Richard teach?


A. Richard teaches at a small college.

Q. Where _________________________________________________________________
Sara works in a large hospital.

2. Q. What __________________________________________________________________
I teach science and math.
3. Q. What __________________________________________________________________
Kathy writes stories.
4. Q. Are ____________________________________________________________________
No, I'm not a teacher.
5. Q. Is _____________________________________________________________________
Yes, Richard is a good teacher.

31

New Dynamic English

3. Numbers and Time


1 to 10; 11 to 20; 10 to 100; and Time
This unit is important for later lessons which use time and numbers, so it should be mastered.
Mastery of this unit will also help students improve their listening comprehension and their ability to
hold English sounds in their short-term memory. Students should use the record feature to practice
saying the numbers and times clearly. This can also be done over the telephone, or in class role-plays
and simulations where it is important to dictate numerical information, prices, and telephone numbers
accurately.
For students who need to use English for their job or for classroom work in school, this unit should be
expanded to include money, prices, and numerical operations such as addition, subtraction,
multiplication, and division.
Goals:
To be able to understand and express numerical information spoken at near normal speed.
To be able to understand and give the time, including fractional times.
To be able to use the telephone to exchange numerical information with accuracy.

Learning Points
numbers
1-10; 11-20; 21-100
times
Clock times
fractions (half, quarter)
quarter of an hour; half an hour; half past four
sequence (before, after)
ten minutes before five o'clock, a quarter past three
telephone numbers
858-0891

32

Module 1: Unit 3, Numbers and Times

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce the numbers 1-10. Have the students practice in pairs or small groups.
Step 2: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 3: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce the numbers 10-20 and 10-100. Have the students practice dictating numbers to each other in pairs
or small groups.
Step 4: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 5: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce telephone numbers, and then clock times. Have the students practice in pairs or small groups.
Step 6: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 and Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.
Step 7: Presentation and Oral Practice: Fractions and Numerical Operations (Optional)
Introduce fractions and the numerical operations, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Then
dictate some simple fractions and problems to the class, such as: one fourth, 2 plus 2, 2 minus 2, 3 times 2,
and 96 divided by 48. Have the students practice dictating problems to each other.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice: Money and Prices (Optional)
Introduce money and how to ask for the cost of something: How much does it cost? Have students write
down the prices of some objects, such as food, and present them to the class. For older students, present the
language of currency conversion: How many Japanese yen are equal to a US dollar?
Step 9: Presentation and Oral Practice: Large Numbers (Optional)
Introduce numbers larger than 100: hundreds, thousands, millions, and billions. Have students practice
dictating large numbers to each other.

Language Extension
Classroom Activity 1: Time Bingo
Prepare and distribute to each student a blank bingo card (five squares across and down). Have students
prepare the card by entering a number from 1 to 12 (to represent the hours) in four squares across the top,
starting with the second square (the first square should be blackened or left blank). Have them enter a
number in increments of 5 (05, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55), to represent the minutes, in the four
squares down the left side of the card. Make four sets of small slips of paper numbered from 1 to 12 and
place them in a bag or box. Make four sets of small slips of paper numbered in increments of five and place
them in a different bag or box. Now the class is ready to play Time Bingo.
Choose a slip of paper from each of the bags and call out the numbers so they form a time, e.g., 4:45, 6:20.
Students who have those numbers on their cards should cover the square (with a coin, or other small token)
where the numbers intersect on their cards. The first student to cover four squares in a row shouts "Bingo"
and is the winner.

33

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 2: No Hands!


Draw a large clock on the board with numbers but no hands. Invite volunteers to come to the board and draw
the hands on the clock for the time which you dictate (e.g., Teacher: "It's a quarter after 5." Student draws
hands pointing to 3 and 5 on the clock.)
Students can also be given a handout of nine to twelve clocks with no hands. The teacher (or another
student) dictates a variety of times and students enter the hands on the clock.
Classroom Activity 3: Telephone Messages
Write this model of a telephone conversation on the board.
a:
b:
c:
d:

Is Mr. Brown there?


Sorry, Hes not. Can I give him a message?
Yes. Please ask him to call me. My name is ..... and my phone number is ...
Your phone number is ....... OK. Ill give him the message.

Pair students and have them practice the dialog using their own names and telephone numbers. This activity
can be expanded to practice time, spelling and addresses. Have students request a return call for a specific
time, spell their names or request information be sent to an address.
Classroom Activity 4: Team Math
Divide the class into two or three teams. Each team writes down the following: two addition problems, two
subtraction problems, two multiplication problems, a division problem, two problems involving two or more
operations, four large numbers, and two fractions. Each team then submits their problem to the teacher or to
a moderator.
The teacher or moderator shuffles the problems and reads the first problem two or three times. Then Team
One is asked to write the problem on the board, or to hold up their answer. If correct, they get a point. If
not, they lose a point, and Team Two has a chance to get the point, etc. The next problem is given to Team
Two. If correct, they get a point. If not, they lose a point and the next team has a chance to get the point.
This process continues until one team gets ten points.

34

Module 1: Unit 3, Numbers and Times

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)

4:55

Five minutes to five. Four fifty-five. It's


five to five.

7:20

Twenty minutes past seven. Seven twenty.

6:40

Twenty minutes to seven. Six forty. It's


twenty to seven.

Numbers 1-10
Here are the numbers 1 to 10.
One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten
Numbers 11-20
Here are the numbers 11 to 20.
Eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen,
seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty

A little before 4:00. A little past 4:00.

Numbers 10-100

851-6817

851-0819

Here are the numbers 10 to 100.


Ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty,
ninety, one hundred

581-9801

202-3576

202-3596

202-4796

Telephone Numbers

twenty-one, thirty-two, thirty-three, forty-four, fiftyfive, fifty-six, sixty-seven, sixty-eight, seventy-six,


seventy-seven, eighty-seven, eighty-nine, ninetyseven, ninety-nine

Times
Here are the hours, 1:00 to 12:00.
One hour is sixty minutes.
Thirty minutes is half an hour.
Fifteen minutes is a quarter of an hour.
What time is it?
1:15

One fifteen. A quarter past one.

1:50

Ten to two. One fifty.

2:15

Two fifteen. A quarter past two.

3:25

Twenty-five minutes past three. Three


twenty-five.

2:40

Twenty to three. Two forty.

5:15

It's five fifteen. It's a quarter past five.

6:15

Six fifteen.

6:30

Six thirty. A half past six.

7:45

Seven forty-five. A quarter to eight.

11:30 Eleven thirty.


35

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening
Focus 4
Focus 1

Listening Task
Review all the lessons, both numbers and times, until you
understand and say each number, telephone number, and
time with confidence. Practice the Quizzes until you can
get them all right.

Focus on the numbers 1-10 and 11-20. Listen and repeat


each number.

Listening Task
Focus on numbers. Practice saying the numbers in each
category.

Goals
Students will be able to understand and accurately
report numbers between 1-100.
Students will be able to tell time both in terms of
segments of an hour (quarter past, half past) and in
numerical terms (nine forty-five).

Goal
Students will be able to understand and say the
numbers 1-20.

Student Follow-up

Focus 2

Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Review the numbers 1-10, 11-20, and focus on the


numbers 10-100. Listen and repeat each number.

Focus 5

Listening Task
Language Focus

Focus on the numbers 10-100 numbers. Practice saying


each number. Then do the Quiz until you can get them all
right.

Language Mastery

Listening Task

Goal
Students will be able to understand and say the

Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.


Practice recording 10~15 numbers or times each time, so
that you can say them fluently. When your Completion
Percentage is 80-100%, take the Mastery Test.

numbers 1-100.

Focus 3

Student Follow-up

Focus on the Time lesson. Click on each example and


practice saying it. Then click on Quiz for more practice
and examples.

Listening Task
Practice saying the different times. Notice the different
ways to refer to the same time. Note how the fractions, a
half and a quarter, are used.

Goal
Students will be able to understand and say the time,
including fractional times such as half past and a
quarter past.

36

Practice dictating numbers over the phone.


Practice leaving messages for someone over the
phone. Include your name and telephone number, and
your address. Then check to see if it is correct.

Module 1: Unit 3, Numbers and Times

Practice Exercises
1(2) Numbers and Times: Exercise A
Write the time.
1. 10:45

ten forty-five or a quarter to eleven

2. 4:30

four thirty or half past four

3. 2:15

___________________________________________________________

4. 12:45

___________________________________________________________

5. 4:20

___________________________________________________________

6. 6:40

___________________________________________________________

7. 7:05

___________________________________________________________

8. ____________________________________________________

9. ____________________________________________________

10. ____________________________________________________

37

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
1(2) Numbers and Times: Exercise B
Write the number.
Example: one thousand two hundred and fifty

1,250

1. fifty eight

_______________________

2. one hundred twenty seven

_______________________

3. five hundred thirty six

_______________________

4. one thousand and one

_______________________

5. one thousand and ten

_______________________

6. one thousand one hundred

_______________________

7. two thousand two hundred and fifteen

_______________________

8. nineteen thousand and ten

_______________________

9. a hundred and twenty five thousand one hundred

_______________________

10. one million, one hundred thousand, one hundred

_______________________

Make the correct match from the box on the right.


Example: __a___ five times ten
1. ______ six plus eight

a) 5 x 10

g) $8.50

2. ______ fifteen divided by three

b) $1.25

h) 6 + 8

3. ______ five dollars

c) $2.50

i) 15 - 3

4. ______ a dollar and a quarter

d) 15 / 3

j) $0.35

5. ______ two and a half dollars

e) $5.00

k) 8 x 6

6. ______ fifteen minus three

f) 8 - 6

l) 15 + 3

7. ______ eight times six


8. ______ eight dollars and fifty cents
9. ______ thirty five cents
10. ______ fifteen and three

38

Module 1: Unit 4, Review Exercises

4. Review Exercises for Module 1


When Units 1-3 are completed, it is important to review the main points even while beginning to work on Module
2. The following lessons help students refocus on some of the main language points that are covered and included
in the Mastery Tests. These lessons should be done on a frequent basis.

Dictations
Dictations focus on important language at the word and phrase level. Detailed instructions for doing the
dictations can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help screens (This Lesson) when you enter
the lesson. The Dictations for Module 1 are as follows:
Dictation 1

Dictation 4

1.
2.
3.
4.

1.
2.
3.
4.

Hello, my name is Kathy.


I come from New York.
Kathy comes from New York.
She doesnt come from France. Shes American, not
French.

Richard is a teacher.
He teaches science and math.
He and his wife have a child, a son.
Their child, a boy, is five years old.

Dictation 5
Dictation 2

1.
2.
3.
4.

1. Max comes from San Francisco, and Kathy is from New


York.
2. They dont come from France.
3. Thats right. Kathy and I are not from France.
4. Pierre is the one who comes from France.

Sara is a doctor. Shes twenty-eight years old.


Shes a good doctor, and she works hard.
She lives in an expensive apartment.
Her apartment is large and comfortable.

Dictation 6
1.
2.
3.
4.

Dictation 3
1. In these two countries, people speak English.
2. In France, French people speak French.
3. Kathy speaks English and Spanish, but she doesnt speak
French.
4. I speak two languages: English and Spanish.

Henry is a businessman. Hes thirty-five years old.


His parents have a lot of money.
He doesnt work hard, but he has lots of money.
He has a large house. Its a very expensive house.

Fill-Ins
This lesson reviews some of the main grammar points that have been introduced in Units 1-3. Detailed
instructions for doing the Fill-Ins (with Speech Recognition) can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help screens (This Lesson) once you are in the Fill-Ins lesson. Please note that the highlighted words
in the answer sentences are linked to the Glossary. Sample sentences from the Fill-Ins lesson are:
(1) Where do you come from, Max? (2) Where are you from, Max? (3) He comes from Paris, France. (5) He
doesnt come from the United States. (6) He isnt from the United States. (7) I come from Paris, France. (9)
They dont come from France. (11) I dont come from Paris. (13) Where are Max and Kathy from? (15) In
these two countries people speak English. (17) This man speaks French, but he doesnt speak Japanese. (19) He
and his wife have a child, a son. (21) She works in a large hospital. (23) She lives with her younger sister, Chris.
(25) Her younger sister, Chris, lives with her. (26) Unfortunately, she doesnt like him. (27) He likes a woman
named Chris. (28) His parents have a lot of money.

39

New Dynamic English

Speech Practice
In addition to developing oral fluency, this lesson provides a means to review and focus attention on many of the
key language points developed in Units 1-3, such as pronouns, subject-verb agreement, and present tense verbs.
Detailed instructions for using Speech Recognition and for doing the Speech Practice lesson can be found in the
Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help screens.
The Speech Practice lesson has four sections: Sentence Reading, Answering Questions, Sentence Repetition and
Speech Quiz. Please note that the Score for the Speech Quiz is designed so that students can try to increase their
personal scores each time they do the quiz, rather than as a test. A record of each score can be found in the
Student Records.

5. Video Interactions, Module 1


This lesson shows a variety of native speakers in the following
situations: Introductions, At a Party, At an Office, Telephone,
Interview, and Hot Seats. Except for the Hot Seats, students may
view each scene in a presentation mode. Lessons marked with
an SR also have an interactive mode where students can interact
with the characters through Speech Recognition (or mouse click)
choices. In the Hot Seats, the characters answer questions put to
them by the students.
Detailed instructions for this lesson, and also for Speech Recognition, can be found in the Study Guides and also
in the pull-down Help screens after you enter the lesson.
Each video scene illustrates language points that have been developed in this module. The scenes have been
designed so that they can be role-played by students. This is an excellent way to review, have fun, and
personalize the language.
Introductions

Telephone (Key Expressions) w/SR

Hi, Im Kathy. Its nice to meet you, Hugh.


Im Kathy, and this is Sandra. Hello. Its nice to meet you.
And whats your name? My names Hubert. What? Could
you say that again, please?
What are you studying? Im studying acting.
Acting? Yeah, you know. I want to be a movie star.
Really! That sounds interesting.
It is, but its difficult. I dont earn much money.
Thats too bad. But you enjoy it, dont you?
Yeah, I do!

May I speak to Carmen please? Carmen? Sorry, theres no


Carmen here. You have the wrong number.
Hello. Is Bob there? Sure. Just a minute please. May I
have your name please? Yes, my name is Dawn.
May I speak to Bob please? Im sorry. Hes not here right
now. Do you want to leave a message? Yes, please.
This is Michelle. Bob isnt here. Could I have your name,
please? Yes, my name is Dawn. And your telephone
number? My number is 989-5003. Okay, Ill give him
the message. Thank you. Youre welcome.

At a Party

Interview w/SR

Whos he? Thats John. Hes Canadian.


Wheres she from? Oh, shes from Brazil, and hes from
Thailand. Does she speak French? No, she doesnt, but she
speaks English. Whats his nationality? I think hes Italian
or Spanish, but Im not sure. Whats his name? Sorry, I
dont know his name.

And how about children? Do you have any children?


Yes, I have two children. How about you?
No, I dont have any children, but I have a cat.
A cat, huh? And whats its name?
Its name is Spock.
Thats an interesting name for a cat.
And how old are your children?
I have a daughter, seven, and a son, four.

At an Office
Your name, please. And how do you spell that? Telephone
number? I dont have a telephone. No telephone? Where
can we reach you? You can leave a message for me at this
number. Okay. 344-7169. Yes, thats right.

40

Module 1: Unit 5, Video Interactions

Hot Seats w/SR


Whats your name? Whats my name? My name is
Where do you come from? Where do I come from?
Who are you? Who am I?
What languages do you speak? What languages do I speak?
What do you do? What do I do?
Are you married? Am I married?
How old are you? How old am I?
Do you have a boyfriend? Do I have a boyfriend?
Do you know Carmen Randall? Do I know Carmen
Randall? Yes, I do.

41

New Dynamic English

Module Summary - Dynamic English, Module 1


Active vocabulary through Module 1: approximately 250 words

Summary of Verbs in each unit (not including Video Interactions)


(1) Names and Places

(2) Jobs and Family

be (am, is, are)


do (auxiliary)
come(s) from
speak(s)

be (am, is, are)


have
like
live
love
practice
teach
want
work
write

42

Module 2, Lesson Map

Module 2 Lesson Map


Unit 1: Family Schedule
The Harris Family
Bob and Sandras Schedule
Collette and Johns Schedules
Questions
Focus Exercises

Unit 2: Matrix Vocabulary and Matrix Game


The Seasons
The Times of Day
Weather
The Times of Life
Types of People

Unit 3: Likes and Dislikes


A Survey: Food and Sports
What Can You Do?
Video Hotseats w/SR

Unit 4: Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Speech Quiz

Unit 5: Video Interactions w/SR


Telephone: Lets Meet on Thursday
Business Telephone
An Interview
Hot Seats w/SR

43

New Dynamic English

1. Family Schedule
The Harris Family; Bob and Sandras Schedules; Collette and Johns Schedules;
Questions; and Focus Exercises
This unit introduces the basic concepts and language structures that are the foundation for Levels 2
and 3. The focus is on specific times, days of the week, habitual, daily activities, means (how things
are done), frequency (how often), and duration (how long something takes). The structures and
vocabulary necessary to express these concepts are fundamental and will be further reinforced and
developed throughout the course.
In these lessons, students learn to understand and express information
related to their daily lives -- in particular their daily schedules. By the
end of this unit, students should be able to describe their daily and
weekly routines. They should also be able to ask and answer questions
about when, how, how long and how often activities take place.
In the Focus Exercises lesson, students practice arranging words into the
correct order to answer questions about the four characters in this unit.

Goals
To be able to understand and express a point in time, means, frequency, and duration of events.
To be able to understand, express, and ask about a typical daily and weekly schedule.
Objective 1: To be able to understand and use adverb and prepositional phrases to express points in
time, frequency and duration.
Objective 2: To be able to understand and differentiate between a period of time (how long does it
take) and a point of time (when does it happen).
Objective 3: To be able to understand and use common verbs to talk about routine activities.
Objective 4: To be able to understand and express before/after sequences, including the use of
gerunds, such as After eating dinner...

44

Module 2: Unit 1, Family Schedule

Learning Points
adverbs of frequency, adverb phrases
(usually, never, every, sometimes, after )
He never watches TV. He usually reads the newspaper after dinner. She usually goes to bed at around 11:00.
Sometimes he dreams about the Olympics. After dinner, Bob reads the newspaper. On other days, she comes
home after school.
days of the week
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday
duration, it takes + duration
(it takes, it lasts, for an hour, from 6:00 until 8:00)
She practices the violin for about an hour. It takes an hour for him to get to work. She teaches from 2:30 to
4:30.
family relationships
husband, wife, sister, brother, father, mother, son, daughter
frequency
five days a week; once a week; usually; each day; on Mondays; every day; in the evenings
means
by car; by motorcycle; by bus, how does he get to work? He usually drives his car to work. She goes to school
by bus
prepositions
of place: at the post office; at her home; in her home, at school
of time: at 6:45; at around 7:00; in the morning/evening; for two hours; from 2:30 to 4:30
of direction: to work; to school; (listen) to music
present simple, daily activities
work; get up; start; eat; leave; drive; take; get; watch; listen; read; go; practice, change; teach; give; begin; end;
last; study; finish. In the evenings, she studies. She does homework She practices the violin for about an
hour
questions:
about time: How long...? When...? What time does he...?
about means: How? How does he get to work?
about duration: How long does it take for her to get to school?
time expressions, phrases
in the morning; at night; at 6:45; between 6:45 and 7:00; after dinner; after reading the newspaper; each day;
someday; on Mondays; from 6:00 until 8:00; after he gets up, on other days
sequence
after; before; until; first; then; after dinner; after that; until 4:30
subject/verb/object pattern
He drives his car to work. Bob reads the newspaper. They eat dinner at around 7:00. She practices the violin.

45

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Go through The Harris Family lesson in class. Put a family tree on the board and go over the vocabulary for
family relationships.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice talking about their immediate family: how many are in their
family, the relationships, where everyone lives and where each side of the family comes from.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Focus on the days of the week and a typical weekly schedule. Then introduce the first part of Bob and
Sandras Schedules. Go over some of the comprehension questions with the class. Have students work in
small groups to talk about their weekly schedules, what they do on the weekends, what they do each day of
the week.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Skim through Bob and Sandras Schedules, focusing on time expressions. Write the expressions on the
board. Have students work in groups to practice using the time expressions and talking about their daily
schedules, from morning through night.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice
Focus on means (how something is done) and duration (how long it takes). Skim through Collette and
Johns Schedules, and focus on how, how long, and how often. Have students work in pairs to practice
asking and answering questions about their daily and weekly schedules.
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 and Listening Focus 5 in the lab or at home.

Follow-up
Once the presentation lessons of the unit have been completed, have the students complete the Questions and
Focus Exercise lessons. As homework, assign the Practice Exercises. Have students take the Mastery
Test when they have a Completion Percentage of more than 80%.

Language Extension
Classroom Activity 1: Family Trees
Ask students about the relationships of the Harris family, or any well-known family, and create a family tree
on the board. Add extended family members such as grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, in-laws. Have
students give the extended family members names and practice pronunciation with the possessive form, e.g.,
John's cousin's name is Sam. Then ask students to make a family tree for their own family which includes as
many extended family members as possible. Have them talk about their family to a partner or to the whole
class.

46

Module 2: Unit 1, Family Schedule

Classroom Activity 2: Busy Days


Elicit from the students daily activities such as get up, eat breakfast, go to work or school, have a coffee
break, etc. Have students write sentences stating what time they perform each of the activities on the list.
Classroom Activity 3: Scrambled Schedules
Using sentences from the unit (see Key Sentences), prepare index cards with parts of sentences. One card
should have the subject and activity. A second card should have the means, duration, or time the character
performs the activity, e.g., Sandra teaches (one card) at 2:30 or from 2:30 to 4:30. (second card) Divide
the class into small groups, and pass the cards out to each group so that none of the cards match for each
group. Then, in a rotating fashion, have each group ask a question to find a match from the other groups. If
theres a match, both the team that asks and the team that answers get a point. For example: When does
Sandra teach? or What happens from 2:30 to 4:30? If theres more than one match for a question, only
the team that answers first gets the point.
Classroom Activity 4: Weekly Schedules
Have students keep a record of their schedules for one week in chart form. Instruct students to exchange
their charts with a partner. Then have each student write about his or her partner's schedule based on the
information in the chart. Encourage students to use words such as usually, often, always, once a week, after
and before.

47

New Dynamic English

an hour. On other days, she comes home after


school. She practices the violin for about an hour.
She usually does homework for about two and a half
hours, from 7:45 to around 10:15.

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)


The Harris Family
This is the Harris family. The Harris family is a
family of four. Bob and Sandra Harris are married.
They have two children. Their daughter's name is
Collette. Their son's name is John.

After finishing her homework she takes a bath. She


usually goes to bed around 11:00.
John is a high school student. He is two years
younger than his sister, Collette. She is eighteen. He
is sixteen.

Bob: My wife's name is Sandra. Our daughter's


name is Collette.
Sandra: My husband's name is Bob. Our son's
name is John. His sister's name is Collette.

John is interested in gymnastics. He practices every


day. He gets up at 6:15 every morning. Then he
takes a shower. He eats breakfast with his family at
7:15. He leaves for school at 7:30. He drives to
school on his motorbike. It takes about fifteen
minutes to get to school. From 8:00 until 8:30 he
practices gymnastics at school. His classes start at
8:45.

Collette is John's sister. Her brother's name is John.


John's father is Bob. His mother is Sandra.
Bob and Sandras Schedules
Bob works at the post office. He works five days a
week: Monday through Friday. He gets up at 6:45.
He eats breakfast at 7:15. He leaves for work at 7:45.
He usually drives to work. It takes an hour to get to
work.

After school John practices gymnastics until 5:00.


He gets home about 6:00. After dinner he studies
hard. He goes to bed between 10:30 and 11:00.
Sometimes he dreams about the Olympics. He wants
to win a gold medal. Someday he wants to be a
gymnastics coach.

He comes home around 6:30 in the evening. They


eat dinner at around 7:00. He usually reads the
newspaper after dinner. After reading the newspaper
he watches TV. If the TV is boring, he reads a book
or listens to music. He goes to bed at 11:00.

Questions
Who is John's father? Who is Bob's wife? Who is
John and Collette's mother?
How many children do the Harrises have?
When does (Bob) get up? When does he eat
breakfast? When does he leave for work?
How does he get to work? How long does it take to
get to work?
What time does he usually get home? When does he
go to bed?
Is (Sandra's) schedule the same every day? Does she
give lessons in her home?
What day of the week does she teach? Does she give
lessons in the morning?
What time does she start to teach? What time does
she stop teaching?
Does (Collette) walk to school? When does she
usually take a bus?
What does she usually do after she comes home from
school?
Is her violin lesson on Tuesdays or Thursdays? How
long does her lesson usually last?
What time does her lesson finish? What does she do
after she studies?

Sandra is a music teacher. She's a piano teacher. Her


schedule changes each day. She teaches piano three
days a week: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.
On Mondays, she teaches from 2:30 until 4:30. On
Wednesdays, she teaches from 3:00 until 6:00. She
teaches for two and a half hours on Thursday
evenings. On Thursdays, she doesn't finish teaching
until 10:00. She teaches at her home. Some of her
students are very good. Some of her students are not
very good.
Collette and Johns Schedules
Collette is a student. She goes to high school. She
gets up every morning at 6:30. She eats breakfast
with her family at 7:15. She leaves for school at
8:00. She goes to school by bus. It takes about
twenty minutes to get to school. Her school starts at
8:45.
After school she usually comes home and practices
the violin. Once a week she has a violin lesson. Her
lesson is at 4:30 on Tuesday afternoons. It lasts for
48

Module 2: Unit 1, Family Schedule

How old is John? What does he do after he gets up?


What does he do from 8:00 until 8:30?
What happens between 10:30 and 11:00?
Who goes to school by bus?
Focus Exercises
They [have] two [children].
Their [mother] [is] Sandra.
He [gets up] [at] 6:45.
He [eats] [breakfast] [at] 7:15.
She [leaves] [for] school [at] 8:00.
She [goes] [to] school [by] [bus].
It [takes] an [hour] for [him] to [get] [to] the post
office.
It [takes] about twenty minutes to [get] [to] school.
She [teaches] [in] the evening [on] Thursdays.
On Wednesdays, [she] [teaches] [from] 3:00 [until]
6:00.
On Thursdays she [teaches] [in] the [evening] [from]
7:30 [until] 10:00.
Her lesson is [at] 4:30 [on] Tuesday afternoons.
It [lasts] [for] an [hour.]
Her lesson [starts] [at] 4:30 and [finishes] around
5:30.
After [finishing] her [homework] she [takes] a [bath.]
After [school] John [practices] gymnastics [until]
5:00.
He [goes] to [bed] [between] 10:30 and 11:00.
She [does] homework [from] 7:45 [to] around 10:15.
If the TV [isnt] interesting, he [reads] a book or
[listens] to [music.]
After [that] he [usually] [watches] television.

49

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening
Student Follow-up
1. Write a 3rd person narrative (Bob gets up at, he eats
breakfast) that summarizes Bobs schedule. Then
write the narrative in the 1st person (I get up at)
2. Do Exercises B and C.

Focus 1
Focus on The Harris Family lesson first. Then click on
Bob.

Language Focus
family relationships, Bobs daily schedule

Focus 3

Listening Task

Review Bob and Sandras Schedules. Then focus on


Collette and Johns Schedules.

Find out how many people are in the Harris family. What
are their names? How many children do the Harrises
have? What are their relationships? What does Bob do?

Language Focus
days of the week, frequency, and time expressions

Goals
Students will be able to repeat basic sentences about

Listening Task
Focus on Sandra and Collette. Practice saying sentences
that describe their weekly schedules.

the Harris family and their relationships.


Students will be able to use possessives to talk about
family relationships.
Students will be able to answer questions about Bobs
daily schedule: Where does Bob work? What time
does he get up in the morning?

Goals
Students will be able to present Sandra and Collettes
weekly schedules. Sandra is a piano teacher. Her
schedule changes every day.
Students will be able to answer questions such as
"When does Sandra teach?" in terms of frequency and
point of time: She teaches three days a week. She
teaches on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Student Follow-up
1. In a paragraph, introduce the Harris family. Then, in a
second paragraph, introduce your own family.
My family is a family of five. My fathers name is ,
and my mothers name . I have a sister, and a
brother. My sisters name is, and my brothers name
is
2. Do Practice Exercise A.

Student Follow-up
1. In an oral or written narrative present Sandras weekly
schedule in both 3rd person and 1st person.
2. Compare Sandra and Bobs schedule: Sandra teaches
three days a week. Bob works five days a week.
Sandra teaches at home. Bob works at the post office.

Focus 2
Focus on Bob and Sandras Schedules.

Focus 4

Language Focus

Review Bob and Sandras Schedules and Collette and


Johns Schedule. Use the ABC button to check the text
and study the Glossary. Use the voice record feature to
practice saying the longer sentences.

present simple, time expressions, prepositions of time

Listening Task
Practice saying the sentences that give a time: He gets up
at 6:45. He eats breakfast at 7:15. He leaves for work at
7:45.

Language Focus
duration and means

Goals
Students will be able to present Bob and Sandras

Listening Task
Focus on how something is done, and how long something
lasts: She goes to school by bus. It takes twenty minutes.

schedules.
Students will be able to use time phrases to ask and
answer questions about Bob and Sandras schedules.

50

Module 2: Unit 1, Family Schedule

Goals
Students will be able to talk about schedules in terms

Focus 6

of frequency, means, and duration.


Students will be able to answer questions about means
and duration: How long does it take Bob to get to
work? How long does Sandra teach on Mondays?
How does John get to school?

Do the Focus Exercises lesson.

Goal
Students will be able to understand and construct
sentences which include time phrases.

Student Follow-up
Student Follow-up

1. Present your weekly schedule.


2. Interview a classmate about their weekly schedule.

Make a list of all the time expressions you have learned


in this unit. Write a sentence for each.

Focus 5

Focus 7

Review Bob and Sandras Schedules and Collette and


Johns Schedules. Then focus on the Questions lesson.

Language Focus
Language Mastery

Language Focus

Listening Task

adverbs of frequency, sequence, Wh-, How, and How long


questions.

Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.


Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently.

Listening Task
Listen for words like after and before and practice saying
the sentences that express sequence:
After school he practices gymnastics. After dinner he
usually reads the newspaper.

Do Focus Exercise lessons everyday until your Completion


Percentage is 80-100%. Then take the Mastery Test.

Student Follow-up

Goals
Students will be able to use words like after and before

to express a sequence of events. After studying, she


takes a bath.
Students will be able to talk about their own daily
schedules.

Student Follow-up
1. Present your daily schedule for a typical day.
2. Interview two classmates or friends about their daily
schedules.
3. Write two sentences with after and before to present a
sequence of events in your daily schedule.
4. Do Practice Exercises D and E.

51

Make a short oral summary of this unit.


Give a one-minute oral presentation of your daily and
weekly routines.
Write a two-paragraph description of your daily and
weekly routines.

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

2(2) Family Schedule: Exercise A

Bob

Sandra

Collette

John

Match the names on the left with the descriptions on the right.
Example: b. Sandra

Collette's mother

Bob's wife
1. _____ Sandra's husband
2. _____ Collette's brother
3. _____ John's father

a. Bob Harris

4. _____ Bob and Sandra's daughter

b. Sandra Harris

5. _____ Bob's wife

c. John Harris

6. _____ John's sister

d. Collette Harris

7. _____ Sandra's kids


8. _____ John and Collette's parents

e. Bob and Sandra


f. John and Collette

9. _____ Sandra's daughter


10. _____ a post office worker
11. _____ a music teacher
12. _____ a female high school student
13. _____ a male high school student
14. _____ the post office workers son
15. _____ the music teachers daughter

52

Module 2: Unit 1, Family Schedule

Practice Exercises
2(1) Family Schedule: Exercise B
Read the paragraph about Bob Harris. Fill in the blanks using these words.
comes
drives
Example:

eats
gets up

leaves
works

Bob eats breakfast with his family.

Bob _____________ at 6:45. He _____________ breakfast at 7:15. He _____________ for work


at 7:45. He usually _____________ his car to work. He _____________ at the post office. He
_____________ until 5:30. Then he _____________ home and _____________ dinner with his
family.

2(1) Family Schedule: Exercise C


Make a sentence with these words.
Example:
breakfast / eats / Bob / at / 7:15. Bob eats breakfast at 7:15.

1. dinner / around / They / at / eat / 7:30


__________________________________________________________________________________

2. dinner / television / After / usually / watches / he


__________________________________________________________________________________

3. newspaper / He / reads / dinner / after / usually / the


__________________________________________________________________________________

4. an hour / to work / It / to get / takes


__________________________________________________________________________________

5. leaves / He / work / for / at / 7:45


__________________________________________________________________________________

53

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
2(1) Family Schedule: Exercise D
Circle the correct word.
Example: Collette practices the violin for, until about an hour.
1. Her school starts

at, for 8:45.

2. She does homework for, from 7:45 to around 10:15.


3. She does homework for, from about two hours.
4. She usually goes to bed around , until 11:00.
5. On Wednesdays, Sandra teaches from 3:00 at, until 6:00.
6. On Thursdays, she teaches in the evening at, from 7:30 until 10:00.

2(1) Family Schedule: Exercise E


Put the sentences below in the right order. Number them 1, 2, 3, etc.

a. ______ He eats dinner around 7:00.


b. ______ Then he comes home.
c. ______ Before class, he practices gymnastics at school.
d. ______ He leaves for school at 7:30.
e. ______ After dinner he studies hard.
f. ______ John gets up at 6:15 every morning.
g. ______ After school John practices gymnastics until 5:00.
h. ______ He drives to school on his motorbike.
i. ______ After getting up, he takes a shower and eats breakfast with his family.
j ______ His classes start at 8:45.

54

Module 2: Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Seasons; Times of Day; Weather Conditions; Times of Life; and Types of People
This unit introduces key vocabulary in five subject areas that affect our lives and the world we live in.
It is important to extend the vocabulary in this unit and to point out differences related to different
cultures and regions of the world. For example, in Tropical countries, the lack of a winter and the
importance of rainy seasons and dry seasons should be added. This adds interest and relevance to
the lessons. The Classroom Activities for this unit will provide a systematic way to further develop
the vocabulary and basic fluency.
The first category, Seasons, focuses on the four classic seasons
of the year and their characteristics, such as hot and cold. By
introducing vocabulary in sets, students are able to associate
words in natural ways. This helps them remember and use the
words in meaningful ways.
In each of the other four categories, a set of four examples is
introduced, such as four types of weather. These should be
added to, along with additional vocabulary once the basic
vocabulary is mastered.
Once the language of each category has been studied, students will enjoy the Matrix Game, which
gives them an enjoyable way to test themselves and see how high they can score. This activity helps
to review and reinforce the language. This kind of repetitive exposure to the language is vital to
increasing language proficiency. See the Classroom Activities for more ideas.
Goals:
To be able to talk about and describe the seasons of the year.
To be able to talk about and describe the times of day.
To be able to talk about and describe typical weather conditions.
To be able to talk about and describe people and their basic life cycle.
Objective 1: To build sentence complexity through the use of adjective, adverb, and noun phrases.
Objective 2: To improve the learning of vocabulary by helping students organize words into natural
sets of words that provide a framework for memory.

55

New Dynamic English

Learning Points
adjectives
sunny; warm; cold; cool; cloudy; long; tall; short; thin; the best; beautiful; good; bad; young; old
adverb phrases
when flowers bloom; when it's raining; in autumn; at birth; after summer; before winter; in the first
years after birth
amount/quantification (most, many, some, lots)
a balloon, most people, many people, some types of people; many men and women; most adults
classification
here are the times of; here are four types of; here are some types of; These are the seasons. This is the
coldest time of the year.
describing conditions its + adj.
its cold, its hot, its raining its 3 a.m., Does it ever rain in your country? Its time to sleep.
indefinite/definite reference
the time; a time; an umbrella; other interests; another place; the hottest time of year; the last years; a
good time; a boy and a girl; the man on the left; a cloudy sky; this kind of weather
logical relations
Hot is to summer as cold is to winter. What season comes after summer and before winter? In winter the
sun sets early, so the daytime is short.
word relations
hot/cold; tall/short; cool/warm/hot; Hot is to summer as cold is to what? Boy is to girl as man is to
woman.

56

Module 2: Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Introduce the Seasons lesson in class, focusing on the vocabulary. Note how adjective and adverb phrases
are used to describe summer and winter. Besides the four seasons in this lesson, what other seasons are
there? Examples: rainy season, dry season. Then make a list of the months of the year and indicate when
each of the seasons begins and ends.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students review the basic information for each of the four seasons. Then write
a season on the board and ask students to brainstorm on a sheet of paper all the activities, clothes, feelings,
and descriptive words they associate with that season. Tell them to write as many things as they can in two
to three minutes. Ask students to share their entries and write all words or phrases on the board. Do the
same with the other three seasons. Ask students to write about their favorite season and their least favorite
season using the words and phrases on the board. Then ask students to describe the seasons in their country
or area.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 and Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Briefly introduce the Times of the Day lesson. Point out how most and many are used to qualify statements
such as Most people wake up in the morning. What happens to the meaning when you substitute other
words, such as all, almost all, everyone, some, nobody, etc.? Then, in pairs or small groups have students
take turns describing how their lives change according to the time of day. What is their favorite time of day?
Which students are morning people, and which students are night owls?
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice:
Briefly review the Weather lesson. Put a list of weather related vocabulary on the blackboard, such as
hurricane, storm, partly cloudy, thunder, lightning and related adjectives, such as warm, cool, wet, humid,
etc. Note how the construction, it is + adjective is often used to describe the state or condition of things.
Have students work in pairs or small groups to make sentences for each of the words on the list and interview
each other about the weather conditions in their country or city.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Focus 4 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice:
Briefly introduce the Times of Life and Types of People lessons. Make a list of other ways to describe the
periods in our lives, such as the teen age years, young adulthood, and middle-age. How do people change
during their lives? What are the greatest dangers and advantages for each period of life? In pairs, have
students practice describing the times of life.
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Focus 5 in the lab or at home, followed by the Matrix Game.

Follow-up
Once the lessons of the unit have been completed, assign the Practice Exercises and prepare for a version of
the Matrix Game to be played in class. See the Classroom Activities below.

57

New Dynamic English

Language Extension
Once the unit is mastered, have the students complete two or more of the following assignments, which are
important for vocabulary development and language mastery.
Classroom Activity 1: Posters and Pictures
Divide the class into five groups and assign each group one of the matrix vocabulary categories: Seasons,
Times of Day, Weather Conditions, Times of Life, People. Ask the group to create a poster or drawing, or
find pictures which represent various examples of that category. Have each group make a short presentation
describing the details of their examples.
Classroom Activity 2: Vocabulary Charades or Questions
Using the Key Sentences as a reference, write the key vocabulary words on index cards - one word per card.
Put the cards face down in a box or bag. Divide the class into two or three teams. One member of a team
picks a card and must use non-verbal clues to help the team guess the word. Example: night Student
pretends to be sleeping; summer Student pretends to be swimming. Give each team 15 to 30 seconds to
guess the word. If the team guesses the word, they keep the card. If the team does not guess the word, the
student returns the card to the box and the other team takes a turn. The first team to win 10 cards wins.
A more difficult variation is to have the student with the card answer Yes/No questions from their team. The
team must guess the word within one minute. Example: Is it a season or type of weather? No? Is it a time
of life or time of day? Is it a time of day? Is it early in the day? Is it morning? Is it sunrise? etc.
Classroom Activity 3: Weather News from around the World
Divide the class into groups of three or four. Instruct each group to prepare a television newscast from a
different city in your country. If possible, choose cities that would have very different weather conditions
such as Miami, New York City, Paris, Sydney, etc. Each group is to prepare two reports, using information
from the news or internet as sources for their information:
A. A feature story describing what one can do in that city in certain seasons or at certain times of the
day.
B. A weather report for today.

Classroom Activity 4: Matrix Game


In this activity, divide the class into two or three groups. Make a list of 30-40 questions and answers from
the unit. Then read a question to one of the teams and ask them to answer it in a complete sentence. For
example: What is the hottest time of the year? The hottest season of the year is summer.
This activity can also be done in a spelling bee format, where individual students are given the questions and
must give the answer or sit down. The last person standing is the winner. If the class is very large, each
group may nominate five students to represent them.
Classroom Activity 5: Whats the Question?
In this more difficult activity, divide the class into two or three groups. Make a list of 30 questions and
answers from the unit. Then read an answer to one of the teams and ask them to ask a question which it
answers. For example: My favorite season is spring? A correct question would be: Whats your favorite
season? Another example: People go to school when they are children. When do people usually go to
school?
This activity can also be done in a spelling bee format, where individual students are given the answers and
must give the question. If they miss, they sit down. The last person standing is the winner. If the class is
very large, each group may nominate five students to represent them.

58

Module 2: Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Night: It's time to sleep. Don't work too late. The


sun is gone, and people are sleeping. We can see
many stars in the sky at night.

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)


Seasons
These are the seasons of the year.

Weather Conditions

Spring: This is the time when flowers bloom. This


is the season of birth and growing. This is the time
when flowers bloom. Spring is the season when trees
turn green. Spring comes after winter and before
summer. My favorite season is spring.

Here are four types of weather: sunny, cloudy, rainy,


and snowy.

Summer: Summer is the hottest time of the year. In


summer the days are long and the nights are short.
Summer is the best time to go swimming. In summer
the sun sets late, so the daytime is long.

Cloudy: Cloudy days are usually cool. The sun is


behind the clouds. A cloudy sky is sometimes
beautiful.

Sunny: Sunny days are warm. The sun is shining.


This kind of weather is good for a picnic.

Rainy: It's raining. Rainy weather is bad for picnics.


When it's raining you need an umbrella. It's raining. I
love the sound of falling rain. Rainy days are usually
cold, but sometimes they are not.

Autumn: In autumn the leaves begin to fall. Another


name for autumn is fall. This is the season when
leaves turn many colors. This is the season between
summer and winter. Autumn comes after summer and
before winter. My favorite time of the year is
autumn.

Snowy: Snowy weather is cold. The air is cold and


quiet. Everything is turning white. When it's
snowing, you need a warm coat. It snows in my
country too, especially in the mountains. Snowy
days are always cold, because snow is never warm.

Winter: This is the coldest season of the year.


Winter is the coldest time of year. Be careful. Don't
catch cold. Hot is to summer as cold is to winter. In
winter the sun sets early, so the daytime is short. The
best time to go skiing is in winter when there's lots of
snow.

Times of Life
These are the times of life: birth, childhood,
adulthood, and old age.

Times of Day

Birth: Our lives begin at birth. Babies are small and


cute. In the first years after birth, we learn to walk
and talk.

Here are the times of day: morning, afternoon,


evening, and night.

Childhood: Children go to school. When we are


children we go to school. Childhood is when we
learn to read and write.

Morning: The day begins. This is when the sun rises


and birds begin to sing. People get up and go to work
in the morning. Morning is the first part of the day.
It's 6 a.m. and people are eating breakfast. Most
people wake up in the morning. The sun rises in the
morning and sets in the evening.

Adulthood: Most adults get married and have


children. Many men and women work hard and have
a career. Boy is to girl as man is to woman.

Afternoon: The sun is high in the sky in the


afternoon. Many people are at work in the afternoon.
Afternoon is between midday and sunset.
It's 3 p.m. and the sun is up.

Old age: This is a good time for hobbies and other


interests. These are the last years of our lives. Old
people have lots of experience. When we are old, we
can enjoy the last years of a long life.

Evening: The sun goes down in the evening. This is


when the sun sets and the sky is beautiful. People
leave work and return home in the evening. Offices
are closing and many people are going home from
work. It's 6 p.m. and people are going home.

People
Here are some types of people: two children, two
men, an old man, and a woman.
Children: Here are two children, a boy and a girl.
This child is a boy, and this child is a girl. The boy
has a balloon, but the little girl doesn't.

59

New Dynamic English

Which child doesnt have a balloon?


Is the child with the balloon a girl?
Who is playing the violin?
Which old man doesnt have a beard?

Two men: This man is tall, and this man is short.


The man on the left is thin, and the man on the right
is fat.
Old man: This old man has gray hair. This old man
has a long gray beard. This man is very old. He is
eighty-six years old.
Young woman: She is playing a violin. This young
woman is a violinist.
Questions
Which season is the hottest/coldest?
When is the best time to go swimming/skiing?
Which season is spring?
What season comes after summer and before winter?
When do trees turn green?
When do leaves begin to fall?
When are the days long and the nights short?
Hot is to summer as cold is to what?
When does the sun rise?
When does the sun set?
When is the sun high in the sky?
When do most people sleep?
When do most people leave home for work?
The sun is gone, and people are sleeping. What time
of day is it?
It's 6 p.m. and people are going home. What time of
day is it?
I'm cold. Where is a coat?
It's raining. Where is an umbrella? Let's take a taxi.
Does it ever snow in your country?
Sometimes I see the sun. Sometimes I don't. What
kind of weather is it?
The air is cold and quiet. Everything is turning
white. What kind of weather is it?
Which is always cold, a rainy day or a snowy day?
When does life begin?
When does life usually end?
What comes after childhood and before old age?
When do people usually have children?
When do people learn to read and write?
When do people learn to walk and talk?
When do people usually have a job?
Which person is the oldest?
Which man has a long gray beard?
Which man is tall and thin?
Which man is short and fat?
Which child has a balloon?

60

Module 2: Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Student Follow-up

Focused Listening

1. Think of things which you do or that happen at various


times of the day, and make a list. Night: do
homework, sleep, watch TV, stars come out
2. Write the questions as the teacher dictates them: When
does the sun come up? When do people wake up?
Then write answers to the questions: Most people
wake up in the morning.
3. Ask a classmate questions about times of day: What is
your favorite time of day? Why? At what time of day
do you work best? Do you like to get up early? Do
you go to bed late?

Focus 1
Focus on the Seasons. Listen carefully to the basic
sentences about each season. Then use the Quiz button
and answer the questions. There is also new information
about the seasons in the Quiz, so listen carefully.

Language Focus
Listen for how each season is described. Make a note of
new vocabulary.

Listening Task

Focus 3

Focus on how the sequence of seasons is used to indicate a


season.
Spring comes before summer and after winter.

Focus on the Weather. Listen carefully to the basic


sentences about each type of weather. Then use the Quiz
button and answer the questions.

Goals
Students will be able to identify the four seasons.
Students will be able to describe the sequence of the

Language Focus
Note how it's is used to describe a condition, such as its
cold. In this case, it has no meaning, except to provide a
subject for the sentence.

seasons: Summer comes after spring and before


autumn.
They will be able to talk about and answer questions
about each season: Spring is when flowers bloom.
Autumn is when leaves fall.

Listening Task
Listen for and record sentences with its (It's raining) and
sentences with adjectives, such as cold or rainy.

Student Follow-up

Goals
Students will be familiar with weather vocabulary (hot,

1. Present a season: Autumn. This is the season between


summer and winter. The leaves turn colors.
2. Ask three classmates about their favorite season: What
is your favorite season? Why?
3. Does every country have four seasons? Why?

cold, rain, snow, cloudy, sunny).

Students will be able to use it is to describe weather


conditions.

Student Follow-up

Focus 2

1. Describe todays weather. It's cloudy and hot today.


2. Write three sentences about temperature or weather
using it's.
3. Listen to todays weather report on TV. Make a list of
new vocabulary words and look them up in a
dictionary.

Focus on the Times of Day. Listen carefully to the basic


sentences about each one. Then use the Quiz button and
answer the questions. Listen carefully, and check the
Glossary for more information.

Language Focus

Focus 4

Note the difference between most people, many people,


and people. How does the meaning change if we say all
people, or everyone/everybody? See the Glossary.

Focus on the Times of Life and Types of People. Listen


carefully to the basic sentences. Then use the Quiz button
and answer all the questions.

Listening Task
Listen for how each time of day is described. Listen for
the time expressions in each sentence.

Language Focus
Note how to use words like some, many and most to
qualify (or soften) a statement, such as Most adults get
married.

Goals
Students will learn the vocabulary associated with
times of day: (p.m., sky, sun, moon, stars, midday,
sunset, rise, come up, set, go down, begin, end, get up,
go to work, come home, sleep).
Students will be able to qualify statements with
quantifiers such as most, many, and some.

Listening Task
Practice saying and recording all the sentences that have
quantifiers or adjectives.

61

New Dynamic English

Goals
Students will be able to talk about and answer

Focus 6

questions about times of life: When do we learn to


walk? When do we learn to read?
Students will be able to talk about amount using some,
many, most, and lots: Most adults get married and
have children. Many men and women have a career.
Students will be able to give simple descriptions of
people.

Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times, on a
daily basis. Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time,
so that you can say these sentences fluently. When your
Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the Mastery Test.

Student Follow-up
1. Think of other times of life, e.g., adolescence, high
school, middle age. What do people do in each?
2. Make a list of activities for each time of life:
Childhood is when we play/grow, etc.
3. Answer questions about rites of passage/times of life:
When do people first...? At what age are people
considered to be adults in your culture?
4. Describe a classmate or a person in a picture from a
magazine or newspaper.
5. Make a list of other ways to describe people, such as
eye color, hair color, length of hair, hair style, etc.

Student Follow-up
1.
2.

Focus 5
Review all five lessons. Practice saying each sentence
until you can say each sentence with confidence. Then do
the Matrix Game.

Goal
Students will be able to use complete sentences to ask
and answer questions about all five categories.

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of additional questions and answers for all
the categories.
2. Make a list of 10 adjectives used in this unit and write
their opposites. Then write a sentence with each.
3. Write a poem about a season, a time of life or a time of
day.
4. Do the Crossword Puzzle.

62

Make a short oral summary of each category.


Write a one or two-paragraph summary of each
category.

Module 2: Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Practice Exercises
2(2) Matrix Vocabulary: Exercise A
Complete each sentence with the correct words or phrases from below.
1. Spring comes after winter and _________________.
2. Summer is ______________ time of the year.
3. The season with long nights and ______________ is winter.
4. Summer is _______________ to go swimming.
5. The sun rises early ________________.
6. Autumn is when the leaves begin _______________.
7. Winter nights are ____________________.
8. The season which comes ____________________ is autumn.
9. In winter, the sun __________________.
10. Spring comes before summer and summer ______________________ autumn.

(Words and phrases)

a) sets early

f) before winter

b) the best time

g) in the summer

c) long and cold

h) to fall

d) short days

i) comes before

e) before summer

j) the hottest

63

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
2(2) Matrix Vocabulary: Exercise B
Complete each sentence with the correct words or phrases from below.
1. The sun rises _____________________.
2. At noon, the sun is _________________.
3. Most people ____________________ in the morning.
4. Some people go to bed very late __________________.
5. The hottest time of the day is usually ____________________.
6. In the evening, most people ______________________ and have dinner.
7. We can usually see ____________________________ at night.
8. Schools usually start in the morning and ______________________ in the afternoon.
9. _________________________ open in the morning and close at night.
10. At night the sky is filled ______________________.

(Words and phrases)

a) with stars

f) the moon and stars

b) Most businesses

g) at night

c) in the morning

h) in the afternoon

d) high in the sky

i) return home

e) get up

j) finish

64

Module 2: Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Practice Exercises
2(2) Matrix Vocabulary: Exercise C
Complete each sentence with the correct words or phrases from below.

1. I need an umbrella because _____________________.


2. Its snowing, so ______________________ outside.
3. In hot, tropical countries _______________ snows.
4. In a hurricane, theres lots of _______________________.
5. Fine weather usually means _______________________.
6. In hot, tropical countries _______________________ rains.
7. A dark, gray sky means ________________________.
8. A bright, blue sky means ______________________ weather.
9. Desert countries dont get _________________________.
10. I need ______________________ because its cold outside.

(Words and phrases)

a) it often

f) it never

b) wind and rain

g) its cold

c) a coat

h) cloudy weather

d) much rain

i) sunny

e) its sunny weather

j) its raining

65

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
2(2) Matrix Vocabulary: Exercise D
Complete each sentence with the correct words or phrases from below.

1. A baby cant _____________________.


2. Almost all children _________________.
3. In some countries there are ____________________.
4. Some people live __________________.
5. Some people dont want ___________________________.
6. Children go to school to learn how to _____________________________.
7. Some adults dont have ____________________________.
8. When older people stop working, _________________________
9. Some people dont eat enough, so theyre _________________________.
10. Some people eat _____________, so theyre overweight.

(Words and phrases)

a) too much

f) walk or talk

b) too thin

g) they retire

c) attend school

h) a very long life

d) a good job

i) many old people

e) to marry

j) read and write

66

Module 2: Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Matrix Vocabulary Crossword


1

6
7
8
9
10

11

12
14

13

15

16

17
18

19

ACROSS
1. the season before winter
2. the opposite of thin
6. you can see them in the sky at night
7. in winter the nights are _____
8. it's high in the sky in the afternoon
10. when the sun rises
12. they are small and cute
14. a good time to make a snowman
16. we learn to do this in school
17. most people sleep at this time
18. opposite of fat is ______
19. at noon the sun is _____ in the sky

DOWN
1. the sun is high in the sky
2. leaves do this in autumn
3. people leave work and return home
4. not all
5. the season when flowers bloom
8. the days are long and hot
9. boy is to girl as man is to _____
11. summer is to hot as winter is to _____
13. this is when life begins
15. it falls from the sky

67

New Dynamic English

3. Likes and Dislikes


A Survey: Food and Sports, What Can You Do? and Video Hotseats
This unit completes the main focus of New Dynamic English, Level 1, which is to prepare
students to comprehend and express general information about themselves and their daily
lives.
In these lessons, Kathy interviews Max about his personal
preferences and abilities -- what kinds of food he likes, what
sports and hobbies he enjoys, and which activities he is good at.
The Video Hotseats gives students the chance to use Speech
Recognition to practice interacting with native speakers, who
answer questions about food and sports preferences.

Goals:
To be able to ask and answer questions about preferences and abilities.
To be able to ask and answer questions about proficiency or manner (how well), using adverbs of
manner.
To be able to conduct a simple survey to find out preferences and abilities.
Objective 1: To understand and express how things are classified and organized into general
categories, through the use of expressions such as What kind of and such as.
Objective 2: To understand how to use the modal can to express ability.
Objective 3: To understand how to use adverbs of manner to express degrees of proficiency, such as
fairly well, a little, and not very well.

68

Module 2: Unit 3, Likes and Dislikes

Learning Points
adverbs of manner
well; a little; fairly well; not at all; He can beat me easily.
amount/quantification (a lot, any, most, some)
most kinds of food; some people; any kinds of meat...? Do you practice a lot? Not so much.
ability, can/can't
Can you play tennis? Yes, I can. I cant play golf at all.
classification
such as; what kinds of? what other kinds? You mean food and hobbies, and things like that?
gerunds
playing tennis; losing, watching TV
questions
Can you...? Do you like...? How well can you...? Does he know how to ...?
useful phrases
You mean...? How about...? Well, let's see... For example... I mean... Yes, that's right. Not so much.
No, not really. I want to ask you a question.

69

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Introduction
Briefly introduce the lesson A Survey: Food and Sports. Then divide the board into three sections: Food,
Sports, and Hobbies/Games. Divide the class into three groups, assigning one category to each group.
Within a limited time (2-4 minutes) have each group brainstorm as many entries as possible for their
category and write the words on the board. Go over any new vocabulary.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In small groups, have students divide each of the three categories into subcategories, such as meat, fruit,
sweet, hot, Chinese, dessert, traditional sports, dangerous sports, difficult games, easy games, etc. Then have
students practice saying what they like or dont like about the items on their list, and also their favorites.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce the lesson What Can You Do? Focus on the meaning and differences between can and know how
to+V.
In pairs or small groups, have the students question each other, alternating between Can you...? and Do you
know how to...?
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice:
Briefly review What Can You Do, and focus on how well and the difference between adverbs and
adjectives to express ability. Show the scales of meaning on the board, from most negative (badly,
terrible) to most positive (very well, very good).
In pairs or small groups, have the students question each other, alternating between Can you...? and
Do you know how to...? and following up with How well do you ? or How good are you at?
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 and Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once all three lessons of this unit have been completed, assign the Practice Exercises and do one or more of
the Classroom Activities below. After the students get a Completion Percentage of 80-100%, have them
take the Mastery Test.

Language Extension
Classroom Activity 1: Classification Race
Pick three or four subjects, such as types of music, types of cars, types of clothes, fruits and vegetables, and
sports played with a ball, etc. Divide the class into three or four groups and have each group brainstorm as
many entries as possible for one category. Students may use a dictionary to add examples and adjectives to
their list. Within a limited time (3-5 minutes) see which group can come up with the largest number of items
and associated adjectives.

70

Module 2: Unit 3, Likes and Dislikes

Classroom Activity 2: Posters


Using magazine pictures or drawings, have students present examples of things and activities which they like
and dislike. Students should describe each item with complete sentences.
Classroom Activity 3: Find a Person Who...
Prepare a handout with the opening statement A person who ... and then list about 10 to 15 phrases such as
likes pizza, doesn't like fish, can play tennis very well, knows how to play the violin, can't ride a bike, etc.
Next to each phrase put a blank line.
Distribute one handout per student. Ask students to circulate in the room and ask their classmates questions
(Do you know how to ride a bike? Do you like fish? etc.). When they find someone who fits the description,
have them write that person's name in the blank next to the item. There should be a different name for each
phrase on the handout. When all students have filled in all the blanks with names, discuss their responses in
the large group.
Classroom Activity 4: You Can, But How Well?
Collect pictures of people engaged in activities such as sports, dancing, driving a car, cooking, or playing
musical instruments. Hold up each picture and elicit the name of the activity from students. Ask students if
they can do the activity and to rate themselves in their ability using the words terrible, good/well, fairly
good/well, very good/well. Have students write sentences about their ability level in each activity you show
them. I'm a very good dancer, but I can't sing very well.
Classroom Activity 5: Class Survey
Have the class design a survey and questionnaire. Each student should survey five or more English-speaking
people, in person, over the telephone, or through the internet, and write a short summary of the results.

71

New Dynamic English

Can You Do It?

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)

K: Can you play tennis?


M: Yes, I can. I play tennis fairly well.

Kathy: I'm doing a survey about what people like.


Max: You mean food and hobbies, and things like
that?

K: Max, can you play the piano?


M: A little. I can play a little.

Food and Sports


K: What kinds of food do you like?
M: Well, let's see. I like most kinds of food.

K: Can you play the violin?


M: No, not at all. I can't play the violin at all.

K: Okay. How about fish? Do you like fish?


M: Not so much. I prefer chicken.

K: Can you sing?


M: No, I can't. I'm a terrible singer. Nobody likes to
listen to me sing.

K: How about beef? Do you like beef?


M: Yes, I do. I like beef, especially steak.

K: Can you play chess?


M: Yes, I can. But I'm not very good. Pierre is a
very good chess player. He can beat me easily.
But I can beat him when we play tennis. He isn't
very good at playing tennis.

K: What other kinds of meat do you like?


M: Let's see. I like pork too, especially ham.
K: Are there any kinds of meat that you don't
like?
M: No, not really.

Sample Questions
Do you like sports?
Which of these sports do you like the best? Which of
these sports do you like the least?
Which of these activities can you do? Can you do it
well? Are you good at it?
Do you prefer mental games, such as chess or cards,
or physical games, such as football or tennis?
Can you ski? How well do you ski?
Do you like to watch television?
Do you get upset when you lose?

K: Do you like Italian food?


M: Sure. For example, I like spaghetti.
K: How about hot food? Do you like hot food?
M: Do you mean spicy hot, or hot hot?
K: I mean spicy hot, such as Thai or Mexican
food.
M: Thai food is too hot for me. Mexican food is
okay.
K: So you like hot food if it isn't too hot.
M: That's right.

Which kind of food does he think is too hot?


Does he know how to play golf?
Which activity can't he do at all? Which activity can
he do fairly well?
How well does Pierre play chess? Is Pierre a good
tennis player?

K: Okay, now I want to ask you about sports.


M: Sure. I like sports.
K:
M:
K:
M:

What is your favorite sport?


My favorite sport is American football.
Do you play it?
No, I don't. I just watch it.

K:
M:
K:
M:

What sports do you do?


I play tennis, and I can ski.
Do you play golf?
No, I don't. I don't know how to play golf.
But I'd like to learn.

K: Is golf a popular sport in your country?


M: Yes, I guess it is. Lots of people watch it on
TV. But I think most people don't play it.

72

Module 2: Unit 3, Likes and Dislikes

Focused Listening

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of adjectives that describe food and sports.
Examples: Sweet, delicious, fattening, healthy,
exciting, interesting, fun to watch, dangerous, etc.
2. Make a list of two foods or sports that you like, and
one food or sport that you dont like. Explain why.
Example: I dont like French Fries because they are
too fattening.
3. Interview a classmate about food and sports
preferences.
4. Do Practice Exercises B and C.

Focus 1
Focus on A Survey: Food and Sports.

Language Focus
classification: such as, what kind of, etc.
What kinds of food do you like? I like most kinds of food.

Listening Task
Study the questions that Kathy asks Max. Practice saying
them.

Focus 3

Goals
Preview and orientation: to familiarize students with

Focus on What Can You Do?

classification and expressing preference.


Students will be able to classify foods: meat is a kind
of food, pork is a kind of meat, ham is a kind of pork,
Chinese food, French food, etc.

Language Focus
can, know how to, adverbs of manner, and short answers
with can/cant.

Listening Task
Listen for and practice saying sentences that say how well
someone does something: I play tennis fairly well. I'm a
terrible singer. I can't play the violin at all.

Student Follow-up
1. Answer questions about classification: What are some
kinds of food? What are some kinds of sports?
2. What kinds of food do you like? What kinds of food
dont you like? What are your favorite sports?
3. Do Practice Exercise A.

Goals
Students will be ask and answer questions using can
and know how to.
Students will be able to talk about ability using adverbs
of manner.
Students will be able to use adjectives to describe
ability: Pierre is a very good chess player. I am a
terrible singer.
Students will be able to modify adjectives and adverbs
with intensifiers (very, fairly, not very).

Focus 2
Review A Survey: Food and Sports. Preview What Can
You Do?

Language Focus
questions with short answers (Yes, I do; No, I dont),
amount/quantification (not very much, a lot, some kinds
of), and the use of intensifiers (very, too).

Student Follow-up
1. What are some things you can and cant do? Make a
list, and say how well you can do them.
I can run fairly fast. Im not a good skier. I cant play
golf at all.
2. Do Practice Exercises D and E.

Listening Task
Repeat and record Kathys questions. Check the Glossary
items in the text.
What kinds of food do you like? How about fish? Do you
like fish?

Goals
Students will be able to ask and answer questions about
food preferences.

Students will be able to quantify likes and dislikes: I


like it a lot. I don't like it very much. I like most kinds
of...
Students will be able to use too to give reasons for
liking or disliking something: It's too hot.

73

New Dynamic English

Focus 4
Review A Survey: Food and Sports and What Can You
Do? and focus on the Video Hot Seats.

Language Focus
Useful expressions, such as Lets see, No, not really,
Sure, Do you mean?

Listening Task
Take notes using only key words. Then, using your notes,
summarize all of Maxs answers in complete sentences.

Goal
Students will be able to use notes to summarize and
answer questions about a survey.

Student Follow-up
1. Prepare a written summary of Kathys interview of
Max. Use complete sentences.
His favorite sport is football. He likes most kinds of
food.
2. Interview two or more classmates about sports and
hobbies, and write a summary.
What is your favorite sport? Do you play it or watch
it? How about hobbies? Do you/Can you...?
3. Do Practice Exercises F and G.

Focus 5
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently. When you have a
Completion Percentage of 80-100%, take the Mastery Test.

Student Follow-up
1.
2.
3.

Make a short oral summary of this unit.


Give a one minute oral presentation about your likes
and dislikes.
Write two-paragraphs about your likes and dislikes.

74

Module 2: Unit 3, Likes and Dislikes

Practice Exercises
2(3) Likes and Dislikes: Exercise A
Write these words under the categories they belong to. (Note: some words may belong to two or
more categories.)
Example:

Meat

ham

ham
tennis
hot food
pork
piano
Thai food
fish
chess
swimming
french fries
movies

pork
steak
chicken

Mexican food
violin
skiing
spaghetti
golf
steak
football
chicken
volleyball
Chinese food
singing

Food

Sports

Games

Meat

75

Hobbies

International Food

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

2(3) Likes and Dislikes: Exercise B


Fill in the blanks with can or can't.
Example:

Max can't play golf.

1. Max can play tennis, and he ____________ ski.


2. Max is a good skier, but he _____________ play golf.
3. Max cant play the violin at all, but he ____________ play the piano a little.
4. I ____________ play basketball fairly well.
5. My friend plays a guitar, but I ____________ play any musical instrument.

2(3) Likes and Dislikes: Exercise C


Fill in the blanks with doesn't know how or can't.
Example: Max

doesn't know how

to play the violin.

1. Max is a good skier, but he __________________ to play golf.


2. Max can play the piano a little, but he ________________ sing. He's a terrible singer.
3. Max ____________________ to play golf, but he's a good tennis player.
4. Pierre speaks English well, but Max __________________ speak French at all.
5. I want to go with you, but Im busy, so I __________________.

76

Module 2: Unit 3, Likes and Dislikes

Practice Exercises

2(3) Likes and Dislikes: Exercise D


Answer the questions using short answers. Use does/doesn't or can/can't.
Example: Does Max like hot food? Yes, he does.
1. Does Max like steak? Yes, ____________________________
2. Can Pierre play chess? Yes, ___________________________
3. Does Max play football? No, ____________________________________________
4. Does Max know how to play golf? No, ____________________________________
5. Can you play the piano? ________________________________________________

2(3) Likes and Dislikes: Exercise E


Here are some questions about you. Practice using short answers.

1. Can you ski? _________________________________________________________


2. Do you know how to play chess? _________________________________________
3. Do you like to watch sports on TV? _______________________________________
4. Do you play a musical instrument? ________________________________________
5. Can you speak German? ________________________________________________

77

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

2(3) Likes and Dislikes: Exercise F


Fill in the blanks with these words.

very good
fairly good
good
terrible
Example: Pierre plays chess very well. He's a

very good

chess player.

1. Max plays tennis fairly well. He's a _________________ player.


2. Pierre plays chess very well. He's a ___________________ chess player.
3. Max can't sing at all. He's a ______________________ singer.
4. Kathy writes very well. She's a _______________________ writer.
5. Im learning how to play golf, so Im not _______________________.

2(3) Likes and Dislikes: Exercise G


Fill in the blanks with good or well.

1. Max is a _____________ tennis player.


2. Pierre plays chess very _______________.
3. Max isn't very ______________ at chess.
4. Max plays the piano fairly ________________.
5. Bob is learning how to cook Italian food, so its not very _______________.

78

Module 2: Unit 4, Review Exercises

4. Review Exercises for Module 2


When Units 1-3 are completed, it is important to review the main points even while beginning to work on Level 2.
The following lessons help students refocus on some of the main language points that are covered and tested.
These lessons should be done on a frequent basis.

Dictations
Dictations focus on important language at the word and phrase level. Detailed instructions for doing the
dictations can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help screens (This Lesson) when you enter
the lesson. The Dictations for Module 2 are as follows:
Dictation 1

Dictation 4

1. Sunny days are usually hot, but sometimes they are not.
2. For example, a sunny day in winter is sometimes very
cold.
3. Rainy days are usually cold, but sometimes they are not.
4. Snowy days are always cold, because snow is never
warm.

1. Her schedule changes each day.


2. She gives piano lessons three days a week.
3. She teaches for two hours on Monday, from 2:30 to
4:30.
4. On Thursdays, she teaches in the evening from 7:30
until 10:00.

Dictation 2

Dictation 5

1.
2.
3.
4.

1. She has a violin lesson once a week.


2. Her lesson is at 4:30 on Tuesday afternoons. It lasts for
an hour.
3. On other days, she comes home after school.
4. She practices the violin for about an hour.

Bob works at the post office.


He works five days a week: Monday through Friday.
He usually drives his car to work.
It takes an hour for him to get to the post office.

Dictation 3
1.
2.
3.
4.

Dictation 6

He eats dinner with his family between 6:45 and 7:15.


He usually reads the newspaper after dinner.
After that he usually watches television.
If the TV isnt interesting, he reads a book or listens to
music.

1. Morning is the first part of the day.


2. People leave home and go to work or school in the
morning.
3. Evening is the early part of night, between sunset and
bedtime.
4. Night is when the sun is down and people go to bed.

Fill-Ins
This lesson reviews some of the main grammar points that have been introduced in Units 1-3. Detailed
instructions for doing the Fill-Ins (with Speech Recognition) can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help screens (This Lesson) once you are in the Fill-Ins lesson. Please note that the highlighted words
in the answer sentences are linked to the Glossary. Sample sentences from the Fill-Ins lesson are:
(1) He leaves for work at 7:45. (3) It takes an hour to get to work. (5) He eats dinner with his family between
6:45 and 7:15. (8) She does homework from 7:45 to around 10:15. (10) John is interested in gymnastics.
(12) How long does it take her to get to school? (13) The sun rises in the morning and sets in the evening.
(14) Boy is to girl as man is to woman. (16) Rainy days are usually cold, but sometimes they are not. (17)
Snowy days are always cold because snow is never warm. (18) In winter the sun sets early, so the daytime is
short. (21) Childhood is when we learn to read and write. (23) Im doing a survey about what people like.
(24) Are there any kinds of meat that you dont like? (26) I cant play tennis at all. (28) He doesnt know how
to play golf.

79

New Dynamic English

Speech Practice
In addition to developing oral fluency, this lesson provides a means to review and focus attention on many of the
key language points developed in Units 1-3, such as time phrases, present tense verbs, and adverbs of manner.
Detailed instructions for using Speech Recognition and for doing the Speech Practice lesson can be found in the
Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help screens.
The Speech Practice lesson has three sections: Sentence Reading, Answering Questions, and Speech Quiz.
Please note that the Score for the Speech Quiz is designed so that students can try to increase their personal scores
each time they do the quiz, rather than as a test. A record of each score can be found in the Student Records.

5. Video Interactions, Module 2


This lesson shows a variety of native speakers in the
following situations: Telephone: Lets Meet on Thursday;
Business Telephone; An Interview, and Hot Seats. Except
for the Hot Seats, students may view each scene in a
presentation mode. Each lesson also has an interactive
mode where students can interact with the characters
through Speech Recognition (or mouse click) choices. In
the Hot Seats, the characters answer questions put to them
by the students.
Detailed instructions for this lesson, and also for Speech Recognition, can be found in the Study Guides and also
in the pull-down Help screens after you enter the lesson.
Each video scene illustrates language points that have been developed in this module. The scenes have been
designed so that they can be role-played by students. This is an excellent way to review, have fun, and
personalize the language.
Telephone: Lets Meet on Thursday!

An Interview

Thursday afternoon? What time?


Well, I leave home at around 10:00, and I work until 3:30.
How about 4:00?
Thats too early. Is 4:30 okay?
Thats fine. Why dont we take the bus?
Okay, lets take the bus downtown and have dinner
together. What time does the concert start?
It starts at 8:00.
Okay, Ill see you after work.

And how about sports? Do you play golf?


Yes, I do. I enjoy playing golf.
How about skiing? Can you ski?
No, I cant ski at all. We dont have any snow where I live.
Do you play tennis?
Sure. I love to play, but Im not very good.

Hot Seats
Whats your name? Whats my name? My name is
Where do you come from? Where do I come from?
Who are you? Who am I?
What languages do you speak? What languages do I speak?
What do you do? What do I do?
Are you married? Am I married?
How old are you? How old am I?
Do you have a boyfriend? Do I have a boyfriend?
Do you know Carmen Randall? Do I know Carmen
Randall? Yes, I do.

Thursday afternoon at 3:30? No, Im sorry. I work until


5:30 on Thursdays.
Lets see. The concert starts at 8:00. Can we meet at 6:00?
Okay, Ill meet you at 6:00.

Business Telephone (Key Expressions)


Im sorry. Hes in a meeting. May I take a message?
Thats okay. Ill call back later.
May I ask who is calling?
Sure. My name is Sandra. Im a friend of his.
Thank you Sandra. Ill tell him you will call back.

80

Module 2 Summary

Module 2 Summary
Active vocabulary through Module 2: approximately 500 words

Summary of Verbs in each unit (not including Video Interactions)


(1) Family Schedule
be*
begin
change
come home
do homework
drive
eat
get up
get home
give lessons
go
have*
last (durative)
leave
listen
practice*
read
start
study
take (durative)
take a shower
teach*
want*
watch*
work*

(2) Matrix Vocabulary


be*
begin*
begin to fall
come up
eat*
end
get married
get up*
go down
go to school
go to work
have*
have children
learn
leave*
love*
need
play (a violin)
rain
read*
return
rise
see
set
shine
sleep
snow
talk
wake up
walk
work*
write*

* verbs introduced in previous lessons

81

(3) Likes and Dislikes


ask
be*
beat
begin*
do
guess
know
like*
mean
play (a sport)
prefer
sing
ski
think
want*
watch

New Dynamic English

Answer Key for Practice Exercises


1 (1) Names and Places: Practice Exercise A
1. My name is Kathy. 2. I come from New York. 3. This is Max. 4. He comes from San Francisco. 5. Kathy
comes from New York.
Names and Places: Practice Exercise B
1. Max comes from San Francisco. 2. Hello. My name is Max. 3. I come from San Francisco. 4. Kathy
comes from New York. 5. She comes from New York.
Names and Places: Practice Exercise C
1. Her name is Kathy. 2. Shes from the US. 3. She is from New York. 4. Shes a woman, not a man. 5. She is a
woman, not a man.
Names and Places: Practice Exercise D
1. (Max/He) (comes from/is from) (San Francisco/the US).
2. (Kathy/She) (is from/comes from) (New York/the US).
3. Kathy does. (Kathy/She) (comes from/is from) New York.
4. Max is. (Max/He) (is from/comes from) San Francisco.
5. Kathy is a woman. / Kathy is. Shes a woman, not a man.
Names and Places: Practice Exercise E
1. isnt 2. doesnt 3. doesnt 4. isnt 5. isnt
Names and Places: Practice Exercise F
1. Kathy isnt from Paris. 2. I dont come from the US. 3. Pierre isnt American. 4. Kathy doesnt speak
French. 5. I dont speak Japanese.
Names and Places: Practice Exercise G
1. come 2. are 3. speak 4. comes 5. come 6. are 7. speak 8. come 9. are 10. dont
Names and Places: Practice Exercise H
1. g 2. c 3. d 4. f 5. b 6. a. 7. e
Names and Places: Practice Exercise I
1Q. Who is that? 2Q. Where are you from? or Where do you come from? 3Q. Where is San Francisco? 4Q. Who
comes from New York? 5Q. Where are they from? or Where do they come from? 6Q. What country do they come
from? or What country are they from? 7Q. What languages does he speak? 8Q. Does she speak German?
1 (2) Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise A
1. Chin 2. thirty years 3. teacher 4. low 5. married 6. son 7. apartment 8. five years 9. fourth 10. first
Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise B
Sara Scott is a doctor. She works in a large hospital Shes a good doctor, and she works hard. She has a high salary.
She lives in a large apartment. She and her sister, Chris, live together. Sara isnt married, but she has a boyfriend.
Her boyfriend is a pilot.
Chris is a ballet dancer. She lives with her older sister, Sara. They live in a large, comfortable apartment. Chris loves
to dance. She practices hard every day. She wants to be a great dancer someday.
Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise B
Henry is a businessman. He has a lot of money, but he doesnt work very hard. He isnt married, but he is in love
with somebody. He likes a woman named Chris. She is a ballet dancer. Unfortunately, she doesnt like him. Henry
isnt very popular with women.
Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise D
1. Sara/She isnt married. 2. Sara isnt a teacher. 3. Henry doesnt work hard. 4. Chris doesnt like Henry.
5. Henry doesnt teach science and math.

82

Answer Key

Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise E


1. d 2. a 3. f 4. b 5. c 6. e 7. h 8. g
Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise F
1. doctor, teacher 2. daughter, son 3. small, large 4. brother, sister 5. apartment, house 6. children, parents
7. married, single
Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise G
1. D 2. S 3. D 4. S 5. D
Jobs and Family: Practice Exercise H
1. Where does Sara work? 2. What do you do? 3. What does Kathy do? or What does Kathy write?
4. Are you a teacher? 5. Is Richard a good teacher?
1 (3) Numbers and Times: Practice Exercise A
3. two fifteen or a quarter past two 4. twelve forty-five or a quarter to one or fifteen (minutes) to one 5. four
twenty or twenty (minutes) past/after four 6. six forty or twenty (minutes) to seven 7. seven o five or five (minutes)
past/after seven (oclock) 8. eleven ten or ten (minutes) past/after eleven (oclock) 9. three fifty-three or seven
minutes to/before four (oclock) 10. six thirty-seven or twenty-three minutes to seven (oclock)
Numbers and Times: Practice Exercise B
1. 58 2. 127 3. 536 4. 1,001 5. 1,010 6. 1,100 7. 2,215 8. 19,010 9. 125,100 10. 1,100,100
1. h 2. d 3. e 4. b 5. c 6. i 7. k 8. g 9. j 10. l
2 (1) Family Schedule: Practice Exercise A
1. a 2. c 3. a 4. d 5. b 6. d 7. f 8. e 9. d 10. a 11. b 12. d 13. c 14. c 15. d
Family Schedule: Practice Exercise B
gets up, eats, leaves, drives, works, works, comes, eats
Family Schedule: Practice Exercise C
1. They eat dinner at around 7:30.
2. After dinner he usually watches television.
3. He usually reads the newspaper after dinner.
4. It takes an hour to get to work.
5. He leaves for work at 7:45.
Family Schedule: Practice Exercise D
1. at 2. from 3. for 4. around 5. until 6. from
Family Schedule: Practice Exercise E
a. 9 b. 8 c. 5 d. 3 e. 10 f. 1 g. 7 h. 4 i. 2 j. 6

83

New Dynamic English

2 (2) Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise A


1. e 2. j 3. d 4. b 5. g 6. h 7. c 8. f 9. a 10. i
Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise B
1. c 2. d 3. e 4. g 5. h 6. i 7. f 8. j 9. b 10. a
Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise C
1. j 2. g 3. f 4. b 5. e 6. a 7. h 8. i 9. d 10. c

a u t
Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise D
f
1. f 2. c 3. i 4. h 5. e 6. j 7. d 8. g 9. b 10. a
f a t
a
e
r
l
l o n g
Matrix Vocabulary Crossword:
o
w
o
m o r n i n
m
b
a
w i n t e r
a
n i g
t h i n

u m n
e
v
e
n
i
n
g

m
o
s t
t
s
u
m
m
a b i e
i
r
r
h t
h i g

a
u

s
e

s
p
r s
i
n
g
c
o
l
a d

2 (3) Likes and Dislikes: Practice Exercise A


Food: hot food, pork, Thai food, fish, French Fries, spaghetti, steak, chicken, Chinese food
Sports: tennis, swimming, skiing, golf, football, volleyball
Hobbies: (all sports), piano, chess, movies, violin, singing
Games: tennis, chess, golf, football, volleyball
Meat: pork, fish, steak, chicken, ham
International food: Thai food, Chinese food, Mexican food
Likes and Dislikes: Practice Exercise B
1. can 2. cant 3. can 4. can 5. cant
Likes and Dislikes: Practice Exercise C
1. doesnt know how 2. cant 3. doesnt know how 4. cant 5. cant
Likes and Dislikes: Practice Exercise D
1. Yes, he does. 2. Yes, he can. 3. No, he doesnt. 4. No, he doesnt. 5. No, I cant. or Yes, I can.
Likes and Dislikes: Practice Exercise E
1. Yes, I can. or No, I cant. 2. Yes, I do. or No, I dont. 3. Yes, I do. or No, I dont. 4. Yes, I do. or No, I dont.
5. No, I cant. or Yes, I can.
Likes and Dislikes: Practice Exercise F
1. fairly good 2. (very) good 3. terrible 4. (very) good 5. very good.
Likes and Dislikes: Practice Exercise G
1. good 2. well 3. good 4. well 5. good.

84

New Dynamic English


Level 2:

Modules 3 & 4

Instructors Guide

The Smart Way to English

Version 2.5

Copyright 2013, DynEd International, Inc.


www.dyned.com

October, 2013

New Dynamic English

Table of Contents
Scope and Sequence, Level 2............................ 3
Module 4 Lesson Map....................................... 53

Introduction to Level 2...................................... 5

1. Planning Ahead .......................................... 54

Module 3 Lesson Map ...................................... 7


1.

Learning Points .......................................... 55


Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 56
Key Sentences ............................................ 58
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 60
Practice Exercises....................................... 62

Daily Activities .......................................... 8


Learning Points .......................................... 9
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 10
Key Sentences ............................................ 12
Focused Listening ...................................... 14
Practice Exercises ...................................... 16

2. Matrix Vocabulary ..................................... 68


Learning Points .......................................... 69
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 70
Key Sentences ............................................ 72
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 74
Practice Exercises....................................... 76

2. Our World .................................................. 22


Learning Points .......................................... 23
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 24
Key Sentences ............................................ 26
Focused Listening ...................................... 27
Practice Exercises ...................................... 29

3. Biography:

3. Locations .................................................... 34
Learning Points .......................................... 35
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 36
Key Sentences ............................................ 40
Focused Listening ...................................... 42
Practice Exercises ...................................... 44

4.

4. Review Exercises ....................................... 92


Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises

Review Exercises ....................................... 49


Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises

5.

Einstein................................. 82

Learning Points .......................................... 83


Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 84
Key Sentences ............................................ 86
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 87
Practice Exercises....................................... 89

5. Video Interactions w/SR ............................ 93


Business Telephone
Friendly Advice
At a Restaurant
An Interview

Video Interactions w/SR ............................ 50


Telephone: Arranging to Meet
Are You Going to Class?
Asking for Information
At a Restaurant
Hot Seats

Module 4 Summary ........................................... 94


Answer Key....................................................... 95

Module 3 Summary ........................................... 52

Scope and Sequence: Module 3

Scope and Sequence:


Module 3, Unit

Module 3
Main Learning Points

Comments

1. Daily Activities
Kathys Schedule
Dianes Schedule
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Students learn to give and


Verb tenses: past, present, and future (ate,
elicit basic information about
got up, started, cooked, is eating, is going to
their daily routines, in the
interview, is going to work late)
past, present, and future.
Time phrases (this morning, an hour ago, in
an hour, later this afternoon)
Presents the lives of two
Time Sequence (then she worked on , after
women, one working as a
the interview shes going to)
journalist, and the other as a
Yes/No and Wh- question formation with past
mother in the home.
tense and future (be going to).
Short answers (Yes, she did. No, she didnt.) Extends basic vocabulary, for
Pronunciation: /d/ called, /t/ cooked
both work and at home.

2. Our World
Our Planet, Earth
Air, Water, and Pollution
Questions
Focus Exercises

Amount/Quantification (enough, plenty, not


enough, the third, one of)
Cause/Effect (They died out because...
Polluted air makes us sick.)
Conditional Relations (Without water there
would be no life; if we were closer...)
Comparison (-er than)/ Superlatives (-est)
Reason (They died out because...)
Reference (one of; one form of life)
Relative Pronouns (that, where, which) one
of eight planets that travel around...
there: existential (there isnt enough)

Students learn to express basic


needs, energy, food, water,
our relationship to the
environment, pollution, and
the conditions for life to exists
Introduces more complex
ideas that will be developed in
Levels 3 and 4.

3.

Locations
City Locations
City Quiz
Spatial Relations

Asking for directions (Where is the . . . ,


Where can I buy some . . . )
Directions (north, south, east, west)
Location/Prepositions of Location (on the
corner, across the street, in front of)
Shapes (triangle, circle, square)
Spatial Relations (near, on, under, on top of,
inside, to the left of, etc.)

4.

Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as verb tenses, time phrases,
and logical connectors.

5.

Video Interactions
w/SR
Tel: Arranging to Meet
Are You Going to Class?
Asking for Information
At a Restaurant
Hot Seats

Requests, Suggestions, Negative Questions


Asking for directions
Ordering at a restaurant

Language review.
Provides a model for roleplays.
Fluency development

Students learn the names of


useful businesses and how to
specify street locations.
The Spatial Relations lesson
focuses on how to describe
how objects are arranged in
relationship to each other.

New Dynamic English

Scope and Sequence:


Module 4, Unit
1. Planning Ahead
Departure
Choices
Meeting a Friend
Questions
Focus Exercises

2.

Matrix Vocabulary
Things to Eat
Things to Drink
Things to Read
Things to Listen to
Colors
Matrix Game

Module 4
Main Learning Points

Adverb phrases/clauses (when he lands in


London, whenever they get together)
Conditional (If he leaves on Saturday, hell
arrive on Sunday. If hes tired)
Degrees of Certainty, Modals (will, may,
can, will probably, if he leaves)
Future (going to, will, may, can)
Infinitive (tried to buy, takes ten hours to fly
from, decide how to get, to go by taxi)
It is to express Condition or State
Noun phrases as the Subject (one way to get
from the airport, one of his best friends)
Reason/Result (so hes going to get a
discount, Hes going because)
Amount/Quantification (some, most, a few,
many, much, lots)
Comparison (-er than)
Countable/Uncountable (a steak, some
vegetables, a piece of cake)
Reference (one, the other, these, else,
besides the radio, one kind of meat)
Preference (would rather, like better, prefer)
Word relations (Grass is to green as)

Comments
Students learn to talk and
answer questions about travel,
future plans, and choices.
Students learn how to give
reasons for their choices.
In the context of a man
planning a trip, the focus is on
future time, contingencies, and
degrees of certainty.

Students learn to describe


things they like.
Students learn how to express
their preferences.

3.

Biography: Einstein
The Early Years
The Later Years
Focus Exercises
Questions

Expressing Change (he became interested in,


got married, he graduated in)
Dates (1879, 1900, 1902, etc.)
Students learn to talk about
Duration (during that period, throughout his
their life history, important
life, until his death, for more than 20 years)
dates, and periods.
Past time, Past tense (showed, published,
made, said, wondered, won, died, etc.)
Presents the life history of
Albert Einstein.
Why, How, and That clauses
Time Sequences (two years later, after
graduation, shortly after that, by this time)

4.

Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review key grammar and
vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

5.

Video Interactions
w/SR
Business Telephone
Friendly Advice
At a Restaurant
An Interview

Students learn to use the


Making an appointment, confirming
telephone for simple business
information, and using the telephone
transactions.
Students may interact with the actors through
Provides models for role-plays
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
and interviews.

Provides language practice


and review activities.

Module 3: Lesson Map

Introduction to Level 2
New Dynamic English, Level 2, prepares students to handle most basic situations in English and to
communicate about the details of their daily lives. It also lays the groundwork for intermediate and
advanced studies, where the focus is more on abstract ideas and logical relationships.
Though listening and oral fluency continue to be the main focus in Level 2, reading and writing skills
play an increasingly important role at this stage. Follow-up assignments, including task based reading,
worksheets, and short, structured writing assignments help to reinforce and extend the language
presented in the lessons. A list of these is included in the Classroom Activities section of each unit.

Content for Level 2


The material presented in Level 2 provides the basis for 40-60 hours of study, depending on the
language background of the students, which may vary considerably.
This estimate assumes that the language presented in each level is used as a model that is systematically
extended and personalized in classroom activities and follow-up assignments as suggested in this
manual. The usual order is as follows:
1. Preview each lesson with a focus on general comprehension.
2. Analyze and practice the language in each lesson with a focus on the key language structures.
3. Extend and personalize the content of each lesson via student generated language, including roleplays, pair practice, written exercises, and group activities.
4. Review and test.

General Language Specifications for Level 2


New Dynamic English, Level 2, develops a useful spoken vocabulary of over 900 high-frequency words
that provide students with the ability to handle simple situations and to communicate about their daily
lives.
Level 2 covers pre-intermediate language structures required to understand and express personal
information and provides a foundation for intermediate and upper-intermediate work. In addition, the
video lessons provide useful language models for the telephone and for other social situations.

Detailed Language Specifications for Level 2


The language focus for Level 2 is on the past tense, the future with modals and be going to, time and
spatial relations, and a further development of the phrase structures of English, which are so critical and
basic to the language. In addition, the course focuses on the construction of Wh- and Yes/No questions
with increasing complexity. Please see the Scope and Sequence for Level 2, and the Learning Points at
the beginning of each unit for additional information and examples. The Index is also helpful in
locating where specific topics or structures are presented or developed in the course.

Module 3: Lesson Map

Module 3 Lesson Map


Unit 1:

Daily Activities
Kathys Schedule
Dianes Schedule
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Unit 2:

Our World
Our Planet, Earth
Air, Water, and Pollution
Questions
Focus Exercises

Unit 3:

Locations
City Locations
City Quiz
Spatial Relations

Unit 4:

Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Speech Quiz

Unit 5:

Video Interactions w/SR


Telephone: Arranging to Meet
Are You Going to Class?
Asking for Information
At a Restaurant
Hot Seats w/SR

New Dynamic English

1. Daily Activities
Kathys Schedule; Dianes Schedule; Question Practice; and Focus Exercises
In this unit, students learn how to talk about events in the immediate past, the ongoing present, and
the assumed future. In contrast to Level 1, where students learned how to talk about general, generic
schedules, the focus here is on the specific activities of today, which has a past, present and future.

Two characters are introduced: Kathy, a working woman who works as a


journalist, and Diane, a mother and housewife who studies at night. The
focus is on the specific activities of today, from this morning and the
immediate present through this evening (assumed future).Within this
framework, we use the past tense, the present progressive, and be going to.
In addition to the verb tenses and time relations, this unit introduces reviews basic concepts and
language structures that were introduced in Level 1. These include, means (how things are done),
duration (how long it takes), and frequency (how often). By the end of this unit, students should be
able to give a complete account of and answer questions about todays activities, from what they did
this morning through what they are going to this evening.

The Question Practice lesson reinforces the language of the unit, giving
students the chance to practice asking questions about both the immediate
past and the assumed future.
In the Focus Exercises lesson, students practice arranging words to answer questions about the
characters in this unit.
Goals
To be able to understand and talk about daily activities in the immediate past and future.
To be able to understand, express, and ask about the events of today, from this morning through
tonight.
Objective 1: To be able to understand and use the past tense form of regular and irregular verbs to
talk about events that happened earlier today.
Objective 2: To be able to understand and use be going to to talk about events that are assumed to
happen later today.
Objective 3: To be able to understand and use common verbs to talk about todays activities, both
for ones job and for activities at home.
Objective 4: To be able to understand and express time relations, such as earlier, later, an hour
ago, and in an hour.

Module 3: Unit 1, Daily Activities

Learning Points
future time, be going to
This evening she's going to interview an important person. In about an hour she's going to pick up her
kids. Later this afternoon, shes going to have a meeting with her boss. Her best friend, who lives in
Paris, is going to get married. What is she going to do this evening?
past time
This morning she got up... Today, for example, she didnt get up until 9:15. She ate lunch an hour
ago. At 11:45 she left home. After taking her kids to school, she and a friend went shopping.
past tense (regular and irregular verbs)
She got up at... She didnt get up until... She didnt eat... They ate breakfast... She worked on
her computer... She left home and took a bus... They started eating at... They went shopping
together. They went to a shopping center and bought some clothes for their children. She drove her
kids to school.
present progressive
Its now 2:00 and she is eating a late lunch. Her friend is trying to lose weight. Shes cleaning the
house. According to her teacher shes getting to be pretty good.
present simple
works for a newspaper, she writes books, her schedule changes, her schedule varies, she gets up late,
we all need energy, their two children both go to school. Twice a week she studies painting. She
enjoys her class. He drives a taxi.
questions about past, present and future
Who took a bus...? What did she do...? What does her husband do?
now? Who is she going to interview? Does she ever...?

What is Diane doing right

sequence
Then she worked on her computer. Later this afternoon she's going to... After the interview she's
going to... Before she goes to bed, she...
time expressions
Its now 2:00, this morning, later this afternoon, this evening, an hour ago, in an hour, after dinner, after
that, at 11:45, after taking her kids to school. She has an hour before shes going to leave.
short answers
Yes, she did. No, she didn't. Yes, she is (going to). No, she isnt (going to). Yes, she does. No, she
doesnt.
pronunciation
/d/ called, married;

/t/ cooked, worked

Module 3: Unit 1, Daily Activities

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of Kathys Schedule in class, through what she did this morning. Focus on the
past tense. Put a list of verbs from the lesson on the board and point out the difference between the
regular and irregular verbs. Have the class practice repeating present and past sentences with each
verb: I eat breakfast in the morning. I ate breakfast this morning. Note that with the past tense
there is no difference between 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person in terms of subject-verb agreement.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice the following exchange: What do you do at
oclock in the morning? At . . . oclock I usually . . . What did you do at . . . oclock this morning?
This morning, at . . . oclock, I . . .
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Review the past tense. Then introduce the present continuous and the future with be going to.
Focus on subject/verb agreement. Have the class come up with additional verbs, and make a chart
showing the present (V), past V(d), and present continuous form V(ing) for each. Note the difference
in pronunciation between the -ed in talked, shopped, /t/, with the -ed in cleaned, married, /d/.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions using each of the verbs
on the board.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Review the past tense, present continuous and the future with be going to. Focus on how time
phrases work together with the speakers frame of reference to indicate past, present or future. For
example, at 10:00 a.m., the phrase at 8:00 this morning signals the past. However, at 6:00 a.m., the
same phrase signals the future. It is important to note that verb tenses alone do not determine past,
present, or future. (See Introduction: Verb Markers.) The verb tenses work together with time
phrases and context.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice presenting their schedule for today from the point of
view of now.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 and Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.
Step 9: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce the Question Practice lesson. Focus on how to make Wh- and Yes/No questions with the
past tense, the present continuous, the present habitual, and with be going to. Note how the short
answers for each change: Yes, she did; Yes, she is; Yes, she does; and Yes, she is. Have students
practice interviewing each other about their schedules for today and for this week.
Step 10: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 5, the Focus Exercises, in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following
Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the unit,
using the practice exercises as a model of items to test.

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 1: Letter to a Pen Pal


Tell students they have a pen pal in another country. The pen pal wants to know about a typical day in
their life. Ask students to complete the following letter with real or imagined information:
Dear Pen Pal,
My life is never boring. To give you an idea of what I do, here is my schedule for today.
The first thing I did was get up. This morning I got up at. . .

Remind students that they will need to use the past tense and encourage them to use words and phrases
such as the following to indicate sequence: Then I , After that I , At ... oclock I ..., In an hour ...,
Right now Im
Classroom Activity 2: Actions Speak Louder than Words
Write actions in the present continuous on small cards, e.g., I am drinking a cup of coffee. I am
painting a picture. Have students choose a card and mime the action for the class. The members of
the class must guess what the student is doing (e.g., "You are eating a banana.")
Classroom Activity 3: Different Jobs, Different Days
Ask each student to write an occupation on an index card. Collect the cards, mix them up and let students
select one. Give students about 10 or 15 minutes to create a schedule of daily activities for a person of
that occupation, similar to the description of Kathy and Diane. In groups or to the whole class, have
students give their description of the daily activities, without saying the occupation or obvious giveaways such as "Now I'm in the fire station." Ask them to focus on talking about activities. The other
members of the class must guess the occupation.
Classroom Activity 4: People, Places, and Times
Instruct students to fold a piece of paper lengthwise to form three columns. Ask students to write Person
at the top of the first column and then write five occupations or types of people in that column. Instruct
students to fold the paper so their words can't be seen and pass it to the person next to them. Have
students write Place at the top of the middle column and enter five places. Students fold the papers so
only the third column remains visible and pass them once again. Ask students to write Time at the top of
the third column and think of five time expressions. Have students pass the papers one last time.
For example:
Person
Place
Time
thief
millionaire
wrestler
bank manager

park
garage
telephone booth
airplane

tonight
last night
tomorrow after lunch
right now

Each student must now write five sentences using an entry from each column (e.g., "The millionaire is
flying in an airplane right now.") This can also be done in pairs allowing the students to combine their
lists to form 10 sentences. An interesting extension of this activity is to ask students to write a
newspaper article using all of the words in their list.
Classroom Activity 5: Question Practice
Using ten of the sentences created by the students in the above activity, write (or have the students write)
the ten sentences on the board omitting the subject and the time (e.g., "____ called the bank from the
telephone booth ____.")
Write the list of ten people and times elsewhere on the board. Then have
the class ask Yes/No questions to find out which person and time fits with each action in the original
sentences, e.g., Did the thief call the bank from the telephone booth last night? If the subject is right, but
the time is wrong, fill in only the subject. If the guess is wrong, nothing is filled in.
This can be played in teams with points being given for each correct answer, or in a "Hangman" format
where each incorrect guess brings the participants closer to being hanged.

10

Module 3: Unit 1, Daily Activities

Key Sentences (partial transcript)

Now Diane is back at home. She is cleaning the


house. She doesn't have much time. In about an
hour, at 3:00, she's going to pick up her kids at
school.

Kathys Schedule
Kathy is a writer. She works for a newspaper, and
she also writes books. Her schedule changes every
day. She often works late at night. As a result,
she doesn't like to get up early. Sometimes she
gets up so late that she doesn't have time for
breakfast.

After dinner, Diane is going to take a class. This


evening Diane is going to attend her art class.
Twice a week, in the evenings, she studies painting.
Diane enjoys her class very much. According to
her teacher, she's getting to be pretty good.

Today, for example, she got up at 9:15. She didn't


eat any breakfast. She just had a cup of coffee.
Then she worked on her computer at home until
11:30. She left home at 11:45 and took a bus
downtown to her office at the newspaper.

Review

(at the end of Dianes Schedule)

Let's assume that today is Wednesday, and it's 2:00


in the afternoon.
Kathy took a bus to work this morning. Its now
2:00 and shes eating a late lunch. This evening
shes going to interview an important person.
After the interview shes going to work late.

It's now 2:00 and she is eating a late lunch. She's


very hungry, so she's having a large lunch. Shes
hungry because she didnt eat breakfast.
Later this afternoon she's going to have a meeting
with her boss. She's going to make a request. She
wants to take a week off so that she can go to Paris.
Her best friend, who lives in Paris, is going to get
married.

Diane drove a car this morning. Now Diane is


back at home. She is cleaning the house. This
evening shes going to attend her art class.
Comprehension Questions

This evening she's going to interview an important


person. The interview is scheduled to last for an
hour, from 6:30 until 7:30. She's going to
interview the person about the problem of nuclear
waste. After the interview she's going to work late.
She wants to finish the story before she goes to bed.
She thinks it's going to be an important story. We
all need energy, but we have to think carefully about
safety.

What time did Kathy get up? Did she eat breakfast?
What did she do after she had some coffee?
When did she leave for work? How did she go
downtown? Is she having an early lunch or a late
lunch? What is she going to do this evening?
When is the interview going to start? What is the
interview going to be about?
What does Diane's husband do?
How long does it take them to get to their school?
How do they usually get to school?
What time did she start to eat?
When did they leave for school?
Where did she go after she took her kids to school?
Who did she go shopping with?
How long were they at the health club?
What is Diane doing right now?
How much longer is she going to be at home?
How does she feel about her class?

Dianes Schedule
Diane is a housewife and mother. Her husband,
Dick, drives a taxi. Their two children both go to
school. Their school is about twenty minutes away
by car.
This morning, Diane got up early, at 6:30. She
cooked breakfast for her family at 7:00. They
started eating at 7:15. At 7:45 she drove her kids
to school.
After taking her kids to school, she and a friend
went shopping together. They went to a shopping
center and bought some clothes for their children.
After that she and her friend went to a health club.
They were at the health club for about an hour.
Her friend is trying to lose weight.

Who got up earlier, Diane or Kathy?


Who got up later?
Do you ever use a bus? Can you drive?
Do you usually eat breakfast?

11

New Dynamic English

They [were] [at] the health club [for] [about] an


hour.
She [has] about an hour [before] she is [going] to
[leave].
Diane [enjoys] her class very [much].
This evening Diane [is] [going] to [attend] her art
class.
Kathy is [going] to [interview] [someone] this
evening.
This [evening] Diane is going to [attend] a
[painting] class.
As a result, she [doesnt] [like] to [get up] [early].
Shes very hungry, [so] shes [having] a [large]
lunch.

Question Practice w/SR


Whats the interview going to be about?
What is Diane going to do this evening?
Do many people drive cars?
What time did she get up?
Who usually takes a bus?
Who didnt take a bus this morning?
When is the interview going to start?
How long is the interview scheduled to last?
Who doesnt usually eat breakfast?
Who ate breakfast this morning?
Who didnt eat breakfast this morning?
Does Kathy ever take a bus?
Did Kathy take a bus this morning?
What does her husband do?
Do Kathy and Diane both paint?
Who doesnt have a painting class?
Who interviews famous people?
Who doesnt interview famous people?
What did they buy?
Who is going to interview someone this evening?
Who isnt going to interview someone this evening?
Do many people study painting?
What did she do at 11:45?
What is Diane doing right now?
When did she leave for work?
Does Diane ever interview people?
Focus Exercises
After [that] [she] and [her] friend [went] to a health
club.
This morning she [didnt] [get up] [until] 9:15.
At 11:45 she [left] home and [took] a [bus]
downtown.
She [takes] a [bus] to [work].
Its now 2:00 and [she] is [eating] a [late] lunch.
This evening shes [going to] [interview] an
[important] person.
The interview is [scheduled] to [last] [for] an hour,
[from] 6:30 [until] 7:30.
Shes [going] to [interview] the person [about] the
[problem] of nuclear waste.
Later this afternoon shes [going] to [have] a
[meeting] with her boss.
They [go] [by] [car].
[Their] school is [about] 20 minutes [away] by car.
This morning Diane [got up] [at] 6:30.
After [taking] her kids to school, she and a friend
[went] [shopping] together.
They [bought] [some] clothes for [their] children.
She [went] [shopping] [with] a friend.
12

Module 3: Unit 1, Daily Activities

Focused Listening
Goals

Students will be able to talk about Kathy's entire day,

Focus 1
Focus on Kathys Schedule. Listen to each sentence
several times. If necessary, use the ABC button to look
at the text.

Language Focus
Talking about the recent past, earlier today

from this morning through this evening, from the


reference point of now being 2:00.
Students will be able to talk about their own today,
using now as the reference point. For example, if it
is 10:00 a.m. then In about two and a half hours Im
going to eat lunch would express the fact that they
are going to eat lunch at around 12:30.

Listening Task

Student Follow-up

Listen for and repeat phrases that indicate past time.


Note the form of the past tense verbs. Some verbs are
regular, and some are irregular.

1. Using now as a reference point, students should say


what they did earlier today, what they are doing now,
what they are going to do later today.
2. Write down 10 verbs used in this lesson, and use them
to make sentences about your own schedule for today.
3. Do Practice Exercises C and D.

Goal

Students will be able to introduce Kathy and her usual


morning routine, and also talk about what she did this
morning and what time she did it.

Focus 3

Student Follow-up
1. Students should make a list of all time expressions and
past tense verbs used in the first part of Kathys
Schedule.
2. Students should talk about what they did this morning
and what time they did it.
3. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Focus on Dianes Schedule. Listen to each sentence


several times. If necessary, use the ABC button to look
at the text.

Language Focus
simple past, present continuous, future with be going to

Listening Task

Focus 2

Listen for and practice saying sentences about what Diane


did this morning: She got up at 6:30. She cooked
breakfast for her family. She drove her kids to school.
Note which verbs are regular and irregular.

Review the first part of Kathys Schedule, through 2:00,


and then focus on from 2:00 through tonight. Listen to
each sentence several times. Use the ABC button to
look at the text. Click on the highlighted words to study
the glossary examples.

Goals

Students will be able to present Diane's morning,

Language Focus

simple past, time expressions, present continuous with


V(ing), and future with be going to.

Listening Task
Listen for and practice saying sentences about what she
did this morning, what shes doing now, and what shes
going to do later today: Today she got up at 9:15. She
didn't eat any breakfast. She worked on her computer
until 11:30. Its now 2:00 and shes eating a large
lunch. This evening shes going to interview an
important person.

afternoon and evening in complete sentences.


Students will be able to talk about their own activities
using simple past.
Students will be able to use after and then to indicate
sequence.

Student Follow-up
1. Interview a classmate about their activities for today:
earlier, now, and later.
2. Do Practice Exercises E, F, G and H.

13

New Dynamic English

Focus 4
Review Kathys Schedule and Dianes Schedule.
focus on the Question Practice lesson.

Goals

Students will be able to understand and express the

Then

Language Focus
Wh- and Yes/No questions about past, present and future.

Student Follow-up

Listening Task

1. Ask or write three questions that can be answered by


Yes, he/she did; Yes, he/she does; and Yes, he/she
is.
2. Present your schedule for this week. What did you
do yesterday? What are you doing today? What
are you going to do tomorrow?
3. Do Practice Exercises K and L.

Listen for and record all of the questions in both lessons.


In the Question Practice lesson, practice asking each
question, and listen to your recording.

Goals

Students will be able to ask and answer questions

difference between general and specific times.


Students will be able to ask and answer questions
about the general present, the past, the specific
present, and the future.

about todays activities.


Students will be able to use the correct form of regular
and irregular verbs in both questions and answers.

Focus 6

Student Follow-up

Language Focus

1. Write two Who, When, and What questions in the past,


present and future, and answer them. Example:
Who got up early this morning? Who didnt eat
breakfast this morning? Who is going to meet with
her boss this afternoon?
2. Write two Yes/No questions in the past, present and
future, and answer them.
3. Do Practice Exercises I and J.

Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently.
Do the Question Practice and Focus Exercise lessons
every day until your Completion Percentage is 80-100%.
Then take the Mastery Test.

Focus 5
Review the Question Practice lesson, and do the Focus
Exercises lesson.

Language Focus
habitual activities versus specific activities:
She often takes a bus / She took a bus this morning.

Listening Task
Focus on questions and answers. Focus on the difference
between habitual activities and specific events. If a
question or sentence is habitual (She takes a bus to work
in the morning), make it specific (She took a bus to work
this morning.) If a sentence is specific (She didnt eat
breakfast this morning), make it habitual (Sometimes she
doesnt eat breakfast).
Notice the difference between questions about habitual
activities (with does) and question about past activities
(with did).

14

Module 3: Unit 1, Daily Activities

Practice Exercises

3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise A

Fill in the blanks with the past tense form of the verb in parentheses.
Example:

got up

This morning Kathy (get up)

late.

She (get up) ______________ at 9:15. She (have, not) ____________________ time for
breakfast.

She just (have) ____________ a cup of coffee. Then she (work) ______________ on

her computer until 11:30. At 11:45 she (leave) ______________ home and (take)
_______________ a bus downtown.

3(1)

Daily Activities:

She (go) ______________ to her office at the newspaper.

Exercise B

Complete the sentence with the correct phrase from the box below.
a.

late at night

f.

any breakfast

2. She works for _______.

b.

going to meet her boss g.

shes hungry

3. She often works

_______.

c.

a writer

h.

a bus downtown

4. She doesnt like

_______.

d.

eating a large lunch

i.

to get up early

j.

a newspaper

1. Kathy is

_______.

5. Sometimes she doesnt

_______.

6. This morning she didnt eat

e. have time for breakfast

______.

7. She took _______.


8. She didnt eat breakfast, so _______.
9. Shes hungry, so shes

_______.

10. Later this afternoon shes

______.

15

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise C

Write the answers to the questions.


Example:

Use full sentences.

What did Diane do at 7:45?

She drove her kids to school.

1. What time did they leave for school?


____________________________________________________________________
2. What did she do after she drove her kids to school?
____________________________________________________________________
3. What time did Diane get up this morning?
____________________________________________________________________
4. How did she take her kids to school this morning?
____________________________________________________________________
5. What did they buy at the shopping center?
____________________________________________________________________

3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise D

Find the sentence with the same meaning.

Circle a, b, or c.

1. Their school is about twenty minutes away by car.


a.

It takes twenty minutes to drive to their school.

b.

Their school is twenty miles away.

c.

You can walk to their school in twenty minutes.

2. They left for school at 7:45.


a.

They left school at 7:45.

b.

They left the house at 7:45.

c.

They arrived at school at 7:45.

3. After taking her kids to school, she and a friend went shopping together.
a.

After school, she went shopping with a friend.

b.

She went shopping, and then she took her kids to school.

c.

She took her kids to school, and then she went shopping.

16

Module 3: Unit 1, Daily Activities

Practice Exercises
3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise E

Fill in the blanks using the present continuous be+V(ing) or the present tense (V).
Example:

It's 2:00 and Kathy (eat)

is eating

lunch.

Right now Kathy (eat) _______________ lunch. She's hungry, so she (have) _________________ a
large lunch. She often (eat) _______________ a large lunch because she (get up)
________________ late and she (have, not) ___________________ time for breakfast.

Right now Diane (clean) __________________ the house. She usually (clean)
__________________ the house after lunch, before her children (come) ____________________
home from school.

This year Kathys friend (live) __________________ in Paris.

She (study)

____________________ French. She (want) __________________ Kathy to come visit her in Paris.

3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise F

Rewrite the sentence with the correct contraction (Im, hes, shes, were or theyre) and the
present continuous be+V(ing) form of the verb.
Example:

Kathy and her friend (buy) clothes.

They're buying clothes.

1.

I (work) at the office. __________________________________________________________

2.

She (meet) her boss. ___________________________________________________________

3.

Her husband (drive) a taxi. ______________________________________________________

4.

She and her friend (talk) on the telephone. __________________________________________

5.

My friend and I (eat) lunch together. ______________________________________________

17

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise G

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of be going to.


Example:

In about an hour she

is going to

pick up her kids at school.

1. In about an hour she __________________________ drive to school.


2. This evening they ______________________________ have dinner early.
3. They ______________________________ eat dinner at 8:00.
4. After dinner she ____________________________ take a class.
5. Tonight I ____________________________ work late.

3(1)

Daily Activities:

Rewrite the sentences.


Example:

Exercise H
Use contractions (...'m, ...'s, ...'re)

Kathy is going to have a meeting with her boss.


Kathy's going to have a meeting with her boss.

1. She is going to take a bus to class.


___________________________________________________________________________
2. Kathy is going to interview someone about the problem of pollution.
___________________________________________________________________________
3. They are going to talk about nuclear waste.
___________________________________________________________________________
4. I am going to watch TV before I go to bed.
___________________________________________________________________________
5. We are going to meet our boss after dinner.
___________________________________________________________________________

18

Module 3: Unit 1, Daily Activities

Practice Exercises

3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise I

Match the part of the sentence on the left with the part on the right.
Example:

I get up early

(on weekdays)
a. an hour ago

1. I am having a large lunch _____

b. once a week, on Tuesdays


2. They ate a large lunch _____

c. late at night
d. right now

3. She is going to have lunch _____

e. later this afternoon


4. I often work ______

f.

on weekdays

5. My boss and I usually meet ______

3(1)

Daily Activities:

Write about yourself.


Example:
It's now

4:30 p.m.

Exercise J

Finish the sentences.

This evening

am going to get together with some friends.

1. It is now (time)

___________________________________________________________

2. This morning I

___________________________________________________________

3. Then I

__________________________________________________________________

4. Now I

__________________________________________________________________

5. This afternoon I
6. Tonight I

__________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

7. In the evening I often


8. Tomorrow I

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

19

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
3(1)

Daily Activities:

Exercise K

Read each Answer, then write the question ("Q").


Example: Who took a bus this morning?
Kathy took a bus to work this morning.
1. Q:

Who

Answer:
2. Q:

Kathy didnt. Kathy didn't drive a car this morning.

Does ___________________________________________________________________

Answer:
3. Q:

Yes, she does.

Do

Answer:
4. Q:

No, they dont. Diane paints, but Kathy doesn't.


___________________________________________________________________

Diane is.

Is

Answer:

3(1)

Diane eats breakfast every morning with her family.

____________________________________________________________________

Who

Answer:
5. Q:

__________________________________________________________________

This evening Diane is going to go to her art class.

_____________________________________________________________________
No, she isnt. Kathy isn't going to attend a painting class this evening.

Daily Activities:

Exercise L

Write the answers to the questions.


Example:

Use short answers.

Did Kathy take a bus to work this morning?

1. Did Kathy and Diane both eat breakfast this morning?


2. Is Kathy going to go to an art class tonight?
3. Does Diane ever interview people?
4. Do you ever take a bus?

Yes, she did.


_____________________________

_____________________________________

____________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

5. Did you eat breakfast this morning?

____________________________________________

6. Are you eating anything right now?

____________________________________________

7. Are you going to play tennis later today?

________________________________________

20

New Dynamic English

2. Our World
Our Planet, Earth; Air, Water, and Pollution; Questions; and Focus Exercises
This unit introduces language concepts and vocabulary for talking about our basic needs, such as
food, water, energy, and air. Our planet, Earth, is the focus, and the conditions necessary for life
to exist. Simple causal relations and conditionals are introduced as well, in preparation for further
development in Levels 3 and 4.
In the first lesson, Our Planet, Earth, we present the relationship
between the Earth and the Sun: how life depends on the Sun, and
how a change in the distance between the Earth and Sun would
change the conditions necessary for life to exist.
In the second lesson, Air, Water, and Pollution, the focus is on
our basic needs: water, air, food, and how pollution threatens our
existence. The lesson ends with a call for us all to work together
to take care of our beautiful planet.
Goals:
To be able to understand and talk about basic needs.
To be able to understand and express simple causal relationships and reasons.
Objective 1: To be able to understand and use there is to express that something exists, and it is to
express a condition.
Objective 2: To be able to understand and use simple comparisons and superlatives in questions
and answers.
Objective 3: To be able to understand and use the modals must, can, and would to express
necessity, potentiality, and certainty in causal relationships.
Objective 4:

To introduce simple conditionals in preparation for later units.

21

Module 3: Unit 1, Our World

Learning Points
amount/quantification (enough, plenty, not enough, the third, one of)
The Earth is one of eight planets. It is the third planet from the sun. The second closest planet to the
sun is Venus. Altogether, there are eight planets. Without enough water, there arent enough plants
and trees.
cause/effect
They died out because conditions changed. Polluted air makes us sick. Automobiles are a major cause
of pollution. Conditions must be right for life to exist. Plants and trees produce the air that we
breathe. Without enough water, food cant grow.
conditional relations
Without water there would be no life. Conditions must be right for life to exist. If we were closer to
the sun, it would be too hot for us. When conditions are not right, life cannot exist.
comparison, -er than, superlatives, -est
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun. The second closest planet is Venus. How many planets are
closer to the sun? Two of the planets are closer to the sun than the Earth. Five planets are farther
away. If we were closer to the sun, it would be too hot for us.
reason
They died out because conditions changed. Conditions must be right for life to exist. Without the sun,
would there be life on Earth? Without enough water, food cant grow and people dont have enough to
eat. To take care of the world is to take care of ourselves.
reference
The Earth is one of eight planets that travel around the sun. It is the only planet where life exists.
Millions of years ago there were forms of life that no longer exist. These forms of life are now extinct.
They died out because conditions changed. Human beings are one form of life that still lives on this
planet. Factories, such as this one, cause lots of pollution.
relative pronouns, adjective/adverb clauses (that, where, which)
The Earth is one of eight planets that travel around the sun. The Sun gives us the energy that we need.
Polluted air also kills the plants which give us clean air. Earth is the only planet where life exists.
there (existential)
There are eight planets. In some parts of our world, there isn't enough water. Without the sun, there
would be no life on earth. Millions of years ago there were forms of life that no longer exist.
necessity, potentiality, certainty (must, can, would)
Conditions must be right for life to exist. When conditions are not right, life cannot exist. Without
enough water, food cant grow. If we were closer to the sun, our planet would burn. Without water
and air, there would be no life.

22

Module 3: Unit 2, Our World

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of Our Planet, Earth. Focus on ordinal numbers and how they are used with
comparatives and superlatives: the two closest, the closer of the two, the second closest, etc. Put a list
of adjectives on the board and show how they can be used with ordinal and regular numbers.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice summarizing the first part of the lesson. Ask one or
two students to summarize the information in front of the entire class. See if they can answer simple
questions.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Focus on needs and the causal relations between the sun, Earth, food, water, etc. Explain the
difference between must, can, and would in terms of the examples in the lesson. For example, If A
causes B, then without A there wouldnt be B, or B cant happen without A, or A must happen for B to
happen.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice summarizing and asking questions about the lesson.
Have each group come up with examples that show the difference between must, can, and would.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Skim through Air, Water, and Pollution. Focus on sentences that
express a cause/effect relationship, including the use of make+adj,
and the implied cause/effect relationship in if sentences such as If we
were closer to the sun, it would be too hot. What is the cause and
what is the effect? Have the class come up with more examples of
causes and effects, and put them on the board.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice explaining the cause and effect relations of the words on
the board.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice
Go over some examples of sentences in the unit that use adverb/adjective clauses to give additional
information. Focus on the use of that, which, and where.
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 5, the Focus Exercises in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following Classroom
Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the unit, using the practice
exercises as a model of items to test.

23

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 1: Name Game (Easy)


Choose one of the names of the students in the class or one of the planet names and write a blank on the
board for every letter in the name. The students must guess the letters by using ordinal numbers to ask
about a specific blank. For example, Is the third letter an R? Is the fifth letter a U? Is it Mercury?
(You may want to fill in one or more letters at first to make guessing easier.)
Classroom Activity 2: Survival! (Difficult)
Divide the class into groups of five or six. Tell the groups that they are being sent to a deserted island
as an experiment to see if they can survive for two years. They will be allowed to take 12 items with
them. The group must come to a consensus about what twelve items to bring. They will have to give
reasons for their choices, saying why they will need each item. Each group writes their list on the board
and presents their choices and reasons to the class. For added practice with ordinal numbers have
students put the list in order of priority. Encourage other groups to ask questions and challenge their
choices.
Classroom Activity 3: Advertising Nature
In order to make people realize how important our world is, we may have to "sell" it like we sell cars or
cosmetics. Give students some magazine or newspaper ads to analyze and use as models. In pairs or
groups have students write advertisements for the sun, water, clean air, the various planets, trees, etc.
These ads could be done for radio, TV, newspapers, or billboards.
Example: Feeling tired today? Are your hands and toes like icicles? You're not seeing well? Then
you need the Sun! Without the Sun, you don't feel your best. It fills all your needs: energy, warmth,
light. Call 1-800 SUNSHINE to place your order.
Classroom Activity 4: Matching Causes and Effects
Divide the class into teams. Have each team come up with five causes and their effects, such as She
plays a lot of tennis (cause), so shes a good tennis player (effect). Each team then makes a list of the
causes and effects:
Cause/Action
plays a lot of tennis
played with matches
studies hard
not enough rain
got up late

Effect/Result
is a good tennis player
the house burned down
is a good student
not enough to eat
missed class

Write the individual Effect/Results on pieces of paper and pass them to members of the other teams.
Then each team takes turns asking questions to find the missing cause. Examples: What caused the
house to burn down? How did someone become a good student? Why did someone miss class? Why
is someone a good tennis player? Why isnt there enough to eat? Each correct question gets a point.
Each correct answer gets a point. The team with the highest score at the end of five rounds wins.
Classroom Activity 5: Pollution Research
Have the class use the Internet or some other source of information to find and rank ten major cities in
the world with the worst air pollution? For each city on the list, try to find the major cause of that citys
pollution.

24

Module 3: Unit 2, Our World

forests, and all of nature are a part of us. This


beautiful planet of ours is our home. To take care
of the world is to take care of ourselves. Let's
work together to keep our world alive and well.

Key Sentences (partial transcript)


Our Planet, Earth
This is our planet, Earth. It is one of eight planets
that travel around our sun. Earth is the only planet
where life exists. It is the third planet from the
sun. Mercury is the closest planet to the sun. The
second closest planet to the sun is Venus.

Questions
How many planets are there? How many planets
are closer to the sun than Earth? Where do we get
the energy that we need? Without the sun, would
there be life on earth? If we were closer to the sun,
would it be hotter or colder? What would Earth be
like if we were farther from the sun? What would
our planet be like if we were closer to the sun?

Altogether, there are eight planets. Two of the


planets are closer to the sun than the Earth. Five
planets are farther away from the sun than the Earth.
Our planet is 93 million miles from the sun. The
sun gives us the energy that we need.

What do we need to grow our food? What


produces the air that we breathe? What gives us
clean air? What can't grow without water? What
cant grow if there isnt enough water? What died
out because conditions changed? Which form of
life still lives on this planet? What does polluted
air cause? What is one cause of air pollution?

The sun is very important to us all. It gives us heat


and light. Without it, there would be no life on
Earth.
If we were closer to the sun, it would be too hot for
us. Our planet would burn. If we were farther from
the sun, it would be too cold for us. Our planet
would freeze. As you can see, the balance in nature
is very important. In nature, small changes can make
big differences.

Do you think it's important to keep our air and water


clean? Is there pollution in your country?

Focus Exercises
Air, Water, and Pollution

Without [water] and air [there] [would] [be] no [life].


It is one of eight planets [that] [travel] around our sun.
The [second] [closest] planet to the [sun] is Venus.
The sun [gives] [us] the energy [that] we [need].
Without [it], [there] [would] be no [life] on Earth.
Without [enough] water, food [cant] [grow] and
people [dont] have enough to eat.
When conditions [are] not [right], [life] [cannot]
[exist].
Two of the [planets] are [closer] to the [sun] [than] the
Earth.
Five [planets] are [farther] [away] from the sun [than]
the Earth.
We [get] the [energy] [that] we [need] from the sun.
If we [were] [closer] to the sun it [would] be [too] hot
for us.
We [need] both [water] and energy to [grow] [our]
food.
Plants and trees [produce] the [air] [that] we [breathe].
Automobiles [are] a major [cause] of [air] pollution.
Without enough water, [food] cant grow and [people]
[dont] [have] [enough] to eat.
It [would] [be] [hotter].
Factories [such] as [this] one [cause] [lots] of pollution.
Human beings are [one] form of [life] [that] still [lives]
on [this] planet.
For example, millions of years [ago] [there] [were]
forms of life [that] no longer [exist].

Besides energy from the sun, we also need water


and air. Without water and air, there would be no
life. Without enough water, there aren't enough
plants and trees. Plants and trees produce the air
that we breathe. We also need water to grow our
food. In some parts of our world, there isn't
enough water. Without enough water, food can't
grow and people don't have enough to eat.
Conditions must be right for life to exist. When
conditions are not right, life cannot exist. For
example, millions of years ago there were forms of
life that no longer exist. These forms of life are
now extinct. They died out because conditions
changed.
Now all of us face the problem of pollution.
Pollution changes the conditions that we depend on.
Polluted air makes us sick. It's bad for our health.
Polluted air also kills the plants which give us clean
air. Polluted water kills animals and fish. It also
poisons our food supply. Automobiles are a major
cause of air pollution. Factories such as this one
cause lots of pollution.
Clear air and clean water. We need them both to
live our lives. The mountains, the rivers, the
25

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening

Goals

Students will be able to answer questions about the

Focus 1

conditions necessary for life: What do we need?


Why do we need plants? What do plants need?
Students will be able to talk about necessity and
purpose: We need water to grow our food.

Preview and study Our Planet, Earth.


Listen to each sentence several times. If necessary, use
the ABC button to look at the text.

Language Focus

Student Follow-up

ordinals (first, second), spatial relations, and comparisons

1. As a class or in small groups, think of other reasons


we need energy, clean air, water and plants: We need
water to drink/to wash our clothes/to cook our food,
etc.
2. Make a list of other things you really need. Why do
we need them?
3. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Listening Task
Go through the lesson once. Then study the part of the
lesson on the planets and their relationship to each other
and to the sun. What planet is closest to the sun?
Which is the third closest? Note how each planet can be
described by its relative location to the sun.

Goals

Focus 3

Preview and orientation. Students will be able to

answer questions about the planets and their


relationship to each other and to the sun.
They will be able to use the ordinal numbers first,
second, and third to refer to an object.

Review Our Planet, Earth, and then preview Air, Water,


and Pollution. Listen to each sentence several times. If
necessary, use the ABC button to look at the text.
Consult the Glossary for highlighted words.

Student Follow-up

Language Focus

1. Describe the position of at least five of the eight


planets, using ordinals in no more than three
descriptions.
closest, farthest, 2nd closest, between Earth and
Jupiter, the third planet from the sun
2. Write three sentences that use an ordinal number
together with a superlative adjective (the 2nd largest,
the third oldest, the fourth most expensive), and five
sentences that use a number with an adjective (the two
largest, the three oldest, the two most popular.)
Note the difference in meaning.
3. From 1 to 5, rank your favorite singers, movie stars, or
athletes, and write a sentence about each of them.

must, can, cant, would, cause and effect

Listening Task
Listen for sentences that express a cause-and-effect
relationship. Which is the cause? Which is the effect?
Focus on sentences that say what happens if there isn't
enough air, food, water, etc.
Without water and air, there would be no life.
water, we cannot grow our food

Without

Note how the words must, can, cant, and would are used
to express necessity, potentiality, and certainty.

Goals

Students will be able to answer simple questions about

Focus 2

the relationships between things necessary for life.


What happens if we don't have air?
Students will be able to understand and express simple
causal relations.
Without water, plants can't grow. Without plants,
there isn't enough air.

Review and study Our Planet, Earth. Listen to each


sentence several times. If necessary, use the ABC button
to look at the text. Consult the Glossary for highlighted
words.

Language Focus

Student Follow-up

needs, necessity, purpose

1.

Listening Task
Focus on what we need to live, such as air and water.
Listen for sentences that answer why, and practice saying
them: Without water and air, there would be no life.
Without enough water, there aren't enough plants and
trees. We need water to grow our food.

2.
3.

26

Complete the following sentence: For me to


succeed in (life, school or work), I need the
following: ... and explain why.
List what you think are the three greatest dangers to
life on Earth, and explain why.
Do Practice Exercises C and D.

Module 3: Unit 2, Our World

Focus 4

Student Follow-up
1. As a class or in small groups, discuss problems of
pollution in your country or town. What causes it?
What are some of its effects?
2. On the board, list the causes and effects of pollution.
3. Do Practice Exercises G and H.

Review Our Planet, Earth, and Air, Water, and Pollution,


and then focus on the Questions.

Language Focus
questions and speculation with if

Listening Task

Focus 6

Focus on sentences with if. Listen especially for


sentences about what would happen to us if we were
closer to the sun. Practice saying these sentences.

Language Focus
Language Mastery

Practice saying all the questions and answers, and then


record yourself. Speak clearly, and in phrases, not
individual words.

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

Goal

Students will be able to understand simple what if


questions.

Student Follow-up
1. Explain what would happen if we were closer or
farther from the sun, if it rained more or less, if you
had a better or worse job, if you were a better or worse
student, etc.
2. Do Practice Exercises E and F.

Focus 5
Review Our Planet, Earth, and Air, Water, and Pollution,
the Questions, and then do the Focus Exercises.

Language Focus
cause and effect, make + adj., and relative clauses

Listening Tasks
1. Focus on pollution. What sorts of problems does
pollution cause? Listen for sentences that answer this
question and practice saying them: Polluted air
makes us sick. Polluted air also kills the plants
which give us clean air.
2. Focus on relative clauses. Listen for sentences or
parts of sentences that give us additional information
about something: the plants which give us clean air,
eight planets that travel around the sun. Click on the
highlighted words that and which.

Goals

Students will be able to understand the distinction

between cause and effect (factories cause pollution


and not vice versa).
They will be able to use make + adj.
Students will understand simple relative clauses.

27

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
3(2)

Our World:

Exercise A

Make sentences with these words.


1. gives

sun

The

/ us

energy

_______________________________________________________________________
2. to grow /

water

need

We

food /

our

_______________________________________________________________________
3. are

eight

that

planets

There

travel

our sun /

around

_______________________________________________________________________
4. the sun

there

Without

no life /

would /

be

on Earth.

_______________________________________________________________________
5. right

be

Conditions

life /

to exist

for

must

_______________________________________________________________________

3(2)

Our World:

Exercise B

Fill in the blank with air, energy, food, life, sun, or water.
Example:

Without the

sun

the earth would be too cold for us.

1. Without enough ______________ we can't breathe.


2. Without enough ______________ we can't grow our food.
3. Without the ______________ there would be no life on earth.
4. Besides ______________ from the sun, we also need water and air.
5. When conditions are not right, ______________ cannot exist.
6. Some forms of ______________ died out because conditions changed.
7. Plants and trees produce the _______________ that we breathe.
8. We need water to grow the _______________ that we eat.

28

Module 3: Unit 2, Our World

Practice Exercises
3(2)

Our World:

Exercise C

Write a new sentence with the same meaning using "without".


Example: We need energy from the sun to live.
Without energy from the sun, we can't live.

1. Plants need sun and water to grow.


_____________________________________________________________________
2. We need water to grow our food.
_____________________________________________________________________
3. We need air to breathe.
_____________________________________________________________________

3(2)

Our World:

Exercise D

Match the part of the sentence on the left with the part on the right.
Example:

x.

If we lived on Mercury,

it would be too hot for us.

a. If we were closer to the sun,

1. _____ there wouldn't be enough air.

b. If we were farther from the sun,

2. _____ it would be too hot for us.

c. If we didn't have plants,

3. _____ it would be too cold for us.

d. Without enough water,

4. _____ to grow our food.

e. We must have water,

5. _____ you would be hungrier at lunch time.

f. If you ate more for breakfast,

6. _____ I would do a better job at work.

g. If you ate less for breakfast,

7. _____ we cant grow food.

h. If you slept more,

8. _____ I wouldnt do so badly in school.

i. If I studied more,

9. _____ you wouldnt be so hungry at lunch time.

j. If I worked harder,

10. ____ you wouldnt be so tired.

29

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
3(2)

Our World:

Exercise E

Circle the correct word.


Example:

Automobiles

1. Plants

need

makes

2. Not enough water


causes

4. Pollution

kills

6. Animals

/
/

causes

makes

pollution.

plants to die.

people sick.

makes

kill

need

water.

needs

3. Pollution

5. Some factories

cause

plants die.

cause

Automobiles

pollution.

cause air pollution.

7. Polluted water

poisons

causes

our food supply.

8. Polluted water

poisons

causes

fish to die.

9. Working too hard

makes

10. Eating too much

makes

3(2)

Exercise F

Our World:

causes
causes

me tired.
me sick.

Match the part of the sentence on the left with the part on the right.
Example:

i.

The earth is one of eight planets

that travel around the sun.

a. Earth is the only planet

1. ____ which is closest to the sun.

b. Mercury is the planet

2. ____ where life exists.

c. The sun gives us the energy

3. ____ that still exists on this planet.

d. Human beings are one form of life

4. ____ that we need.

e. I like weather

5. ____ which give us clean air.

f. I dont like foods

6. ____ which no longer exist.

g. Polluted air kills the plants

7. ____ that isnt too hot or cold.

h. There are many forms of life

8. ____ that are too hot.

30

Module 3: Unit 2, Our World

Practice Exercises
3(2)

Our World:

Exercise G

Make the two sentences into one sentence using "that."


Example: The earth is one of eight planets. Eight planets travel around the sun.
The earth is one of eight planets that travel around the sun.
1. Plants and trees produce air.

We breathe the air.

__________________________________________________________________
2. Millions of years ago there were forms of life. They no longer exist.
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
3. There are lots of old cars. Old cars are a major cause of pollution.
__________________________________________________________________

3(2)

Our World:

Exercise H

Match the actions or causes with the results or effects in the box.
Example:

The child played with matches

Actions/Causes

(Their house burned down).

Results/Effects

1. The bus came late.

_____

2. She studies hard.

_____

3. He plays a lot of tennis.

_____

4. He almost never plays tennis.

_____

5. She ate too much.

_____

6. She didnt eat breakfast.

_____

7. There wasnt enough rain.

_____

8. He doesnt get enough sleep.

_____

9. The air pollution was very bad

_____

10. He speaks several languages.

_____

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.

31

Shes very hungry.


Hes usually tired.
Shes a good student.
Hes a good tennis player.
Food prices are very high.
He got an interesting job.
Many people got sick.
She missed her class.
He cant play tennis very well.
Shes not hungry at all.
Their house burned down.

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

3. Locations
City Locations; City Quiz; and Spatial Relations
This unit focuses on spatial relations, street locations and the names of common places of business,
such as a bank, restaurant, and post office. This unit is extended and followed up in Level 3, where
the focus is on giving directions.
In the City Locations lesson, students click on various locations in DynEd City and learn the names
of places of business and how to describe the location of each in terms of street names, intersections,
and relative location.
In the City Quiz, the students hear a location described and they are then supposed to click on the
correct spot to show their comprehension. A score is given for each correct choice. Each quiz
provides 15 locations to find.
In the Spatial Relations lesson, students study the spatial relations between geometrical shapes,
letters, and stamps. The focus is on words such as under, near, on, on the right, inside, outside and
around. These can and should be extended in Classroom Activities.
Goals:
To be able to understand and explain the location of an object or building.
To be able to ask for information about location.
To be able to understand and name common places of business.
To be able to understand and name geometric shapes.

32

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

Learning Points
asking for directions, useful expressions
Excuse me. Where is the...? Where can I buy some...? Could you help me find...? Is there a post
office near...? Is the bank far from the hotel? Could you show me where the cinema is? Which
street runs in front of the post office?
directions
(north, south, east, west) These are the four directions. The park is on the northwest corner of High
Street and First Avenue. First Avenue runs north-south. High Street runs east-west. There is a
police station on High Street, west of First Avenue.
location, prepositions of location
(in, on, across, behind, inside, outside, around, opposite, next to, near, between, on top of, under,
around the corner from, in the middle of) on the corner; on first avenue; next to; in the park;
in the middle of the block; The subway entrance is around the corner from the bookstore. What is
located behind the art museum?
present simple verbs
buy, sell, cost, help find, show, make reservations, park, visit, cash checks, exchange currency, attend,
play
questions about location
Is the bank far from the hotel? Is the bookstore on the same side of the street as the drugstore? Are
there any public rest rooms on Second Avenue? What is on the corner of High and First, next to the
art museum? Which street runs in front of the post office? What is located behind the art museum?
Could you show me where the cinema is? Where can I buy some stamps? Could you help me find a
chemist?
shapes
triangle, a triangle has three sides;

circle;

square, a square has four sides.

spatial relations
(inside, around, outside, to the left, side by side, near, under, on, on top of) The triangle is inside the
circle. The circle is around the triangle. Its to the left of the triangle. The stamp is near the
envelope. Its on the envelope. The letter is inside the envelope. Its on top of the envelope.
there (existential)
There is a traffic light at this intersection. Is there a...?

33

There are many stores along Second Avenue.

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Introduce City Locations and show the students how to methodically go through the city to hear various
ways of giving a location. While you do this, write important expressions on the board, such as across
the street, on the corner, etc. And make a list of common places of business that students need to
know.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students draw simple maps and practice using the phrases on the board to
describe locations on their maps. Be sure to include the directions: North, South, East and West.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Have the class help you construct a map of a small city. Then focus on how to ask for the location of
a place of business. Put several expressions on the board, such as Excuse me, but could you tell
where the bank is? Is there a coffee shop near the bank? etc. Note: This might be a good time to
focus on the difference between a bank and the bank closest to the hotel.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions about the map. Then
ask students from different groups to come to the front of the class and ask each other about two or
three locations on the map. It should be fun. Remember to have the students be polite.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce Spatial Relations and make a list of the words and phrases used, such as around, inside,
near, under, and side by side.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions about spatial relations.
Students may use either drawings of geometric figures, or use objects in the classroom, such as desks,
chairs, books, and their classmates.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following
Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the unit, using
the practice exercises as a model of items to test.

34

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

Classroom Activity 1: My Neighborhood


Ask students to write a description of their neighborhood, the area they go shopping, or their favorite
part of town. Have them describe what type of shops and services exist and where they are in relation
to each other. Remind them to use the forms there is and there are.
Classroom Activity 2: Know your way around DynEd City
Pair students and give one student Map A of DynEd City and another Map B (following pages). Each
map is missing different places in DynEd City. Have each student ask his or her partner where the
missing places are and fill them in on his/her map.
Classroom Activity 3: Community Questions TicTacToe
Divide the class into two teams and draw a TicTacToe grid on the board. Explain to the class that you
will give each team a location in the community and the person answering must ask a question about
that place. For example, you say, Hair Salon and the team member could ask Where can I get a
haircut? If the question is correct for that location, the student can give you directions for placing the
X or O on the TicTacToe grid. (Put the X in the bottom left square.) The first team with three in a row
is the winner.
Choose a student from the first and second teams before giving the location. If the student from the
first team is not able to ask a question, the student from the second team is given a chance to answer.
Classroom Activity 4: Shapes All Around
Instruct students to draw a large four-square grid on a sheet of paper. Have students draw any two
shapes (triangle, circle, square, rectangle, diamond) in the top left box. In the next box have them
draw three shapes, then four and finally five in the last box.
Pair students and tell them not to show their partners their drawings. Partner A must describe the
position of the shapes in each box so that Partner B can duplicate the drawing. Then Partner B gives
oral directions so Partner A can duplicate his/her drawing. The pairs then compare their drawings
with the originals.
Classroom Activity 5: Mystery Construction
Divide students into pairs or small groups. Give each group some blocks, preferably different colored
blocks, and a large piece or cardboard to use as a barrier. Then have one student construct a city or
shape with the blocks so that the other students cannot see it. (Have the student work behind the
cardboard, so that the other students cannot see.) The task is for the first student to give instructions
to the other students so that they can make an exact copy of the city or shape. Example: Put your
green block on top of the long red one or Put the bank next to the hotel. When finished, take away the
barrier and compare the results. If students need new words, such as perpendicular, they should use
a dictionary and make a list. Enjoy!

35

New Dynamic English

Know your way around DynEd City

A
You are A.

Your partner is B.

These places are not on your map:

Hospital
Travel Agency
Restaurant
Subway
Public Restrooms
Ask your partner where they are.
Then answer B's questions.

Write the name of each place on the correct location.

36

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

Know your way around DynEd City

B
You are B.

Your partner is A.

These places are not on your map:

Police Station
Gas Station (Petrol Station)
Cafe
Drugstore (Chemist's)
University
Ask your partner where they are.
Then answer A's questions.

Write the name of each place on the correct location.

37

New Dynamic English

Restaurant. This restaurant is next door to the


hotel, at the corner of High Street and Second
Avenue. It costs a lot to eat here, but the food is
very good.

Key Sentences
City Locations
Welcome to DynEd City.
City park. The park is on the northwest corner of
High Street and First Avenue. In summer, children
love to play in the park.

Gas station (Am). There is a gas station at the


intersection of High Street and Second Avenue.
This petrol station (Br) is open from 7:00 a.m. to
midnight every day.

University. The university is located behind the art


museum. The university is between First Avenue
and Second Avenue, north of the art museum. Many
international students attend this university.

Parking lot. There is a parking lot on First


Avenue, south of the hospital. You can park here
while you visit the hospital.

First Avenue. First Avenue runs north-south.


There is a travel agency and a post office on First
Avenue.

Gas station (2). There is a gas station on First


Avenue, opposite a travel agency. This gas station
is open all night.

Cafe. There is a cafe on the corner of High Street


and First Avenue, next to the art museum. This
cafe is popular with students from the university.

Post office. The main post office is on First


Avenue between a bank and a travel agency. You
can buy stamps or mail a letter here.

Art museum. The art museum is on High Street,


directly across from the hotel. The art museum is
between a cafe and a cinema.

Travel agency. There is a travel agency on First


Avenue, next to the post office. You can buy
airplane and train tickets here. You can make hotel
reservations here.

Movie theater (Am) Cinema (Br). There is a


theater on the corner of High Street and Second
Avenue. There are shows here every night, at
seven and nine o'clock.

Department store. There is a large department


store on Second Avenue, south of High Street.
This department store is around the corner from the
hotel. This store sells clothing, furniture, and
many other items.

Second Avenue. There are many stores along


Second Avenue. Second Avenue is a very busy
street. This is the intersection of High Street and
First Avenue. This is where First Avenue crosses
High Street. There is a traffic light at this
intersection.
High Street. High Street runs east-west.
Street runs in front of the hotel.

Bookstore. There is a bookstore on Second


Avenue, between a gas station and a drugstore.
There is a bookstore on Second Avenue, round the
corner from the entrance to the underground. This
shop sells books, magazines and newspapers.

High

Public rest rooms (Am). There are public rest


rooms in the park. There are public conveniences
(Br) across the street from the university.

Drugstore (Am) chemist (Br). There is a drugstore


on Second Avenue, across from a department store.
You can buy medicine, toothpaste and other
personal items here.

City hospital. The hospital is at the intersection of


First Avenue and High Street. There is an
emergency room here at the hospital.

Subway station (Am). The entrance is on High


Street, around the corner from a bookstore. This
underground station (Br) is next to a petrol station.

Bank. There is a bank on the corner of First


Avenue and High Street, next door to the hotel.
You can cash checks and exchange currency here.

Police station. There is a police station on High


Street, west of First Avenue.

Hotel. The city's best hotel is on High Street,


across from the art museum. This hotel is in the
middle of the block, between First Avenue and
Second Avenue.

These are the four directions:


and West.

38

North, East, South

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

City Quiz
Where is the park?
What is on the northwest corner of High Street and
First Avenue?
What is located behind the art museum?
Which of these buildings is next to the art museum?
What is on the corner of High and First, next to the
art museum?
What building is directly across from the hotel?
What building is between a cafe and a cinema?
Which of these buildings is on the corner of High
Street and Second Avenue?
Which street runs in front of the post office?
The travel agency is on which street?
Where is the intersection of High Street and First
Avenue?
Which of these buildings is located in the middle of
the block?
Is there a post office near the hotel?
Are there public rest rooms on Second Avenue?
Is the bank far from the hotel?
Is there a department store on High Street?
Is the bookstore on the same side of the street as the
drugstore?
Could you show me where the cinema is?
Excuse me. Where is the post office?
Where can I buy some stamps?
Could you help me find a chemist?
Spatial Relations (and shapes)
The triangle is inside the circle. The circle is
around the triangle.
The circle is to the left of the triangle. The triangle
is to the right of the circle.
The triangle and circle are side by side. The
triangle is on the left, and the circle is on the right.
A triangle has three sides. A square has four sides.
The stamp is near the envelope. The stamp is on
the envelope. The stamp is under the envelope.
The letter is inside the envelope. The letter is
outside the envelope. The letter is on top of the
envelope.
What has four sides? A square has four sides.
What has three sides? A triangle has three sides.

39

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening
Student Follow-up

Focus 1

1. Give the locations of five places relative to other


places in the city.
The bank is next door to the hotel. The gas station is
next to a subway station. There is a parking lot
across the street from the travel agency.
2. Write 4 pairs of sentences that show the difference
between the articles a/an and the.
There is a hotel on High Street. The hotel on High
Street is across the street from a museum.
3. Do Practice Exercise B.

Focus on City Locations. Find out the name of each place


on the map.

Language Focus
vocabulary:

community services; there is/there are

Listening Task
Listen for and practice saying phrases that indicate
location.
on First Avenue, on the corner of High Street and First
Ave., across the street from, etc.

Focus 3

Goals

Review City Locations.


Then focus on the City Quiz
and see how high you can score.

Students will know vocabulary relating to services,

stores and streets: department store, bank, post


office, intersection, corner, etc.
Students will be able to talk about location in terms of
street name and prepositions of location. There is a
travel agency on First Avenue. Note the difference
between American usage (on High Street) and British
(in High Street).
They will be able to use there is or there are: There
are restrooms in the park.

Language Focus
can, asking for location

Listening Tasks
In City Locations, listen for and record sentences that tell
you what you can do at any of these places: You can buy
airplane and train tickets here. You can park here while
you visit the hospital. Prepare to talk about one of these
places.

Student Follow-up

In City Quiz, listen for and practice asking questions about


location, such as Excuse me, could you tell me where the
bank is?

1. Write two sentences using there is and there are.


2. Make a list of five prepositions of location and write
two sentences for each.
3. Do Practice Exercise A.

Goals

Students will be able to describe places and services:

Focus 2

You can buy stamps at a post office.


Students will be able to ask questions with Where can
I...?
Students will be use polite language to ask for city
locations.

Review City Locations.


Then try the City Quiz. If
you have difficulty, study City Locations again and use the
Glossary for additional help.

Language Focus

Student Follow-up

prepositions of location, asking questions about location

1. Ask and answer questions about 5 services or stores:


Where can you buy stationery? (department store,
bookstore, art museum)
Where can you get cup of coffee? (restaurant, cafe)
Where can you get medicine? etc.
2. Give a brief presentation about one of the places in
DynEd City or in your own city, e.g.: Cafe. There
is a cafe on the corner of High St. and First Avenue.
The cafe is next to the art museum and across the
street from the park. You can get a cup of coffee or
something to eat here. This cafe is popular with
students from the university.
3. Do Practice Exercise C.

Listening Task
Listen for and practice saying sentences that give the
location of a place relative to another place: There is a
gas station...next to a subway station.

Goal

Students will be able to give the location of one place


relative to the location of someplace else.
between the cafe and the cinema, next to, next door
to, across the street from, around the corner from

40

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

Focus 4
Review City Locations.
Relations.

Focus 6

Then focus on Spatial

Language Focus
Language Mastery

Language Focus
directions (north, south, east, west), shapes and relative
locations (under, on top of, etc.)

Listening Task
Review the lessons in this unit several times. Practice
recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you can say
these sentences fluently and with confidence. When
your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the Mastery
Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

Listening Task
In City Locations, listen for sentences that give location in
terms of directions (north, south, east, west) and practice
saying them.

Goal

Students will be able to talk about location in terms of

directions: High Street runs east-west. The park is


on the northwest corner of High Street and First
Avenue.
Students will learn the basic shapes: circle, triangle,
and square.

Student Follow-up
1. Ask and answer 5 questions about directions: Which
street runs east-west? Which run north-south?
What is on the southwest corner of High Street and
First Avenue? Is the Hotel on the south side of High
Street?
2. Do Practice Exercise D.

Focus 5
Review and focus on the Spatial Relations lesson.

Language Focus
spatial relations, prepositions, shapes

Listening Task
Focus on shapes and locations. Click on each picture
and practice saying the sentences. Then do the review
quiz and see if you can get them all right.

Goal

Students will be able to use prepositions to talk about


spatial relationships: The stamp is near the envelope.
The envelope is on top of the stamp, etc.

Student Follow-up
1. Describe the position of 10 objects in the classroom:
The desk is near the window. The book is on top of
the desk, etc.
2. Do Practice Exercise E.

41

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
DynEd City

3(3)

Locations:

Exercise A

Fill in the blanks with the correct word or phrase from below.
bank
museum
rest rooms
Example:

hospital
cinema
across

The department store is

across from
around
at
around

the corner

between
from
in
from

of
on
next
the hotel.

1. The park is _______________ the street ______________ the university.


2. The museum is ____________________ the cafe and the movie theater.
3. The post office is _____________ the corner _____________ the hotel.
4. The art museum is directly ___________________ the hotel.
5. The bookstore is _____________ the corner _____________ the subway entrance.
6. There is a ___________________ next to the hotel.
7. There are _____________________ in the park.
8. There is a _____________________ next to the museum.
9. The hospital is _________ the corner ________ 1st and High Street.
10. There is a coffee shop _________________ to the museum.

42

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

Practice Exercises

DynEd City
3(3)

Locations:

Exercise B

Complete each sentence with a word or


phrase from the box below.

a. at
b. behind
c. between
Example:

d. near
e. in
f. in front of

g. next to
h. on
i. opposite

The department store is

j. at the intersection
k. around the corner from
l. on the same side of the street as
the hotel.

1. The entrance to the subway is _____ High Street.


2. Theres a parking lot _____ the post office.
3. The book shop is _____ the drugstore.
4. Public restrooms are _____ the park.
5. The university is _____ the museum.
6. The gas station which is open all night is _____ 1st Street.
7. The hotel is _____ a bank and a restaurant.
8. The hospital _____ the hotel.

3(3)

Locations:

Exercise C

Fill in the blanks with a or the.

There is _____ fairly good hotel on High Street.

Next to _____ hotel is _____ restaurant.

_____ restaurant is expensive, but _____ food there is very good.


next to _____ hotel.

However, _____ bank is closed on Sundays.

There is also a bank


If you have _____ car

and need some gas, there is _____ gas station on 1st street which is open twenty four hours
a day.

Its _____ only place to go if you need gas late at night.

43

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
3(3)

Locations:

Exercise D

Read each answer ("A").


Example:
1Q:
A:
2Q:
A:
3Q:
A:
4Q:
A:
5Q:
A:

3(3)

Then complete the question ("Q") for that answer.

Q. Where can I
get some aspirin?
A. There's a drugstore on Second Avenue.

Could you tell me where I ______________________________________________________


You can buy a newspaper at the bookstore on Second Avenue.
Could you tell me where I ______________________________________________________
You can park your car at the parking lot on 1st Avenue.
Could you tell me where I ______________________________________________________
Sure.

Theres a gas station at the intersection of High Street and 2nd Avenue.

Excuse me, but could you tell me where I __________________________________________


Sure.

You can find a restroom in the park.

Where can I __________________________________________________________________


You can get something to drink at the coffee shop next to the museum.

Locations:

Exercise E

Fill-in the blanks with the correct choice from the box on the right.
Example:

The bookstore is

of High Street.

1. The Police Department is _____ of the hotel.


2. High Street _____ , and 1st Avenue _____.
3. The University is _____ of High Street.
4. The hospital is _____ of High Street and 1st Avenue.
5. The bank is _____ of High Street and 1st Avenue.
6. Theres a cafe _____ of High Street and 1st Avenue.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.

a half block north

a half block south


goes north-south
runs east-west
one block east
one block west
on the north side
on the south side
on the southeast corner
on the southwest corner
on the northeast corner

7. The theater is _____ of High Street, at the intersection of 2nd Avenue.


8. The subway entrance is _____ of the hotel.

44

Module 3: Unit 3, Locations

Practice Exercises
3(3)

Locations:

Exercise F

Write a sentence that describes the spatial relations in each picture.

1. The stamp _______________________________________________

2. The stamp _______________________________________________

3. The envelope _____________________________________________

4. The circle ________________________________________________

5. The circle ________________________________________________

6. The triangle _______________________________________________

7. The letter _________________________________________________

45

New Dynamic English

Location Crossword
1.

5.

2.

3.

4.

6.

7.

10.

8.

9.

11.

12.
13.
14.
15.

16.
17.

18.
22.
19. 20.

21.
24.

23.

25.
26.

ACROSS
1.
4.
5.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
23.
24.
25.
26.

to pay for something


the opposite of left
you need this before you go to a hotel
coffee or _____
what you do to a car
The sun rises in the _____.
The sun sets in the _____.
you buy these at the post office
the opposite of over
cars need this to run
they stop fast drivers
on the outside
where two streets cross
the opposite of entrance
How much money does it _____?
the opposite of to
you need this to go on the subway

DOWN
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
12.
20.
21.
22.

46

The opposite of no is ____.


Its _______ the street from the museum.
Another word for street is _____.
a place where you pay to eat
what you do with food
a shape with three sides
The opposite of under is _____.
Its not far. Its _____.
The opposite of difficult is _______.
very close, beside
Its on the same _____ of the street.
Please open it so we can go inside.

Module 3: Unit 4, Review Exercises

4. Review Exercises for Module 3


When Units 1-3 are completed, it is important to review the main points even while beginning to work on Module
4. The following lessons help students refocus on some of the main language points that are covered and
included in the Mastery Tests. These lessons should be done on a frequent basis.

Dictations
Dictations focus on important language at the word and phrase level. Detailed instructions for doing the
dictations can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) when you enter
the lesson. The Dictations for Module 3 are as follows:

Dictation 1

Dictation 4

1.
2.
3.
4.

1. Later this afternoon she's going to have a meeting with


her boss.
2. She's going to make a request.
3. She wants to take a week off so that she can go to Paris.
4. Her best friend, who lives in Paris, is going to get
married.

This morning, Diane got up early, at 6:30.


She cooked breakfast for her family at 7:00.
At 7:15 they sat down together and ate breakfast.
After taking her kids to school, she and a friend went
shopping together.

Dictation 2
Dictation 5

1. Sometimes she gets up so late that she doesn't have time


for breakfast.
2. Today, for example, she got up at 9:15.
3. At 11:45 she left home and took a bus downtown.
4. It's now 2:00 and she is eating a late lunch.

1. Conditions must be right for life to exist.


2. When conditions are not right, life cannot exist.
3. For example, millions of years ago there were forms of
life that no longer exist.
4. They died out because conditions changed.

Dictation 3
1.
2.
3.
4.

Dictation 6

This morning she didn't get up until 9:15.


She didn't eat any breakfast.
She just had a cup of coffee.
Then she worked on her computer at home until 11:30.

1.
2.
3.
4.

The sun gives us the energy that we need.


Without it, there would be no life on Earth.
Besides energy from the sun, we also need water and air.
Without water and air, there would be no life.

Fill-Ins
This lesson reviews some of the main grammar points that have been introduced in Units 1-3. Detailed
instructions for doing the Fill-Ins (with Speech Recognition) can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) once you are in the Fill-Ins lesson. Please note that the highlighted
words in the answer sentences are linked to the Glossary. Sample sentences from the Fill-Ins lesson are:
(1) This morning she didn't get up until 9:15. (2) After the interview she's going to work late. (4) She ate
lunch an hour ago. (6) It's now 2:00 and she is eating a late lunch. (7) Later this afternoon she's going to
have a meeting with her boss. (8) Her best friend, who lives in Paris, is going to get married. (9) The
interview is scheduled to last for an hour, from 6:30 until 7:30. (12) She's very hungry, so she's having a large
lunch.
(15) We all need energy, but we have to think carefully about safety. (16) After taking her kids to school, she
and a friend went shopping together. (21) She doesn't have much time. (23) She has about an hour before
she's going to leave. (24) If we were closer to the sun, it would be too hot for us. (25) Besides energy from
the sun, we also need water and air. (26) Without water and air, there would be no life. (27) Polluted air
also kills the plants which give us clean air.

47

New Dynamic English

Speech Practice
In addition to developing oral fluency, this lesson provides a means to review and focus attention on many of the
key language points developed in Units 1-3, such as the past tense, present continuous, be going to, and relative
pronouns. Detailed instructions for using Speech Recognition and for doing the Speech Practice lesson can be
found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens.
The Speech Practice lesson has four sections: Sentence Reading, Answering Questions, Sentence Repetition and
Speech Quiz. Please note that the Score for the Speech Quiz is designed so that students can try to increase their
personal scores each time they do the quiz, rather than as a test. The scores can be found in the Study Records.

5. Video Interactions, Module 3


This lesson shows a variety of native speakers in the
following situations: Telephone: Arranging to Meet;
Are You Going to Class? Asking for Information; At a
Restaurant; and Hot Seats. Except for the Hot Seats,
students may view each scene in a presentation mode.
Lessons marked with an SR also have an interactive
mode where students can interact with the characters
through Speech Recognition (or mouse click) choices.
In the Hot Seats, the characters answer questions put to
them by the students.
Instructions for this lesson, and also for Speech Recognition, can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help Screens after you enter the lesson.
Each video scene illustrates language points that have been developed in this module. The scenes have been
designed so that they can be role-played by students. This is an excellent way to review, have fun, and
personalize the language.
Telephone:

No, Im not. So could you call me after class and give me


the assignment for next week?
Sure, no problem.

Arranging to Meet

(variation 1)
Lets meet at the restaurant, okay? (suggestion)
Okay, wheres the restaurant?
Do you know where the Empire Theater is? Sure.
The restaurant is across the street from the theater.
(variation 2)
Lets meet at the restaurant, okay?
How about meeting at your office instead? We can walk
from there.
Do you know where my office is?
Sure, its in front of the bus station, right?

Asking for Information


(variation 1)
Excuse me, but Im looking for a good restaurant. Is there
anything good around here?
There's an excellent Chinese restaurant about a block away.
Do you mean the one across from the park?
No, not that one. There's a better one on 2nd Avenue, near
the corner. Its next to a bookstore.
(variation 2)
Excuse me, can you tell me where I can buy tickets for a
basketball game?
Sure. You can buy tickets at the tourist information office
down the street. It's right across the street from the post
office.
Across the street from the post office? (confirmation)
Yes, that's right. Do you want me to write it down?
No, that's okay. I'll remember.

Are You Going to Class?


Hello John. Its me, Emily? Yeah, what is it Emily?
(variation 1)
Are you going to class this evening? No, Im not.
Oh, why not? I dont like the teacher.
So what are you going to do? I think Im going to quit.
Oh come on. Dont be a quitter.
(variation 2)
Are you going to class this evening? Sure. Ill be there.
Could you do me a favor? (request)
What is it? Arent you coming to class?

48

Module 3: Unit 5, Video Interactions

At a Restaurant
Are you ready to order sir?
No, not yet. But I'd like something to drink. Do you have
lemonade?
(variation 1)
Sure. I'll get your lemonade and be right back.
Thanks.
(variation 2)
I'm sorry. We're out of lemonade. Would you like anything
else? Coffee, tea?
Okay, I'll have some coffee please.
All right, I'll bring it right away.

Hot Seats
What did you do last weekend?
What are you going to do next weekend?
What do you usually do on the weekend?

49

New Dynamic English

Module 3 Summary - New Dynamic English


Active vocabulary through Module 3:

approximately 750 words

Summary of Verbs in each Lesson (not including Video Interactions)


Regular Verbs
(1) Daily Activities
change*
clean
cook
enjoy
finish
interview
last (durative)*
like*
live*
need*
pick up
schedule
start*
stay
study*
try
vary
want*
work*

(2) Our World


breathe
burn
change*
die
exist
grow
keep
kill
live*
need*
poison
produce
travel

Irregular Verbs and their Past Tense forms


V
be*
buy
do*
drive*
eat*
freeze
get up*
get+adj*
give
go*
have*
leave*
make
sit
take*
think*
write*
* verbs introduced in previous lessons

Lessons
(1)
(1,3)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(1,2)
(1)
(1)

50

V(d) Past
was/were
bought
did
drove
ate
froze
got up
got+adj
gave
went
had
left
made
sat
took
thought
wrote

Module 4 Lesson Map

Module 4 Lesson Map


Unit 1:

Planning Ahead
Departure
Choices
Meeting a Friend
Questions
Focus Exercises

Unit 2:

Matrix Vocabulary and Matrix Game


Things to Eat
Things to Drink
Things to Read
Things to Listen to
Colors

Unit 3:

Biography
The Early Years
The Later Years
Questions
Focus Exercises

Unit 4:

Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Speech Quiz

Unit 5:

Video Interactions w/SR


Business Telephone
Friendly Advice
At a Restaurant
An Interview

51

New Dynamic English

1. Planning Ahead
Departure; Choices; Meeting a Friend; Questions; and Focus Exercises
This unit extends and follows up Module 3, Unit 1, Daily Activities. In that unit the focus was on
time relations, past, present and future. The emphasis here is on the future, with degrees of
certainty and how modals are used to express the uncertain future.
In the first lesson, Departure, Max prepares to go on a business
trip. The narrative shifts from planning about the future to talking
about the past and making comments about the habitual present.
The main focus is on time phrases and contrasting tenses. In
Choices, the focus is on conditionality, degrees of certainty, and
giving reasons. This lays the groundwork for more advanced work
in Modules 5-7. In Meeting a Friend, we see examples of how to
use clauses and relative pronouns to link ideas, such as: He wrote a
story that appeared on television.
In Questions and Focus Exercises, students test both their comprehension and their ability to use
the target vocabulary and structures to reconstruct sentences from the lessons.
Goals
To be able to understand and talk about plans and future alternatives.
To be able to understand and express different degrees of certainty about the future.
To be able to shift back and forth, from past to present to future, in a simple narrative.
To begin to understand longer sentences where several ideas are linked together in one sentence.
Objective 1: To be able to understand, use, and ask questions in the simple past, present, and
future tenses.
Objective 2: To be able to understand and use time phrases and adverb clauses to indicate the
time of an event.
Objective 3: To be able to understand sentences which use infinitives to name an action.
Objective 4: To be able to understand the difference between the use of modals, such as will, may
and can, and the use of be going to.

52

Module 4:

Unit 1, Planning Ahead

Learning Points
adverb phrases and clauses (time phrases)
Next week Max is going on a business trip. Max is going to arrive in London on a Sunday. The next
day... On Monday, hes going to attend a meeting. When its late at night in London, its afternoon in
San Francisco. Hell probably watch TV before he goes to bed. Whenever hes away from home, he
looks forward to coming back. When he lands in London, hell claim his baggage. Once he arrives at
his hotel, hell check in. After he checks in to his room . . .
conditionals and suppositions with if
Max isnt sure what he will do. If hes tired, he may decide to take a taxi. If he leaves on Saturday
afternoon, he'll arrive on Sunday. If he decides to take a bus or a taxi, he can see the countryside. If
it's now 11:45, when did the last bus leave? If he still cant sleep, he may telephone his wife.
Sometimes its possible to get a cheaper rate if you stay for several days. If he telephones at night, what
time will it be?
degrees of certainty with modals, be going to
(will, may, can, will probably, is going to, its possible) If hes tired, he may decide to take a taxi.
Hell probably be very tired. Max will probably watch a late movie on TV. The next day, on Monday
hes going to attend a meeting. If he decides to take a bus, he can see the countryside.
future with modals, be going (to), and Wh-questions
(going to; will; may; can) Next week Max is going on a business trip. Once he arrives at his
hotel, hell check in. Hell probably be very tired. Hes going to get a discount. If he still cant
sleep, he may telephone his wife. Hes working on a new story that will appear on television next year.
When will he arrive?
infinitive (to name an action)
He tried to buy airplane tickets. It takes ten hours to fly from S.F. to London. Its hard to sleep in the
hotel. Its nice to travel, but Max misses his family. He'll have to decide how to get to his hotel.
One choice is to go by taxi. Its cheaper to go by bus. He may decide to take a bus. Sometimes its
possible to get a cheaper rate. Its always interesting to talk to John. They have to be careful not to
drink too much.
it is + adj. (to describe state or factual condition)
It's cheaper to go by bus. It's possible to get a cheaper rate. It's interesting to talk to him. If its now
11:30, the next bus is going to leave in ten minutes.
noun phrases
One way to get from the airport to his hotel is to take a taxi. One of his best friends, John, lives in
Brighton. The time difference between London and San Francisco is eight hours.
relative pronouns (how, that, what, who)
His travel agent called and told him (that) there was space on the flight. Max isnt sure what he will do.
Hell have to decide how to get to his hotel. He wrote a story that appeared on television. It was a
story about a man who lost his memory. Hes working on a new story that will appear on television
next year.
reason, result
He tried to buy tickets, but the flight was full. He has a good travel agent, so he's going to get a
discount. He's going to take British Airways because it has a non-stop flight. As a result, it's often
hard to sleep.

53

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of Departures in class. Focus on the times phrases and tenses used in each sentence.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students ask and answer questions about something they did last week,
yesterday, and something they are going to do tomorrow or next week.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4:

Presentation and Oral Practice


Put a list of words and phrases on the board related to travel, such as non-stop
flight, direct flight, ticket, travel agent, trip, reserved seats, passport, roundtrip, one-way, etc. Have the class help you make an example sentence for
each and put it on the board.
Have students practice summarizing the information about Maxs trip. How
is he going? Why? How long is it going to take? What airline is he going to
take? When did he get the tickets? Then have students decide what steps they
need to take when planning a trip to a foreign country.

Step 5: Listening Focus


Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Present the Choices lesson in class. Focus on the use of if and the different ways to express certainty:
be going to, will, will probably, may, and can. Show how the meaning changes when you substitute
one word for another.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice first presenting Maxs choices. Then have students ask
and answer the following questions: What is something you are going to do next week? What is
something you may do next week? What is something you can do and probably will do in the future?
What is something you want to do but probably wont ever do?
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice
Present the Meeting a Friend lesson, and focus on how John is described. Note the use of relative
pronouns in sentence such as: He wrote a story that appeared on television. Point out how the tenses
take the same form in clauses as they do in the main predicate, including subject-verb agreement.
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 and Listening Focus 5.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following
Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the unit,
using the practice exercises as a model of items to test.

54

Module 4:

Unit 1, Planning Ahead

Classroom Activity 1: The Best for Me


Have students brainstorm all possible ways to get from their homes to school or work (bus, train, taxi,
bike, walk, drive own car, trolley, underground). List these on the board and ask students to suggest the
positives and negatives of each method (slow, fast, expensive, causes air pollution, healthy, meet people,
etc.) List the pros and cons next to the modes of transportation. Have students decide which is the best
mode of transportation and give their reasons. Encourage students to make comparisons and use if
clauses. (The bus is easier than driving. If I'm tired, I can sleep on the bus.) Follow-up with written
assignment.
Classroom Activity 2: Maxs Travel Agency Role Play
Have the students work in pairs and prepare a short dialog of the discussion between Max and his travel
agent. Remind them that both the travel agent and Max need to ask questions. The travel agent must
ask questions about Max's agenda. When does he need to be in London? How long does he want to stay?
Will he go to any other cities on this trip? Max will need to ask questions such as How long is the flight?
How can I get from the airport to the hotel? How long does it take to get to Brighton? The dialogs can
be presented to the class.
Classroom Activity 3: Vacation Plans
Have students divide a piece of paper into 3 columns and write May at the top of the first column Will
Probably in the next column, and lastly Will. Explain that may means chances are 50/50 you will do
something, will probably is stronger, closer to 80 or 90%, and will means you definitely are planning to do
something. Ask students to think of their next vacation or business trip and write activities in each
column they think they may, will probably, or will definitely do or not do.
Students can share their plans with the class or a partner and answer questions about it.
Classroom Activity 4: Real Choices from Around the World
Have the class use the Internet to find out the best ways to get from various airports around the world to a
hotel in the city. What alternatives are there? What are the prices? How about hotels? How do the
prices compare from one country to another?
Classroom Activity 5: Time Differences and Travel
Have the class make a list of cities around the world. Then, using the Internet to find flight schedules
from various airlines, make a list of flights and schedules to those cities. Note the arrival and departure
times, and the time differences between the cities. Examples: How many hours ahead is Paris? If its
X oclock in London, what time is it in Tokyo? What is a time zone? What is jet-lag? If you have a
meeting in Paris at 9:00 a.m., what time is it in San Francisco? If you came from Beijing, how do you
feel at 9:00 a.m.?
Classroom Activity 6: Plan for the Worst
What if all the wrong things happen on a trip? What if the ticket doesn't arrive in the mail? What if
your luggage is lost? What if the bus drivers are on strike? Using the Key Sentences for reference, ask
students What if questions. Students will answer in complete sentences, e.g., If my ticket doesn't arrive, I
can show the receipt and get another ticket at the airport. The point is to identify alternatives and create
new choices.
Classroom Activity 7: Bus & Train Schedule
Buses leave every 20 minutes. Trains leave every 40 minutes. Put the schedules on the board.
For example, a bus trip to the city takes 50 minutes, and by train it takes 35 minutes. Ask and answer
questions like: If its X oclock, when did the last bus leave? When is the next bus going to leave? Etc

55

New Dynamic English

If its Y oclock and you need to get there by Z oclock, whats the best way to get there? Do you have
enough time? If you take the 10:00 train, when will you arrive? If you took the 9:00 bus, when will it
arrive? When did it arrive? How long ago did it arrive?

56

New Dynamic English

Key Sentences

Meeting a Friend

Departure

After he checks in to his room, Max is going to


telephone a friend. One of his best friends, John,
lives in Brighton. Brighton is about an hour south
of London by train.

Next week Max is going on a business trip. He's


going to fly to London from San Francisco. He
tried to buy airplane tickets last week, but the flight
was full. Yesterday his travel agent called and told
him there was space on the flight.

Max's friend, John, is a famous writer. Max is


looking forward to seeing him. Whenever they get
together, they go out to dinner and talk about many
things. It's always interesting to talk to John.
John has an interesting mind. He is always
thinking about new stories and new projects.
(only appears if shuffler more than 1.2)
Last year, for example, he wrote a story that
appeared on television. It was a story about a man
who lost his memory. Now he's working on a new
story that will appear on television next year.
(all levels)
John also knows a lot about wine. Whenever they
have dinner together, John chooses a great bottle of
wine. They have to be careful not to drink too
much.

Max is going to get the ticket in the mail tomorrow.


He's going to take British Airways because it has a
non-stop flight. It takes about ten hours to fly from
San Francisco to London. If he leaves on Saturday
afternoon, he'll arrive in London on Sunday
morning.
(continues only for shuffler more than 1)
Max is going to arrive in London on a Sunday.
The next day, on Monday, he's going to attend a
meeting. However, he'll probably be very tired.
The time difference between London and San
Francisco is eight hours. That means when it's late
at night in London, it's afternoon in San Francisco.
As a result, it's often hard to sleep in the hotel at
night. Max will probably watch a late movie on
TV before he goes to bed. If he still can't sleep, he
may telephone his wife and children in San
Francisco.

When they finish eating, they both try to pay the


bill. Sometimes Max pays. Sometimes John pays.
Bus Schedules
(appears in Choices and Questions)
Here is the schedule of buses going into London.
Buses leave about every twenty minutes, at 11:00,
11:20, 11:40, 12:00.

Its always nice to travel and see the world, but Max
misses his family. Whenever he is away from
home, he looks forward to coming back. As the
saying goes: Theres no place like home.
Choices

If it's now 11:30, the next bus is going to leave in


about ten minutes, at 11:40. If it's now 11:45, the
last bus left about five minutes ago, at 11:40.

When he lands in London, he'll claim his baggage


and go through customs. Then he'll have to decide
how to get to his hotel. One choice is to go by taxi.
But the taxi fare is expensive. Another choice is to
go by bus or subway. It's cheaper to go by bus or
subway. In London, the subway system is called
the Underground.

Questions

Max isnt sure what he will do. If he's tired, he


may decide to take a taxi. On the other hand, he
may decide to take a bus. If he decides to take a
bus or a taxi, he can see the countryside.

When is he (Max) going on a business trip? Where


is he going to fly to/from? When did he try to buy
airline tickets? When did his travel agent call him?
Is there space on the flight? When is he going to
get the tickets? How long does the flight usually
take? If he leaves on Saturday afternoon, when
will he arrive?

Once he arrives at his hotel, he'll check in. Hotels


are expensive in London, but weekend rates are a bit
less. Sometimes it's possible to get a cheaper rate
if you stay for several days. Max has a good travel
agent, so hes going to get a 20% discount.

When is he going to arrive in London? When is he


going to attend a business meeting? What is the
time difference between London and San Francisco?
If he telephones his family at night, what time of the
day will it be in San Francisco?

57

New Dynamic English

What is the cheapest/most expensive way to get to


his hotel from the airport? Can he see the
countryside if he takes the underground?
(T/F) Weekends are more expensive than weekdays.
How much of a discount is he going to get?
If it's now 11:30, when is the next bus going to
leave? If it's now 11:45, when did the last bus leave?
How often do buses leave this time of day?
Who lives in Brighton? (T/F) Brighton is north of
London. When is his (Johns) new story going to
appear on television? Did his last story appear on
television? Who knows a lot about wine? (T/F)
Max always pays the bill. Why dont some people
drink wine?

Focus Exercises
Next [week] Max [is] [going] on a business [trip].
Hes [going to] [fly] [to] London [from] San Francisco.
He [tried] [to buy] tickets [last] week but the [flight]
was full.
[Yesterday] his travel agent [called] and [told] him
[there] was space on the flight.
Max is [going to] [get] the ticket [in] the mail
[tomorrow].
It [takes] [about] ten hours to [fly] [from] San
Francisco to London.
If he [leaves] on Saturday afternoon, [hell] [arrive] in
London [on] Sunday morning.
Another [choice] is [to go] [by] bus [or] subway.
On the [other] hand, he [may] [decide] to [take] a bus.
Weekdays [are] [more] expensive [than] weekends.
Max [has] a good travel [agent], so hes [going to]
[get] a 20% [discount].
John [has] an [interesting] [mind].
Last year, for [example], he [wrote] a [story] [that]
[appeared] on television.
They [have to] be [careful] not to [drink] [too] [much].
Max is [going to] [arrive] [in] London [on] a Sunday.
Then hell [have to] [decide] [how] to [get] to his hotel.
If hes [tired], he [may] [decide] to [take] a taxi.
If he leaves [on] Saturday afternoon, hell arrive [in]
London on Sunday morning.
Brighton is about [an] hour south [of] London [by]
train.
The day [after] he [arrives] in London, hes [going to]
[attend] a meeting.

58

Module 4:

Unit 1, Planning Ahead

Focused Listening
Focus 1

Student Follow-up
1. Explain how Max is going to get from San Francisco to
his hotel in London? How long does it take to get to
London?
2. Find out and explain how long it takes to travel from
your city to two other destinations.
3. What is the time difference between your city and
London? Tokyo? Mexico City? Bangkok?
4. Do Practice Exercises B and C.

Preview and study the Departure lesson.

Language Focus
future vs. past, time expressions

Listening Task
Listen to all the time expressions and note the tense of the
verbs used in each of the sentence.

Goal

Focus 3

Preview and orientation. Students will be able to talk


about what Max did last week, what happened
yesterday, and what will happen tomorrow (he's going
to get the ticket in the mail).

Review the Departure lesson, study the Choices lesson,


sentence by sentence, and preview the Meeting a Friend
lesson.

Student Follow-up

Language Focus

1. Write three sentences about Max beginning with Last


week... Yesterday... and Next week...
2. Write three sentences about yourself beginning with
last week, yesterday, and next week.
3. Do Practice Exercise A.

if clauses, comparison, it's (with comparisons), and time


schedules.

Listening Tasks
1. Focus on the three choices and why Max may or may
not take each: If he takes the Underground, he can't
see the countryside. If he's tired, he may decide to
take a taxi.
2. Study the questions and answers for the bus schedule.

Focus 2
Review and study the Departure lesson.
Choices lesson.

Preview the

Goals

Students will be able to use if clauses to compare the

Language Focus
vocabulary:
result

transportation; manner, duration, reason and

Listening Task
Focus on transportation. Listen for and record sentences
that describe how and why Max is going to travel, and
sentences that deal with time difference.
He's going to fly on British Airways. He may take a taxi
to his hotel. Theres an eight hour time difference
between London and San Francisco.

Student Follow-up
1. Explain Max's choices for getting to his hotel: The
bus. It's cheaper to go by bus, and he can see the
countryside. Taxi...
2. Find a real bus or train schedule and explain when and
how often trains or buses leave from a particular
location.
3. Do Practice Exercises D, E, and F.

Goals

Students will be able to talk about different types of

choices.
Students will be able to ask and answer questions about
a bus schedule with time expressions: when, how long,
how often, every twenty minutes.

transportation and the benefits of each. (airplane, train,


subway, bus, taxi).
They will be able to use expressions of manner (by
train)
They will know the basic vocabulary associated with
travel and transportation: flight, ticket, non-stop,
baggage claim, customs, hotel, check in, arrive.

59

New Dynamic English

Focus 6

Focus 4
Language Focus

Review the Departure and Choices lessons, and study the


Meeting a Friend lesson.

Language Mastery

Language Focus
Listening Task

adverb phrases, clauses, its + adjective, and infinitives to


name an action.

Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.


Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

Listening Tasks
1. Practice saying the sentences which describe John and
what he and Max do whenever they get together.
2. Listen for and repeat sentences which use infinitives to
name an action: It is difficult to sleep.

Goals

Students will be able to describe someone by

describing what they do, their interests, and where they


live.
Students will be able to use when and whenever to talk
about habitual activities: Whenever they get together,
they talk about interesting things.

Student Follow-up
1. Write 4 sentences which describe John.
2. Write 4 sentences which describe a friend or famous
person you admire. Explain what they do and what is
interesting about them.
3. Do Practice Exercises G and H.

Focus 5
Review all three lessons, then focus on the Questions and
Focus Exercises lessons.

Language Focus
modals, degrees of certainty, Wh- questions

Listening Tasks
1. Listen for and practice saying every sentence that has a
modal such as will, may, or can.
2. Listen to and practice saying each question that uses a
modal.

Goal

Students will be able to talk about and express different


degrees of certainty when talking about their future
plans.

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of things that you will, will probably, or
may do next week or next year.
2. Do Practice Exercise I.

60

Module 4:

Unit 1, Planning Ahead

Practice Exercises

4(1)

Planning Ahead:

Exercise A

Complete the sentences with the correct word or phrase:

yesterday
ten hours

Example:

last week
in two weeks

Next week

tomorrow
a year ago

next week
ten oclock

on Saturday afternoon
on Sunday morning

Max is going on a business trip.

1. His travel agent called him ______________________ and said there was space on the flight.
2. He tried to buy airplane tickets
3. Until

_________________________ but the flight was full.

______________________ there was no space on the flight.

4. The ticket is going to arrive in the mail

____________________________.

5. His flight is going to leave for London ____________________________.


6. If he leaves on Saturday afternoon, hell arrive in London __________________________.
7. The flight to London usually takes about

___________________________.

61

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
4(1)

Planning Ahead:

Exercise B

Here are some ways to get to Max's hotel from the airport.
Leave Heathrow Airport

Arrive Yorkville Hotel

by subway

10:05 a.m.

10:35 a.m.

by bus

10:15 a.m.

11:10 a.m.

by taxi

10:00 a.m.

10:25 a.m.

Please answer the questions.

Example:

Q:
A:

1. Q:
A:

How long does it take to get to the hotel on the bus?

_______________________________________________________________

3. Q:
A:

How long does it take to get to the hotel on the subway?

_______________________________________________________________

2. Q:
A:

How long does it take to get to the hotel in a taxi?


It takes 25 minutes to get to the hotel in a taxi.

When will he arrive at the hotel if he goes by subway?

_______________________________________________________________

4(1)

Planning Ahead:

Exercise C

Write the question that goes with the answer.


Example:

Q: How long does it take to get to the hotel in a taxi?


A: It takes twenty-five minutes.

1. Q: _______________________________________________________________
A:

It takes ten hours to fly from San Francisco to London.

2. Q:
A:

_______________________________________________________________

It takes an hour by train to get to Brighton from London.

62

Module 4:

Unit 1, Planning Ahead

Practice Exercises
4(1)

Planning Ahead:

Exercise D

Match the questions on the left with the answers on the right.
1. How long does it take to get there?

_____

a. every twenty minutes

2. How often do the buses come?

_____

b. twenty minutes ago

3. When is the next bus going to leave?

_____

c. by bus

4. When did the last bus leave?

_____

d. about twenty minutes

5. How is he going to get there?

_____

e.

4(1)

Planning Ahead:

in twenty minutes

Exercise E

Fill in the blanks using "if".


Example:

If he's tired,

he may decide to take a taxi.

1. ___________________________________, he won't be able to see the countryside.


2. It will be expensive ________________________________________________________.
3. _____________________________________, it will take a long time to get to his hotel.
4. _____________________________________, he can see the countryside.
5. Itll be less expensive _______________________________________________________.
6. Sometimes its possible to get a cheaper rate at a hotel _____________________________
_________________________________________________________________________.
7. _____________________________________________ on Saturday afternoon, hell arrive
in London on Sunday morning.

63

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

4(1)

Planning Ahead:

Exercise F

Fill in the blanks. Use the present tense or


be going to with the verb in parentheses.
Example:
Next week I (fly)

am going to fly

to London.

Whenever I go to London, I (get together)

get together

with one of my friends, John.

I (arrive) _____________________________ in London next Sunday.

After I (get)

____________________ to my hotel, I (check in) ________________________. Once I


check in, I (telephone) __________________________________ a friend of mine who
(live) ___________________________ in Brighton, which is south of London.
Whenever we (get together) _________________________ we go out to dinner and (talk)
__________________________ about many things.

4(1)

Planning Ahead:

Its always fun to talk to him.

Exercise G

Fill in the blanks with interested or interesting.

My friend, John, is a very ____________________ man.


Last year, for example, he wrote a very ___________________ story that appeared on television.
In addition to writing, John is ___________________ in music, travel, and sports. Its always
_________________________ to talk to him because he and I are ___________________ in
many of the same things. How about you?

What are you _________________________ in?

65

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
Exercise H
Find the sentence with the closest meaning.
1.

Circle a, b, or c.

Once he arrives at his hotel, he'll check in.

a. He stayed at this hotel once before, and he checked in.


b. As soon as he arrives at his hotel, he'll check in.
c. He is only going to check in for one night at the hotel.

2.

After he checks in to his room, Max is going to telephone a friend.

a. Max is going to call his friend. Then he will check in to his room.
b. Max is going to check in to his room and then call his friend.
c. Max is going to telephone a friend before he checks in.

3.

Whenever they get together, they go out to dinner and talk about many things.

a. When they get together they never have dinner.


b. They often get together and have dinner.
c. Every time they get together, they go out to dinner.

4.

Brighton is about an hour south of London by train.

a. You have to take the train to get to Brighton in about an hour.


b. It takes about an hour by train to get to Brighton, which is south of London.
c. You can take a train Brighton, which is south of London.

5.

He may telephone his wife and children in San Francisco.

a. There is a possibility that he will telephone his wife and children.


b. He is going to call his wife and children in San Francisco.
c. He probably wont telephone his wife and children.

6.

If hes tired, he may take a taxi to his hotel.

a. Its possible that he will take a taxi to his hotel.


b. He will probably take a taxi to his hotel.
c. He probably wont take a taxi to his hotel.

7.

If he still cant sleep, he may telephone his family.

a. If he can sleep, he probably wont telephone his family.


b. If he cant sleep, hell call his family.
c. If he can sleep, hell probably telephone his family.

8.

John wrote a story that appeared on television.

a. John wrote a story and then he appeared on television.


b. John wrote a story on television.
c. John wrote a story and then his story appeared on television.

66

New Dynamic English

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Things to Eat; Things to Drink; Things to Read; Things to Listen to; Colors; and
Matrix Game
This unit introduces vocabulary related to five subject areas of importance in daily conversations.
It is important to extend the vocabulary in this unit, for example, in Things to Eat, by listing
additional types of foods and doing role plays where students practice ordering in a restaurant or
buying food at a store. The Video lessons in Unit 5 give examples of how the role plays can be set
up in the classroom. In addition, the Classroom Activities for this unit will provide opportunities
for follow-up and extension.
The first two categories, Things to Eat and Things to
Drink, focus on types of food and drink, and ways to
order or request them. A mastery of this type of
language is essential since these types of situations are
very common.
In each of the other three categories, a set of four
examples is introduced, such as four different kinds of
things to read. These should be added to, along with
words are associated with the category. For example,
novel, author, technical articles, and poems are all
useful vocabulary associated with this category.
Once the language of each category has been studied, students will enjoy the Matrix Game, where
they can test themselves and see how high they can score. This activity helps to review and
reinforce the language, and can be extended to an activity in the class. See the Classroom
Activities for more ideas.
Goals:
To be able to talk about and order foods and drink in various situations.
To be able to talk about sources of information and news, both written and oral.
To be able to talk about and use colors to describe everyday objects.
Objective 1: To introduce students to socially acceptable ways to talk about food, drink, and make
requests for information, including personal preferences.
Objective 2: To improve the learning of vocabulary by helping students organize words into
natural sets of words that provide a framework for memory.

67

Module 4:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Learning Points
amount/quantification
(some, most, a few, many, much, lots) This is a glass of water. A lot of apples are red, but some are
green or yellow. Many people like to listen to the radio. Some people listen to baseball on the radio.
If you want to study history, youll probably read many books. Most children like to drink milk.
comparison
The red book is bigger than the blue book. Which usually takes longer to read...? It usually takes
less time to read a magazine than a book. A magazine usually costs more than a newspaper.
conditionals
If you want to read about today's news, you'll probably read a newspaper. If you mix yellow and red,
you get orange. If you want to gain weight, what is a good dessert?
countable/uncountable amounts
a steak, some vegetables, a piece of chocolate cake; two books, a newspaper, some magazines;
too much; many people; lots of news; its a kind of dessert; a glass of milk.
useful expressions and requests
Could I have...? Could you please...? Is there anything else? So do I. Me neither. Excuse me,
but where is the restroom? I dont drink wine. How about some water instead? Please bring me
something else to drink. Lets listen to the radio.
object (direct and indirect), make (causative)
bring me something; give it to Kathy; Could you find me some music to listen to?
book and give it to Max. Find an apple and make it green.

Find the big

asking about and expressing preferences


Which do you like better, meat or vegetables? I prefer vegetables. I'd like something hot to drink.
like music, especially jazz. What color do you prefer, red or blue? My favorite color is blue.
Would you rather read a book or watch television?

reference
on one side, on the other side; One book is red. The other is blue. These are things to listen to.
What else? What can I listen to besides the radio? Steak is one kind of meat. There are many
different kinds of magazines.
request/imperatives
Could I have...? Please bring her something to drink. May I have some coffee please? Could you
please get me a cup of tea? Id like something to eat. I dont want any dessert, thanks. Just tea will
be fine. Find the big book and give it to Max.
word relations
Grass is to green as lemon is to yellow. Steak is to meat as corn is to vegetables. Animal is to bird
as musical instrument is to ______. What is yellow on the outside and white on the inside? The sky
is blue on a sunny day, but it is gray on a rainy day.
would rather
Would you rather read a book or watch television?

68

Module 4:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Introduce the Things to Eat lesson in class. Focus on countable/uncountable amounts and types of food.
Besides the four examples of food in this lesson, what are some other foods? Examples: fried rice, lamb,
vegetarian food, potatoes (mashed, baked), curry, stew, deep fried, fish, etc. What foods go well together?
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students interview each other about what kinds of food they like to order in a
restaurant. What kinds of foods go together? What kinds of foods dont go together? What kinds of food
are served for guests? What kinds of food are expensive? What kinds of food are traditional? What kinds
of food can you cook?
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 and Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Briefly introduce the Things to Read lesson. Then make a list of different kinds of things to read for business,
study, pleasure, and for news. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each? Then, in pairs or small
groups have students take turns talking about their reading preferences, including their favorite novels, authors,
and daily reading.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice:
Briefly introduce the Things to Listen to and Colors lesson. Add to the examples from the lesson. Then, in
groups, have students interview each other about the kinds of things they enjoy listening to, and also their
favorite colors. What is the favorite color of the students in your group?
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4, the Matrix Game, in the lab or at home.

Follow-up
Once the lessons of the unit have been completed, assign the Practice Exercises and prepare for a version of
the Matrix Game to be played in class. See the Classroom Activities below.
Classroom Activity 1: Things that are....
On index cards write a category and three to five words in that category, e.g., Things that are green: dollar,
spinach, grass, avocado, lime. Divide the class into two teams and have one of the team members choose a
card. This person states the category and then gives the team clues until they guess all the words on the card.
It is best to give this activity a time limit: more time for beginning groups, less time for advanced groups.
Teams get a point for every word they guess. The other team takes a turn when time is up or all the words
have been guessed.
Classroom Activity 2 Food & Drink Questions for Discussion
Describe your favorite meal and how to eat it. What do you eat first? What do you eat last? What foods go
well together? What kinds of food can you cook? What kinds of food are expensive? What kinds of food are
served for guests? What kinds of food are traditional? What about manners? Is making noise okay? What do
you say before you start eating? Or drinking?

69

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 3:
1.

Restaurant Problems

Prepare index cards with problems that would cause a customer to make a request, such as the following:
Your food is not cooked well enough.
You need more water.
The air-conditioning is too cold.
There is no salt on the table.
You dropped your fork on the floor.
The music in the restaurant is so loud that you can't hear yourself think.
You forgot your wallet and now you have no money.
The salt is on the other end of the table

2.

Have students role play a party ordering a meal in a restaurant. Give each "customer" a card and have
them make an appropriate request during the "meal." The cards can also be placed on the table and
students draw a card, make their request when appropriate and then keep drawing cards and making
requests until there are no more cards. More advanced groups can be challenged to think of their own and
make the most number of requests during the "meal."

Classroom Activity 4: Matrix Game


Divide the class into two or three groups. Make a list of 20-30 questions and answers about the topics in the
unit. Then read a question to one of the teams and ask them to answer it in a complete sentence. For example:
What are two different kinds of vegetables? Corn and carrots are two different kinds of vegetable.
Corn is to vegetable as apple is to what? Corn is to vegetable as apple is to fruit. Note: Since
questions may have several correct answers, the teacher should act as judge to determine whether an answer is
acceptable or not.
Classroom Activity 5: Whats the Question?
In this more difficult activity, divide the class into two or three groups. Make a list of 30 questions and
answers from the unit. Then read an answer to one of the teams and ask them to ask a question which it
answers. For example: A banana. A correct question would be: What is an example of a fruit which is
yellow on the outside and white on the inside? Another example: A newspaper. What do most people
read to get the daily news?
This activity can also be done in a spelling bee format, where individual students are given the answers and
must give the question. If they miss, they sit down. The last person standing is the winner.
Classroom Activity 6: Reading
Choose 5 questions to focus on for class discussion: What kinds of things do you like to read? How often? When was
the last time you read X? What was the last book you read? What was it about? Are you a fast reader? Where do
you read? In bed?
How do you get the news? Where do you go to get a book or buy a magazine? Do you subscribe
to anything? What do you subscribe to? How much is it? What kinds of books are most popular in your country? Why?
Do you talk about books or the news with your friends? What kind of things do you talk about?

Communication Activity 7 Listening


Choose 5 questions to focus on for class discussion: How often do you listen to music? How often do you
listen to the radio? What do you listen to? Who are your favorite artists? When was the last time you went
to a concert? What instruments can you play? What kinds of music are most popular in your country? Why
do you think so? Do you talk about books or the news with your friends? What kind of things do you talk
about? Etc
Dictation: There are many different kinds of music.
Some music is very loud and has a fast beat
The musicians are very popular and have many screaming fans.
Some of these musicians cant sing very well, but they are still popular.

70

Module 4:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Magazines usually come out every week or every


month. A magazine usually costs more than a
newspaper. It usually takes less time to read a
magazine than a book.

Key Sentences
Things to Eat
These are things to eat: spaghetti, a steak, some
vegetables, and a piece of cake. Here is a
hamburger and a soft drink.

Postcard. People on vacation send postcards to


their friends. Postcards often have a picture on one
side and words on the other side.

Spaghetti. Here is some spaghetti. You can


always order spaghetti at an Italian restaurant.

Things to Listen to
These are things to listen to:
bird, and a piano.

Steak. This is a steak. Steak is one kind of meat.


I love meat, especially steak.
Vegetables. Here are some vegetables.
Vegetables are good for your health. Corn and
tomatoes are both vegetables. I prefer vegetables.
I especially like corn.

Speech. This man is giving a speech. Speeches


are sometimes too long.
Radio. Many people like to listen to the radio.
You can listen to music on the radio. Some people
listen to baseball on the radio.

Cake. Here is a piece of chocolate cake.


Chocolate cake is a kind of dessert. Chocolate
cake is fattening. Don't eat too much!
Things to Drink
These are things to drink:
water.

a speech, a radio, a

Bird. This bird is singing. Some birds sing


beautiful songs. It's nice to listen to birds singing.
Piano. Here is a piano. A piano is a musical
instrument. Piano music is beautiful, especially
Chopin. Animal is to bird as musical instrument is
to piano.

milk, coffee, tea, and

Milk. This is a glass of milk. Most children like


to drink milk. Milk comes from cows.
Coffee. Some people drink coffee every morning.
Some people drink coffee with milk and sugar.
Children usually don't drink coffee or tea.

Colors
Here are four colors: red, yellow, green, and blue.
Look at the beautiful rainbow!

Tea. Many people drink tea. Tea is popular in


many parts of the world.

Red. This is the color red. A lot of apples are


red, but some are green or yellow. Find a book and
make it red. The sky sometimes turns red at
sunset.

Water. This is a glass of cold water. Cold water


tastes good on a hot day. Cup is to coffee as glass
is to water. We usually drink milk and water from
a glass.

Yellow. Lemons are yellow. If you mix yellow


and blue, you get green.
Green. This is the color of spring. Leaves are
green in the spring, but in autumn some turn red and
yellow.

Things to Read
Here are some things to read: two books, a
newspaper, some magazines, and a postcard.

Blue. This is the color blue. On a sunny day the


sky is blue. The sky is blue on a sunny day, but it
is grey on a rainy day.

Books. One book is red. The other is blue. The


red book is bigger than the blue book. If you want
to study history, you'll probably read many books.
A book usually takes longer to read than a magazine.

Questions

Newspaper. Some people read a newspaper every


day. People read newspapers to find out about
daily news. It usually takes less time to read a
newspaper than a book. If you want to read about
today's news, you'll probably read a newspaper.

Requests, Polite Commands and Tasks


Could I have some spaghetti? May I have some
coffee please? Could you please get me a cup of
tea? I'm hungry. I'd like something to eat. I had
spaghetti yesterday. How about a big steak? I'm in
a hurry. Where can I get some fast food?

Magazine. There are many different kinds of


magazines. These are news magazines.
71

New Dynamic English

May I have some coffee please? I'd like something


hot to drink. I'd love a glass of cold water. I don't
want any dessert, thanks. Just tea will be fine.
Kathy is thirsty. I dont drink wine. How about
some water instead? Please give her a glass of
water. I'm thirsty, but I don't want coffee or tea.
Please bring me something else to drink. Im not
thirsty, but I would like something to eat.

vegetables or chocolate cake? Which do you like


better, meat or vegetables? What is sweet and
fattening? If you want to gain weight, what is a
good dessert? Some people dont eat meat. Is
there anything else to eat?
What do small children usually drink? What's
white and comes from cows? Whats cold and
comes from rain and snow? Cup is to coffee as
glass is to _______? Excuse me, but where is the
rest room?

It's too noisy. Please turn off the radio. Could


you find me some music to listen to? Id like to
hear some music. Lets listen to the radio.

What do you send to your friends when you are on


vacation? I can't read without glasses. Where are
my reading glasses? Which usually takes longer to
read, a book or a magazine? Which takes less time
to read, a newspaper or a book? Which costs more,
a magazine or a newspaper? Which is usually
more expensive, a magazine or a newspaper?

Please bring me a magazine. Could you bring me a


magazine?
Find the big book and give it to Max. Find an
apple and make it green.
Personal Questions and Information
Are you a good cook? Which do you like better,
meat or vegetables?
Which do you prefer, coffee or tea?
coffee with cream and sugar?
Do you like to read?
or watch television?

What is a popular musical instrument? Where is a


piano? Who is giving a speech? I live in a tree
and I love to sing. What am I? The radio is
broken. What else can I listen to? What can I
listen to besides the radio?

Do you like

Would you rather read a book

My favorite color is blue. Where is the color blue?


What is yellow on the outside and white on the
inside? What color is a lemon? Grass is to green
as lemon is to ______? When spring begins, what
color is all around? What color do you get when
you mix yellow and blue? What color do you get
when you mix yellow and red? If you mix yellow
and red you get orange. What color does the sky
turn when the sun sets? What a beautiful sunset!
Is the blue book bigger than the red book?

Do you like music? Do you like to listen to music?


I like music, especially jazz. I like to read when I
listen to music. Can you play the piano? I enjoy
playing the piano. Would you like to hear some
music? Here is some music.
What color do you prefer, red or blue? In your
country, do the leaves change color in autumn?
Information Questions
I'm in a hurry. Where can I get some fast food?
Which food is always on the menu at an Italian
restaurant? Which is better for your health,

72

Module 4:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Student Follow-up

Focused Listening

1. Write 5 questions and answers about books,


newspapers, magazines, etc. What do people on
vacation send to their friends? Do people read
books if they want to get the news?
2. Indicate your own reading preferences.
3. Interview a classmate about his or her reading
preferences.
4. Do Practice Exercise C.

Focus 1
Focus on the Things to Eat and Things to Drink. Click
on each item several times and listen to the basic
sentences about each. Then use the Quiz button and
answer the questions.

Language Focus
countable vs. uncountable quantities (some, not any, a
piece of), and requests

Focus 3
Review Things to Eat, Things to Drink, Things to Read
and then focus on Things to Listen to and Colors.

Listening Tasks
Focus on words that express quantities of food or drink.
Note the difference between countable and uncountable
amounts. Then listen for sentences which express a
request, and practice saying it.

Language Focus
vocabulary: things to listen to; colors, word
relationships, likes and dislikes

Listening Task

Goals

Students will be able to classify and order different


types of food and drinks: vegetables, a steak,
dessert, etc.
Students will be able to recognize countable and
uncountable nouns.
Students will be able to make direct and indirect
requests for food and drink: Could you please get me a
cup of tea? I would like a cup of tea.

Listen for and practice saying sentences that express


preferences: I like music, especially jazz. Max likes to
play the piano.

Goals

Students will be able to talk about various things to


listen to.
Students will be able to use colors to describe and
refer to things.
Do Practice Exercises D and E.

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of other kinds of food and drink and
classify them (chicken is a type of meat, peas and corn
are vegetables, dessert, etc.)
2. Choose 3 kinds of food and drink, and indicate how
you would buy or order them: Id like some
chocolate cake for dessert, please.
3. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Student Follow-up
1. Think of some other things to listen to: the news,
language tapes, sounds of nature etc. and write a
sentence for each.
2. Make a list of eight colors and write a sentence for
each.
3. Interview a classmate about his or her listening and
color preferences.

Focus 2
Review Things to Eat and Things to Drink.
on Things to Read.

Focus 4

Then focus

Review the Matrix Vocabulary. Then do the Matrix


Game. See how high you can score.

Language Focus
vocabulary:

reading material; comparison

Language Focus

Listening Task

Questions and answers

Focus on things to read. Listen for and practice saying


sentences that compare books, magazines and newspapers:
Which takes less time to read, a book or a newspaper?
It usually takes less time to read a newspaper than a
book.

Goal

Students will be able to use complete sentences to ask


and answer questions about all five categories.

Student Follow-up

Goals

1. Make a list of additional questions and answers for all


the categories.
2. Do the Matrix Crossword (below).

Students will be able to describe things to read.


Students will be able to talk about their reading
preferences.

73

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

4(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise A

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.

1. A popular

________________ of Italian food is spaghetti.

2. Vegetables are _____________.


3. Corn, carrots and peas are all _____________ of vegetables.
4. Would you like ______________ of chocolate cake?
5. Which _______________, rice or potatoes?
6. I dont want ______________ thanks. Just tea would be fine.
7. Do you have __________________?

I dont eat meat.

8. Id like to order ___________________ to eat, please.


9. May I have _________________ please?

Id like to order.

10. Im not hungry, so Im just going to have _______________ and salad, please.

(Words and phrases)


a) a piece

f)

different kinds

b) anything else

g)

would you prefer

c) the menu

h)

something

d) some soup

i)

kind

e) good for your health

j)

any dessert

74

Module 4:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Practice Exercises

4(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise B

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.

1. Id like _____________ of coffee, please.


2. Its hot, and Im not hungry, so Ill just have _________________ to drink.
3. Most people drink it ____________________.
4. I dont drink wine or anything alcoholic. What ___________________ do you have?
5. Im really ____________________. Lets get something to drink.
6. If you dont want anything hot, how about a cold fruit juice ____________________?
7. Which would you ________________ have, some juice or a soft drink?
8. Im sorry, but we dont have ______________________ to drink.
9. Dont you have anything to drink ______________________ tea and coffee?
10. Tea is fine, but Id ______________________ coffee, if you dont mind.

(Words and phrases)


a) instead

f)

with sugar and milk

b) else

g)

a cup

c) rather

h)

anything else

d) besides

i)

thirsty

e) prefer

j)

something cold

75

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

4(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise C

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.

1. There are many _________________ of magazines.


2. Scientists and engineers read ______________ technical journals to stay up-to-date.
3. Most newspapers are published ______________.
4. I read several magazines that come out _______________.
5. When Im traveling I like to read ________________ or two.
6. I enjoy _____________________, but I dont like to write them.
7. In school we studied many ____________________ by famous authors.
8. If you ___________________ you can improve your vocabulary.
9. When you go on vacation, please remember __________________ me a postcard.
10. There are usually many things to read ________________ in a magazine.

(Words and phrases)


a) daily

f)

different kinds

b) to send

g)

receiving letters

c) lots of

h)

besides the news

d) a book

i)

once a week

e) great novels

j)

read a lot

76

Module 4:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Practice Exercises

4(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise D

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words


or phrases from below.

1. During election time we have to listen to _______________.


2. Just before sunrise we can usually hear _______________.
3. There are many _______________ of music.
4. Some people _______________ classical music.
5. Some people think classical music is _________________.
6. Its always nice to go to a concert and hear __________________.
7. Many people listen _________________ when they drive to and from work.
8. Some people are not __________________. They dont listen to what other people say.
9. Please turn down the volume on the radio. That music is much ___________________.
10. Its useful to know how to give ____________________.

(Words and phrases)


a) prefer

f)

many speeches

b) good listeners

g)

too loud

c) birds singing

h)

different kinds

d) to the radio

i)

boring

e) an interesting speech

j)

great musicians

77

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

4(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise E

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or phrases from below.

1. A banana has yellow on the ______________ and white on the ________________.


2. If you see a red stop light, it means _______________.
3. Grass is to green as lemons are to _______________.
4. When you mix _______________ you get green.
5. When you mix _______________ you get orange.
6. In the evening, when the sun sets, the sun __________________.
7. When the weather turns bad, the sky _________________.
8. There are __________________ in a rainbow.
9. Blue is to sky as ___________________ is to tree.
10. Dark is to night as __________________ is to day.

(Words and phrases)


a) green

g)

light

b) outside

h)

inside

c) yellow and blue

i)

orange

d) turns red

j)

many colors

e) yellow and red

k)

turns gray

f) to stop

l)

yellow

78

Module 4:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Matrix Vocabulary Crossword


1

6
7

8
9

10
12

11

13

14
15

16

17

18

19
20
21

22
23

24

25
26

ACROSS

DOWN

3. you send this to a friend when you're on vacation


4. it's sometimes long and boring
8. a kind of fruit that is often red
9. a kind of music that people listen to
10. the past tense of the verb, sit
11. a form of life that lives in water _____
12. the color of many apples
13. it comes from rain and snow
17. a kind of Italian food, a pasta
18. an animal that gives us milk
19. many people drink it in the morning
21. you can read about the news here
23. the opposite of large
24. its sweet and fattening
25. yellow and red make _______
26. the opposite of correct

1.
2.
4.
5.
6.
7.
12.
14.
15.
16.
18.
20.
21.
22.

79

something to read on a long trip


day is to newspaper as week is to _____
a kind of meat
the opposite of future, its in the _____
something to eat that comes from chickens
it lives in a tree and loves to sing
you can listen to baseball on it
a popular hot drink
corn and carrots are types of _____
its white and comes from cows
a yellow vegetable
its the color of lemons
its nice to read a great _____
on sunny days the sky is _____

New Dynamic English

3. Biography of Einstein
The Early Years; The Later Years; Focus Exercises; and Questions.
This unit develops the past tense, time sequence and time expressions in the context of the life
history of Albert Einstein. Dates, periods of time, and changes, both active and passive, are also a
major focus. In addition, students are introduced to one of the most important figures in the 20th
century.
Once the language of this unit is introduced, students should be
encouraged to talk about their own life histories and find out about
the life histories of others. For example, students can choose to
research and report about a famous person from their own country,
or a popular athlete or singer.
In Questions and Focus Exercises, students test both their
comprehension and their ability to use the target vocabulary and
structures to reconstruct sentences from the lessons.
Goals:
To be able to present and find out about a persons life history.
To be able to sequence and organize a group of sentences by events, dates, and periods in time.
To be able to use prepositions to express both time and spatial relationships.
To be able to use past time expressions and the past tense, with both regular and irregular verbs.
Objective 1:

Students will be able to express and ask questions about common events in a typical
persons life history.
Objective 2: Students will be able to use time phrases to sequence a presentation.
Objective 3: Students will be able to understand and express historical dates.

80

Module 4:

Unit 3, Biography of Einstein

Learning Points
change
He became interested in science. He became a professor at the University of Berlin. He graduated in
1900. In 1902, he also got married. In 1919 he married for the second time. His wife died in 1936.
dates
He was born in Germany more than a hundred years ago, in 1879. In 1900 he graduated from a
university in Zurich. From 1902 to 1909 he worked in the patent office in Bern. In 1921 he won the
Nobel Prize for physics.
duration
From 1902 to 1909 he worked in the patent office in Bern. During that period he made several great
discoveries. Throughout his life, he loved to listen to classical music. Until his death, Einstein
continued to study physics. How many years after graduation did he get married? He lived in the US
for more than twenty years. From 1933 until his death, Einstein lived in the US. During the last years
of his life, Einstein continued to study physics.
indirect speech
People who knew him said he was a great man.
passive
He was born in 1879. He showed that mass and energy are related. He died in 1955. As a result, he
lost his German citizenship.
past time expressions
He was born more than a hundred years ago, in 1879. When he was five years old, his father showed
him a compass. Two years later, in 1902, he got a job. During that period he made several great
discoveries.
past simple tense
His father showed him a compass. He wondered how it worked. He showed that mass and energy are
related. In 1905 he published several important papers. He became interested in science. People
who knew him said he was a great man.
He discovered the famous equation: E = mc2. In 1921 he
won the Nobel Prize for physics.
clauses with why, how and that
Young Einstein was interested in how it worked. He wondered why the compass needle always pointed
in the same direction. He showed that no particle can travel faster than the speed of light. In one
paper he showed that mass and energy are related.
sequence
When he was five years old; Two years later; After graduation; Shortly after that; By this time; During
that period he made several great discoveries. During the last period of his life, Einstein continued to
study physics.

81

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of The Early Years in class. Focus on the time phrases, prepositions of time and place,
and dates. Put a timeline on the board, from 1879 through 1905, and have the class fill in the details.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students use the timeline to practice summarizing the information.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Quickly review The Early Years, focusing on phrases that indicate the time
sequencing: Two years later, Shortly after that, During that period, etc.
What other expressions could be used?
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice presenting 5 dates in their own
lives. They should connect the dates by using phrases such as: Two years
later, in, I got a job.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Present The Later Years lesson in class and focus on the changes in his life and whether he caused them or
they happened to him. Make a list of these changes and put them on the board. Indicate whether they were
active (he worked) or passive (he was born, his wife died, he lost his citizenship).
In pairs, or small groups, have students make a list of active and passive changes in their lives. If active,
explain why they did it. If passive, explain what caused it to happen.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation and Oral Practice
Present the life of another important figure from history. Put their timeline on the board, and assign students
to think of another character to research and present to the class. (See Timelines below.)
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 and Listening Focus 5.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following Classroom
Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the unit, using the practice
exercises as a model of items to test.

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Module 4:

Unit 3, Biography of Einstein

Classroom Activity 1: Timelines


On the board with the whole class, or in groups, have students make a timeline of the important events in
Einstein's life. Using this as a model, ask students to make a timeline to reflect the important events in their
own lives. These timelines can be used as a basis for sharing information about themselves orally or writing an
autobiography.
Classroom Activity 2: Jumbled Life
Write sentences from the Key Sentences, omitting the date on index cards, e.g., Einstein's father showed him a
compass. He lived in the US. He worked in a patent office, He won the Nobel prize. Give a set of mixed
up cards to a group of four students. Have the groups race to correctly sequence the cards.
Classroom Activity 3: Me and You
Pair students and ask each partner to interview the other to make a timeline with at least 5 dates. Then each
student presents the timeline of their partner to the class, or in a written presentation.
Class Activity 4: Education Timeline School History
Have students give the dates, age range, and descriptions of the schools they have attended (or jobs they have
had): For example: I started to go to school when I was 5 years old. That was in 1975. It was an
elementary school. I studied there for 4 years. When I was 10, I started high school. In 1990, I went to
University, where I studied psychology. Etc
Dictation: Albert Einstein was born in Germany on March 14, 1879.
He didnt talk until the age of three.
During his childhood, he went to schools in Germany and Switzerland.
Between the ages of six and thirteen, he also studied the violin.
He graduated from high school at the age of 17.
He eventually became the most famous scientist of the 20th century.

Class Activity 5: Biography Research


Ask students to research a favorite historical or modern-day figure and write a short biography of that person.
The Internet is a good source for the information.
Class Activity 6: Video Interview
Have the class prepare a five-minute video documentary about the life of an important world figure or popular
personality.
Class Activity 7: Country Timeline
Have students prepare a short history of their country, or a country of their choice, with at least 5 important dates
that marked changes in the development of the country.
Class Activity 8: Interests
Interview a classmate about his or her interests. Are you interested in science? What are you interested in?
When did you first become interested in it?
Class Activity 9: Periods of Life Presentation Discussion
Divide your life into 5 or 10-year periods. Briefly describe two or three of these periods -- the major event(s) in
each. Which period(s) of your life do you think were the most important, and why? How did they change or
influence your life?

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New Dynamic English

of our universe. He died in 1955, at the age of


seventy-six.

Key Sentences
Albert Einstein, The Early Years

Sample Questions

Albert Einstein was a famous scientist. Einstein


was one of the greatest scientists of all time. He
was born in Germany more than a hundred years
ago, in 1879.
(higher shuffler level)
When he was five years old, his father showed him a
compass. Young Einstein was interested in how it
worked. He wondered why the compass needle
always pointed in the same direction. After that,
he became interested in science.

Which direction does a compass needle point to?


When you were a child, were you interested in
science?
When was he (Albert Einstein) born? Where was
he born?
When did he get married? How many
years after graduation did he get a job? How old
was he when he graduated?
Where did he live in 1905? How long did he work
in the patent office? When did he start/stop
working in the patent office? How old was
Einstein when he published his famous papers?

He attended schools in Germany and in Switzerland.


However, he didn't like school. He preferred to
work on his own. In 1900 he graduated from a
university in Zurich. Two years later, in 1902, he
got a job. In 1902 he got a job at the patent office
in the city of Bern, Switzerland. In 1902 he also
got married for the first time.

How many times did he marry? In which year did


he win the Nobel prize? What happened in 1921?
Which country did he move to in 1914? Who
came to power in 1933? When happened in 1936?
Where did Einstein live during World War II?
How old was he when he died? Who discovered
the relationship between mass and energy? Was
Einstein still alive when you were born?

From 1902 to 1909 he worked in the patent office in


Bern. During that period he made several great
discoveries. In 1905 he published several
important papers. In one paper, he showed that
mass and energy are related. He discovered the
famous equation: E = mc2. He also showed that no
particle can travel faster than the speed of light.

Focus Exercises
He [was] [born] in 1879.
In 1902 he also [got married] for the [first] time.
In 1902 he [got a job] [at the] patent office [in the] city
of Bern, in Switzerland.
In 1914 he [moved] [to Germany] and [became] a
professor [at the] University of Berlin.
[Shortly] [after] that he [left] his first wife.
From 1933 [until] his death, Einstein [lived] [in the
U.S.]
[By this] time he [was] [quite] famous.
[In] 1900 he [graduated] [from] a university in Zurich.
Three years [later], [in] 1936, his wife died.
He [died in] 1955 [at the] age of seventy-six.
[During] [that] period he [made] several great
discoveries.
In 1921 he [won] the Nobel Prize [for] physics.
[After] [that] he [became] interested in science.
[However], he [didnt] like school. He preferred [to
work] on his own.
Two years [later], in 1902, he [got] a job.
Young Einstein [was] [interested] in how it [worked].
He [wondered] why the compass needle always
[pointed] in the same direction.
In one paper he [showed] [that] mass and energy [are
related].

The Later Years


In 1914 he moved to Germany and became a
professor at the University of Berlin. Shortly after
that, he left his first wife. In 1919, he married for
the second time. In 1921 he won the Nobel Prize
for physics. By this time, he was quite famous.
In 1933 he became a professor at a research institute
in the US.
In 1933, Hitler also came to power in Germany.
As a result, Einstein, who was Jewish, lost his
German citizenship.
From 1933 until his death, Einstein lived in the US.
Three years later, in 1936, his wife died. In 1941
he became an American citizen. During the last
years of his life, Einstein continued to study physics.
Throughout his life, Einstein loved to listen to
classical music. He also enjoyed playing the
violin. People who knew him said he was a great
man. He always wanted to understand the nature

84

Module 4:

Unit 3, Biography of Einstein

Focused Listening
Focus 3

Focus 1
Preview and study the The Early Years.
sentence several times.

Review The Early Years, and focus on The Later Years.


Listen to each sentence several times.

Listen to each

Language Focus

Language Focus

simple past, prepositions of place and time

time duration

Listening Task

Listening Task

Focus on places and times in Einstein's life: Where was


he born? When was he born? Where did he attend
school? When did he graduate?

Focus on periods of time in Einstein's life (from 1902 to


1909, from 1933 until his death, during that period,
throughout his life). Practice saying the sentences.

Goals

Goals

Students will be able to talk about events that occurred


over a period of time in Einstein's life.
Students will be able to use for, during and from...to to
talk about duration.

Preview and orientation. Students will become


familiar with the basic events of Einstein's early life
and the places (countries, cities) where he lived and
worked.
Students will be able to use prepositions of place and
time (in Germany, in 1900, at the patent office) and
prepositions of direction (from Switzerland to )

Student Follow-up
1. Present three periods of time in Einstein's life.
From 1902 to 1909 he worked in the patent office in Bern.
During that period he made several great discoveries.
2. Present three periods of time in your life.
3. Do Practice Exercises E and F.

Student Follow-up
1. Present 5 important places in your life. Where were
you born? Where did you first go to school?
2. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Focus 4
Focus 2

Review The Early Years, and focus on The Later Years.


Listen to each sentence several times.

Focus on The Early Years, and preview The Later Years.


Listen to each sentence several times.

Language Focus
change, result

Language Focus
dates, simple past, time expressions, sequence

Listening Task
Find four important dates in Einstein's life: two dates
that marked a positive experience and two that marked a
negative experience. How do you think they changed his
life? What were the results?
In 1921 he won the Nobel Prize for Physics. In 1936,
his wife died.

Listening Task
Focus on dates and periods in Einstein's life. Make a
chronological list of dates mentioned in the lesson.
Practice saying the sentences: He was born in 1879. In
1900 he graduated from
In 1902 he got a job.

Goals

Students will know how to name the year.


Students will be able use dates with prepositions of
time (in 1879, in 1905).
Students will be able to use the past tense of
vocabulary relating to life experience: be born, live,
move, graduate, work, get married.

Goal

Students will be able to talk about dates in Einstein's


life and explain their significance.
1921 was important because he received a prize and
became more famous. In 1933, Hitler came to power
in Germany, and Einstein lost his German citizenship.

Student Follow-up

Student Follow-up:

1. Ask and answer 5 questions about places and times in


Einstein's life: Was he born in 1979? When was he
born? Was he born in the United States?
Where
was he born? When did he get a job? etc.
2. Present 5 important dates in your life. Explain what
happened.
3. Do Practice Exercises C and D.

1. Make your own timeline, including at least 10


important dates or periods in your life.
2. What are two important events in your life that
changed your life in a positive way?

85

New Dynamic English

Focus 5
Review The Early Years and The Later Years.
the Questions and Focus Exercises lessons.

Then do

Language Focus
Questions about time and place

Listening Task
Listen for and practice saying questions that ask about
time or place. Think of one additional question you
would like to ask about Einsteins life.
How many years after graduation did he get a job?
Why did he have to move to the US in 1933?

Goal

Students will be able to ask questions about times and


places in the past.
How long did he work in the patent office? Where did
he live in 1905?

Student Follow-up
1. Give a brief presentation of a historical character.
Where and when were they born? What did they do?
Why were they important? What were they
interested in?
2. Interview a classmate about his or her interests. Are
you interested in science? What are you interested in?
When did you first become interested in it?

Focus 6
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times on
different days. Practice recording 10~15 sentences each
time, so that you can say these sentences fluently.
Do the Questions and Focus Exercise everyday until your
Completion Percentage is 80-100%. Then take the
Mastery Test.

Student Follow-up:
1. Write a two page summary of your life history.

86

Module 4:

Unit 3, Biography of Einstein

Practice Exercises
4(3)

Biography:

Exercise A

Fill in the blanks with the prepositions

in,

Example:

Germany.

Einstein was born

in

at,

or

to

1. He attended schools _________ Germany and Switzerland.


2. He got a job _________ (or _________)

the patent office __________ Bern, Switzerland.

3. In 1914 he moved _______ Germany and became a professor ______ the University of Berlin.
4. In 1933, he moved ________ the United States.
5. He lived ________ the United States from 1933 until his death.

4(3)

Biography:

Exercise B

Fill in the blanks with the past tense form of the verb in parentheses.
Albert Einstein (be born) _______________ in Germany in 1879. When he (be) ___________ five
years old, his father (show) _____________ him a compass. Young Einstein (be)

____________

interested in how it worked. After that he (become) ______________ interested in science.


Einstein (like, not) _________________ school. He (prefer) ________________ to work on his
own.

In 1900 he (graduate) _________________ from a University in Zurich. Two years later, in

1902, he (get a job) ________________. In 1902 he also (get married) _________________ for the
first time. From 1902 to 1909 he (work)
Bern.

_______________ in the patent office in the city of

During that period he (make) ________________ several great discoveries.

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New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
4(3)

Biography:

Exercise C

Match the dates on the left with the time expressions on the right.
Example:

c.

in 1902

when he was 23

a. in 1884

1. _____ when he was 21

b. in 1900

2. _____ three years after he started working in Bern

c. in 1902

3. _____ when he was five years old

d. in 1905

4. _____ when he won the Nobel Prize for physics

e. in 1919

5. _____ when he married for the second time

f. in 1921

6. _____ two years after he graduated

4(3)

Biography:

Exercise D

Fill in the blank with a word from the list.


from
Example:

From

for

until

during

by

1884 to 1900 Einstein attended school.

1. _____________ 1902 to 1909 he worked at the patent office in Bern.


2. _____________ that period he made several great discoveries.
3. He worked at the patent office _____________ seven years.
4. He lived in Germany _____________ 1933, when he moved to the U.S.
5. From 1933 _____________ his death, Einstein lived in the U.S.
6. _____________ the last years of his life, Einstein continued to study physics.
7. ____________ the time he moved to the US, he was quite famous.
8. Einstein lived in the US ___________ more than twenty years.

88

Module 4:

Unit 3, Biography of Einstein

Practice Exercises
4(3)

Biography:

Exercise E

Fill in the blank with a word from the list.


how

that

why

who

when

As a child, Einstein became interested in _______ a compass works. He wondered ________ the
compass needle always pointed in the same direction. After _________, he became interested in
science. In 1905, ________ he was twenty six, he published several important papers. In one
paper, he showed ________ mass and energy are related. He also showed ________ no particle
can travel faster than the speed of light. During the last years of his life, Einstein continued to
study physics.

People _______ knew him, said he was a great man. He always wanted to

understand the nature of our universe.

4(3)

Biography:

Exercise F

Write the question (Q) that fits each answer, (A).


Example:
1. Q:

Q: When were you born?


A: I was born in 1984.

When ______________________________________________________________

A: I started working there two years ago.

2. Q:

How long ____________________________________________________________

A: I worked there for about three years.

3. Q:

How old _____________________________________________________________

A: I graduated when I was twenty years old.

4. Q:

How old _____________________________________________________________

A: We moved to Brazil when I was five years old.

5. Q:

Where _______________________________________________________________

A: I was born in Toronto, Canada.

6. Q:

What ________________________________________________________________

A: My father was a pilot.

89

New Dynamic English

4. Review Exercises for Module 4


When Units 1-3 are completed, it is important to review the main points even while beginning to work on Module
5. The following lessons help students refocus on some of the main language points that are covered and which
are included in the Mastery Tests. These lessons should be done on a frequent basis.

Dictations
Dictations focus on important language at the word and phrase level. Detailed instructions for doing the
dictations can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) when you enter
the lesson. The Dictations for Module 4 are as follows:
Dictation 1

Dictation 4

1. Next week Max is going on a business trip.


2. He tried to buy airplane tickets last week, but the flight
was full.
3. Yesterday his travel agent called and told him there was
space on the flight.
4. Max is going to get the ticket in the mail tomorrow.

1. Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time.


2. He was born in Germany more than a hundred years
ago, in 1879.
3. When he was five years old, his father showed him a
compass.
4. Young Einstein was interested in how it worked.

Dictation 2

Dictation 5

1. It takes about ten hours to fly from San Francisco to


London.
2. He's going to take British Airways because it has a nonstop flight.
3. If he leaves on Saturday afternoon, he'll arrive in
London on Sunday morning.
4. The day after he arrives in London, he's going to attend
a meeting.

1. Max is going to arrive in London on a Sunday.


2. Max will probably watch a late movie on TV before he
goes to bed.
3. If he still can't sleep, he may telephone his wife and
children in San Francisco.
4. Whenever he is away from home, he looks forward to
coming back.

Dictation 6

Dictation 3

1. People read newspapers to find out about daily news.


2. It usually takes less time to read a newspaper than a
book.
3. If you want to read about today's news, you'll probably
read a newspaper.
4. If you want to study history, you'll probably read many
books.

1. It's always interesting to talk to John.


2. He is always thinking about new stories and new
projects.
3. Last year, for example, he wrote a story that appeared
on television.
4. Now he's working on a new story that will appear on
television next year.

Fill-Ins
This lesson reviews some of the main grammar points that have been introduced in Units 1-3. Detailed
instructions for doing the Fill-Ins (with Speech Recognition) can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) once you are in the Fill-Ins lesson. Please note that the highlighted
words in the answer sentences are linked to the Glossary. Sample sentences from the Fill-Ins lesson are:
(1) Last week the flight was full. (3) Max has a good travel agent, so hes going to get a 20% discount. (4) Hes going to
take British Airways because it has a non-stop flight. (5) When he lands in London, hell claim his luggage and go through
customs. (6) Then hell have to decide how to get to his hotel. (7) One choice is to go by taxi. (9) Max isnt sure
what he will do. (11) Hotels are expensive in London, but weekend rates are a bit less. (13) Its always interesting to
talk to John. (15) If he still cant sleep, he may telephone his wife and children in San Francisco. (17) Buses leave about
every twenty minutes. (20) A book usually takes longer to read than a magazine. (23) Young Einstein was interested in
how it worked. (24) He wondered why the compass needle always pointed in the same direction. (26) During the last
years of his life, Einstein continued to study physics. (27) People who knew him said he was a great man.

90

Module 4:

Unit 4, Review Exercises

Speech Practice
In addition to developing oral fluency, this lesson provides a means to review and focus attention on many of the
key language points developed in Units 1-3, such as the past tense, present continuous, be going to, and relative
pronouns. Detailed instructions for using Speech Recognition and for doing the Speech Practice lesson can be
found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens.
The Speech Practice lesson has four sections: Sentence Reading, Answering Questions, Sentence Repetition and
Speech Quiz. Please note that the Score for the Speech Quiz is designed so that students can try to increase their
scores each time they do the quiz, rather than as a test. A record of each score can be found in the Study Records.

5. Video Interactions, Module 4


This lesson shows a variety of native speakers in the following
situations: Business Telephone; Friendly Advice; At a
Restaurant; and An Interview. Students may view each scene in
a presentation mode and also an interactive mode where they
can interact with the characters through Speech Recognition (or
mouse click) choices.
Detailed instructions for this lesson, and also for Speech
Recognition, can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help Screens after you enter the lesson.
Each scene illustrates language points that have been developed in this module. The scenes have been designed
so that they can be role-played by students. This is an excellent way to review, have fun, and personalize the
language.
Maybe Ill have that too.
Would you like some dessert?
No thanks. I dont feel like any dessert.
The fresh fruit looks good.
Okay. If you have fruit, Ill have ice cream.

Business Telephone
There's going to be an important meeting tomorrow
afternoon. Can you come?
I think I'm free, but I'm not sure. Let me check my schedule
first and get back to you.
If you can't come, we can change the time. Its an important
meeting.
I'll call you back in an hour and let you know, okay?
Thanks. Ill be waiting for your call. Youve got my number,
right?
Yes, but why dont you give it to me again?

Whats wrong?
Wow, this is really hot!
I told you to be careful. Thats very spicy.

An Interview
And where did you grow up?
We moved around a lot when I was growing up, so there
isn't any one place.
Oh, where are some of the places that you lived?
I lived in Canada for a couple of years. Then we moved to
Brazil for a year. After that we moved to Singapore.
I see. What did your parents do?
My father died when I was growing up, so it was just my
mother.
Oh, I'm sorry. So why did your mother move around so
much?
She worked for a publishing company.
Was it interesting to live in so many countries?
Yes, it was. But sometimes it was a little lonely. I never had
any close friends.
Oh, thats too bad. I know what you mean. I moved
around a lot too.

Friendly Advice
Do you know if Carmen is going to be there?
Carmen?
Yes, Carmen! You know who I mean.
Im sorry John, but you should forget all about Carmen.
Shes no good for you.
I dont know why you dont like her, Emily.
I dont dislike her. But she doesnt like you. Youre just
wasting your time, and I hate to see it.
Okay, maybe she doesnt like me. But Im not going to give
up. I think shes interesting.

At a Restaurant
Are you ready to order yet?
No, not yet. How about you? What are you going to order?
Im just going to have a salad. Im not so hungry.

91

New Dynamic English

Module 4 Summary - New Dynamic English 2


Active vocabulary through Module 4:

approximately 900 words

Summary of Verbs in each unit (not including Video Interactions)


Regular Verbs
(1) Planning Ahead
arrive
appear
attend*
call
check in
claim
contain
decide
finish*
fly
land
live*
look forward to
miss
stay*
talk*
telephone
travel*
try*
watch*
work*

(2) Matrix Vocabulary


change*
cook*
enjoy*
gain
like*
listen*
live*
look
mix
order
prefer*
study*
turn
turn off
want*

(3) Biography (Einstein)


attend
continue
die*
discover
enjoy*
graduate
like*
live*
love*
marry
move
play*
point
prefer*
publish
show
study*
travel*
wonder
work*

Irregular Verbs and their Past Tense forms


V
be*
become
bring
buy*
come
come back
choose
do*
drink
eat*
find
get
give*
go*
have*
hear
know*
leave*

Lesson
(1,2,3)
(3)
(2)
(1)
(2,3)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1,2)
(1,2)
(2)
(1,2,3)
(2)
(1)
(2)
(2)
(1,3)
(1,3)

V(d)
was/were
became
brought
bought
came
came back
chose
did
drank
ate
found
got
gave
went
had
heard
knew
left

V
lose
make*
mean*
pay
put
read*
say
see*
send
sing*
sleep*
take*
tell
think*
understand
win
write*

* verbs introduced in previous lessons

92

Lesson
(1,3)
(2,3)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(2)
(4)
(1)
(2)
(2)
(1)
(1,2)
(1)
(1)
(3)
(3)
(1)

V(d)
lost
made
meant
paid
put
read
said
saw
sent
sang
slept
took
told
thought
understood
won
wrote

Answer Key

Answer Key for Practice Exercises


3 (1) Daily Activities: Practice Exercise A
got up; didnt have; had; worked; left; took; went
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise B
1. c
2. j
3. a 4. i
5. e

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Daily Activities: Practice Exercise C


1. They left for school at 7:45. 2. (After she drove her kids to school) she and a friend went shopping together.
3. She got up at 6:30. 4. She drove her kids to school. 5. They bought some clothes (for their children).
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise D
1. a
2. b
3. c
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise E
is eating; is having; eats; gets up; doesnt have; is cleaning; cleans; come; is living; is studying; wants
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise F
1. Im working at the office. 2. Shes meeting her boss.
telephone. 5. Were eating lunch together.
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise G
1. is going to 2. are going to
3.

are going to

4.

3.

Hes driving a taxi.

is going to

5.

4.

Theyre talking on the

am going to

Daily Activities: Practice Exercise H


1. Shes going to take a bus to class. 2. Kathys going to interview someone about the problem of pollution.
3. Theyre going to talk about nuclear waste. 4. Im going to watch TV before I go to bed.
5. Were going to meet our boss after dinner.
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise I
1. d
2. a
3. e
4. c
5.

or

Daily Activities: Practice Exercise J


(varies according to student)
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise K
1. Who didnt drive a car this morning? 2. Does Diane (usually) eat breakfast (with her family)? 3. Do they
both paint? OR Do Diane and Kathy both paint? 4. Who is going to (go to) an/her art class this evening? 5.
Is Kathy going to attend a painting class this evening?
Daily Activities: Practice Exercise L
1. No, they didnt. 2. No, she isnt. 3. No, she doesnt. 4. Yes, I do. OR No, I dont.
No, I didnt. 6. No, Im not. OR Yes, I am. 7. No, Im not. OR Yes, I am.

5.

Yes, I did. OR

3 (2) Our World: Practice Exercise A


1. The sun gives us energy. 2. We need water to grow our food. 3. There are eight planets that travel around
our sun. 4. Without the sun there would be no life on Earth. 5. Conditions must be right for life to exist.
Our World: Practice Exercise B
1. air 2. water 3. sun 4.

energy 5.

life

6.

life

93

7.

air

8.

food

New Dynamic English

Our World: Practice Exercise C


1. Without sun and water, plants cant grow.
cant breathe.
Our World: Practice Exercise D
1. c 2. a 3. b 4. e 5. g
Our World: Practice Exercise E
1. need 2. causes 3. makes
makes 10. makes
Our World: Practice Exercise F
1. b
2. a
3. d
4. c

6.

4.

5.

2.

Without water, we cant grow our food.

7.

makes

6.

8.

9.

5.

cause

6.

Automobiles

7.

8.

10.

3.

Without air, we

7.

poisons

8.

causes

9.

Our World: Practice Exercise G


1. Plants and trees produce the air that we breathe. 2. Millions of years ago there were forms of life that no longer
exist.
3. There are lots of old cars that are a major cause of pollution.
Our World: Practice Exercise H
1. h 2. c 3. d 4. i 5. j

6. a

7.

8.

3 (3) Locations: Practice Exercise A


1. across, from 2. between
3. around, from
restrooms
8. cinema
9. on, of 10. next
Locations: Practice Exercise B
1. h OR e (British) 2. i OR d

3.

Locations: Practice Exercise C


a fairly good hotel; the hotel; a restaurant;
place to go

4.

4.

9.

10.

across from

5.

behind

6.

5.

around, from

7.

c OR g

6.

bank

8.

The restaurant; the food; the hotel; the bank; a car; a gas station; the only

Locations: Practice Exercise D


1. Could you tell me where I can buy a newspaper? 2. Could you tell me where I can park my car? 3.
you tell me where I can get/buy some gas/petrol? 4. Excuse me, but could you tell me where I can find a
restroom?
5. Where can I get something to drink?
Locations: Practice Exercise E
1. f 2. d, c 3. a 4. j 5. i

6.

7.

k 7.

8.

Could

Locations: Practice Exercise F


1. The stamp is near the envelope. 2. The stamp is on the envelope. 3. The envelop is on/on top of the stamp.
4.
The circle is around the triangle.
5. The circle is inside the triangle.
6. The triangle is to the right of the
circle. 7. The letter is inside the envelope.

94

Answer Key

Locations:

Location Crossword

a
d

4 (1) Planning Ahead: Practice Exercise A


1. yesterday 2. last week
3. last week
morning
7. ten hours

4.

e
d

e
e

o
v

n
i

r
a

tomorrow

5.

6.

on Sunday

on Saturday afternoon

Planning Ahead: Practice Exercise B


1. It takes thirty minutes to get to the hotel on the subway/by subway. 2. It takes thirty-five minutes to get to the
hotel on the bus/by bus. 3. If he goes by subway, hell arrive (at the hotel) at 10:35 a.m. OR Hell arrive at the
hotel at 10:35 if he goes by subway.
Planning Ahead: Practice Exercise C
1. How long does it take to fly from San Francisco to London?
London (by train)?

2.

How long does it take to get to Brighton from

Planning Ahead: Practice Exercise D


1. d
2. a
3. e
4. b
5. c
Planning Ahead: Practice Exercise E
1.
If he takes the underground/the subway, he wont be able to see the countryside.
2. It will be expensive if he takes/decides to take a taxi. OR if he goes by taxi.
3. If he takes a bus, it will take a long time to get to his hotel.
4. If he goes by taxi or bus, he can see the countryside.
5. Itll be less expensive if he goes by bus or subway/underground.
6. Sometimes its possible to get a cheaper rate at a hotel if you stay for several days.
7. If he leaves (San Francisco) on Saturday afternoon, hell arrive in London on Sunday morning.
Planning Ahead: Practice Exercise F
am going to arrive; get; am going to check-in;

am going to telephone ;

lives;

get together;

talk

Planning Ahead: Practice Exercise G


interesting man; interesting story; interested in music; interesting to talk; interested in many of the same things;
interested in
Planning Ahead:

Practice Exercise H

1.

3.

2.

4.

5.

6. a

7. a

95

8. c

New Dynamic English

4 (2) Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise A


1. i
2. e
3. f
4. a
5. g
6. j
Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise B
1. g
2. j
3. f 4. b
5. i
6.

7.

7.

Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise C


1. f
2. c
3. a 4. i
5. d
6. g

7.

Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise D


1. f
2. c
3. h 4. a
5. i
6. j
7. d
8. b
9. g
10. e

8.

9.

10.

8.

9.

10.

8.

b
p

Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise


E
1. b, h
2. f
3. l 4. c
5. e
6. d
7. k
8. j
9. a
10. g

9. b

10.

m
s

a
j

Matrix Vocabulary Crossword

Biography: Practice Exercise B


was born;
was;
showed; was;
worked; made
Biography: Practice Exercise C
1. b
2. d
3. a
4. f
5.

became;

6.

Biography: Practice Exercise D


1. From 2. During
3. for

4.

Biography: Practice Exercise E


how; why; that; when; that; that;

who

until

n
r

5.

4 (3) Biography: Practice Exercise A


1. in
2. in/ at, in 3. to, at 4. to

t
w

d
v

r
r

n
w

u
e

in

didnt like;

preferred;

graduated;

got a job;

got married;

5.

until

6.

During

7.

By

8.

for

Biography: Practice Exercise F


1. When did you start working there? 2. How long did you work there? 3. How old were you when you
graduated? 4. How old were you when you moved to Brazil. 5. Where were you born? 6. What did your
father do? OR What was your fathers occupation/job?

96

New Dynamic English


Level 3:

Modules 5 & 6

Instructors Guide

The Smart Way to English


Version 2.5

Copyright 1998~2013, DynEd International, Inc.


www.dyned.com

October, 2013

New Dynamic English

Table of Contents
Scope and Sequence, Level 3............................ 3

Module 6 Lesson Map....................................... 46

Introduction to Level 3...................................... 5

1. Life Experience .......................................... 47


Learning Points .......................................... 48
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 49
Key Sentences ............................................ 51
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 53
Practice Exercises....................................... 54

Module 5 Lesson Map ...................................... 6


1.

On a Trip .................................................... 7
Learning Points .......................................... 8
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 9
Key Sentences ............................................ 11
Focused Listening ...................................... 14
Practice Exercises ...................................... 16

2. Matrix Vocabulary ..................................... 57


Learning Points .......................................... 58
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 59
Key Sentences ............................................ 61
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 63
Practice Exercises....................................... 65

2. Energy Sources .......................................... 20


Learning Points .......................................... 21
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 22
Key Sentences ............................................ 24
Focused Listening ...................................... 26
Practice Exercises ...................................... 28

3. Comparisons ............................................... 71
Learning Points .......................................... 72
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 73
Key Sentences ............................................ 75
Focused Listening Tasks ............................ 77
Practice Exercises....................................... 79

3. Directions ................................................... 32
Learning Points .......................................... 33
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 34
Key Sentences ............................................ 36
Focused Listening ...................................... 38
Practice Exercises ...................................... 40

4.

4. Review Exercises ....................................... 83


Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises

Review Exercises ....................................... 43


Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises

5.

5. Video Interactions w/SR ............................ 84


Telephone Conversation
Flight Information
At a Restaurant
An Interview: Job Experience

Video Interactions w/SR ............................ 44


How Much Are the Tickets?
Business Telephone
At a Restaurant
Hot Seats

Module 6 Summary ......................................... 86


Answer Key....................................................... 88

Module 5 Summary ........................................... 45

Scope and Sequence:

Modules 5 & 6

Scope and Sequence, Module 5


Module 5, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

On a Trip
A Paris Vacation
Todays Activities
Florence and Beyond
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Past, present, future events and experience


In the context of a trip to
Present Perfect tense (she has had..., they
Europe, this Unit introduces
have kept in touch, she has never been)
the Present Perfect tense.
Duration (been, for, since)
Future time and Modals (be going to, will,
Students focus on the
may, look forward to V(ing))
difference between the past
Conditional (she would do the writing, if they
tense to express a singular
go together, it could be)
event and the present perfect
already, yet, ever
to express a state or
Yes/No and Wh-question formation with
experience.
Present Perfect and Past tenses.

Energy Sources
Our Energy Needs
What about the Future?
Questions
Focus Exercises

Cause/Effect (As the supply decreases, the


price will increase. Oil spills cause)
This unit focuses on global
Classification (such as, some of the ways we
issues, such as Global
get energy, fossil fuels include coal, oil)
Warming.
Conditionals (if the temperature rises, if it
gets into the environmentetc.)
Students learn important
Degrees of Certainty (will increase, can
vocabulary and concepts
convert, there may even be)
useful for talking about basic
Noun phrases (many kinds of wildlife, the
science.
energy of falling water)
Passive voice (is converted, are produced,
This unit follows up 3(2) Our
must be limited, is used, are being cut)
World.
Purpose (We need energy for heat. We
need energy to run our factories).

Directions
City Directions
City Quiz
Spatial Relations

Giving Directions (turn right at the


intersection, cross the street, etc.)
Distance (too far, not far enough, one block
east, two doors down)
Location (on the same block as, on the
opposite side of the street)
Spatial Relations (upper left-hand corner,
second from the left in the top row)

4.

Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and speech recognition exercises


review key grammar and vocabulary.
Develops fluency and reading skills.

5.

Video Interactions
w/SR
How Much Are the
Tickets?
Business Telephone
At a Restaurant (1)
Hot Seats

Polite language for solving a problem over


Language review.
the telephone and for buying something.
Provides a model for role Students may interact with the actors through
plays.
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.

1.

2.

3.

Prepares students for giving


and following directions.
This unit follows up 3(3)
Locations.

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as the Present Perfect tense.

New Dynamic English

Scope and Sequence, Module 6


Module 6, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

Life Experience
Making a New Life
A Path to Success
A Troubled Past
Questions
Focus Exercises

Present Perfect/Past tenses contrasted


Passive voice (was rejected, was arrested)
Gerund/Infinitive (enjoys teaching, decided
to study, likes living in England)
Change (she became a model, hes getting
older, their relationship got better.)
Reason/Purpose (for a personal reason, a
grant to study, arrested for stealing)
Time Sequence (at the same time, a year
later, before that, since then, he still lives)

Matrix Vocabulary
Occupations
Places to Go
Ways to Travel
Things to Wear
Feelings
Matrix Game

Adverb clauses/phrases (when they are


happy, when someone is rude to them)
This unit focuses on subject
Compulsion, have to (I only go when I have
areas that are often in daily
to. You have to put on your socks.)
conversations.
Word relations/analogies (Driver is to bus as
pilot is to airplane.)
Students should extend the
Gerunds/Infinitives (I prefer flying. The
vocabulary given here, for
fastest way to travel is to go by airplane.)
example by interviewing each
Countable/Uncountable Amounts (many
other.
people, some people, a lot of education, a
pair of gloves, most people)

3.

Comparisons
Price and Quality
Three Sisters
Country Data
Four Cities
Focus Exercises

Adjective clauses/phrases (which was made


in 1920, the second most expensive)
Approximation (approximately 5,400 miles; Students learn to ask
about 7,400 miles; just over)
information questions and
Asking about price/product information
make different kinds of
(How much is the newest one? When was it
comparisons, such as for
made? Which one has the best?)
product comparison.
Comparison (-er than, -est, as good as, better
than, the most expensive one)
People, products, and places
are contrasted.
Countable/Uncountable (how many more,
how much more, how much taller)
Physical Description, Temperature, Distance

4.

Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and speech recognition exercises


review key grammar and vocabulary.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

5.

Video Interactions
w/SR
Telephone Conversation
Flight Information
At a Restaurant (2)
Interview: Job
Experience

Presents polite language useful for doing


Students learn how to solve
business over the telephone.
problems over the telephone.
Students may interact with the actors through Provides models for role-plays
Speech Recognition (SR) activities.
and interviews.

1.

2.

Students learn to talk about


their past experiences and
hopes for the future.
This unit contrasts the lives of
three characters.
This unit extends and follows
up 5(1) On a Trip.

Provides language practice


and review activities.

Introduction to Level 3

Introduction to Level 3
New Dynamic English, Level 3, prepares students to handle most day to day situations in English and to
communicate about their lives and the framework we live in. It also lays the groundwork for advanced
studies, where the focus moves toward abstract ideas and logical relationships.
Though listening and oral fluency continue to be the main focus in Level 3, reading and writing skills
play an increasingly important role. Follow-up assignments, including task-based reading, readers,
worksheets, and short, structured writing assignments are highly recommended to help reinforce and
extend the language presented in the lessons. Some of these are included in the Classroom Activities
section of each unit.

Content for Level 3


The material presented in Level 3 provides the basis for 40-60 hours of study, depending on the
language background of the students, which may vary considerably. The estimated TOEFL level of
students at this level is in the range of 400 +/- 50, and the TOEIC range is estimated to be 450-600.
The estimated time for completing this level assumes that the language presented in each level is used
as a model that is then systematically extended and personalized in classroom activities and that followup assignments are used as suggested in this manual. The usual order is as follows:
1. Preview each lesson with a focus on general comprehension.
2. Analyze and practice the language in each lesson with a focus on the key language structures.
3. Extend and personalize the content of each lesson via student generated language, including roleplays, pair practice, written exercises, and group activities.
4. Review and test.

General Language Specifications for Level 3


New Dynamic English, Level 3, develops a useful spoken vocabulary of over 1500 high-frequency
words that provide students with the ability to handle common situations and to communicate about
their lives, their experience, qualifications, and the basic technology and framework of our everyday
lives.
Level 3 covers intermediate language structures and provides a foundation for upper-intermediate and
advanced work. In addition, the video lessons provide useful language models for the telephone and for
other social situations appropriate to this level.

Detailed Language Specifications for Level 3


The language focus for Level 3 is on the perfect and passive forms of the verb, infinitives and gerunds,
general vocabulary development, spatial relations, and a further development of the phrase structures of
English, which are so critical and basic to the language. In addition, the course focuses on the
construction of Wh- and Yes/No questions with increasing complexity. Please see the Scope and
Sequence for Level 3, and the Learning Points at the beginning of each Unit for additional information
and examples. The Index is also helpful in locating where specific topics or structures are presented or
developed in the course.

New Dynamice English

Module 5 Lesson Map


Unit 1:

On a Trip
A Paris Vacation
Todays Activities
Florence and Beyond
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Unit 2:

Energy Sources
Our Energy Needs
What about the Future?
Questions
Focus Exercises

Unit 3:

Directions
City Directions
City Quiz
Spatial Relations

Unit 4:

Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Speech Quiz

Unit 5:

Video Interactions w/SR


How Much are the Tickets?
Business Telephone
At a Restaurant
Hot Seats w/SR

Module 5:

Unit 1, On a Trip

1. On a Trip
A Paris Vacation; Todays Activities; Florence and Beyond; Question Practice; and
Focus Exercises
This important Unit introduces the present perfect and contrasts it with the simple past. In the
context of Kathys trip to Europe, students learn to talk about plans, schedules, and how to report
and find out about a series of events unfolding in time.
In A Paris Vacation the focus is on the contrast between past events (she came to Paris two days
ago) and the resulting experience (she has come to Paris). In Todays Activities, we follow
Kathys progress throughout the day, contrasting when events happened with how long it has been
since they happened.
In Florence and Beyond, we look at future plans and how they relate
to present and past experiences (she has never been to Salzburg).
In the Question Practice lesson, students practice making information
questions with the present perfect and past tense. In the Focus
Exercises lesson, students arrange a set of words to construct
sentences.
Goals:
To be able to understand and use the present perfect to express a resulting state.
To be able to understand and be able to express events and states in the past, present, and future.
To be able to ask and answer information questions regarding events and states in the past, present
and future.
Objective 1:
Objective 2:

To understand the difference between the past tense and the present perfect.
To be able to use the time expressions already, still, since, yet, and ago.

New Dynamic English

Learning Points
been
has been; has never been; how long has she been in Paris? This is the third time she has been in Paris.
Have you ever been to Paris?
for, since, in, until
She has been there for two hours, since 11:30. She hasnt had a vacation in a long time. They didnt
arrive at their hotel until late last night. In another hour shes going to leave. Shell be there for another
hour.
information questions (how long, how long ago, how many times, how much longer)
How long has she been at the museum? How many times has she been in Paris? How much longer is
she going to stay at the museum? How long ago did she arrive in Paris? How long has she been in
Paris?
look forward to/planning to
They are looking forward to staying there. Shes looking forward to seeing some beautiful old
buildings. Shes looking forward to talk to him about the project.
modals (will, may)
Then they will travel to Austria. She may not want that kind of relationship. This will be her first visit
there. She will fly to Paris, where she will catch her flight back to the States.
present perfect
It is the first vacation she has had in a long time. She hasnt had a vacation in a long time. She has come
to Paris to attend her best friends wedding. Kathy has been in Paris before. She has been there for two
hours. Since then they have kept in touch. They have written to each other several times. She has never
been to Salzburg. Have you ever been to Paris?
present perfect and past tense contrasted
How long has she been in Paris...? When did she arrive in Paris? She has been in Paris since Saturday.
She arrived in Paris on Saturday. She first came to Paris ten years ago. The last time was two years ago.
This is the third time she has been in Paris.
supposed to, have to
Her plane was supposed to arrive at 1:00. She has to leave on Saturday evening.
time relations with already, still, yet, and ago
Have they arrived at their hotel yet? Have they already left for Salzburg? Are the newlyweds still in
Paris? Shes still at the museum. Has her friend gotten married yet? How long ago did Kathy and Pierre
first meet each other?

Module 5:

Unit 1, On a Trip

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of A Paris Vacation in class. Focus on the present perfect and how it is different
from the past tense. Put a list of verbs from the lesson on the board, and list the past tense V(d) and
past participle V(n) forms of each.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice making sentences with both the past tense and
present perfect for the following verbs: be, arrive, come, get married, eat, drive, check-in, meet
(someone), and take a vacation. Go over some of the examples in class.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce Todays Activities in class. Focus on the difference between
already, since, still, for, and yet. In pairs, or small groups, have students
practice asking and answering questions using each of the above words.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce Florence and Beyond. Focus on the use of have ever +V(n) and have never +V(n) to talk
about experience.
In pairs or small groups, have students interview each other to find out about things they have and
havent done.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.
Step 9: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce the Question Practice lesson. Focus on how to ask and answer information questions with
the past tense and the present perfect.
Step 9: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 5, the Focus Exercises, in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following
Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the Unit,
using the practice exercises as a model of items to test.
Classroom Activity 1: Kathy's Trip
Divide the board into three parts. Write did in the first section, has done in the next, and is going to do
in the last. Invite students to come to the board and write sentences about Kathy's trip in the appropriate
column. Assume that it is 2:00 on Monday and that Kathy is now at the Louvre.

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 2: Paris Postcards


Have students write postcards from Kathy to her friends at home. Ask them to make sure each postcard
contains at least one line about what she is doing at the moment, what she has done so far on her trip,
and what she is going to be doing. The postcards should be written at different times during her trip
(e.g., when she arrived in Paris, in Florence, just before she leaves, etc.)
Classroom Activity 3: Me and You
Pair students and ask each partner to write down three things he or she thinks have been the same in
their two lives, and three things he or she thinks have been different. Have the partners then discuss
what they have written, and then write a paragraph or two about the differences and similarities.
Classroom Activity 4: Winners Introduction
Have students list two or three things they have or havent done in their lives which they are proud of:
I have traveled around the world. I have never received an F on a report card. I have spent three hours
in a car with my brother without fighting with him. I have never gotten a speeding ticket. Then pair
students and have them share these accomplishments. Ask students to pretend they are at an awards
banquet and they will tell the audience why their partner is so great and very deserving of the award.
Have them prepare a short speech praising their partner and describing all the wonderful things s/he has
accomplished.
Classroom Assignment 5:

A Perfect Vacation

Using the internet, have groups of students make a detailed plan for a two-week vacation anywhere in the world.
Then, assuming that they are in the middle of their trip, write a report about what they have done thus far and what
they are still planning to do.

Classroom Assignment 6:

A Progress Report to Your Boss (or teacher)

Think of a project you have at work or at school. What are the steps necessary to complete the project? Write a
progress report to your boss, detailing where you are in the project, what you have finished, and what still needs to
be done. How does your progress meet the original time schedule?

Classroom Assignment 7

Self Critical (you, a public figure, or an organization)

What are some things you are supposed to do but usually dont? What are some of your strengths and weaknesses?
How have you changed? Have you gotten better or worse or stayed the same?
What are some things you think your company or school should do better? Are things changing? How have things
changed in the past year or so? Are things getting better or worse? How difficult is it to change things? Why dont
people change? Why do people change? How about you? Are you open to change? Are you flexible? When was
the last time you changed your mind about something? Have you ever been wrong? Has your boss ever been
wrong? Has your boss ever admitted to making a mistake?

Classroom Assignment

One Year Plan:

An Oral Presentation or Interview

Consider a period of time, such as this year. Make a short oral presentation that covers the following (or similar)
points about your job, studies or personal life:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

What I have already done. What remains to be done.


What I am doing now.
What I still havent finished.
What I am still looking forward to doing? What I hope to complete by the end of the (time period).
What I am tired of doing? What I am looking forward to finishing?

Follow-up questions: Are you pleased by your progress? Why not? Have there been any surprises? What have you
enjoyed the most? What has been the most difficult? Has anything been easier than you expected? Have there
been any unexpected delays? Do you expect any problems? What do you think will happen if you cant finish?
What could happen that might delay the project? Do you really think its possible? What are the risks? Are there
any risks? Are you a risk-taker or Are you more cautious or conservative?

10

Module 5:

Unit 1, On a Trip

Key Sentences

Todays Activities

A Paris Vacation

Today, in Paris, Kathy is enjoying herself. This


morning she took a walk through the streets of Paris.
After her walk, at around 9:00, she enjoyed a
delicious cup of coffee in a small cafe. At 10:00 she
went to the Notre Dame Cathedral where she
listened to some beautiful organ music.

Kathy is on a one-week vacation from her job as a


journalist. It is the first vacation she has had in a
long time. She hasnt had a vacation in a long time.
She is in Paris to attend her best friend's wedding.
She has come to Paris to attend her best friends
wedding.

Now she's at the Louvre, the famous art museum.


It's 1:30. She has been there for two hours, since
11:30. She's looking at the Mona Lisa, one of the
world's most famous paintings. In another hour she's
going to leave the museum and do some shopping.
She wants to buy a nice dress for herself and some
perfume for her mother.

This is the third time she has been in Paris. (This


isn't the first time she has been in Paris. Kathy has
been in Paris before.) She first came to Paris as a
student, ten years ago. (The first time she came to
Paris was as a student ten years ago.) The last time
was two years ago, when she came on business.
During that trip, she was so busy that she didn't have
time to see any of the sights. This time she plans to
relax and enjoy herself.

This evening, she has a date to meet someone for


dinner. Can you guess who he is?
She's going to have dinner with Pierre, a famous
photographer. She interviewed him two years ago.
Since then they have kept in touch. They have
written to each other several times.
(higher shuffler level)
Kathy is interested in doing a project with him.
She would do the writing, and he would take the
pictures. Shes looking forward to talk to him about
the project.

Kathy arrived in Paris two days ago/ the day before


yesterday, which was Saturday. Her plane landed at
3:00, two hours behind schedule. Her plane was
supposed to arrive at 1:00.
After arriving, Kathy visited with her friend and met
her friend's fianc for the first time. He is a very
successful Italian businessman.
The wedding was yesterday. It was a small wedding,
but very nice.
(higher shuffler level)
After the wedding, the newlyweds left for a skiing
trip in the Swiss Alps. They went by rental car.
Unfortunately, they got tied up in traffic. They didn't
arrive at their hotel until late last night.
Fortunately, they had confirmed reservations, so
they had no trouble checking in.

She doesn't know it, but Pierre has romantic


intentions. He thinks she's very attractive.
Florence and Beyond
Tomorrow Kathy is going to leave Paris and fly to
Florence, Italy.
(higher shuffler level)
She's planning to stay in Florence for one day, until
Wednesday evening. Pierre would like to go to
Florence with her. If they go together, it could be the
beginning of something beautiful. On the other
hand, Kathy may not want that kind of relationship
with Pierre. In any case, Kathy is planning to enjoy
Florence.

They plan to stay there until Thursday. Then they


will travel on to Salzburg, in Austria. They are
going to meet up with Kathy there before she returns
to the U.S. The three of them are going to stay in a
castle hotel ten miles outside Salzburg.
The hotel is on a lake, and the view from the hotel is
wonderful. The hotel is in a five hundred-year-old
castle. It used to belong to an Austrian prince.
Everyone is looking forward to staying here.

This will be her first visit there. The last time she
was in Italy she visited Rome, but she didn't have
time to go to Florence. She's looking forward to
seeing some of the beautiful old buildings and great
works of art.

11

New Dynamic English

When did she get to the Louvre? How long has she
been at the Louvre? What is she looking at right
now? How much longer is she going to stay at the
museum? Has she gone shopping yet?

From Florence, she's going to take a train to


Salzburg, where she will join her friends. They are
going to meet her at the station.
She has never been to Salzburg. It will be her first
time. Like so many other cities in Europe, Salzburg
has an interesting history. She wants to visit the
place where Mozart was born. He was born there
more than 200 years ago.

Who is she going to meet for dinner? Has she met


him before? What does Pierre do for a living?
How have they kept in touch?
How is Kathy going to get to Salzburg? Has Kathy
ever been to Salzburg? Who wrote this piece of
music? Who was born in Salzburg? Do you like
Mozart's music?

Kathy only has time to stay in Salzburg for a couple


of days. On Friday she and her friends are going to
attend a concert.

According to her schedule, which day is Kathy


going to leave for home?

She has to leave Saturday evening. She will fly to


Paris, where she will catch her flight back to the
States.

Have you ever been to Paris?

Though a week isn't very long, Kathy's memories of


this trip will last a lifetime. She is glad she came.

Question Practice w/SR


Has Kathy ever been to Salzburg?
How is Kathy going to get to Salzburg?
Is Kathy going to visit Salzburg?
How long ago did she arrive in Paris?
How long has she been in Paris?
Has Kathy been in Paris before?

Comprehension Questions
How long is her vacation (going to last)? Has Kathy
been in Paris before? What is the main reason she
has come to Paris? How many times has she been in
Paris? How many years ago did she first come to
Paris? When was the last time she came to Paris?

Did she meet Pierre two years ago?


Did her flight arrive on time?
When did she arrive in Paris?
Has her friend gotten married yet?
Has the wedding taken place yet?
What does Kathy want to see in Italy?

How long has she been in Paris? When did she


arrive in Paris?
Did her flight arrive on time? When was her flight
supposed to arrive? How late was her flight? How
many hours late was her flight? When did her flight
actually arrive?

When was her flight supposed to arrive?


When did her flight actually arrive?
Are the newlyweds still in Paris?
Have the newlyweds left Paris yet?
When did the newlyweds leave Paris?
Has she met him before?

When did her friend get married? Has her friend


gotten married yet? Who did Kathys friend marry?
Have the newlyweds left Paris yet? When did the
newlyweds leave Paris? Are the newlyweds still in
Paris? How did they travel from Paris to their hotel
in the Alps? Have they arrived at their hotel yet?
Why did they arrive late? They arrived late because
of heavy traffic.

When did they arrive at their hotel?


Have they arrived at their hotel yet?
Have they already left for Salzburg?
Has she had any coffee yet today?
Has she been to dinner yet?
When is she going to meet him?

Where are they going to be until Thursday? When


are they going to leave for Austria? Have they
already left for Salzburg? Is there a good view from
the hotel? How far out of town is the hotel? Who did
the hotel used to belong to?

How much longer is she going to stay at the


museum?
How many times has she been in Paris?
When did her friend get married?

What did she do first thing this morning? Has she


had any coffee yet today? Where did she go after
she had some coffee?

12

Module 5:

Unit 1, On a Trip

When are they going to leave for Austria?


What did she do first thing this morning?

Focus Exercises
This is the [third] [time [she [has] [been] in Paris.
She first [came] to Paris [as [a student ten years
[ago.]
The [last] time [was] two years [ago] when she
[came] on business.
Kathy [arrived] in Paris the day [before] [yesterday],
[which] was Saturday.
She [has] [been] in Paris [for] two days.
Her plane [was] [supposed] to [arrive] at 1:00.
It [didnt] [arrive] [until] 3:00.
It [took] [place] yesterday, [which] was Sunday.
Fortunately, they [had] confirmed reservations, [so]
they had no [trouble] [checking] in.
On the [other] hand, Kathy [may] not want [that]
[kind] of relationship with Pierre.
They [arrived] [late] [because] of [heavy] traffic.
They [wont] [leave] [for] Salzburg [until]
Thursday.
They are [going] to [meet] [her] in Salzburg,
[which] is in Austria.
It [used] to [belong] to an Austrian [prince].
She [has] [been] there [for] two hours, [since] 11:30.
Shes [looking] at the Mona Lisa, [one] of the
worlds [most] [famous] paintings.
They [have] [written] to [each] [other] several times.
She [has to] [leave] Saturday [evening].
On Friday [she] and [her] friends are [going] to
[attend] a concert.
The [first] time [was] two years [ago], [when] she
[came] on business.

13

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening
Focus 3

Focus 1
Preview A Paris Vacation for general comprehension.
Then focus on each sentence several times.

Review A Paris Vacation and Todays Activities. Then


focus on Florence and Beyond. Listen to each sentences
several times.

Language Focus

Language Focus

present perfect, been, past tense, ago

time relations, past, present, and future

Listening Task

Listening Task

Listen for sentences which use the past tense or present


perfect. Practice saying and recording these sentences.

Practice saying and recording the sentences which have


time phrases.

Goals

Goal

Students will know the setting and time frame of the

Students will be able to talk about and answer

story.
Students will begin to understand some of the
differences between the past tense V(d) and the
present perfect, have +V(n).

Student Follow-up
1. Assuming that it is now Monday, summarize the
events of Kathys trip from Saturday through Sunday.
Why has she come? What has she been doing since
she arrived? What happened on Saturday and Sunday?
Fill in the details as you imagine them.
2. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

questions about Kathy's activities in Paris, Florence


and beyond.
Students will be able to use present perfect to express
duration: She has been there for two hours.
Students will be able to use going to, will and may
with time expressions. From Florence shes going to
take a train to Salzburg, where she will join her
friends.

Student Follow-up
1. Present Kathys travel plans from Monday through
Saturday. Assume that today is Monday.
2. Present your own schedule for today, and how it is
unfolding. What have you done? What havent you
done yet?
3. Do Practice Exercises E and F.

Focus 2
Review A Paris Vacation and preview Todays Activities
for general comprehension. Then focus on each sentence
in Todays Activities several times.

Focus 4

Language Focus
Review A Paris Vacation, Todays Activities, and
Florence and Beyond. Then focus on the Question
Practice lesson.

present perfect, since, yet, duration, for, since, past tense


ago

Listening Task
Listen for sentences and questions which use the past
tense or present perfect. What has Kathy already done,
what is she doing, and what is she going to do? Practice
saying and recording these sentences.

Language Focus

Goals

Practice saying and recording the questions.

information questions with the present perfect and past


tense.

Listening Task

Students will be able to use since, for, and already to

Goal

express duration or completion with the present


perfect.
Students will be able to ask and answer questions with
the present perfect and past tense.

Students will be able to ask information questions

Student Follow-up
1. Summarize Todays Activities.
2. Do Practice Exercises C and D.

about both events and the resulting states of those


events.
Students will understand the difference between
already, ever, still, yet and ago.

Student Follow-up
1. Write five questions that use the present perfect, and
answer them.

14

Module 5:

Unit 1, On a Trip

2. Write one question each which use already, yet, still,


ever, and ago.
Has she had coffee yet? Have the newlyweds already
gotten married? Are they still in Paris? How long ago did
Kathy and Pierre first meet?

Focus 5
Review Todays Activities, Florence and Beyond, and the
Question Practice lesson. Then do the Focus Exercises
lesson.

Language Focus
present perfect and sentence construction review

Listening Task
Listen to all the sentences in the Focus Exercises lesson
and practice saying them.

Goal

Students will be able to use the present perfect to ask


and answer questions.

Student Follow-up
1. From Kathys point of view, write a complete account
of her trip to Europe. Assume that it is now Monday
evening, after her dinner with Pierre. What has
happened, and what is going to happen?
2. Write about yourself and your plans for today. What
has happened, and what is going to happen?

Focus 6
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

15

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

5(1)

On a Trip:

Exercise A

Fill in the blank with the past participle, V(n) , or the


past tense form, V(d), of the verb.

Example:

Kathy has (be)

been

in Paris before.

1. It is the first vacation she has (have) _______________ in a long time.


2. Kathy (arrive) _______________ in Paris two days ago, on Saturday.
3. This isn't the first time she has (be) ________________ in Paris.
4. Kathy has (come) _________________ to Paris to attend her friends wedding.
5. The first time she (come) _______________ to Paris was ten years ago.
6. This is the third time she has (be) _________________ in Paris.
7. After arriving, Kathy (meet) _______________ her friends fianc for the first time.
8. The newlyweds have already (get married) ___________________.
9. They have already (arrive) ________________ at their hotel in the Swiss Alps.
10. They had no trouble checking in because they (have) ______________ confirmed reservations.

5(1)

On a Trip:

Exercise B

Answer the questions. Use short answers. Assume that today is Monday.
Example: Has Kathy been to Paris before?

Yes, she has.

1. Did Kathy arrive in Paris on Saturday?

________________________

2. Has Kathy met her friends fianc yet?

________________________

3. Has the wedding taken place yet?

________________________

4. Did Kathys plane arrive on schedule?

________________________

5. Was the wedding on Sunday?

________________________

16

Module 5:

Unit 1, On a Trip

Practice Exercises
5(1)

On a Trip:

Exercise C

Complete the answers with either the past or present perfect form of the verb.
1. Q:

Has Kathy been in Paris before?

has been

in Paris.

A:

Yes, she has. This is the third time she (be)

She first (come) _______________ to Paris as a student, ten years ago.

Two years ago she (come) ________________ on business.


2. Q:

Have Kathy and Pierre met before? A: Yes, they have. Kathy (interview) _______________

him two years ago. Since then they (keep in touch) ____________________________. They
(write) ____________________ to each other several times.
3. Q:

Has Kathy gotten to the museum yet? A:

to the museum at 11:30.

She (be)

Yes, she has. She

(get) _______________

___________________ there for two hours.

This is the

second time she (visit) ____________________ the Louvre. She (visit) ___________________
it for the first time when she (come) ___________________ to Paris ten years ago.

5(1)

On a Trip:

Exercise D

Fill in the blanks with ago, for, in, since, or until.


Example:

She has known Pierre

for

two years.

1. The newlyweds will stay in the Alps __________ Thursday.


2. Kathy has been in Paris __________ Saturday.
3. Shes been in Paris __________ two days.
4. She arrived in Paris two days __________.
5. The newlyweds wont leave for Salzburg _________ Thursday.
6. She plans to go shopping _________ another hour or two.
7. Kathys friend plans to stay in Europe _________ another year or two.
8. My boss has been working ___________ early this morning.
9. I havent been to my home town ___________ many years.
10. We have to work __________ another hour or two.

17

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

5(1)

On a Trip:

Exercise E

Complete the sentences with the letter of the correct expression from the box below.
Example:

Kathy arrived in Paris two days ago

1. Kathys plane landed at 3:00, _____.


2. Tomorrow Kathys going to leave Paris and _____.
3. The last time Kathy was in Italy, _____.
4. Shes looking forward to _____.
5. Shes going to take a train to Salzburg, _____.
6. Like so many other cities in Europe, _____.
7. Mozart was born in Salzburg _____.
8. Kathy only has time to stay in Salzburg _____.
9. The hotel is on a lake, _____.
10. The newlyweds are going to meet up with Kathy in Salzburg before _____.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.

seeing some great works of art.


for a couple of days.
she returns to the US.
which was supposed to arrive at 1:00.
Salzburg has an interesting history.
ten miles outside of Salzburg.
she visited Rome.
which was Saturday.
two hours behind schedule.
where she will join her friends.
more than 200 years ago.
fly to Florence, Italy.

18

Module 5:

Unit 1, On a Trip

Practice Exercises

5(1)

On a Trip:

Exercise F

Fill-in the blanks with ago, already, yet, still, ever, or never
Example:

Has Kathy left the museum

yet?

No, she hasnt. Shes still there.

1. The newlyweds have ________ left Paris. They left right after the
wedding.
2. Have the newlyweds ________ left Switzerland? No, they still havent
left.
3. Have the newlyweds arrived in Salzburg _______? No, they havent.
Theyre still in Switzerland.
4. Has Kathy _______ been to Florence? No, she hasnt. This will be her
first time.
5. Kathy is _______ in Paris. She wont leave for Florence until tomorrow.
6. Kathy hasnt left Paris ________. Shes _________ at the museum.
7. She arrived in Paris two days ________. She came to attend her
friends wedding.
8. Kathy has ________ been to Florence. This will be her first time.
9. Kathy interviewed Pierre two years _________.
10. They _______ havent met _______ today. Theyre going to meet for dinner later this evening.
11. Have you ________ listened to Mozarts music? Yes, I have.
12. Have they made reservations for the concert _________? Yes, theyve ___________ made
reservations.

19

Module 5:

Unit 2, Energy Sources

2. Energy Sources
Our Energy Needs; What about the Future? Questions; and Focus Exercises
As a follow-up to the Our World lesson, 3(2), this unit introduces the passive voice and important
vocabulary for talking about our world, its natural resources, and global issues of importance.
Cause and effect relations, expressing purpose, and the use of noun phrases are also developed
further, preparing students to begin to communicate about more abstract ideas and relationships,
which will be developed extensively in Level 4.
In Our Energy Needs, different energy sources are presented and
briefly explained. In What about the Future? we focus on various
problems related to our use of fossil fuels, including global warming
and acid rain, and the importance of conservation as a means to
protect our environment. The lesson provides interesting topics for
discussion, including alternative energy sources, and helps to
prepare students to participate in a content-based curriculum.
Goals
To be able to understand and talk about energy sources and natural resources.
To be able to understand the difference between active and passive verbs.
To be able to express the purpose, results, and reasons for an act or event.
Objective 1:

To introduce the passive form, be+V(n).

Objective 2:

To be able to understand and express cause and effect relations in a variety of ways.

Objective 3:

To be able to understand and use the infinitive, to+V, to express purpose.

20

Module 5:

Unit 2, Energy Sources

Learning Points
cause/effect
As the supply decreases, the price will increase. Oil spills cause the death of many kinds of wildlife.
These accidents have caused the deaths of wildlife. Burning fossil fuels causes air pollution. Air
pollution causes acid rain. When a large amount of carbon gases are in the atmosphere, our world
begins to heat up. If the temperature rises, the polar ice caps will begin to melt.
classification (such as, some of the ways, include)
Here are some of the ways we get energy. Fossil fuels include coal, oil, and natural gas. We burn
fossil fuels, such as coal, to generate electricity.
conditionals
If the temperature rises, the polar ice caps will melt. If there are more plants, then the rate of global
warming is reduced. If it gets into the environment, it can cause serious health problems. If we use
less energy, it will help with the problem. If air pollution increases, what will happen to our forests?
degrees of certainty
The price will increase. Solar cells can convert sunlight. There may even be war. There is always
some risk of an accident.
noun phrases
many kinds of wildlife; the energy of falling water; another major source of energy; another way to
get energy; One of the main problems we now face is how to reduce the use of fossil fuels.
passive, be+V(n)
The energy of falling water is converted into electricity. Waste gases, such as carbon dioxide, are
produced. If there are more plants, then the rate of global warming is reduced. Many of our great
forests are being cut down or burned. The number of dams must be limited. Some of our forests are
being killed by acid rain.
present perfect
there have been several accidents;

accidents have caused the deaths;

radiation has escaped

purpose/reason/result
We need energy for heat. For people to live on our planet... We also need energy to run our factories.
Many people hope that the use of solar energy will increase because its safe for the environment.
There are many reasons why this is important. Plants help reduce global warming because they convert
carbon dioxide into oxygen. Fossil fuels are not renewable, so the supply is running out.
qualification
in some cases;

However, it is only useful in areas where...

to (purpose):

to store water;

to prevent flooding;

21

to run our cars;

to generate electricity

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of Our Energy Needs in class. Focus on the key vocabulary by listing energy
sources and related words on the board. Introduce the topic of the lesson.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice explaining each type of energy source.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Skim through Our Energy Needs and stop to focus on sentences which use the passive, such as The
energy of falling water is converted into electricity. Point out that in a passive sentence, the subject of
the sentence is not the agent of the action, and that the agent of the action is often not indicated. In
groups, have students make active and passive sentences with each of the following verbs: boil, heat,
convert, burn, produce, and use. Examples: When water boils, it turns to steam. When water is
boiled, it turns to steam. We heat our houses by using gas or electricity. Our houses are heated by
using gas or electricity.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce What about the Future? Focus on cause and effect relations,
reason, purpose, and results.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions about the following
topics: acid rain, global warming, the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear energy, and
alternative energy sources, such as wind power, and solar energy.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3, Listening Focus 4, and Listening Focus 5.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, and while the students are working on Listening
Focus 4 and 5, complete two or more of the following Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the
language. Then test the main points of the Unit, using the practice exercises as a model of items to test.
Classroom Activity 1: Energy Web
Tell students that a good technique to help remember a lot of information is to make a word web. In the
middle of the board write the word Energy. Ask students to call out words, ideas and/or phrases they
learned at the computer relating to energy. Students might call out things such as fossil fuels, sun, heat,
hydroelectric power, global warming, etc. Write the words on the board. When students have
completed their contributions, ask if any of the words can be connected in any way. Someone may point
out that fossil fuels and nuclear power are sources of energy. Move the two of them together and draw a
large circle around them. Ask the students which other words could be placed in this circle. Continue in
this manner until all of the words have been grouped. Finally, ask students to suggest category names for
each grouping such as Sources of Energy, Problems, Purposes, etc.
Higher level students may be able to do this activity on their own in groups of four to six. Each group is
instructed to create an Energy Web on a sheet of butcher paper.

22

Module 5:

Unit 2, Energy Sources

Classroom Assignment 2: Environmental Problems


Assign students to find articles in their newspapers or on the internet related to environmental problems
such as acid rain, air pollution, global warming, etc. Post copies of these articles on a bulletin board and
use for discussions during these lessons.
Write headlines from the articles on the board, and assign students or groups of students to summarize one
or two of the main points in each article.
Classroom Assignment 3: Tell Me Why
In pairs or small groups ask students to brainstorm problems in the world, in their city, or in their lives.
These can be societal as well as environmental, e.g., increase of crime, lack of employment opportunities,
air pollution, etc. Have them list these problems down the middle of a page. On the left side of the paper
have them brainstorm all the causes of those problems. On the right side have them list results of those
problems.
Cause
Drug use
Automation
Air pollution

Problem
Increase of crime
Lack of employment
Acid rain

Result
More people buy guns for protection
Increase of crime
Death of trees

Have students make sentences with forms such as is caused by, is a result of, causes, because of, is the
reason for.

23

New Dynamic English

and cause pollution, which damages our


environment. For example, air pollution causes
acid rain, which is killing many of our forests.

Key Sentences
Our Energy Needs
For people to live on our planet, we need energy.
We need energy for heat, for light, and for
transportation. When it's cold, we need energy for
heat. When it's dark, we need energy for light.
When we want to travel, we need energy for
transportation. For example, to run our cars, we burn
gasoline, which comes from oil. We also need
energy to run our factories.

There is also the problem of global warming.


When a large amount of carbon gases are in the
atmosphere, our world begins to heat up. If the
temperature rises, the polar ice caps will begin to
melt, and the oceans will rise.
So, as you can see, fossil fuels cause many
problems.
(higher shuffler level)
Plants and trees help reduce global warming because
they convert carbon dioxide into oxygen.
If there are more plants, then the rate of global
warming is reduced. However, many of our great
forests are being cut down or burned. Our forests
are also being killed by acid rain.

Here are some of the ways we get energy. Fossil


fuels include coal, oil, and natural gas. Fossil fuels
are an important source of energy. We burn fossil
fuels, such as coal, to generate electricity.
We also get energy from hydroelectric power
stations. Hydroelectric power comes from the
energy of falling water. The energy of falling
water is converted into electricity.

So, as you can see, it's important for us to move


away from fossil fuels as soon as possible.

There are also other ways to get energy. The sun is


another source of energy. Solar cells can convert
sunlight directly into electricity. Many people hope
that the use of solar energy will increase, because
it's safe for the environment. However, solar
energy is still expensive and underdeveloped.

Nuclear energy also has problems. One problem is


safety. Nuclear reactors are not completely safe.
There is always some risk of an accident. In some
cases, radiation has escaped into the atmosphere and
into water supplies.

Wind power is also a safe source of energy.


However, it is only useful in areas where there is a
lot of wind. Like solar energy, the use of wind
power is still quite limited.

There is also the problem of nuclear waste. The


radiation from nuclear waste products is very
dangerous. If it gets into the environment, it can
cause serious health problems and even death.

What about the Future?

How about hydroelectric power? Can it help us


move away from fossil fuels? Hydroelectric power
is a clean source of energy. In addition, dams help
us manage our water supplies. However, building
dams does change the environment. Dams can
cause problems for wildlife such as fish.
Therefore, the number of dams must be limited.

One of the main problems we now face is how to


reduce the use of fossil fuels. There are several
reasons why this is important. One reason is that
the supply of fossil fuels is running out. Fossil
fuels are not renewable. As the supply decreases,
the price will increase. There may even be war.

This leaves us with the problem of how to balance


our growing needs for energy with our need to
protect our environment.

There is also the problem of transport. Large oil


tankers transport oil across the oceans. Sometimes
there are accidents, and large amounts of oil spill
into the ocean. In the past few years, there have
been several accidents. These accidents have
caused the deaths of many fish, birds, and other
wildlife.

If we use less energy, it will help with the problem.


As a result, conservation is very important. All of
us want progress and a comfortable life. However,
we must also look ahead to the future and take care
of our beautiful world.

Another problem is air pollution. Burning fossil


fuels causes air pollution. When we burn fossil
fuels, waste gases, such as carbon dioxide, are
produced. The waste gases enter our atmosphere
24

Module 5:

Unit 2, Energy Sources

Some of [our] forests [are] [being] killed [by] acid


rain.
Plants and trees [convert] carbon dioxide [into]
[oxygen].
If air pollution continues to [increase], [many] of
[our] forests [will] [die].
Plants and trees [help] [reduce] global warming
[because] they [convert] carbon dioxide [into]
oxygen.
The waste gases [enter] our atmosphere and [cause]
pollution, which [damages] our environment.
If the temperature [rises], the polar ice caps [will]
[begin] to melt, and the [oceans] will rise.
In addition, dams [help] us [manage] [our] water
supplies.
However, we [must] also look [ahead] to the [future]
and take [care] of our beautiful world.
The [energy] of [falling] water [is] [converted] into
electricity.

Questions
When it's cold, what do we need energy for?
do we need to run our cars?

What

Which of these energy sources is the cleanest? Are


coal and oil both fossil fuels? Which power source
needs sunlight? Which power source converts heat
from a nuclear reaction into electricity? What's a
good way to get energy in an area where there is lots
of wind? Is the supply of fossil fuels increasing or
decreasing? What will happen to the price of oil as
the supply runs out?
What is often used to transport oil on land? What
is used to transport oil across the oceans? What is
one result of an oil spill? What is one result of air
pollution? What kinds of gases are produced when
fossil fuels are burned? What produces carbon
dioxide and other gases when it is burned? What
reduces the amount of carbon dioxide in the
atmosphere? If air pollution increases, what will
happen to our forests? How do plants reduce the
rate of global warming? How does the burning of
coal increase the rate of global warming?
What is being killed by acid rain? What kind of
waste products are radioactive? In your country,
do many homes use solar energy?
Focus Exercises
When [its] [cold] we [need] energy [for] heat.
In a [windy] area wind [power] [would] be a [good]
way to [get] energy.
As the [supply] [decreases], the price [will]
[increase].
Oil spills [cause] the [death] of [many] [kinds] of
wildlife.
When we [burn] fossil fuels, waste [gases] [such as]
carbon dioxide, [are] [produced].
These accidents [have] [caused] the deaths of
[many] fish, birds, and [other] wildlife.
For example, [air] pollution [causes] acid rain, and
acid [rain] is [killing] many of [our] forests.
In some [cases], radiation [has] [escaped] into the
atmosphere and [into] water supplies.
If it [gets] into the environment, it [can] [cause]
serious health problems and [even] death.
However, [solar] [energy] is [still] expensive and
underdeveloped.
Therefore, the number of dams [must] [be] [limited].
25

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening
Focus 3

Focus 1

Review Our Energy Needs, and focus on What about the


Future?

Focus on Our Energy Needs. First listen to the lesson


for general comprehension. Then go through the lesson
again and listen to each sentence several times. If
necessary, use the ABC button to look at the text and
consult the Glossary.

Language Focus
passive voice, and causal relations

Listening Task
Focus on sentences which use the passive voice, such as
the rate of global warming is reduced; and Our forests
are being killed by acid rain. Say these sentences, and
then write them down.

Language Focus
classification, purpose, vocabulary

Listening Task
Listen for general comprehension. Repeat and record
sentences which have new vocabulary words.

Goal

To introduce students to the passive voice.

Goals

General comprehension and vocabulary building.


Students will be able to use expressions of purpose:
We need energy for heat.
factories.

Student Follow-up
1. Summarize and explain the problems related to fossil
fuels: non-renewable, carbon gases, acid rain, etc.
2. Do Practice Exercises D and E.

We need energy to run our

Student Follow-up

Focus 4

1. Make a list of reasons why we need energy, and give


an example for each:
We need energy for light. For example, if its dark
and we want to read, we can turn on an electric light.
Also: for heat, for transportation, for factories, for
appliances, for computers, etc.
2. Do Practice Exercise A.

Review Our Energy Needs, What about the Future? and


focus on the Questions.

Language Focus
information questions

Listening Task
Focus on the questions, and practice saying them.
the record feature to listen to yourself.

Focus 2

Use

Goal

Focus on Our Energy Needs, and preview What about the


Future? First listen to each lesson for the general
meaning. Then go through the lessons again and listen to
each sentence several times. If necessary, use the ABC
button to look at the text and consult the Glossary.

Students will understand the distinction between cause

Listening Task
Focus on the descriptions of each type of energy source.
What are the advantages and disadvantages of each?

and effect. Air pollution causes acid rain. Acid


rain kills trees. One result of acid rain is the death
of trees.
Students will be able to ask and answer questions
about the energy sources and environmental issues
presented in this lesson.

Student Follow-up

Goal

1. Summarize What about the Future? and be prepared


to answer questions about the lesson.
2. Explain two causal relations presented in this Unit and
why they are important to our planets future. Which
one do you think is most serious, and why?
3. Do Practice Exercise F.

Students will be able to explain each type of energy


source, and present the advantages and disadvantages
of each.

Student Follow-up
1. Write a summary of Our Energy Needs.
2. Do Practice Exercises B and C.

26

Module 5:

Unit 2, Energy Sources

Focus 5
Review Our Energy Needs, What about the Future? and
then focus on the Focus Exercises.

Language Focus
review passive, purpose, and causal relations

Listening Task
Listen to each of the completed sentences, and practice
saying it.

Goal

Students will have mastered the vocabulary in this

Unit and will be able to summarize the main points


with well-formed sentences.
Students will understand the distinction between
passive and active voice.

Student Follow-up:
1. What are two other environmental or social problems
we face? What are their main causes? What do you
think we should about these problems?
Crime, poverty, racism, health, corruption, education,
etc.

Focus 6
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

27

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
5(2)

Energy Sources:

Exercise A

Arrange the words in the correct order to complete the


Example:

1. We

We / gasoline / cars / our


We need gasoline to run our cars.

homes

/ our

use

to light

sentence.

need

to run

electricity

_____________________________________________________________________________
2. We

for

energy /

light

need

_____________________________________________________________________________
3. When

for

cold

heat

need /

we

it's

energy

_____________________________________________________________________________
4. When

to travel

for

want

need /

we

transportation /

energy / we

_____________________________________________________________________________
5. Fossil fuels

energy /

are

source

of

important

an

_____________________________________________________________________________
6. We

electricity /

such as

fossil fuels

coal

burn /

to generate

_____________________________________________________________________________
7. The sun

energy /

is

of

another

source

_____________________________________________________________________________
8. Solar cells

directly into

electricity /

convert

can /

sunlight

_____________________________________________________________________________
9. Solar energy /

expensive

is still

/ and underdeveloped

_____________________________________________________________________________
10. Wind power

source

also /

safe

is

energy /

of

_____________________________________________________________________________

28

Module 5:

Unit 2, Energy Sources

Practice Exercises
5(2)

Energy Sources:

Exercise B

Write the words under the energy source they are associated with.
oil
dams

rivers
tanker

natural gas
falling water

Fossil Fuels

gasoline
reactor

Hydroelectric Power

coal
cars

radiation
air pollution

Nuclear Power

oil

5(2)

Energy Sources:

Exercise C

Match the part of the sentence on the left with the part on the right.
a.

Carbon gases cause

1. ____ produced by nuclear reactors

b. Our forests are

2. ____ kill fish, birds, and other wildlife

c.

Radioactive wastes are

3. ____ caused by air pollution

d.

Oil spills

4. ____ problems for fish

e.

Dams cause

5.

f.

Solar cells can

6. ____ convert sunlight into electricity.

g.

Fossil fuels are

7. ____ not renewable

h.

Plants convert

8. ____ carbon dioxide into oxygen

global warming

i. Oil tankers transport

9. ____ oil across the oceans.

j.

10. ___ being killed by acid rain.

Acid rain is

29

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

5(2)

Energy Sources:

Fill in the blanks with

Example:

One

result

Exercise D

cause

or

result.

of an oil spill is the death of fish and other wildlife.

1. Pollution is a ___________________ of burning fossil fuels.


2. One ___________________ of acid rain is the destruction of our forests.
3. Oil spills are a ___________________ of death to fish and birds.
4. Burning fossil fuels is a

___________________ of air pollution.

5. Global warming is the ___________ of carbon gases in our atmosphere.


6. A decrease in the supply of fossil fuels would _________ the price of oil to increase.
7. A rise in the temperature of our atmosphere would _________ the oceans to rise.
8. If radiation gets into the environment it can _________ serious health problems.
9. Using less energy will __________ in less pollution, so conservation is important.
10. The destruction of our forests will _________ an increase in global warming.

5(2)

Energy Sources:

Exercise E

Fill in the blank with the passive form.


Example:

Energy (need)

is needed

to run our factories.

1. Fossil fuels (burn) ___________________ to generate electricity.


2. Dams (use) ___________________ to generate power.
3. Forests (kill) ___________________ by acid rain.
4. Acid rain (cause) ___________________ by air pollution.
5. Carbon dioxide (convert) _________ into oxygen by plants.

30

Module 5:

Unit 2, Energy Sources

Practice Exercises
5(2)

Energy Sources:

Exercise F

Use the passive to write a new sentence with the same meaning.
Example:

We burn fossil fuels to generate electricity.


Fossil fuels are burned to generate electricity.

1. We convert the energy of falling water into electricity.


___________________________________________________________________________
2. The burning of fossil fuels produces waste gases.
___________________________________________________________________________
3. The burning of fossil fuels causes air pollution.
___________________________________________________________________________
4. Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity.
___________________________________________________________________________
5. We burn fossil fuels to generate electricity.
___________________________________________________________________________
6. We are cutting down or burning many of our forests.
___________________________________________________________________________
7. We must limit the number of dams.
___________________________________________________________________________
8. Plants convert carbon dioxide into oxygen.
___________________________________________________________________________
9. Protecting our forests will reduce the rate of global warming.
___________________________________________________________________________
10. We use large oil tankers to transport oil across the oceans.
___________________________________________________________________________

31

New Dynamic English

3. Directions
City Directions; City Quiz; and Spatial Relations
This Unit focuses on giving directions, street locations, the names of common places of business,
and spatial relations. This Unit extends and follows up Module 3, Unit 3.
In the City Directions lesson, students click on various locations in DynEd City and hear the
directions of how to get there from the Hotel, which is on High Street.
In the City Quiz lesson, the students are given directions and asked to indicate the location where
the directions lead. A score is given for each correct choice.
In the Spatial Relations lesson, students study how to specify locations on a grid of blank squares:
upper left hand corner, middle of the top row, etc. After clicking on the middle square, the Grid
then opens up and shows a group of clocks, animals, flowers, and people arranged throughout the
Grid. Students are then given comprehension questions to show that they understand the spatial
directions.
Goals:
To be able to understand and give street directions.
To be able to understand and specify spatial directions, such as lower left-hand corner, etc.
To be able to understand and name common places of business.
To be able to specify objects by giving their spatial location, such as the clock in the upper righthand corner.

32

Module 5:

Unit 3, Directions

Learning Points
giving directions
Turn right at the intersection. Cross the street. Go straight through the intersection. Go south
along Second Avenue. Go about half a block. Go West on High Street. Go to the corner. Go to
the end of the block. Turn right and cross the street. Make a right. When you get to the corner,
take a left.
distance
too far; not far enough;

one block east; two doors down

location
on the same block as; on the opposite side of the street; on the other side of the street from; east of
the hotel; across the street from; between a gas station and a drug store; just past the gas station; its
on the corner, after you cross the street; its on the right, in the middle of the block. Its directly
across from the hotel. Its one block west of the hotel, on the same side of the street. Its east of the
hotel, on the other side of Second Avenue. Its around the corner from the hotel. Its the second
building on the left.
prepositions of location
at the intersection; on the same block;
intersection. Its on the right.
prepositions of direction
from the left; to the right;

in the middle; across the street;

along Second Avenue, out the door;

around the corner;

at the

through the intersection

should
You should have turned right...
spatial relations
upper left-hand corner; second from the left in the top row; middle of the top row; one block east
of the hotel. This is the top right corner. This square is on far left of the middle row.

33

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Introduce City Directions and show the students how to methodically go through the city to hear
various ways of giving directions. While you do this, write important expressions on the board, such
as: half a block, after you cross the street, turn right, etc. and review the names of common places of
business that students need to know, as well as their locations.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students draw simple maps and practice using the phrases on the board to
give directions to various locations on their maps. Be sure to include the directions, North, South,
East and West.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Have the class help you construct a map of a small city. Then focus on how to ask for the location of
a place of business. Put several expressions on the board, such as Excuse me, but could you tell me
how to get to the bank? Is there a coffee shop near the bank? etc.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions about the map. Then
ask students from different groups to come to the front of the class and give each other directions to two
or three locations on the map. It should be fun. Remember to have the students be polite.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce Spatial Relations and make a list of the words and phrases used, such
as upper left-hand corner, the top row, the second from the right, and in the
middle of the middle row.
Have students practice asking and answering questions about spatial relations.
Students may arrange objects around the room and specify them by giving their
location: What is on the second table to the right of the desk?
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following
Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the Unit,
using the practice exercises as a model of items to test.
Classroom Activity 1: Listen Carefully!
Give students a grid with 15 squares (five across and three down). Dictate directions for the students.
"Put your first name in the middle square in the second row. Put the third letter of the alphabet in the
bottom row, the second square from the right. Draw a flower in the top left hand corner, etc."
Have a completed one on an overhead transparency or a piece of butcher paper so students can compare
their versions. This activity could also be done on the blackboard, inviting one student at a time to
make the entry on the board.

34

Module 5:

Unit 3, Directions

Classroom Activity 2: Recreating DynEd City


Elicit from students all the locations they remember in DynEd City. List these locations on the board
or on a sheet of butcher paper. Next, ask students to help you recreate DynEd City on the board by
telling you where to put these locations. Ask them first to give you the name of the streets and the
directions they run. Then call on different students to give you directions to place the locations, e.g.,
The hospital is on the southwest corner of High Street and First Avenue. The police station is next to
the hospital on High Street. As each location is placed on the board, cross it out from the original list.
Continue until all of DynEd City is on the board.
Classroom Activity 3: DynEd City Directions
Using a drawing on the board of DynEd City practice giving directions to different locations.
a. Give students a starting point and ask them to direct you to a location in the city.
b. Dictate directions to students and ask them what location they should be in.
c. Show students where you are which is different from where you want to be and have them
give you feedback on how you went wrong. (Assume that you begin at the hotel.)
Classroom Activity 4: Directions to a Party
In small groups, tell students to imagine they are having a party this weekend and they need to give
directions to a foreign student who is invited. Have them write out detailed directions from where the
student is staying (such as at a hotel) to the location of the party. Each group should draw a small map
and include written directions.
Classroom Activity 5: Giving Directions to a Tourist
In small groups, have students choose an interesting or famous place in their city or country where a
tourist might want to go. Then make a map and give detailed instructions as to how to get there.
Include highway numbers, exits, compass directions, and distances. For example: From San
Francisco to Yosemite, cross the Bay Bridge and go west on highway 580 ...

35

New Dynamic English

Key Sentences
The city's best hotel is on High Street in the middle
of the block.
You are already there!

City Directions (and City Quiz)


You are at the hotel. Where would you like to go?
Follow these directions. (Quiz)

This restaurant is on the corner next to the hotel.


Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn right.
Its next door, on the right.

The park is on the corner of First Avenue and High


Street, west of the hotel.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Go West on
High Street. Go to the corner. Turn right and
cross the street. Cross First Avenue. Its on
the corner, after you cross the street.

This gas station is east of the hotel, on the other


side of Second Avenue.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn right.
Go straight through the intersection. Its on the
corner after you cross the street.

The university is north of the hotel, behind the art


museum.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn left.
Turn right at the intersection. Cross High
Street. Go North on First Avenue. Go about
half a block. Its on the right.

The subway entrance is one block east of the hotel.


Go out the front door of the hotel. Go East on
High Street. Go across the street. Its on the
right, just past the gas station.

The cafe is on the same block as the hotel, but on


the opposite side of the street.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Go West on
High Street. Turn right and cross the street.
Its on the corner after you cross the street.

There is a parking lot on First Avenue, south of the


hospital.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn left.
Go straight through the intersection. Turn left.
Its on the right, in the middle of the block.

The art museum is directly across from the hotel.


Go out the front door of the hotel. Make a
right. When you get to the corner, take a left.
Cross High Street. Go left. Its on the right,
in the middle of the block.

This gas station is across the street from a travel


agency.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn left.
Go straight through the intersection. Turn left.
Go South. Its directly across from a travel
agency.

The movie theater is on the other side of the street


from the hotel.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn right.
Go to the corner. Turn left and cross the street.
Its on the corner after you cross the street.

The post office is around the corner from the hotel.


Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn left.
Turn left at the corner. Itll be on your left, in
the middle of the block.
There is a travel agency on First Avenue.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn left.
Turn left at the corner. Go south. Go past the
post office. Itll be on your left.

There are public rest rooms in the park.


Go out the front door of the hotel. Go West on
High Street. Go to the end of the block. Turn
right and cross the street. Turn left. Cross
First Avenue. Turn right. Go about half a
block. Theyll be on your left.

The department store is on Second Avenue, around


the corner from the hotel.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn right.
Turn right at the intersection. Go about half a
block. Its on the right.

The hospital is one block west of the hotel, on the


same side of the street.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Go West on
High Street. Go straight through the
intersection. Its on the corner after you cross
the street.

The bookstore on Second Avenue is between a gas


station and a drugstore.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Go East on
High Street. Cross Second Avenue. Turn
right. Go South. Itll be on your left, in the
middle of the block.

The bank is right next door to the hotel.


Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn left.
Its next door, on the left.

36

Module 5:

Unit 3, Directions

What time is shown in the upper left-hand corner?


It says 10:15.
Which animal is in the top row, second from the
left? This is a monkey.
What color is the flower in the middle of the top
row? Its yellow.
Which person is second from the left in the middle
row?
What does the clock in the lower left-hand corner
say?
What animal is in the bottom row, second from the
right?
What is in the center of the middle row?

The drugstore is across the street from a


department store.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Go East on
High Street. Cross Second Avenue. Turn
right. Go South. Its two doors down from
the gas station.
There is a police station on High Street, one block
west of the hotel.
Go out the front door of the hotel. Go West on
High Street. Go straight through the
intersection. Its the second building on the
left.
These are the four directions:
and West.

North, East, South,

feedback (for wrong choices in Quiz)


You should have turned right at the intersection.
You should have turned left at the corner.
You turned right, but you should have turned left.
You turned, but you should have kept on going.
You went west on High Street, but you should have
gone east.
You went too far.
You didn't go far enough.
You went in the wrong direction when you left the
hotel.
You're on the wrong side of the street.
You're on the wrong corner.
Spatial Relations
(Grid)
This is the upper left-hand corner.
This is the second square from the left in the top
row.
This is the middle of the top row.
This is the top row, second square from the right.
This is the upper right-hand corner. This is the top
right corner.
This is the first square in the middle row.
This square is on the far left of the middle row.
This is the second square from the left in the middle
row.
This square is second from the right in the middle
row.
This square is in the center of the middle row.
(opens grid).
Grid Quiz (samples)

37

New Dynamic English

Listening Focus
Listening Task

Focus 1

Focus on the descriptions of the locations of each place in


the city. Listen to and record these sentences.
The drugstore is two doors down from the gas station.
The hospital is one block west of the hotel.

Focus on City Directions.


Find out the name of each
place on the map, and listen to the directions for how to
get there.

Goal

Language Focus

Students will be able to describe locations and give

Following directions, distance

directions.

Listening Task
Listen to and practice saying the directions to each of the
locations. Go out the front door of the hotel. Turn
right. Cross the street at the intersection.

Student Follow-up
1. Describe the locations of five places in DynEd City.
2. Describe the locations of five objects in the classroom,
office, or places in the city or school.

Goal

Students will be able to follow directions: turn right,


turn left, cross the street, go two blocks, etc.

Focus 4

Student Follow-up
1. Write the directions to your school or place of work.
2. Do Practice Exercise A.

Focus on Spatial Relations

Language Focus
spatial relations and giving directions which involve
spatial relations

Focus 2
Review City Directions.
Then try the City Quiz. If
you have difficulty study City Directions again and use
the Glossary for additional help.

Listening Task
Click on each square in the grid and make it blue.
Practice saying the sentences. This is the upper left-hand
corner. This is the top row, second square from the
right, etc. Then click on the center grid until it opens
into a new grid. Complete the listening tasks: What
color is the flower in the first square of the middle row?

Language Focus
directions, distance

Listening Task
Follow the directions and see how high you can score.

Goal

Goal

Students will be able to understand and use vocabulary

Students will be able to follow and give clear

of location for spatial orientation: top, bottom,


middle, right, left, upper right-hand corner, second
from the right, etc.

directions to anywhere in DynEd City.

Student Follow-up
1. Using a map or drawing of your city, write out the
directions to two places of interest.
2. Do Practice Exercise B.

Student Follow-up
1.

Focus 3

2.

Review City Directions and City Quiz.


3.

Language Focus
Location

38

Describe the location of five squares in the grid.


This is the upper left-hand corner. This is the
second square in the top row.
Specify five objects in the classroom by indicating
their spatial orientation and location. My desk is the
second desk from the left in the first row, etc.
Do Practice Exercise C.

Module 5:

Unit 3, Directions

Focus 5
If necessary, review all the lessons in this Unit and
practice recording some of the longer sentences.

Goal

The ability to give clear directions and instructions.


Student Follow-up
Think of a place of interest in your city or country, and
write out detailed instructions for how to get there by
car from a central location.

Focus 6
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

39

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
DynEd City

5(3)

Directions:

Exercise A

Fill in the blanks with the correct word or phrase from below.
go out
go west
go past
Example:

go to
go through
across the street

to the intersection
of the intersection
at the corner

half a block
on your left
on the corner

of the block
on your right
in the middle

To get to the bank from the hotel, first go out the front door of the hotel.

1. To get to the hospital, ______________ on High Street until you get _______________________ of
High Street and 1st Avenue. The hospital is on the southwest corner _______________________.
2. To get to the police station, _________________ the hospital on the corner of High Street and 1st
Avenue.

Itll be ___________________.

3. To get to the department store, _________________ the corner of High Street and 2nd Avenue, turn
right and go ________________. Itll be __________________.
4. To get to the post office, turn left __________________ of High Street and 1st Avenue. Itll be on
your left, in the middle ___________________.
5. To get to the hotel from the subway, exit on High Street. Its one block west,
___________________ of the block and ___________________ from a museum.

40

Module 5:

Unit 3, Directions

Practice Exercises
DynEd City

5(3)

Directions:

Exercise B

Write down the directions to these places from the hotel.


Example:

Police Station:

Go out the front door of the hotel.


left, next to the hospital.

Turn left.

Cross First Avenue.

Go straight.

It's on your

Park:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Post Office:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Drugstore:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________

41

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

5(3)

Directions:

Exercise C

Complete the sentences.


Example:

I is the

second

from the right in the

middle

row.

1. G is the _________________ from the left in the _________________ row.


2. H is in the ________________ of the _________________ row.
3. E is in the upper ________________-hand corner.
4. N is second from the _________________ in the _________________ row
5. K is in the ________________ left corner.
6. C is the _________________ from the left in the _________________ row.

42

Module 5:

Unit 4, Review Exercises

4. Review Exercises for Module 5


When Units 1-3 are completed, it is important to review the main points even while beginning to work on Module
6. The following lessons help students refocus on some of the main language points that are covered and
included in the Mastery Tests. These lessons should be done on a frequent basis.

Dictations
Dictations focus on important language at the word and phrase level. Detailed instructions for doing the
dictations can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) when you enter
the lesson. The Dictations for Module 5 are as follows:
Dictation 1

Dictation 4

1. Kathy arrived in Paris the day before yesterday, which


was Saturday.
2. Her plane landed at 3:00, two hours behind schedule.
3. It was supposed to arrive at 1:00.
4. After arriving, Kathy visited with her friend and met her
friend's fianc for the first time.

1. She has never been to Salzburg. It will be her first


time.
2. Like so many cities in Europe, Salzburg has an
interesting history.
3. She wants to visit the place where Mozart was born.
4. He was born there more than 200 years ago.

Dictation 2

Dictation 5

1. This isn't the first time she has been in Paris.


2. The first time she came to Paris was as a student, ten
years ago.
3. The last time was two years ago, when she came on
business.
4. During that trip, she was so busy that she didn't have
time to see any of the sights.

1. When we burn fossil fuels, waste gases, such as carbon


dioxide, are produced.
2. The waste gases enter our atmosphere and cause
pollution, which damages our environment.
3. For example, air pollution causes acid rain, and acid rain
is killing many of our forests.
4. If air pollution continues to increase, many of our forests
will die.

Dictation 3
1. This evening she has a date to meet someone for dinner.
2. She's going to have dinner with Pierre, a famous
photographer.
3. She interviewed him two years ago.
4. Since then they have kept in touch. They have written to
each other several times.

Dictation 6
1. Plants and trees help reduce global warming because
they convert carbon dioxide into oxygen.
2. If there are more plants, then the rate of global warming
is reduced.
3. However, many of our great forests are being cut down
or burned.

Fill-Ins
This lesson reviews some of the main grammar points that have been introduced in Units 1-3. Detailed
instructions for doing the Fill-Ins (with Speech Recognition) can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) once you are in the Fill-Ins lesson. Please note that the highlighted words
in the answer sentences are linked to the Glossary. Sample sentences from the Fill-Ins lesson are:
(1) It is the first vacation she has had in a long time. (3) She has come to Paris to attend her best friend's wedding. (4)
She first came to Paris as a student, ten years ago. (6) Her plane was supposed to arrive at 1:00. (8) She has been there
for two hours, since 11:30. (9) She has never been to Salzburg. (11) They won't leave for Salzburg until Thursday.
(14) We burn fossil fuels, such as coal, to generate electricity. (15) The energy of falling water is converted into
electricity. (16) The sun is another source of energy. (18) There are several reasons why this is important. (22) Our
forests are also being killed by acid rain. (25) In a windy area, wind power would be a good way to get energy. (27) On
land, trucks are often used to transport oil and gas. (28) Some of our forests are being killed by acid rain.

43

New Dynamic English

Speech Practice
In addition to developing oral fluency, this lesson provides a means to review and focus attention on many of the
key language points developed in Units 1-3, such as the present perfect, , the past tense, and the passive.
Detailed instructions for using Speech Recognition and for doing the Speech Practice lesson can be found in the
Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens.
The Speech Practice lesson has four sections: Sentence Reading, Answering Questions, Sentence Repetition and
Speech Quiz. Please note that the Score for the Speech Quiz is designed so that students can try to increase their
personal scores each time they do the quiz, rather than as a test. Their scores can be found in the Study Records.

5. Video Interactions, Module 5


This lesson shows a variety of native speakers in the
following situations: How Much Are the Tickets?
Business Telephone; At a Restaurant; and Hot Seats.
Except for the Hot Seats, students may view each scene
in a presentation mode. Lessons marked with an SR
have an interactive mode where students can interact
with the characters through Speech Recognition choices.
In the Hot Seats, the characters answer questions put to
them by the students.
Detailed Instructions for this lesson, and for Speech Recognition, are in the Study Guides and also in the pulldown Help Screens after you enter the lesson.
Each scene illustrates language points that have been developed in this module. The scenes have been designed
so that they can be role-played by students. This is an excellent way to review, have fun, and personalize the
language.
Im afraid that flight is full, so its going to be difficult.
But I made the reservations more than a month ago. The
seats were supposed to be together.
Okay sir. Im sorry about the mistake. Let me see what I
can do. Give me your number and Ill call you back.
Thanks. I appreciate your help. My number is ..

How Much are the Tickets?


Do you have any more tickets for the concert?
Sorry, therere no more seats left for this afternoons
performance.
Are there any seats for this evening?
Yes, we do, but theyre expensive seats.
How much are they?
Lets see. Those seats are $100.
You dont have anything else?
No, Im sorry.
If I take three, will you give me a discount?
Sorry, I wish I could help you. I just work here.

At a Restaurant
Have you decided what you want to order yet?
No, I havent. What are you going to get?
I havent decided yet either.
Why is it always so difficult to decide?
I dont know. Why dont you try the roast chicken?
really good.
I cant. I dont eat meat.
You dont eat meat? How about some pasta?
Okay, that sounds like a good idea.

Business Telephone
Ace Travel. May I help you?
Hello? Im calling about some airline seats Ive reserved.
Theres a problem.
Okay sir, what kind of problem?
I just got the tickets in the mail and now I see that the seats
are not together.
Oh, I see. When is the flight?
The flight is scheduled for tomorrow. Is there anything
you can do?
Whats the flight number?
Its Flight 002 to Madrid.

Hot Seats
Have you ever been abroad?
Ive been to London, and also to Paris.
Whats the most interesting trip you have ever taken?
It was the time I went to Amsterdam.

44

Its

Module 5 Summary

Module 5 Summary - New Dynamic English 3


Active vocabulary through Module 5:

approximately 1,250 words

Summary of Verbs in each Unit


Regular Verbs
(1) On a Trip
arrive*
attend*
belong
enjoy*
guess*
interview*
join
land
last*
listen*
look*
look forward*

(2) Energy Sources

marry
plan
prefer*
relax
return*
shop
stay*
talk*
travel*
visit
want*

balance
burn*
cause
change*
convert
damage
decrease
die*
enter
escape
face
generate

happen
heat up
help
hope
include
increase
kill*
limit
live*
look ahead
manage
melt

move away
need*
prevent
produce*
reduce
require
spill
store
transport
travel*
use
want*

Irregular Verbs, their Past Tense and Past Participle forms


V

Unit

be*
(1,2)
begin*
(2)
buy*
(1)
catch
(1)
come*
(2)
cut down
(2)
do*
(1)
fly*
(1)
get*
(2)
get+adj
(1)
go*
(1)
have*
(1,3)
hold
(1)
keep in touch
(1)
know*
(1)
leave*
(2)
meet
(1)
rise*
(2)
run
(2)
run out
(2)
see*
(1)
take a picture
(1)
take a walk
(1)
take care
(2)
take place
(1)
think*
(1)
write*
(1)
* verbs introduced in previous lessons

V(d) Past

V(n)

was/were
began
bought
caught
came
cut down
did
flew
got
got+adj
went
had
held
kept in touch
knew
left
met
rose
ran
ran out
saw
took a picture
took a walk
took care
took place
thought
wrote

been
begun
bought
caught
come
cut down
done
flown
gotten/got
gotten+adj/got+adj
gone
had
held
kept in touch
known
left
met
risen
run
run out
seen
taken a picture
taken a walk
taken care
taken place
thought
written

45

Past Participle

Module 6 Lesson Map

Module 6 Lesson Map


Unit 1:

Life Experience
Making a New Life
A Path to Success
A Troubled Past
Questions
Focus Exercises

Unit 2:

Matrix Vocabulary and Matrix Game


Occupations
Places to Go
Ways to Travel
Things to Wear
Feelings

Unit 3:

Comparisons
Price and Quality
Three Sisters
Country Data
Four Cities
Focus Exercises

Unit 4:

Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Speech Quiz

Unit 5:

Video Interactions w/SR


Telephone Conversation
Flight Information
At a Restaurant (2)
An Interview: Job Experience

46

New Dynamic English

1. Life Experience
Making a New Life; A Path to Success; A Troubled Past; Questions; and Focus
Exercises
This Unit completes the presentation of intermediate verb structures introduced in New Dynamic
English, Levels 2 and 3, and prepares students for Level 4, where students will focus on more
abstract relationships, especially the modals and conditionals.
In this Unit, students learn how to talk about the totality of their lives:
their past and
accumulated experience, their current situations, and their plans and hopes for the future. In
particular, we review and develop the present perfect and passive constructions of the verb.
In Making a New Life, A Path to Success, and A Troubled Past, the
lives of three characters are introduced and summarized. Within the
contexts of each life, the lessons focus on events and experiences and
how they are sequenced in time.
In Questions and Focus Exercises, students focus on information
questions and sentence construction with a mixture of verb
constructions, including the passive and perfect forms.
Goals
To be able to understand and talk about ones life experience and qualifications.
To be able to organize a brief presentation about ones education and travel experience.
Objective 1: To be able to understand and use the present perfect and past tense forms in a
simple narrative about experience.
Objective 2: To be able to understand and use the passive form together with the past tense and
perfect forms of the verb.
Objective 3: To be able to use appropriate time phrases to organize a brief written or oral
presentation about ones experience.

47

Module 6:

Unit 1, Life Experience

Learning Points
change, get + adjective
She became a successful model. Now that he's getting older... Their relationship got better. After
about two years, they got married.
for (reason)/ to (purpose)
He decided to study in the UK for a personal reason. His girlfriend was going to London to get a job
as a model. He was arrested for stealing a car. He was given a grant to study in the UK.
gerund, infinitive
Richard likes living in England; he decided to study; enjoys teaching; hopes to return; decided
to quit; his dream to be a writer; he kept on trying; Richard was given a grant to study in the UK.
Jack was arrested for stealing a car
passive
He was given a grant to study in the UK. He was also offered a grant to study in the US. His first
book was rejected. He got kicked out of several schools. He was arrested by the police. He has
been arrested twice.
present perfect + for
He has taught there for the past five years. They have lived there for almost eight years. Altogether,
he has been in jail for about two years.
present perfect and past contrasted
He has taught there for the past five years. Before that he was a graduate student... The police
arrested him. He has been arrested three times. He came to England eight years ago. He has lived
in England for eight years.
time sequence
At the same time; A year later; Before that; During that time; After about two years; Since
then; Now he is a well-known writer. During his school day When he was sixteen, he got into a
fight. When he was twenty he got married. Six months later, his wife left him.
still, yet
Richard's family still lives in Hong Kong. He still hasn't met the right woman. He hasnt met the
right woman yet.
used to
John used to work for a large company, but he doesnt work there anymore. He used to be a
businessman.

48

Module 6:

2, Unit 1, Life Experience

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Present the first part of Making a New Life in class. Focus on the past tense, the present perfect, and
the passive. Point out that the present perfect is often used to talk about experience.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice summarizing the first part of the lesson and answering
questions about Richards background, such as: Where did he live before he came to study in the UK?
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce A Path To Success in class. Review the meaning of used to, and note once again the use of
the present perfect to express experience in sentences such as: He has written several books.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions about their travel or
job experience, such as: Have you ever been abroad? How many countries have you travelled to?
How old were you when you first went abroad?
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce A Troubled Past in class, and go over all the sentences which
use the passive form, such as: He got kicked out of several schools; That
was the first time he was arrested; Since then he has been arrested twice;
Each time he was arrested he had to go to jail, etc.
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice summarizing the life
experiences of all three characters.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 4, the Focus Exercises in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following
Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the Unit,
using the practice exercises as a model of items to test.
Classroom Activity 1: Richard's Timeline
Challenge students to work back through Richard's life and create a timeline with dates of all the
important events in his life. Start with this year and work back. What year is this? His mother died last
year. In what year did his mother die? He has taught science for five years. When did he start teaching
at the college? etc.

49

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 2: Changing Lifestyles


Have students make a list of things they did in the past, but they no longer do. Then have them write
five sentences using used to: e.g., I used to take the bus to work, but now I drive my car. I used to
baby-sit on weekends, but now I have a job in a restaurant.
With a partner or in a small group have students think of things people used to do, but no longer do
because of modern conveniences or changes in society: e.g., Women used to wash clothes by hand,
but now there are washing machines. Children used to live with their parents until they married, but
now they move into apartments.
Classroom Activity 3: Letters to the Newspaper -- Getting Advice
a. Dear Abby Letter
Jack is tired of his life and doesn't know what to do. Have students write a letter from Jack to Dear Abby
giving a short history of his life and asking for advice. Have them also write Abby's advice.
b. The Personals
John would like to get married and have a family, but he can't find the right woman. Have students
write an ad that John might place in the personals or on the internet to look for the right mate. Have
them also write an ad from a woman who would be a good match for John.
Classroom Activity 4: Me and you
Have students work in pairs or groups of three. Ask each student to write down three things he or she
thinks they have in common with their partner(s), and three things he or she thinks have been different.
Then the partners should discuss what they have written, and write a report summarizing the results.
Classroom Assignment 5: Significant Experiences That Have Changed My Life
In this written assignment, students should write a one page paper that presents significant experiences in
their lives. How have the experiences changed their lives? What were the results or consequences?
Classroom Assignment 6: Famous Persons Experiences
In this small group assignment, have students choose a famous person to research and write about.
Students should find two or three significant events in the persons life and present each event in a
paragraph or two. Then have one person from each group make an oral presentation to the class.
Suggestions: singers, actors, politicians, scientists, writers, explorers, athletes, etc.
Sources: Biographies, Encyclopedias, Internet
Classroom Assignment 7: Job Resume
Prepare a resume for applying for job or scholarship. Include your education and job experience and
any other special qualifications and skills you have.
Using a classmates resume, interview them about their experience.
Classroom Assignment 8: The Value of Experience and Skills
In this small group assignment, have groups of students list various types of experience or qualifications
and rank them according to importance. Consider how different jobs require different qualifications.
What kinds of experience and skills are most valuable? What kinds of experience and skills are least
valuable? Then have one person from each group make an oral presentation to the class to summarize
the conclusions of the group and give reasons why.
Suggestions: travel, work experience, higher education, ability to speak a foreign language, sports,
community service, ability to play a musical instrument, ability to write well, etc.

50

New Dynamic English

Now he is a well-known writer. He has written


several books. In fact, four of his books have been
best sellers. Now John is writing a book about the
life of Mikhail Gorbachev, the famous Soviet leader.

Key Sentences
Making a New Life
Richard is a teacher at a small college in England.
He has taught science there for the past five years.
Before that, for two years, he was a graduate student
at Newton University, near London. At the same
time, he worked part-time as a research assistant.

John has traveled to many parts of the world.


When he was eighteen years old, he went abroad for
the first time. He went to the U.S. and Canada. A
year later, when he was nineteen, he went to Japan
and Korea. Since then, he has gone to a different
country every year.

He came to England eight years ago, after finishing


his university studies in Hong Kong. He was a top
student in Hong Kong, and he was given a grant to
study in the UK. He was also offered a grant to
study in the US. It was a great opportunity for him
because he wanted to get some international
experience.

Now that he's getting older, John thinks he should


get married. He would like to have a family.
Unfortunately, he still hasn't met the right woman
for him. Of course he's looking for a woman who
likes to travel. He hopes to get married within the
next two or three years.

It was a difficult choice, but he decided to study in


the UK for a personal reason. His girlfriend was
going to London to get a job as a model. He was
afraid he would lose her if she went to London and
he went to the U.S.

A Troubled Past
Jack can't find a job. Nobody will hire him.
That's not surprising, however, because he hasn't
done very much.

After only three months in London, she became a


successful model. During that time their
relationship got better. On weekends they often
went places together. After about two years, they
got married.

During his school days, he was often in trouble.


He got kicked out of several schools. When he was
sixteen, he got into a fight and lost two teeth.
When he was eighteen, he stole a car. The police
caught him and arrested him. That was the first
time he was arrested.

Now they are happily married and have a five-yearold son. Altogether, they have lived in England for
almost eight years.
Richard's family still lives in Hong Kong. He has
two sisters and a brother. Richard is the youngest.
His mother died last year, but his father is in good
health.

Since then he has been arrested twice. Altogether,


he has been arrested three times. Each time he was
arrested he had to go to jail. He has been in jail
three times, each time for about eight months.
Altogether, he has been in jail for about two years.

Richard speaks two languages, Chinese and English.


He likes living in England, and he enjoys teaching.
He thinks it's important to get international
experience.

When he was twenty he got married. Six months


later his wife left him. She couldn't stand living with
someone who was always getting into trouble.

He hopes to return to Hong Kong someday.


wants to help contribute to its future.

Now he's all alone. He's wondering about his life.


He is tired of getting into trouble, but he doesn't
know what to do. He'd like to get an interesting
job. Unfortunately, he doesn't have any job skills.
He wishes he could start his life over.

He

A Path to Success
John used to be a businessman. He worked for a
large company for six years. He earned lots of
money, but he decided to quit. He wanted to
follow his dream to be a writer.

Questions
How long has he (Richard) been a science teacher?
How long did he work as a research assistant? He
worked as a research assistant for two years.
Where did he decide to study? Why did he decide

His first book was rejected. He almost gave up,


but he didn't. His next book was much better.
51

New Dynamic English

to study in the UK? Besides Britain, where else did


Richard have a chance to study? Why did he
decide not to study in the US? Where did Richard
live before coming to the UK?

When he [was] [sixteen], he [got] into a [fight] and


[lost] two [teeth].
Two years [later], he [was] [arrested] for [stealing] a
car.
That was the [first] [time] he [was] [arrested].
Since then he [has] [been] [arrested] twice.
Unfortunately, he [doesnt] [have] [any] job skills.
Altogether, he [has] [been] [arrested] three times.
Unfortunately, he [still] [hasnt] [met] the [right]
woman for him.
A year [later], when he [was] nineteen, he [went] to
Japan and Korea.
He [used to] [work [for a large company, [but] he
[doesnt] work there [anymore].
Jack [was] [arrested] by the [police].
After [about] two years, they [got] [married].

Who became a model? How long did it take


Richard's girlfriend to become a successful model?
Who did he marry? How many sisters does he
have? He has two sisters and a brother. Is
Richard's mother still alive? How many languages
does he speak?
Does he (John) work for a large company? Has he
ever worked for a large company? Why did he
decide to quit?
Who has written several books? How many of his
books have been best sellers? Who is he writing
about now? How old was he when he went abroad
for the first time? How old was he when he went
to Japan and Korea? Have you ever been abroad?
Do you enjoy traveling? True or False: He's
going to get married very soon.
Who can't get a job? What happened to Jack when
he was sixteen? What did Jack steal? Who stole
a car? Who arrested Jack?
Who was arrested for stealing a car? How many
times has he been arrested? Has he ever been
married? Is he married? Who lost two teeth
when he was sixteen? How old was he when he
lost two teeth?
Focus Exercises
He [has] [taught] science there [for] the [past] five
years.
It [was] a difficult [choice], but he [decided [to
[study] in the UK for a personal reason.
He [came] to England eight years [ago], [after]
[finishing] his university [studies] in Hong Kong.
He [was] also [offered] a grant to [study] in the US.
His girlfriend [was] [going] to London to [get] a
[job] as a model.
His mother [died] [last] year, [but] his father is in
good health.
John [has] [written] [several] successful books.
In fact, [four] of his [books] [have] [been] best
sellers.
John [has] [travelled] to [many] [parts] of the world.
John [travelled] to Japan and Korea [when] he
[was] nineteen.

52

Module 6:

2, Unit 1, Life Experience

Focused Listening

Focus 3

Focus 1

Review Making a New Life, A Path to Success and then


focus on A Troubled Past. Listen to each sentence
several times. If necessary, use the ABC button to look
at the text and the Glossary.

Focus on Making a New Life. Listen to each sentence


several times. If necessary, use the ABC button to look
at the text.

Language Focus

Present perfect, past, and passive forms of the verb

Passive with past (was arrested) and perfect forms (has


been arrested)

Listening Task

Listening Task

Listen to how the verb tenses change from sentence to


sentence. Repeat each sentence, and record it.

Focus on sentences that use the passive form. Repeat


and study these sentences. Note that some sentences
have a passive meaning without using the passive form:
He got kicked out of several schools. His mother died.

Language Focus

Goal

Students will learn how to use the present perfect and

Goals

past tense together in a narrative, with the present


perfect emphasizing experience and results, and the
past tense emphasizing an event or act.

Students will be able to use passive constructions with

Student Follow-up
1. Write a summary of Richards life up until he got
married. Fill in the details as you imagine them,
especially his decision to study in the UK instead of
the US.
2. Do Practice Exercises A and B.

Student Follow-up
1. Summarize Jacks life, and fill in the details as you
imagine them.
2. Summarize your own travel and/or job experience:
What countries have you been to? What kinds of jobs
have you had?
3. Do Practice Exercises E and F.

Focus 2
Review Making a New Life, and then focus on A Path to
Success. Listen to each sentence several times. If
necessary, use the ABC button to look at the text and the
Glossary.

Focus 4
Review Making a New Life, A Path to Success and A
Troubled Past. Then do the Questions and Focus
Exercises lessons.

Language Focus
present perfect to express experience, simple past, and
used to

Language Focus
still, yet, passives, present perfect

Listening Task
Listen for sentences that summarize experience.
record these sentences.

the past and perfect forms.


Students will be able to use well-formed sentences to
summarize the experiences of all three characters.

Say and

Goal

Students will be able to use still, yet, and used to.


Students will be able to use well-formed sentences to

Goal

Students will be able to use the present perfect to ask

ask and answer questions about their own lives and


experiences.

and answer questions about experience.

Student Follow-up

Student Follow-up

1. Write a two page autobiography.


2. Prepare a job resume. Include your education and
work experience.

1. Write a summary of Johns life. Fill in the details as


you imagine them. What are the significant
experiences in his life?
2. Do Practice Exercises C and D.

53

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
6(1)

Life Experience:

Exercise A

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the verb.

Richard (be)

is

a teacher at a college in England. He (teach) _________________ science

there for the past five years.

Before that, for two years, he (be) _______________ a graduate

student at Newton University. At the same time, he (work) ________________ part-time as a


research assistant.
Richard (come) __________________ to England eight years ago . After finishing his studies in
Hong Kong, he (give) ___________________ a grant to study in the UK. Another reason he
(decide) _____________________ to study in the UK was that he (want) __________________ to
be with his girlfriend who (go) ____________________ to London to get a job as a model.
After about two years, Richard and his girlfriend (get married) ____________________ Now they
(have) _________________ a five-year-old son. Altogether, they (live) __________________ in
England for eight years.

6(1)

Life Experience:

Exercise B

Rearrange the words to form the correct sentence.


Example:

Richard /but now/ /used to / /a graduate student/ /be/


/is/ a science teacher.
Richard used to be a graduate student, but now he is a science teacher.

1. Richard

/in Hong Kong/

/but now/

/live/

/used to/

/he lives/

in England.

Richard ____________________________________________________________ in England.


2. His girlfriend

/to get/

/to London/

/came/

/as/

/a job/

a model.

His girlfriend __________________________________________________________ a model.


3. Richard

/in England/

/living/

/likes/

/enjoys/

/and he/

teaching.

Richard _______________________________________________________________ teaching.

54

Module 6:

2, Unit 1, Life Experience

Practice Exercises

6(1)

Life Experience:

Exercise C

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the verb.

John (be)

is

a well-known writer. He (write) ____________________ several books.

Four

of his books (be) ____________________ best-sellers. Now John (write) ____________________


a book about the life of Mikhail Gorbachev.
John (like) ___________________ to travel. He (travel) ___________________ to many parts of
the world. When he was eighteen years old, he (go) __________________ to the US and Canada.
A year later he (go) _________________ to Japan and Korea. Since then, he (go)
_________________ to a different country every year.
Now that he (get) __________________ older, John thinks he should (get) ________________
married. Unfortunately, he still (meet, not) ______________________ the right woman for him.

6(1)

Life Experience:

Exercise D

Fill in the blanks with ago, for, since, or after


Example:

John worked for a large company

for

six years.

1. When John was nineteen he went to Japan and Korea. _______ then, he has been to a different
country every year.
2. Richard has taught science

________ the past five years.

3. Richard and his girlfriend came to England eight years ________.


they got married.

________ about two years

4. They have lived in England ________ almost eight years.


5. Richard came to England eight years _______, ________ finishing his university studies in Hong
Kong.

55

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
6(1)

Life Experience:

Exercise E

Use the passive form of the verb to write a new sentence with the same
meaning.
Example:
They kicked Jack out of school.

Jack was kicked out of school.

1. The police have arrested Jack three times.


___________________________________________________________________________
2. They caught Jack and put him in jail.
___________________________________________________________________________
3. The publishers rejected John's first book.
___________________________________________________________________________
4. The government gave Richard a grant to study in the UK.
___________________________________________________________________________
5. That was the first time they arrested him.
___________________________________________________________________________

6(1)

Life Experience:

Exercise F

Fill in the blanks with still, yet, already, or anymore


1. Richard got married six years ago. He is _________ married.
2. John ____________ hasn't met the right woman for him.
3. John isn't married _____________.
4. Jack used to be married, but he isn't married _____________.
5. Richard's mother died last year but his father is ____________ alive.
6. Richard's family _____________ lives in Hong Kong.
7. John used to work for a large company but he doesn't ____________.
8. John has _________ been to Korea and Japan, but hes never been to Malaysia.

56

New Dynamic English

2. Matrix Vocabulary
Occupations; Places to Go; Ways to Travel; Things to Wear; Feelings; and Matrix
Game
This Unit introduces vocabulary related to five subject areas of importance in daily conversations.
It is important to extend the vocabulary in each category. For example, in Occupations the class
should list additional jobs and professions and discuss the advantages, disadvantages,
qualifications, and give a detailed description of each. In The Interview lesson (Unit 5, Video)
there is also an example of how a role play can be set up in the classroom. In addition, the
Classroom Activities for this Unit will provide opportunities for follow-up and extension.
In the second category, Places to Go, students learn how to describe a variety of places by
indicating what happens there. An expanded list of places will add useful vocabulary to the lesson
and allows students to bring in their own interests. In the third category, Ways to Travel, students
can add travel-related vocabulary, such as commute, rush hour, in cities, in the country, passengers,
mass transit, etc. There is also a video lesson, Flight Information, in Unit 5, that extends this
category.
In the fourth and fifth categories, Things to Wear and
Feelings, there are many interesting ways to extend
and add to the examples. How this is done depends on
the age and profile of your students. Both categories
lend themselves to role plays and other activities,
examples of which are listed in Classroom Activities.
Once each category has been studied, students will
enjoy the Matrix Game where they can test themselves
and see how high they can score. This activity helps
to review and reinforce the basic language, and can be
extended into a class activity. See the Classroom
Activities for more ideas.
Goals:
To be able to talk about common jobs and professions.
To be able to describe places of business and of general interest by talking about what happens
there.
To be able to talk about means of transportation, and general travel patterns.
To be able to talk about and describe clothes.
To be able to talk about and describe feelings.
Objective 1: To prepare students to talk about their job ambitions and/or present jobs and places of
business.
Objective 2: To prepare students to make their own travel arrangements.
Objective 3: To prepare students to describe and buy clothes.
Objective 4: To prepare students to understand references made to feelings, and to talk about
feelings in an appropriate and understandable way.

57

Module 6:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Learning Points
adverb phrases and adverbs of frequency
when they are happy; when a friend is sick; when someone is rude to them. Construction workers
work outside and sometimes operate heavy machinery. A dentist often charges a lot of money.
countable/uncountable amounts
many people; many other materials; some people; most people; a lot of education; not much education;
a pair of gloves; a lot of money; many different kinds of animals; other sports
comparing amounts
Dentists almost always earn more than sales clerks. Which usually costs more?
more expensive than going by train. A train holds more passengers than a bus.

Flying is usually

conditionals
Who would you go to if you had a toothache? How would you feel if you were all alone and lost in a
dark forest? How do you feel if someone is rude to you?
compulsion, have to
You have to put on your socks before you put on your shoes. I only go when I have to. You have to
go to an airport...
gerunds and infinitives
Do you enjoy going to the dentist? I prefer flying. Flying is usually more expensive than going by
train. Many people don't like going to the dentist. The fastest way to travel a long distance is to go by
airplane. A bus is an inexpensive way to travel. A library is a good place to do research. Some
people are afraid to fly.
purpose (in order to, to); reason (because)
You have to go to an airport to get on an airplane. What do people wear to keep their heads warm?
You usually need an appointment in order to see a dentist. You usually need a reservation in order to
get on a train. Many people don't like going to the dentist because they are afraid of pain.
word relations
Driver is to bus as pilot is to airplane.

Black is to white as hate is to love.

preference, would rather


Would you rather go to a zoo or to a disco?

I'd rather read a book or listen to music.

58

Module 6:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Introduce the Occupations lesson in class. Make a list of occupations and jobs on the board, and talk
about the advantages, disadvantages, and qualifications for each. Sample occupations include: a
doctor, a cook, a restaurant owner, a lawyer, a nurse, a pharmacist, a salesperson, a plumber, an
architect, a software programmer, a graphic artist, a journalist, etc.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students interview each other about what kinds of jobs they have or
would like to have? What are their responsibilities? What do they do every day? What are the
advantages, disadvantages, and qualifications for the job.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Briefly introduce the Places to Go lesson. Make a list of places on the board ask the class to help you
describe what goes on at each place. For example, at a bank people are depositing or withdrawing
money, getting a loan, or arranging to transfer money from one account to another. Write down the
new vocabulary, and have students work in pairs to come up with more examples and present them to
the class.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation, Oral Practice, and Listening Focus
In successive lessons, introduce each of the next three categories and follow the above pattern for each.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons of this Unit, including the Matrix Game, have been completed, assign the Practice
Exercises and complete three or more of the following Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce
the language. Then test the main points of the Unit, using the practice exercises as a model of items to
test.
Classroom Activity 1: Posters
Divide the class into groups of three or four. There must be at least five groups. Assign each group one
of the categories from the Unit. Have each group create a poster using magazine pictures or drawings
with colored markers depicting words in that category. Place the posters around the classroom and use
these visuals for discussion throughout this lesson.
Classroom Activity 2: What's My Line?
Have students write an occupation on a card or provide cards with occupations already written on them
for each student. The class must guess the occupation of one student by asking questions. The student
may give one clue initially, e.g., I work with water. I work in a small space. From there the questions
begin: e.g., Do you work outside? Do you work by yourself or in a team? The first student to guess the
occupation is the next one up.

59

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 3: Hot Spots


Divide the class into groups of three or four. Ask each group to pretend they are creating a guide for
new students or employees that includes interesting places to go in the neighborhood, on campus, or
related to the business. Have them think of at least five places, with short descriptions of each place:
e.g., Swimming Pool. The Swimming Pool is a good place to get exercise. At the Swimming Pool you
can get a tan.
Classroom Activity 4: Budget Buys
Bring newspaper and magazine clothing ads or clothing store catalogs to class. Tell students they can
buy anything they need, but they must stay within a budget. Decide on a reasonable amount that
everyone must limit themselves to. Have students "go shopping" through the ads and make a list of
what they will buy and the price of each item. Have students share with the class what is on their list.
Encourage students to describe the color and features of the clothing.
Classroom Activity 5: What am I Wearing?
Group students into pairs. Have the partners stand back to back and take turns asking each other
questions about what each is wearing, e.g., Am I wearing a belt? What color is my shirt? What is
it made of? Am I wearing brown shoes? The other student tries to answer.
Classroom Activity 6: Way to Go!
On the board, write the names of two places in the area (towns, public buildings, parks, etc.) that
students are familiar with. Have the class brainstorm ways to travel between the two places. Write these
means of transportation on the board. Then divide up the class into small groups and ask each group to
decide the best way to get from place A to place B and why. They may decide to use several modes of
transportation (e.g., walking, train, taxi) to get there, but everyone in the group must agree on the
sequence. Have each group choose one student to present the group's choices and reasons to the rest of
the class.
Classroom Activity 7: Feelings
Have students write about one of the following topics: My Happiest Day, My Most Embarrassing
Moment, My Most Frightening Experience, A Situation That Made Me Really Angry.
Ask students to think back to the moment and brainstorm what they saw, heard, felt, smelled or tasted
in the experience. Have them write a few paragraphs about the experience using the five senses to help
readers understand their experience.
Classroom Activity 8: Matrix Game
In this activity, divide the class into two or three groups. Make a list of 30-40 questions and answers
about the topics in the Unit. Then read a question to one of the teams and ask them to answer it in a
complete sentence. For example: In what profession to people practice law? Lawyers practice
law. How do most people feel if someone is rude to them? If someone is rude to them, most
people get angry. Black is to white as hate is to _____? Black is to white as hate is to love.
Classroom Activity 9: Job Interview
Divide the class into two or three groups and have each group write and produce a short video of a job
interview.
Classroom Activity 10: At a Department Store
Divide the class into two or three groups and have each group write and produce a short video of
someone buying new clothes at a department store.
Classroom Activity 11: Matrix Vocabulary Crossword Puzzle
As a class, or as a competition between teams, solve the Crossword Puzzle (below).

60

New Dynamic English

Ways To Travel
Here are four ways to travel: by airplane, by bus, by
train, and by taxi.

Key Sentences
Occupations
Here are four kinds of jobs: a scientist, a
construction worker, a dentist, and a sales clerk.

Airplane. Airplanes are a safe way to travel, but


some people are afraid to fly. The fastest way to
travel a long distance is to go by airplane. Flying is
usually more expensive than going by train. You
have to go to an airport to get on an airplane.

Scientist. Scientists study the nature of the universe


and how things work. Scientists work in laboratories
and do experiments. Scientists like to solve difficult
problems and explore the unknown. You need a
lot of education to become a scientist or a dentist.

Bus. A bus is an inexpensive way to travel from one


place to another. Buses are sometimes crowded and
uncomfortable, especially during rush hour. Buses
are an important form of transportation in places
where there are no planes or trains. Bus drivers
drive buses and pilots fly airplanes.

Construction worker. Construction workers build


things like bridges, dams, and highways.
Construction workers work outside and sometimes
operate heavy machinery. Construction workers
sometimes have dangerous jobs. You dont need
much education to become a construction worker or
a sales clerk.

Train. Trains travel from station to station and carry


many passengers. Many people commute to and
from work by train. Sometimes you need a seat
reservation in order to get on a train. A train holds
more passengers than a bus.

Dentist. A dentist fixes our teeth and often charges a


lot of money. Many people don't like going to the
dentist because they are afraid of pain. You usually
need an appointment in order to see a dentist.
Dentists almost always earn more than sales clerks.

Taxi. Taxis are an expensive way to travel, but they


are convenient. When you get into a taxi, you have
to tell the driver where you want to go. You have to
pay your fare when you get out of a taxi.

Sales clerk. Sales clerks help customers buy things


in stores. Sales clerks work in department stores and
many other kinds of shops. Sales clerks should be
helpful and polite to do their job well.

Things To Wear
Here are some things to wear: shoes and socks, two
shirts, a pair of gloves, and some hats.

Places To Go
Here are four places to go: a zoo, a disco, a stadium,
and a library.
Zoo. You can see many different kinds of animals in
a zoo. A zoo is a good place to go with children on a
sunny day. In a zoo we can look at the animals, and
the animals can look at us.

Shoes and socks. Here are a pair of shoes and a pair


of socks. First you put on your socks, then you put
on your shoes. Some people take off their shoes
when they enter their house. You wear socks on
your feet and you wear gloves on your hands.
Do you wear your shoes inside your house?
Feet are to socks as hands are to gloves.

Disco. Discos are popular places for people to go


dancing. Discos play loud music and stay open late
at night. People go to a disco when they want to
have a good time.

Shirts. Here are two shirts. The shirt on the left


has long sleeves. The shirt on the right has short
sleeves. Shirts are made of cotton, silk, and many
other materials.

Stadium. You can see football, baseball, and other


sports at a stadium. Sports fans like to go to the
stadium to watch their favorite teams. Good seats at
a sports event are usually expensive.

Gloves. Here is a pair of gloves. People wear


gloves in cold weather to keep their hands warm.
Some workers wear gloves to protect their hands.
Hats. There are many different kinds of hats. In cold
weather people wear hats to keep their heads warm.
A hat can protect your head from the sun in hot
weather.

Library. There are lots of interesting books in a


library. A library is a good place to study and do
research. People go to a library when they want to
borrow a book.

61

New Dynamic English

Feelings
These are four feelings:
afraid.

Would you rather go to a zoo or to a disco?


Would you rather look at animals or go dancing?
What can you borrow from a library?
Where can you dance and listen to music?
Are you a sports fan?
What is an inexpensive way to travel around a city?
What is an inexpensive way to travel in places where
there are no trains or planes?
What is usually the most expensive way to travel from
one part of a city to another part? Which holds more
passengers, a bus or a train?
What is the fastest way to travel from London to New
York?
Which is usually more comfortable and convenient, a
taxi or a bus?
Where do you have to go to catch a plane?
Have you ever flown first class?
Would you rather travel a long distance by train or by
airplane?
Driver is to bus as pilot is to ______?
Which form of transportation is usually the fastest way
to travel a long distance?
Which form of transportation is usually more
expensive, an airplane or a train?
Which do you put on first, your shoes or your socks?
Which do you take off first, your shoes or your socks?
What do most people wear on their feet?
What do people wear to keep their heads warm?
Feet are to socks as hands are to _______?
Do you wear your shoes inside your house?
Which shirt has short sleeves?
Head is to hat as feet are to _______?
Kathy is cold. Which hat would keep her ears warm?
Do you like to go shopping for clothes?
How do you feel when someone you love is going
away for a long time?
How do you feel when someone you love is returning
from a long trip?
How do you feel when you get good news?
How do most people look when they are happy?
How do most people feel on their birthday?
How do most people look when they are angry?
How would you feel if you were all alone and lost in a
dark forest?
How do you feel if someone is rude to you?
He failed the entrance examination. How does he
feel?
Do you get angry easily?
Do you lose your temper easily?
When you were a child, were you afraid of the dark?
How do people usually feel at a funeral?

happy, sad, angry, and

Happy. People smile and laugh when they are


happy. Good news makes people happy. Don't
worry. Be happy.
Sad. Some people cry when they are sad. There
are tears in her eyes. People often feel sad when
they get bad news. Most people feel sad at
funerals or when a friend is sick.
Angry. Most people get angry when someone is
rude to them. It makes some people angry if their
train or bus arrives late. If you get angry easily,
you should try to control your temper.
Afraid. Small children are often afraid of the dark.
Some people are afraid to try anything new. Most
people feel afraid when they are in a dangerous
situation.
Sample Questions
Who earns more, a dentist or a sales clerk?
Who makes more money, a dentist or a sales clerk?
Whose job is more dangerous, a construction worker or
a sales clerk?
Which job is best for you if you like to solve difficult
problems?
Which job is best for you if you like working with
customers?
Who does experiments in a laboratory?
Who would you go to if you needed help in a store?
Who would you go to if you had a toothache?
In your country, are sales clerks usually helpful and
polite?
Do you enjoy going to the dentist?
Which job requires people to work outside?
Do you usually need an appointment in order to see a
dentists?
Please take the gloves to the sales clerk to pay for
them. Which two jobs require the most/least
education?
Where is a good place to go with young children on a
sunny afternoon?
Have you ever seen an elephant in a zoo?
Where can you go to watch monkeys playing in their
cages?
Which place stays open very late at night?
Where is a good place to go to watch your favorite
team play?
Have you ever been to a professional football game?
Which usually costs more, a ticket to a sports event or
admission to a zoo?
62

Module 6:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Focused Listening

Focus 3

Focus 1
Focus on Occupations. Click on each item several times
and listen to the basic sentences about each. Then use
the Quiz button and answer the questions.

Review Places to Go, and then focus on Ways to Travel.


Click on each item several times and listen to the basic
sentences about each. Then use the Quiz button and
answer the questions.

Language Focus

Language Focus

Vocabulary related to job descriptions

Vocabulary:

Listening Task

Listening Tasks

Listen to each job description. Then answer the


questions and say each sentence.
Write down any
unfamiliar vocabulary.

Listen to the descriptions of each way to travel. Then


answer the questions and say each sentence. Write down
any unfamiliar vocabulary. Practice saying sentences
that talk about what you have to do when taking a
particular type of transportation.

Goal

Students should be able to describe and answer

transportation

Goal

questions about a variety of occupations.

Students will be able to talk about and compare

Student Follow-up

different kinds of transportation

1. Make a list of four other occupations.


2. Describe one of these occupations, its advantages,
disadvantages, and qualifications.
3. Do Practice Exercise A.

Student Follow-up
1. Present the advantages and disadvantages of each type
of transportation.
2. Present the sequence of actions necessary for taking a
bus, taxi, etc. Example: Taxi. First you get in the
taxi. Then you give the driver directions. After you
get out, you pay the fare.
3. Do Practice Exercise C.

Focus 2
Review Occupations and focus on Places to Go. Click
on each item several times and listen to the basic
sentences about each. Then use the Quiz button and
answer the questions.

Focus 4

Language Focus
Vocabulary:

Review Ways to Travel, and then focus on Things to


Wear. Click on each item several times and listen to the
basic sentences about each. Then use the Quiz button
and answer the questions.

Descriptions of places to go.

Listening Task
Listen to the descriptions of each place. Then answer the
questions and say each sentence.
Write down any
unfamiliar vocabulary.

Language Focus
Vocabulary:

Goal

clothing, and buying clothing

Listening Task

Students should be able to describe what happens at

Listen to the descriptions of each thing to wear. Then


answer the questions and say each sentence.
Write
down any unfamiliar vocabulary.

various places of business or other places to go.

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of four other places to go.
2. Describe one of these places, what happens there or
why people go.
3. Interview a classmate about their favorite places to go
on a weekend. Would you rather go to a disco or to
a sporting event?
4. Do Practice Exercise B.

Goals

Student will be able to talk about articles of clothing


and other things worn on the body.

Students will be able to specify where the item is


worn, when, and what it is made of. You wear a hat
on your head. A hat can protect your head from the
sun. This shirt is made of cotton.

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of three additional things to wear, and
describe them. When and where do you wear them?

63

New Dynamic English


What information, such as size, do you need to have
when buying them?
2. Do Practice Exercise D.

Focus 5
Review Things to Wear, and then focus on Feelings.
Click on each item several times and listen to the basic
sentences about each. Then use the Quiz button and
answer the questions.

Language Focus
Vocabulary: emotions and facial expressions or actions
associated with emotions.

Listening Task
Listen to the descriptions of emotion. Then answer the
questions and say each sentence.
Write down any
unfamiliar vocabulary.

Goals

Students will be able to talk about emotions and facial

expressions.
Students will be able to use make and get to talk about
emotions: It makes me angry when...
I get angry
when...

Student Follow-up
1. Interview a classmate about what makes them smile,
laugh, cry, get angry, or scream from fright.
2. Make a list of two or three additional emotions, and
give situations associated with each emotion:
Example: I get excited when I watch a good football
game and the score is close.
3. Do Practice Exercise E.

Focus 6
Review each of the lessons in the Matrix Vocabulary.
Then play the Matrix Game. See how high you can
score.

Language Focus
Questions and answers.

Student Follow-up
1. Make a list of additional questions and answers for all
the categories.
2. Do the Matrix Vocabulary Crossword.

64

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

6(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise A

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.

1. Construction workers build ______________ bridges, dams, and highways.


2. Dentists fix our teeth and often _____________ of money.
3. Dentists _____________ earn more than sales clerks.
4. Most department stores have sales clerks ______________ customers buy things.
5. Scientists often solve difficult problems and study _______________ work.
6. Many high paying jobs require ______________ education.
7. Sales clerks __________________ helpful and polite.
8. Someone who comes to work late and doesnt work hard might _______________.
9. Its often hard to _________________ without work experience.
10. If you speak a foreign language it may help you to find _______________.

(Words and phrases)

a) almost always

f)

things like

b) charge a lot

g)

a better job

c) how things

h)

a lot of

d) lose their job

i)

to help

e) get a job

j)

should be

65

Module 6:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Practice Exercises

6(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise B

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.

1. There are many _____________ of animals in a zoo.


2. Professional sports events are _________________ in a large stadium.
3. Tourists usually go to ___________________ places in a city.
4. In most big cities ___________________ many office buildings.
5. One way to see a city is ____________________ a tour bus around the city.
6. If you dont like cities, you can always ____________________ and see the countryside.
7. Some parts of a city are not safe, so you shouldnt ________________.
8. Its not fun when you ________________ a toilet when you really need one.
9. A museum is a good place to go if you want _________________ the history of a place.
10. A good map will help you ___________________ around a city or country.

(Words and phrases)


a) the most famous

f)

often held

b) to learn about

g)

there are

c) go alone

h)

different kinds

d) to take

i)

find your way

e) cant find

j)

rent a car

66

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

6(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise C

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.

1. The fastest way ____________ a long distance is to go ______________.


2. Flying is usually more expensive than going _______________.
3. A bus in an inexpensive way ___________ from ____________ to another.
4. Traffic is usually heaviest _____________ rush hour.
5. Many people _____________ to and from work ____________.
6. Buses are an important form of _____________, especially where there are no planes or
trains.
7. Trains travel from station to station and carry many _______________.
8. Taxis are an expensive way to travel, but they are _______________.
9. Some countries have an excellent ______________ system.
10. Subways are _____________ form of transportation.

(Words and phrases)


a) during

f)

one place

b) another

g)

transportation

c) convenient

h)

by airplane

d) to travel

i)

by train

e) commute

j)

passengers

67

Module 6:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Practice Exercises

6(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise D

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.
1. Men usually wear a shirt and _______________ for business.
2. For a formal business meeting, men usually wear _______________.
3. A womans business suit usually consists of ____________, blouse, and jacket.
4. When you buy a shirt or trousers you need to know your _______________.
5. When a man travels, he needs to take several pairs of ________ and underwear.
6. In some countries, students wear ________________ to school.
7. In order to know your size youll need to _________________.
8. In a department store you can try on clothes in a ________________ room.
9. If your shoes dont __________, your feet will hurt.
10. At a hotel there is usually a ____________________ service for cleaning your clothes.

(Words and phrases)


a) fit

f)

be measured

b) dressing

g)

tie

c) socks

h)

a skirt

d) size

i)

laundry

e) a suit

j)

a uniform

68

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

6(2)

Matrix Vocabulary:

Exercise E

Complete each sentence with the letter of the correct words or


phrases from below.

1. Please dont ______________, but Ive made a terrible mistake.


2. I am _______________ to hear that you cant come with us.
3. Reckless drivers make me really _______________.
4. Im sorry, but _______________ there are no seats left for tonights concert.
5. She has a beautiful _______________, doesnt she?
6. His jokes were so ____________ I couldnt stop _______________.
7. At the end of the game the score was close, so it was really _______________.
8. The little child was all ___________ and ____________ when we found her.
9. Well be careful, so please __________________.
10. The roller coaster was so scary that everyone was __________________.

(Words and phrases)


a) crying

g)

funny

b) sorry

h)

dont worry

c) laughing

i)

get angry

d) exciting

j)

alone

e) smile

k)

screaming

f) Im afraid

l)

nervous

69

Module 6:

Unit 2, Matrix Vocabulary

Matrix Vocabulary Crossword


1

5
7

9
10

11

13

12

15

14
16

18

17

19

20
21
23

22
24

25

26

27

28

29

ACROSS

DOWN

1. the person you go to when you are sick


3. its in the restroom; we use it several times a day
6. black is to white as love is to _____
10. a place where you can borrow books
11. the past tense of the verb, wear
12. to find your size; to _____ the length
14. you go to school to get a good _____
16. what you feel when you are angry
17. what you buy to give your friends and family
20. what you feel when you are afraid
22. cars travel on a ____
23. something you wear on your hands
25. put your ____ on before you put on your shoes
27. where people go if they are very sick
28. a person who flies an airplane
29. a person who sells things is a _______

70

1. you go to a ____ when you have a toothache


2. the opposite of in is _____
4. extreme fear; to scream in ____
5. we use a ____ to find our way around
7. older people have lots of _____; if you work,
you gain _____
8. a person on a train or airplane is a ____
9. a person who practices law
13. the name of our planet
15. where airplanes take off and land
16. if someone is rude to you, you get ____
18. if your shoes dont ___, your feet will hurt
19. what you wear on your feet
21. if someone you love goes away you feel ___
24. something you wear when you are cold
25. it wont fit if it isnt the right ____
26. the opposite of under is _____

New Dynamic English

3. Comparisons
Price and Quality; Three Sisters; Country Data; Four Cities; and Focus Exercises
This unit reviews and extends the language necessary to make comparisons and introduces the
vocabulary to discuss and compare product quality, date of manufacture, price, physical
descriptions of people, distance, temperature, area, and population.
In the first lesson, Price and Quality, we focus on and compare three violins: their dates of
manufacture, their prices, and their sound quality.
In the second lesson, Three Sisters, we compare the physical characteristics of three sisters:
eye color, hair length and color, their heights and weights.

their

In the third lesson, Country Data, the


focus is on the size and populations of
Australia, England, and the United States.
In the fourth lesson, Four Cities, we
compare the distances of three cities from
San Francisco, and their temperatures.
In the Focus Exercises lesson, students practice constructing sentences which include comparisons
and superlatives.
Goals
To be able to express and understand comparative data about people, products, countries, and
places.
To be able to ask questions to find the degree of difference, such as in How much warmer is it in
Sydney than in London?
Objective 1: To be able to understand and use the comparative and superlative forms of
adjectives and quantifiers.
Objective 2: To be able to use relative clauses to specify a person or object, such as The violin
which was made in 1920 ...
Objective 3: To be able to understand and talk about common units of measurement, such as
degrees Celsius, pounds, and square miles.

71

Module 6:

Unit 3, Comparisons

Learning Points
adjective phrases/clauses
The violin which was made in 1920 is the second most expensive. The one on the right is the oldest.
approximation
approximately 5,400 miles; about 7,400 miles; England has an area of just over 50,000 square miles.
In January, London is generally a little warmer than New York.
asking about price, cost, and product information
How much is the newest one? How much is the most expensive one? Which violin costs the most?
When was it made? Which one has the best...? It costs $2,000. This violin costs $3,000 more than
the one made in 1990. Which one has the best sound quality?
comparison, comparatives and superlatives
ten pounds heavier than; longer hair; much larger; Australia has the smallest population. Australia
is larger than England, but smaller than the U.S. It doesn't sound as good as the other two. Barbara is
the tallest. The violin which was made in 1920 is the second most expensive. The US is about
500,000 square miles larger than Australia. England is much smaller than Australia, but is population is
much bigger. New York is the closest to San Francisco. Mary has longer hair.
countable/uncountable amounts
how many more people; how much more expensive;

how much taller;

degree
second most expensive; least expensive; a little older;
doesnt sound as good as the other two
distance, how far
about 2,600 miles; about 2,000 miles farther away;
far is it from San Francisco to London?
-er than
$3,000 more than; ten pounds heavier than;

how much warmer

how much taller;

just over;

New York is the closest to San Francisco.

the other two;

the one in the middle

physical description (height, weight, hair color)


They are both four feet, four inches; She weighs 95 pounds. How much taller is...?
blue eyes and brown hair, but Mary has longer hair.
of the three;

How

much smaller than Australia. Mary has longer hair.

noun phrases/clauses
the one on the left; the one which was made in 1920;

reference
the other two;

much smaller,

They both have

the only one over five feet tall

size and area


It has an area of about 3 million square miles. Who is the tallest?
superlatives
newest; oldest;

the least;

the most;

the most expensive

temperature
The average temperature is 21 degrees Celsius. New York is generally the coldest. Sydney is warmer.

72

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Introduce Price and Quality in class.
superlatives.

Use the examples to review comparisons, comparatives and

Step 2: Oral Practice


In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering questions about the violins or
other products.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce Three Sisters. Put a list of physical characteristics on the board which are useful for
describing people: height, weight, hair color, skin color, age, athletic, good-looking, etc. Note that the
comparative ending -er and the superlative ending -est are only used for adjectives that are stressed on
the first syllable, such as heaviest, and that adjectives such as intelligent use the modifiers more or less,
the most or the least, etc. Have students work in pairs to practice describing and comparing people.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice
Introduce Country Data and Four Cities.
Focus on units of
measurement, such as degrees Celsius, square miles, kilometers, and
various averages. What kind of data is important to know about
currency values, GNP, stock market indices, etc.?
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice asking and answering
questions about the following topics: country sizes, populations, average
temperatures, annual rainfall, and the rate of economic growth.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 and Listening Focus 4 in the lab or at home.

Follow-up and Extension


Once the lessons have been introduced and practiced, complete two or more of the following
Classroom Activities to extend and reinforce the language. Then test the main points of the unit,
using the practice exercises as a model of items to test.
Classroom Activity 1: Picture Comparisons
Collect pictures of items that can be compared such as vehicles, dresses, musical instruments, toys, food,
appliances, people. Hold up two pictures and ask students to make sentences comparing the items:
e.g., The station wagon is bigger than the sports car. The sports car is faster than the station wagon.
After modeling in this way, pair students and ask them to write comparison sentences about two photos
you give them. By adding a third person and picture, the group can practice forming sentences with the
superlative.

73

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 2: Shopping Role Play


Have students work with a partner to write a dialog between a salesperson and a customer. The
customer should ask for something bigger, smaller, less expensive, not as heavy as, etc. The sales clerk
should try to persuade the customer to make a choice. Circulate as the students are working and give
suggestions as needed. Have the pair perform the dialog for the class.
Classroom Activity 3: Letter to the Chief
Have students write letters to their school principal, director, company boss, or city mayor and ask for
improvements. Help them to first express how things are not as good as they used to be, or as good as
the competition, or as good as at another school. Students should tell the person what needs to be done to
improve conditions, e.g., We need better roads. We need longer lunch hours. We need as many days off
as government employees have.
Classroom Activity 4: We're the Best!
Have students write ads for products, companies, stores, or cities. Suggestions:
a) Write an ad for your city. Use lots of superlatives to convince people to come there.
b) Write an ad for your favorite product or place of business. Use the technique of giving
testimonials. "I've tried all the rest and this is the best!"
Classroom Activity 5: Economic Data Comparisons
Define the following terms: unemployment rate, inflation rate, foreign exchange rate, rate of economic
growth, and population growth rate. Use the internet, newspaper or other source to find out and
compare these rates for five countries.
Classroom Activity 6: Buying Preferences
Design and conduct an interview about buying preferences. For example, when choosing an airline, a
car, a newspaper, or a computer, what factors are most important?

74

New Dynamic English

Key Sentences

Country Data

In this lesson well practice comparing things.

Let's compare the size and population of these three


countries.

Price and Quality (Violins)


Here are three violins. The one on the left is the
newest. It was made in 1990. It has a nice sound,
but it doesn't sound as good as the other two. It
costs $2,000.

Australia has a population of about 25 million


people. Australia has the smallest population. It
has an area of about 3 million square miles.
Australia is larger than England, but smaller than the
U.S. The difference in population between
Australia and England is about 25 million people.

The one in the middle was made in 1920. It has a


very nice sound. It costs $5,000. This violin
costs $3,000 more than the one made in 1990.

England is much smaller than Australia, but its


population is much bigger. England has an area of
just over 50,000 square miles. Approximately 50
million people live in England, which is more than
in Australia and less than in the U.S.

The one on the right is the oldest. It was made in


1880, more than 100 years ago. This violin is the
most expensive. It costs $50,000.
0f the three, the one made in 1880 has the best
sound quality. The violin which was made in 1920
is the second most expensive.

The U.S. has a population of about 300 million


people, five times the population of England. The
U.S. is larger than either Australia or England. It
has an area of 3.5 million square miles. The U.S.
is about 500,000 square miles larger than Australia.

Three Sisters
Here is information about three sisters: Barbara,
Susan, and Mary.

Four Cities
Max lives in San Francisco. Next January, he
would like to visit New York, London, or Sydney.
Here are the distances from San Francisco to each
city, and also the average temperature during the
month of January.
The distance between San Francisco and New York
is about 2,600 miles. In January, the average
temperature in New York is 0 degrees Celsius.
New York is generally the coldest. New York is
the closest to San Francisco.

Barbara is the oldest of the three. She is twelve


years old. Barbara is five years older than her
sisters. She is five feet, two inches tall, and she
weighs 95 pounds.

London is approximately 5,400 miles from San


Francisco. The average temperature in London is 4
degrees Celsius in January. In January, London is
generally a little warmer than New York.

Susan and Mary are twins. They were both born on


the same day. They are both seven years old.
However, Susan was born ten minutes earlier, so
Susan is a little older than Mary.

Sydney is about 7,400 miles from San Francisco.


The average temperature in Sydney is 21 degrees
Celsius in January. In January, Sydney is the
warmest of these cities. Sydney is the farthest
from San Francisco.

Barbara is the tallest. She's ten inches taller. Susan


and Mary are both ten inches shorter than Barbara.
They are both four feet, four inches. They are the
same height, but they don't weigh the same. Mary
is ten pounds heavier than Susan. Mary weighs ten
pounds more than Susan. They both have blue eyes
and brown hair, but Mary has longer hair.

Sample Questions
Which violin is the most/least expensive? Which
violin is the newest/oldest?
How much is the most expensive one? When was
the newest one made?
75

New Dynamic English

It has a [nice] sound, but it [doesnt] [sound] as


good [as] the [other] two.
However, Susan was born ten minutes [earlier], so
Susan is a [little] [older] [than] Mary.

Who is the oldest of the three sisters? Who is the


tallest? Who weighs the least? Who weighs
more, Susan or Mary? How much taller is Barbara
than Susan?
Which country has the largest population? Which
country is the smallest? How many more people
live in England than in Australia? What is the
difference in area between the U.S. and Australia?
What is the average temperature in Sydney in
January? How much warmer is it in Sydney than
in London in January? Which city is the farthest
from San Francisco? How far is it from San
Francisco to London?
Focus Exercises
The violin [which] [was] [made] in 1920 is the
second [most] expensive.
[This] [one] is [the] [least] expensive.
The [one] on [the] [left] is the [newest].
It [was] [made] in 1880, [more] [than] 100 years
[ago].
The violin [which] [was] [made] in 1920 [costs]
$5,000.
Of the [three], the [one] [made] in 1880 [has] the
[best] sound quality.
Barbara is the [oldest] of [the] [three]. She is
twelve years old.
Mary is ten [pounds] [heavier] [than] Susan.
Barbara is the [only] [one] [over] five [feet] tall.
Barbara is five [years] [older] [than] [her] sisters.
They [both] have blue [eyes] and brown hair, but
Mary has [longer] [hair].
In January, Sydney is [the] [warmest] of [these]
[cities].
Australia is [larger] [than] England, [but] [smaller]
than the US.
The [difference] in population [between] Australia
and England is about 25 [million] [people].
England is [much] [smaller] [than] Australia, but its
population is much [bigger].
The US is [about] 500,000 [square] [miles] [larger]
[than] Australia.
England has an [area] of [just] [over] 50,000
[square] miles.
The US is [larger] [than] [either] Australia or
England.

76

Module 6:

Unit 3, Comparisons

Focused Listening

Focus 3

Focus 1
Review Price and Quality and Three Sisters.
on Country Data.

Preview Price and Quality and Three Sisters. Then


focus on Price and Quality. Listen to each sentence
several times. If necessary, use the ABC button to look
at the text.

Then focus

Language Focus
Vocabulary, country data

Listening Task

Language Focus
Comparisons, reference and relative clauses:
made in 1990.

Listen for different ways to compare the data.


saying the sentences.

which was

Practice

Goals

Goal

Students will be able to use well-formed sentences to

Students learn to ask about and compare products.

describe and compare the sizes and populations of


countries.

Listening Task
Listen to how the violins are specified, described and
compared. Practice saying the sentences.

Student Follow-up
1. Ask and answer two questions about each of the three
countries.
2. Compare two or more aspects of your own country
with another country.
3. Do Practice Exercise D and E.

Student Follow-up
1. Ask and answer five questions about the three violins
or about some other products which you describe.
2. Do Practice Exercise A.

Focus 4

Focus 2

Review Three Sisters and Country Data.


Four Cities.

Review Price and Quality and focus on Three Sisters.


Listen to each sentence several times. If necessary, use
the ABC button to look at the text and use the Glossary.

Then focus on

Language Focus
comparison, quantification of differences, and units of
measurement

Language Focus
Vocabulary of physical descriptions, comparisons, units of
measurement

Listening Task
Focus on the units of measurement and how to express the
degree of difference: How much warmer is it?

Listening Task
Listen for and practice saying sentences that compare the
three sisters. Susan is a little older than Mary. Mary is
ten pounds heavier than Susan.

Goal

Students will be able to quantify comparisons:

Goal

Sydney is 5,800 miles farther from S.F. than New


York.

Students will be able to describe and compare people.


Students will learn the units of physical measurement.

Student Follow-up
1. Present each city: Sydney: Sydney is the warmest
in January. Sydney is the farthest from San
Francisco.
2. Compare the three cities with your own.
3. Do Practice Exercise F.

Student Follow-up
1. Write a physical description of yourself. Use units of
measurement.
2. Describe and compare two classmates or famous
people.
3. Do Practice Exercises B and C.

77

New Dynamic English

Focus 5
Review the first four lessons, and then do the Focus
Exercises.

Language Focus
Question and sentence construction

Listening Task
Practice saying and recording the most difficult sentences
in the Unit.

Goal

Students will be able to use well-formed sentences to


ask and answer questions about products, countries,
and people.

Student Follow-up
1. Choose a product, company, country or city, and list
its most important characteristics. How does it
compare to others?
2. Find an advertisement which describes and describes a
product. Do you think it is a good advertisement?
Why?

Focus 6
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

78

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

6(3)

1990

1920

$2,000

$5,000

(a)

(b)

Comparisons:

1880
$50,000

(c)

Exercise A

Match the violins above with the descriptions below.


Example:

Write a, b, or c.

the one on the left

1. _____ the one which was made more than 100 years ago
2. _____ the most expensive violin
3. _____ the violin that costs $3,000 more than the one made in 1990
4. _____ the violin which was made in 1990
5. _____ the one made forty years after the oldest one was made
6. _____ the oldest one
7. _____ the one in the middle
8. _____ the one that costs $2,000
9. _____ the least expensive of the three
10. _____ the second oldest of the three violins
11. _____ the one with the best sound quality
12. _____ the one that costs the least
13. _____ the violin which costs more than the one made in 1920
14. _____ the one that costs less than the violin made in 1920
15. _____ the one that costs less than $10,000 but more than $2,000

79

Module 6:

Unit 3, Comparisons

Practice Exercises
6(3)

Comparisons:

Exercise B

Write the comparative and superlative forms of these adjectives:


tall

taller, tallest

young

______________________

short

________________________

new

______________________

long

________________________

small

______________________

old

________________________

big

______________________

heavy

________________________

light

______________________

beautiful ________________________

strong

______________________

expensive ________________________

handsome

______________________

fast

difficult

______________________

________________________

6(3)

Comparisons:

Exercise C

Complete the sentences using the


comparative.
Example: Barbara is 12. Susan is 7.
Barbara is older than
Susan.

1. Susan and Mary are both four feet, four inches tall.
They are both _____________________________ Barbara.
2. Mary has ____________________ hair _________________ Susan.
3. Susan was born at 6:05. Mary was born at 6:15.
Susan was born _____________________________ Mary.
4. Barbara weighs 95 pounds. She is __________________________ Mary.
5. Mary weighs ______________ Barbara and ______________ Susan.

80

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

6(3)

Comparisons:

Exercise D

Complete the sentences with the superlative form.


Example:

Barbara is taller than Susan and Mary.

She is

the tallest.

1. The violin made in 1880 is older than the other violins.


It is

____________________________________________.

2. Barbara is heavier than Susan and Mary.


She is __________________________________________ of the three.
3. The violin made in 1880 has a nicer sound than the others.
It has ____________________________________________.
4. Australia has a smaller population than either the U.S. or England.
It has _______________________________________________ of the three countries.
5. The United States has a larger area than Australia and England.
It has _______________________________________________________.

6(3)

Comparisons:

Exercise E

Circle the correct choice.


Example:

The violin on the left is the

1. Barbara is

tall

2. Susan isnt as
3. Barbara is

taller

tall
old

/ the oldest

more than

5. Susan doesnt weigh

as much as

7. The US is

smaller

large

8. England has a

large

larger
/

as Barbara.

of the three girls.

/ the most
/

newest

than Susan.

/ the tallest

4. Barbara also weighs

6. England is much

/ the tallest

taller

older

new

the other two.

as many as

smallest

Barbara weighs.

than Australia.

than either Australia or England.

larger

population than Australia.

81

Module 6:

Unit 3, Comparisons

Practice Exercises
6(3)

Comparisons:

Exercise F

Distances
San Francisco to New York:
San Francisco to London:
San Francisco to Sydney:

2,600 miles
5,400 miles
7,400 miles

Average Temperatures in January


San Francisco:
10 C
New York:
0 C
London:
4 C
Sydney:
21 C
Complete the sentences.
Example: Sydney is

4,800 miles farther

In January, New York is

from San Francisco than New York.

four degrees colder than

London.

1. London is __________________________________ from San Francisco than New York.


2. Sydney is ________________________________ New York in January.
3. Barbara is five feet, two inches tall. Susan is four foot four.
Barbara is _______________________________________ Susan.
4. Mary is seven years old.

Barbara is twelve.

Mary is __________________________________ Barbara.


5. Violin B costs $5,000. Violin A costs $2,000.
Violin B ________________________________________ violin A.
6. Violin C was made in 1880. Violin A was made in 1990.
Violin C is ____________________________________ violin A.

82

Level III, Disc 2, Unit 4, Review Exercises

4. Review Exercises for Module 6


When Units 1-3 are completed, it is important to review the main points even while beginning to work on Module
7. The following lessons help students refocus on some of the main language points that are covered and
included in the Mastery Tests. These lessons should be done on a frequent basis.

Dictations
Dictations focus on important language at the word and phrase level. Detailed instructions for doing the
dictations can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) when you enter
the lesson. The Dictations for Module 6 are as follows:
Dictation 1

Dictation 4

1. Altogether, he has been arrested three times.


2. Each time he was arrested he had to go to jail.
3. He has been in jail three times, each time for about eight
months.
4. Altogether, he has been in jail for about two years.

1.
2.
3.
4.

Dictation 2
1. John has done a lot of travelling.
2. When he was eighteen years old, he went abroad for the
first time.
3. A year later, when he was nineteen, he went to Japan and
Korea.
4. Since then, he has gone to a different country every year.

1. The one on the left is the newest. It was made in 1990.


2. It has a nice sound, but it doesn't sound as good as the
other two.
3. The one on the right is the oldest. It was made in 1880,
more than 100 years ago.
4. Of the three, the one made in 1880 has the best sound
quality.

Dictation 3

Dictation 6

1. Jack can't find a job. Nobody will hire him.


2. Unfortunately, he doesn't have any job skills.
3. That's not surprising, however, because he hasn't done
very much.
4. He wishes he could start his life over.

1. The fastest way to travel a long distance is to go by


airplane.
2. Flying is usually more expensive than going by train.
3. A train holds more passengers than a bus.
4. A bus is an inexpensive way to travel from one place to
another.

John has written several successful books.


The first book he wrote was rejected.
He almost gave up, but he didn't. He kept on trying.
His next book was much better.

Dictation 5

Fill-Ins
This lesson reviews some of the main grammar points that have been introduced in Units 1-3, such as the passive
and present perfect forms of the verb. Detailed instructions for doing the Fill-Ins (with Speech Recognition) can
be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens (This Lesson) once you are in the Fill-Ins
lesson. Please note that the highlighted words in the answer sentences are linked to the Glossary. Sample
sentences from the Fill-Ins lesson are:
(2) He has written several books. (4) He was a top student in Hong Kong, and he was given a grant to study in the
UK. (7) The first book he wrote was rejected. (9) Unfortunately, he still hasn't met the right woman for him. (12)
Altogether, he has been arrested three times. (13) Each time he was arrested he had to go to jail. (15) He is tired of
getting into trouble, but he doesn't know what to do. (17) He wishes he could start his life over. (18) Where did
Richard live before coming to the UK? (20) Has he ever travelled abroad? (21) He used to work for a large company,
but he doesn't work there anymore. (22) Jack was arrested by the police. (24) Buses are sometimes crowded and
uncomfortable, especially during rush hour. (26) Sometimes you need a seat reservation in order to get on a train.
(27) Have you ever flown first class?

83

New Dynamic English

Speech Practice
In addition to developing oral fluency, this lesson provides a means to review and focus attention on many of the
key language points developed in Units 1-3, such as the passive, present perfect, and time phrases. Detailed
instructions for using Speech Recognition and for doing the Speech Practice lesson can be found in the Study
Guides and also in the pull-down Help Screens.
The Speech Practice lesson has four sections: Sentence Reading, Answering Questions, Sentence Repetition and
Speech Quiz. Please note that the Score for the Speech Quiz is designed so that students can try to increase their
personal scores each time they do the quiz, rather than as a test. Their scores can be found in the Study Records.

5. Video Interactions, Module 6


This lesson shows a variety of native speakers in the
following situations: Telephone Conversation; Flight
Information; At a Restaurant (2); and An Interview: Job
Experience. Students may view each scene in a
presentation mode and also an interactive mode where
students can interact with the characters through Speech
Recognition SR (or mouse click) choices.
Detailed instructions for this lesson, and also for Speech
Recognition, can be found in the Study Guides and also in
the pull-down Help Screens after you enter the lesson.
Each video scene illustrates language points that have been developed in this module. The scenes have been
designed so that they can be role-played by students. This is an excellent way to review, have fun, and
personalize the language.
(variation 2)
I need flight information please.
Flight number?
It's Flight 002 from Bangkok.
There is a Flight 002 from Hong Kong, but not from
Bangkok.
Are you sure?
There's no flight by that number from Bangkok.
What are the flight numbers from Bangkok?
Let me see. Oh, I'm sorry. That flight from Hong Kong
originated in Bangkok.
Great. Has it arrived yet?
Yes, it's just arrived at Gate 52.

Telephone Conversation
You've reached John's apartment. Please leave a message
after the beep.
John, it's me, Emily. Are you there?
Oh, hi Emily. I was hoping it was you.
Why didn't you answer the phone?
Well, I didn't do well on my exam, so I didn't feel like
talking to anybody.
Oh. Well, it's over now, so stop worrying about it. Let's
go out for dinner.
Okay! That sounds nice. Where shall we meet?

Flight Information
(variation 1)
I need flight information please.
Flight number?
It's Flight 002 from Bangkok.
That flight's been delayed about an hour.
time is 11:30.
Thanks.

At a Restaurant (2)
Have you been here before?
I've been coming here for 20 years.
Twenty years? Are you joking?
I'm serious.
Don't you ever get tired of it?
Well, I don't come here that often. Maybe two or three
times a year.

Its new arrival

84

Level II, Disc 2 Summary

You may not have much imagination, but you certainly


know what you like. I can't believe you've been coming
here for twenty years.
I hate unpleasant surprises! When I come here I know
exactly what I'm going to get.
Okay, so what do you recommend for dessert?
Are you still hungry?
No, but I feel like having some dessert, especially if it's
good.
Then I recommend their cheesecake. It's really good.
Okay, I'll try it.

An Interview:

Job Experience

Okay, now I'm going to ask about your job experience.


Sure.
How long have you been working at your present job?
I started about a year ago.
What were you doing before that?
I was working at an advertising company.
That sounds interesting. Why did you change jobs?
I wanted more responsibility, and I was tired of designing
packages.
Oh, how long did you do that?
I designed packages for more than five years!
Yes, I can see why you wanted to change jobs.

85

Module 6 Summary

Module 6 Summary - New Dynamic English 3


Basic Vocabulary through New Dynamic English, Module 6:

Approx. 1,500 words

Regular verbs
(1) Life Experience
arrest
contribute
decide
die
earn
enjoy
finish*
follow
have*
have to
help*
hire
hope*
kick out
like*
live*
look for
offer
reject
return*

(2) Matrix Vocabulary

start*
study*
travel
try
want
wish
wonder*
work*

arrive*
borrow
carry
charge
commute
control
cry
dance
earn*
enter*
explore
fail
fix
have*
have to*
help*
laugh
like*
listen*
look at

love*
need*
operate
pay
play
prefer
protect
require*
return*
shop*
smile
stay*
solve
study*
travel*
try*
want*
watch*
work*

(3) Comparisons
compare
like
live
practice
sound
visit*
weigh

Irregular Verbs, their Past Tense and Past Participle forms


V

Lessons

V(d) Past

be*
become*
bring*
build
buy*
catch*
come*
cost
do*
feel
find*
fly*
get*
get+adj*
get on
give*
give up

(1,2,3)
(1)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(1,2)
(1)
(2,3)
(1,2)
(2)
(1)
(2)
(1,2)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(1)

was/were
became
brought
built
bought
caught
came
cost
did
felt
found
flew
got
got+adj
got on
gave
gave up

86

V(n) Participle
been
become
brought
built
bought
caught
come
cost
done
felt
found
flown
gotten/got
gotten+adj/got+adj
gotten on/got on
given
given up

Level II, Disc 2 Summary

Continued...

Irregular Verbs, their Past Tense and Past Participle forms (cont.)
go*
hold*
keep*
keep on*
know*
lose*
make*
meet*
put on
quit
read*
see*
speak*
stand
steal
take*
take off
teach*
tell*
think*
wear
write*

(1,2)
(2)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(1,2)
(2)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(2)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1,2)
(2)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(2)
(1)

went
held
kept
kept on
knew
lost
made
met
put on
quit
read
saw
spoke
stood
stole
took
took off
taught
told
thought
wore
wrote

* verbs introduced in previous lessons

87

gone
held
kept
kept on
known
lost
made
met
put on
quit
read
seen
spoken
stood
stolen
taken
taken off
taught
told
thought
worn
written

New Dynamic English

Answer Key for Practice Exercises


5 (1) On a Trip: Practice Exercise A
1. had 2. arrived 3. been 4. come
On a Trip: Practice Exercise B
1. Yes, she did. 2. Yes, she has.

5. came

3.

6. been

Yes, it has.

7. met

4.

8. gotten/got married

No, it didnt.

9. arrived

10. had

5. Yes, it was.

On a Trip: Practice Exercise C


1. came; came 2. interviewed; have kept in touch; have written

3.

got; has been; has visited; visited; came

On a Trip: Practice Exercise D


1. until 2. since
3. for

4.

ago

7.

for

On a Trip: Practice Exercise E


1. i 2. l
3. g
4.
a

5.

5.

6.

On a Trip: Practice Exercise F


1. already 2. already 3. yet
4. ever
11. ever
12. yet, already

until

e.

5. still

7.

6.

in

8.

6. yet, still

9.

7. ago.

8.

since

10.

9.

for/in

10.

for

8. never

9. ago

10. still, yet

5 (2) Energy Sources: Practice Exercise A


1. We use electricity to light our homes. 2. We need energy for light. 3. When its cold we need energy for
heat.
4. When we want to travel we need energy for transportation. 5. Fossil fuels are an important source of energy.
6. We burn fossil fuels such as coal to generate electricity. 7. The sun is another source of energy.
8. Solar cells can convert sunlight directly into electricity. 9. Solar energy is still expensive and underdeveloped.
10. Wind power is also a safe source of energy.
Energy Sources: Practice Exercise B
Fossil Fuels: oil; tanker; natural gas; gasoline; coal; cars; air pollution
Hydroelectric Power: dams; rivers; falling water
Nuclear Power: reactor; radiation
Energy Sources: Practice Exercise C
1. c
2. d
3. j
4. e
5. a
Energy Sources: Practice Exercise D
1. cause 2. result 3. cause 4.
cause

6.

cause

5.

7.

result

Energy Sources: Practice Exercise E


1. are burned 2. are used 3. are killed/are being killed

8.

6. cause

4.

9.

7.

is caused

10.

cause

5.

8.

cause

9.

result

10.

is converted

Energy Sources: Practice Exercise F


The energy of falling water is converted into electricity. 2. Waste gases are produced by the burning of fossil fuels.
3. Air pollution is caused by the burning of fossil fuels. 4. Sunlight is converted into electricity by solar cells. 5.
Fossil fuels are burned to generate electricity. 6. Many of our forests are being cut down or burned.
7. The number of dams must be limited. 8. Carbon dioxide is converted into oxygen by plants. The rate of
global warming will be reduced by protecting our forests. 10. Large oil tankers are used to transport oil across the
oceans.
5 (3) Directions: Practice Exercise A
1. go west; to the intersection; of the intersection 2. go past; on your left
4. at the corner; of the block 5. in the middle; across the street

88

3.

go to; half a block; on your right

Answer Key

Series of
Directions: Practice Exercise B
See the Key Sentences
Directions: Practice Exercise C
1. second; middle 2. middle/center; center

3.

right

6 (1) Life Experience: Practice Exercise A


has taught; was; worked; came; was given;
lived

4.

decided;

right; bottom

wanted;

5.

lower

was going;

6.

got married;

third; top

have;

have

Life Experience: Practice Exercise B


1. Richard used to live in Hong Kong, but now he lives in England.
2. His girlfriend came to London to get a
job as a model. 3. Richard enjoys/likes living in England and he likes/enjoys teaching.
Life Experience: Practice Exercise C
has written; have been; is writing; likes;
Life Experience: Practice Exercise D
1. Since 2. for
3. ago; after 4.

has travelled;

For

5.

went;

went;

has gone;

is getting;

get;

hasnt met

ago; after

Life Experience: Practice Exercise E


1.
Jack has been arrested three times. 2. Jack was caught and put in jail. 3. Johns first book was rejected
(by the publishers). 4. Richard was given a (government) grant to study in the UK. 5. That was the first time he
was arrested.
Life Experience: Practice Exercise F
1. still
2. still
3. yet
4. anymore

5.

6 (2) Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise A


1. f
2. b
3. a
4. i
5. c
6. h
Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise B
1. h
2. f
3. a
4. g
5. d
6.

still

7.

7.

6.

still

7.

8.

9.

10.

8.

9.

10.

10.

Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise C


1. d; h
2. i
3. d; f 4. a
5. e; i

6.

7.

8.

Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise D


1. g
2. e
3. h 4. d
5. c
6.

7.

8.

9. a

g; c

7.

Matrix Vocabulary: Practice Exercise E


1. i
2. b
3. l 4. f
5. e 6.

89

anymore

8.

j; a/k

9.

10.

9. h

8.

10.

already

New Dynamic English

t
l

Matrix Vocabulary Crossword

s
a

n
c

6 (3) Comparison: Practice Exercise A


1. c
2. c 3. b 4. a 5. b
6.
c
14. a
15. b

7.

8.

9.

10.

a
r
i

o
e

a
p

r
s

c
h

p
e

t
m
h

e
a

11.

12.

13.

Comparison: Practice Exercise B


short/shorter/shortest; long/longer/longest; old/older/oldest; heavy/heavier/heaviest; beautiful/more beautiful/most
beautiful; expensive/more expensive/most expensive; fast/faster/fastest; young/younger/youngest;
new/newer/newest; small/smaller/smallest; big/bigger/biggest; light/lighter/lightest; strong/stronger/strongest;
handsome/handsomer/handsomest; difficult/more difficult/most difficult
Comparison: Practice Exercise C
1. shorter than 2. longer; than 3.
more than
Comparison: Practice Exercise D
1. the oldest 2. the heaviest
3.
Comparison: Practice Exercise E
1. taller
2. tall
3. the oldest

ten minutes earlier than

the nicest sound.

4.

more than

4.

4.

(thirty pounds) heavier than

the smallest population

5. as much as

6. smaller

Comparison: Practice Exercise F


1. 2,800 miles farther 2. 21 degrees warmer than
3. ten inches taller than
5. costs $3,000 more than 6. a hundred years older than

90

5.

7.

4.

5.

less than;

the largest area

larger

8.

larger

five years younger than

New Dynamic English


Level 4:

Modules 7 & 8

Instructors Guide

The Smart Way to English

Version 2.5

Copyright 1998-2013, DynEd International, Inc.


www.dyned.com

October, 2013

New Dynamic English

Table of Contents
Scope and Sequence, Level 4............................ 3
Module 8 Lesson Map....................................... 47
Introduction to Level 4...................................... 5
1. A Secret Code ............................................. 48
Module 7 Lesson Map ...................................... 6

Learning Points .......................................... 49


Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 50
Key Sentences ............................................ 51
Focused Listening....................................... 54
Practice Exercises....................................... 56

1. Life Choices ............................................... 8


Learning Points .......................................... 9
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 10
Key Sentences ............................................ 12
Focused Listening ...................................... 15
Practice Exercises ...................................... 17

2. Matrix Vocabulary ..................................... 60


Learning Points .......................................... 61
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 62
Key Sentences ............................................ 64
Focused Listening....................................... 67
Practice Exercises....................................... 69

2. Epidemic .................................................... 22
Learning Points .......................................... 23
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 24
Key Sentences ............................................ 26
Focused Listening ...................................... 29
Practice Exercises ...................................... 31

3.

3. UFOs:

Space and Time Sequences ........................ 34


Learning Points .......................................... 35
Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 36
Key Sentences ............................................ 38
Focused Listening ...................................... 40
Practice Exercises ...................................... 42

4.

For and Against ........................... 76

Learning Points .......................................... 77


Classroom Activities and Extension ........... 78
Key Sentences ............................................ 80
Focused Listening....................................... 83
Practice Exercises....................................... 85

4. Review Exercises ....................................... 89


Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises

Review Exercises ....................................... 43


Dictations
Fill-Ins
Speech Practice Exercises .......................... 44

5. Video Interactions w/SR ............................ 90


Telephone for Business
Friends on the Telephone
UFO Interview
Press Conference

5. Video Interactions w/SR ............................ 44


Telephone for Business
Telephone Invitation
Interview with an Actor
Dinner Conversation
Hot Seats

Module 8 Summary ........................................... 91


Answer Key....................................................... 93

Module 7 Summary ........................................... 45

Scope and Sequence:

Module 7 & 8

Scope and Sequence, Module 7


Module 7, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

Life Choices
Harrys Accident
Joans Challenge
Joes Cafe
Sandras Dilemma
Question Practice w/SR
Focus on Conditionals

Conditionals: Contrary-to-fact, Present, and


Future (if, unless, had)
Logical Relations between events (because,
even though, not unless, if, had to)
Past Habitual (used to, could, would)
Cause/Effect Sequences and Relations
Modals (will, would, might, could) in
conditionals
Necessity, have to, in Conditionals
Passives (hadnt been injured)
Wh-questions and making Conditionals

Epidemic
Our Changing Lives
Fighting Infections
The Adaptability of Life
Preparing for Our Future
Sentence Reordering

Classification and Exemplification (such as,


Students learn to listen for the
other kinds of, one type, another example)
main ideas or for specific.
Present Perfect tense to express Result (have
information in a presentation.
made it easier)
Students learn how to link and
Potentiality and Past Ability (can/could)
organize sentences in a
(you can still live, an epidemic could...)
presentation.
Logical Relations and Sentence Connecting
Develops vocabulary related
(therefore, these, also, as a result, another)
to health and other global
Adjective clauses (which, that)
issues.
Passives w/Perfect tenses, be used+infinitive

3.

Space and Time


Sequences
Presentation
Speaking Practice w/SR
Space Game
Time Game

Specification (neither of them, on either side, Students learn to follow


one of them)
instructions involving
conditions and sequences.
Conditional Action (not unless, if, so that)
and Problem Solving
Focuses on spatial
relationships, time sequences,
Qualifiers if, except for
conditional action, and
Past Perfect tense (still hadnt arrived)
specification/exception.
Time Sequence (by the time that, not until,
Features click and drag games.
when, while, as, adverb clauses, etc.)

4.

Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review grammar and vocabulary
with a special emphasis on Conditionals.
Develops oral fluency and reading skills.

Reviews the language of Units


1-3, focusing on key points
such as conditionals, verb
tenses, and modals.

5.

Video Interactions
w/SR
Telephone for Business
Telephone Invitation
Interview with an Actor
Dinner Conversation
Hot Seats

Making Requests, Giving Advice,


Speculating, and use of the Telephone for
business.
Negative Questions (cant you come) and
Tag Questions (you can, cant you?)
Students develop oral fluency through
Speech Recognition activities.

Students learn how to make


polite requests, suggestions,
and refusals over the
telephone and in a friendly
conversation.

1.

2.

Students learn to make


predictions and suppositions
based on real and contrary-tofact conditions.
Develop language for decision
making, linking events, and
for giving reasons.

New Dynamic English

Scope and Sequence, Module 8


Module 8, Unit

Main Learning Points

Comments

The Secret Code


Setting a Trap
The Suspects
The Investigation
Guilty or Not Guilty?
Focus Exercises

Adverb and Noun clauses (that someone


had gotten in, when the files were opened) Students examine evidence
and draw conclusions as they
Past Possibilities (may have opened the
try to solve a mystery.
drawer)
This unit follows up 7(1)
Past Conditionals (if she went to the office,
which also focuses on
she couldnt have)
Conditionals.
Modals and Degrees of Certainty and
Important language for
Logical Necessity (must have, could have,
problem-solving, and for
may have)
giving reasons.
Making Conditionals and Past Inferences

Matrix Vocabulary
Historical Figures
A World Timeline
News Events
Great Accomplishments
Regions of the World
Matrix Game

Vocabulary related to global issues,


history, trends and news events
Adjective, Adverb and Noun clauses (She
succeeded to the throne when she was 17
years old.)
Adjective phrases (Winner of the Nobel
Peace Prize, Nelson Mandela)
Gerunds and Infinitives (with some parts
getting no rainfall, too hot for matter to
exist)

3.

UFOs: For and


Against
Presentation
For or Against?
Drakes Equation
Rulers and Clocks
Sentence Reordering

Citing Evidence, Reason, and


Argumentation (according to, given the
fact that, it has been well established)
Students learn to analyze an
Logical Necessity, Degrees of Certainty
argument.
(impossibility, unlikely, must accept the
fact, not unreasonable, might have)
This innovative lesson focuses
Speculations, Implied Conditionals (it
on the building of arguments
would mean that..., they might have
and counter arguments.
discovered)
Qualification and Logical Connectors
Builds note-taking and
(however, even if, this means, just, only, on
summarization skills.
the contrary, otherwise, as a result)
Sentence Ordering and Pronoun Reference
(it, this means, this, as a result, such a)

4.

Review Exercises
Dictations
Fill-Ins w/SR
Speech Practice w/SR

Gap-filling and Speech Recognition


exercises review grammar and vocabulary
with an emphasis on Conditionals and
Inferences.
Develops fluency and reading skills.

5.

Video Interactions w/SR


Giving Advice, Speculating, and use of the Provides a model for roleTelephone for Business
Telephone.
Friends on the Telephone
plays and for being
UFO Interview
interviewed.
Implied conditionals
Press Conference

1.

2.

Extends vocabulary in subject


areas necessary for academic
and general studies.
Oral and written follow-up
assignments build presentation
skills.

These lessons review Units 13 and focus on key points such


as Conditionals, Verb Tenses,
and Modals.

Introduction to Level 4

Introduction to Level 4
New Dynamic English Modules 7 & 8 (Level 4) prepare students to use English to express abstract ideas
and logical relationships. This abstract focus is necessary for problem solving, making hypotheses and
logical inferences, and participating in discussions about the news and general issues of importance.
The language studied at this level provides a broad foundation for specialized content studies and for
using English for business and social situations.
The focus throughout is on the language of critical thinking, the logical sequencing of ideas, and the
building of a strong vocabulary. At the completion of Level 4, students will have a strong enough base
in English to allow for successful studies in a wide range of subject areas, including social studies,
business, and technology. Students will also be ready to prepare for language tests such as the TOEFL,
TOEIC, and Cambridge examinations.

Content for Level 4


The material presented in Level 4 provides the basis for 40-60 hours of study, depending on the language
background of the students.
This estimate assumes that the language presented in each level is used as a model that is systematically
extended and personalized in classroom activities and follow-up assignments as suggested in this manual.
The usual order is as follows:
1. Preview each lesson with a focus on general comprehension.
2. Analyze and practice the language in each lesson with a focus on the key language structures.
3. Extend and personalize the content of each lesson via student generated language, including roleplays, oral reports, written reports, and group activities.
4. Review and test.

General Language Specifications for Level 4


New Dynamic English Levels 1-4 develop a strategic spoken vocabulary of over 2,500 high-frequency
words that provide a strong foundation for academic study, business, and daily conversation.
Level 4 covers intermediate and advanced language structures required to understand and express the
conceptual content in a wide range of subjects and develops all four skills areas: listening, speaking,
reading, and writing. In addition, the video lessons provide useful language models for the telephone
and for other social situations.

Detailed Language Specifications for Level 4


The language focus for Level 4 is on critical thinking, inference, conditionals, degrees of certainty, cause
and effect (past, present, future, real/unreal), speculation, logical relations, sentence linking devices, and
other language used in support of decision-making, problem-solving, theorizing, and arguing a point.
There are also lessons which focus on active listening, summarizing, and sentence ordering, to help
students understand the logical structure of paragraphs and simple arguments.
Key language structures include the modals and conditionals (real/unreal), qualifiers (unless, except,
neither, etc.), relative clauses, complex passives, degree (too, enough, as far as possible), time sequences
(e.g., not until, while, when, by the time...), and the past perfect. Please see the Scope and Sequence
chart for a summary of the main language points for each unit.
The vocabulary focus throughout is on preparing students to discuss global issues, trends and news
events, from the election of presidents to the burning of the Amazon rain forests and the dangers of a
global epidemic. In the Matrix Vocabulary, Unit 8(2), students study a timeline of Earths history, from
the birth of the universe to the present day.

New Dynamic English

Module 7 Lesson Map


Unit 1:

Life Choices
Harrys Accident
Joans Challenge
Joes Caf
Sandras Dilemma
Question Practice w/SR
Focus Exercises

Unit 2:

Epidemic
Our Changing Lives
Fighting Infections
The Adaptability of Life
Preparing for the Future
Sentence Reordering Exercise

Unit 3:

Space and Time Sequences


Presentation
Speech Practice w/SR
Space Game
Time Game

Unit 4:

Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Conditionals
Speech Quiz

Unit 5:

Video Interactions w/SR


Telephone for Business
Telephone Invitation
Interview with an Actor
Dinner Conversation
Hot Seats

Module 7:

Unit 1, Life Choices

1. Life Choices
Harrys Accident; Joans Challenge; Joes Cafe; Sandras Dilemma; Question
Practice; and Focus on Conditionals

This unit focuses on decisions and their consequences, both real and imaginary. In Harrys
Accident, Joans Challenge, Joes Caf, and Sandras Dilemma, the language models are
presented, with comprehension checks. When these four lessons have been studied, students
should do the Question Practice lesson, which uses Speech Recognition and the Focus on
Conditionals lesson which gives students practice constructing conditionals which follow from a
set of facts. The two support-lessons should be done frequently -- until the Completion
Percentage is 80% or more -- while students continue to practice and review the language in the
four main lessons.
Goals:
To be able to speculate about or predict the consequences of a series of events.
To be able to explain why and how an event in the past, present, or future leads to another.
To contrast factual, imaginary, and predicted outcomes of an event.
To be able to make predictions with different degrees of certainty.
Objective 1: To understand and express different degrees of logical connection between events
in the past, present, and future, using the modals (would, could, might, will, may, etc.), and logical
connectives such as as a result, even though, and unless.
Objective 2:
structures:

To understand and express contrary-to-fact conditionals, using the following two


If + subj. + had+V(n) --> subj. + (d)modal + have+V(n)
Had + subj. + V(n) --> subj. + (d)modal + have+V(n).

Objective 3: To understand and express conditional predictions with different degrees of certainty
and reality, such as:
If + subj. +V --> subj. + modal + V (more likely)
If + subj. + V(d) --> subj. + (d)modal + V (less likely).

New Dynamic English

Learning Points
conditional, likely/unlikely
If + subj. + V real prediction, If + subj. + V(d) unlikely speculation
If she sells/sold the company, the new owners will/would control it. If he is/were lucky, he might
make enough to retire. If Sandra refuses/refused their offer, the other company will/would compete
against her. If they compete/competed against her, she will/would have to work harder. If they
decide/decided to, they could even let her go.
conditional, unreal/imaginary
If + subj. + V(d) speculation; If + subj. + had+V(n) speculation;
Had + subj. V(n) speculation
If you were Sandra, what would you do? If they didnt like the way she runs the company, they
wouldnt want her to stay. If the car hadnt been going too fast, it wouldnt have gone out of control.
If Joes prices had been lower, he might not have lost so much business. Joes business might have
survived had the factory not had to lay off workers.
have to / compulsion (have to, let happen)
He has to use a wheelchair. She had to pay for food and rent. The factory had to lay off workers.
If they compete against her, shell have to work harder. She can sell the company and let them control
it. Shes sure they would force her to make changes. Since then, he has had to use a wheelchair.
logical relations (as a result, because of, even though, in spite of, instead of, since, unless)
Since Joan was looking for a challenge, she decided to apply. In spite of his injury, Harry has gone
ahead with his life. As a result of the accident, Harry almost died. Unless she agrees to stay on, they
wont buy her business.
modals with past real meaning (would, could)
When he was a young man, he could run very fast. Instead of thinking about the things he couldnt do,
he focused on what he could do. She wanted a job that would be challenging. She was confident that
she would do well.
modals with unreal or unlikely meaning (would, could, might)
Though Harry wishes he could walk, he is looking forward to the future. He wonders what might have
happened had he not been injured. If hes lucky, he might make enough to retire. If they decide to,
they could even let her go. They could also decide to lay off some of her employees. If she sold the
business, she would never know what she could have done.
passives with modals (will be forced to close, wouldnt have been injured)
If he hadnt been running near a road, he wouldnt have been hit by a car.
passives (was hit by a car, was bought, had been offered, were paid)
He has to use a wheelchair because he was injured in an accident. What happened to the travel agency?
It was bought by another company.
past habitual used to
Harry used to be a runner. Joan used to work at a travel agency. What happened to the travel agency
where she used to work? Where did Joan use to work?

Module 7:

Unit 1, Life Choices

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Begin with Harrys Accident. Present the first part of the lesson in class, or
have the students go through the lesson on their own. Focus on Logical
Relations and contrary-to-fact Conditionals.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students discuss and summarize portions of the
lesson. In a large class, have the students piece together the lesson and put the
summary on the board.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Present Joans Challenge, and review contrary-to-fact Conditionals, with new examples.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.

Repeat the above series of steps for Joes Caf and Sandras Dilemma.
Follow-up
Once the presentation lessons of the unit have been presented, introduce the Question Practice and Focus
on Conditionals lessons. Students should do these on their own, once or twice each study session. As
homework, assign the Practice Exercises. When students have a Completion Percentage of at least 80%
for the entire unit, they should take the Mastery Test.

Language Extension
Once the unit is mastered, have the students personalize the language with two or more of the following
classroom activities. If further preparation is necessary, have the students work in pairs or groups first.
At this level it is especially important to follow up the lessons with written exercises as a way to reinforce
and extend the language.
Classroom Activity 1: Present (orally or written) a series of past events in your (or someone else's) life,
where one event led to another.
Example 1: Parents got a new job --> We moved to another city --> I changed schools and met new friends
Example 2: Watched the Olympics --> became interested in skiing --> started skiing --> won the national
championship

In the above series of events, explain how the events were connected and how strongly they were connected.
Example 3: Even if my parents hadn't gotten a new job, we might still have moved to another city.
Example 4: She might have become interested in skiing even without watching the Olympics. She couldn't
have won the national championship without knowing how to ski.

Classroom Activity 2:

Answer the question:

If you had three wishes, what would they be, and why?

New Dynamic English

Classroom Activity 3: Think of a decision you have to make about the future. Give reasons for and
against deciding one way or the other.
Classroom Activity 4: Research Assignment
Choose a historical figure and focus on an important decision they made that affected you or your country.
Explain why you agree or disagree with their decision.
Classroom Activity 5:

Complete each of the following sentences, and then explain.

a: One of the best decisions I ever made was when I....


b: One of the most difficult choices Ill have to make in the future is

10

Module 7:

Unit 1, Life Choices

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)

Since Joan was looking for a challenge, she decided


to apply.

Harrys Accident

Within a week she had been offered the job. She


wasnt sure whether she should take it or not
because of the low salary. A friend advised her to
take a higher paying job with a larger company.
But Joan liked the idea of working her way up in a
small company. She was confident that she would
do well and that she could help it grow. Its
products were good, and there was increasing
interest in health foods.

Harry used to be a runner. Then, one day while


running alongside a road, he was hit by a car. The
car was going too fast and had gone out of control.
As a result of the accident, Harry almost died from a
serious injury. Since then, he hasnt been able to
walk, and he has had to use a wheelchair.
In spite of his injury, Harry hasnt let it stop him
from going ahead with his life. After his injury,
instead of thinking about all the things he couldnt
do, he focused on what he could do. He realized
that there are many interesting possibilities for
someone who cant walk.

Now, after much hard work, shes a vice-president


at Ace Health. Since she joined the company, it
has more than doubled in size. Joan looks forward
to each day and feels proud of her accomplishments.
Shes glad she made the decision she did. If she
hadnt taken a chance, she thinks things wouldnt
have turned out the way they have.

One of the things he became interested in was


foreign languages. Every day he listened to tapes
and read books, and he found he was very good at
learning languages. After several years he became
fluent in five languages. Then he started working
as a translator.

Joes Caf
Joe used to run a little coffee shop. Business was
good and his shop was busy because it was near a
factory. The factory workers often came there for
coffee and something to eat.

Now he works full time for a translation company.


He and a group of friends are even thinking of
starting their own company.

Then two things happened. First, another coffee


shop opened across the street. This hurt Joes
business because some of his customers went to the
other shop. The other coffee shops prices were
lower because its workers were paid less.

Though Harry wishes he could walk, he is looking


forward to the future. Sometimes, when looking
back on his life, he wonders what might have
happened had he not been injured. He misses
being able to walk or run. But at least he is able to
live on his own and do things that he enjoys. He
thinks there is much to be thankful for.

Second, and more serious, the factory began to lay


off workers. It was forced to reduce its operations
because of its high levels of pollution.

Joans Challenge

It wasnt long before the number of customers had


dropped by more than half. At that point, Joe was
forced to close the business he had run for twenty
years. Now hes trying to decide what to do next.

Joan used to work at a travel agency. She helped


people plan trips and arranged for their hotels and
transportation. She worked there for several years
and was promoted several times for her hard work.

One possibility he is considering is to open up


another shop in another place. Another choice is to
take a friends advice and invest all of his money in
the stock market. If hes lucky, he might make
enough to retire. On the other hand, if his
investments were to fail, he could lose everything.
Hes not sure if he should take the risk.

Unfortunately, the agency she was working for was


bought by another company. As a result, her job
was eliminated.
At first she was depressed. She had to pay for food
and rent, but she had no money coming in. She
needed a job, but not just any job. She wanted a
job that would be challenging.

Sandras Dilemma

After applying for several jobs, she saw an ad in the


newspaper. The ad was for a job at a small health
food company. The pay wasnt very good, but it
looked like a company with a promising future.

Sandra has her own business, a small printing


company. She started it more than ten years ago.
Its a growing business, and her clients are happy
with her work. She prints posters, brochures and
11

New Dynamic English

What happened while he was running near a road?


Why did the car go out of control? Why cant
Harry walk? Why does Harry have to use a
wheelchair? How long has Harry been unable to
walk? What did Harry focus on after his injury?
Because of his injury, what could Harry have done?
What did he realize? What is something he found
he could do? What is one reason he could become
a translator? What couldnt he have done if he
hadnt studied foreign languages? What does
Harry miss being able to do? What is something
Harry can be thankful for?

books. She enjoys her work, and she takes pride in


what she has accomplished.
Now another company has offered her a lot of
money to buy her business. They even want her to
stay on and work for them. In fact, if she wont
stay on for at least a year, they wont buy her
business. They like the way she runs her business.
On the other hand, they would like to cut costs and
make the business even more profitable. Shes
sure they would force her to make changes.
Sandra has a choice. She can sell the company and
let them control it. Or she can keep the business
and run it herself.

Where did Joan use to work? Why did Joan lose


her job? Why was Joans job eliminated? What
happened to the travel agency where she used to
work? Why was she depressed? What kind of
job did she want? How did she find out about the
job at the health food company? What job was
being advertised? Why did she apply for the job?
Why wasnt she sure if she should take the job?

If she sells the company, she worries what might


happen to her employees. She doesnt want to sell
unless she knows her employees can keep their jobs.
If she refuses their offer, the other company will
compete against her. They will open a new
printing company nearby. If they compete against
her, shell have to work harder. Theres even a
chance her company will fail and be forced to close.
On the other hand, she will be her own boss. She
also has many loyal customers who are pleased with
the quality of her work.

Who used to come to Joes for coffee and something


to eat? Would business have been as good if there
hadnt been a factory nearby? How did the other
coffee shop hurt Joes business? How did the
other coffee shops prices compare to Joes? Why
did the factory have to begin laying off workers?
What advice would you give to Joe? Why
shouldnt he invest all his money in the stock
market? What is he trying to decide? Besides
investing in the stock market, what is he considering? Why cant he retire right now? What
would happen if he invested in the stock market and
stock prices went down?

If Sandra accepts their offer, the other company will


pay her a high salary. She will also have a ten
percent share of the larger company. On the other
hand, if they own the company, they will make the
big decisions. If they decide to, they could even let
her go. They could also decide to lay off some of
her employees.

Who owns a small printing company? Why does


the other company want her to stay? If she sells
the company, who will control it? Who will run
the company if she refuses to sell it? What might
happen if she refuses to sell? If Sandra sells her
company, who will make the big decisions?

If you were Sandra, what would you do?


She is probably going to refuse their offer. She
enjoys running the business, and she wants to see
how well she can do. Unless she keeps the
business, shell never know what she could have
done on her own. If she sold the business, she
would never know what she could have done on her
own. She would also feel bad if her employees lost
their jobs.

Fact/Conditional Summary
He was hit by a car while running alongside a road.
If he hadnt been running near a road he wouldnt
have been hit by a car.
It went out of control because it was going too fast.
If the car hadnt been going too fast, it wouldnt
have gone out of control.
He cant walk because he was injured in an
accident.
If he hadnt been injured, he could walk.

If you were one of Sandras employees, what would


you advise her to do?
Question Summary
What did Harry used to be? What wouldnt have
happened had he not been running near a road?

12

Module 7:

Unit 1, Life Choices

Her business wouldnt be growing if her clients


werent happy.
Her business is growing because her clients are
happy.
If her clients werent happy her business wouldnt
grow.
They like the way Sandra runs the company, so they
want her to stay.
If they didnt like the way she runs the company,
they wouldnt want her to stay.
They wont buy her company unless she agrees to
stay.
If she doesnt agree to stay, they wont buy her
company.
The other company wont compete against her
unless she refuses to sell.
If she refuses to sell, the other company will
compete against her.

He has to use a wheelchair because he was injured


in an accident.
He wouldnt have to use a wheelchair if he hadnt
been injured.
He learned a foreign language. As a result, he
became a translator.
He couldnt have become a translator if he hadnt
learned a foreign language.
She lost her job because the agency she worked for
was bought by another company.
She wouldnt have lost her job if the agency
hadnt been bought by another company.
Her job was eliminated because another company
bought the agency.
Her job wouldnt have been eliminated had
another company not bought the agency.
She was depressed because she had lost her job.
She wouldnt have been depressed had she not lost
her job.
Since Joan was looking for a challenge, she decided
to apply.
If she hadnt been looking for a challenge, she
wouldnt have decided to apply.
She applied for the job because she wanted a
challenge.
If she hadnt wanted a challenge, she wouldnt
have applied for the job.
Since she joined the company, it has more than
doubled in size.
If she hadnt joined the company, it might not
have doubled in size.
Joes shop was doing well until the other coffee
shop opened.
If the other coffee shop hadnt opened, Joes
coffee shop might still be doing well.
He was losing money, so he had to close his shop.
If he hadnt been losing money, he wouldnt have
had to close his shop.
He doesnt have enough money, so he cant retire.
If he had enough money, he could retire.
He wont lose money unless the stock market goes
down.
Hell lose money if stock prices go down.
Her business is growing because shes doing a good
job.
Her business wouldnt be growing if she werent
doing a good job.
Her business wouldnt be growing unless her clients
were happy.

13

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening

Student Follow-up
1.

Focus 1
Focus on Harry and Joan. Listen for the connecting
phrases that express causal relationships between two
events or situations.

2.

Harry can't walk because he was injured.


Harry was able to work as a translator because he was
fluent in five languages.
The agency she was working for was bought by another
company. As a result, her job was eliminated.
She wasn't sure whether she should take the job or not
because of the low pay.

Focus 3
Language Focus
Expressing likely and unlikely assumptions about the
future.

Goal

Listening Task

To become familiar with different ways to connect


events. Some events are causally linked, and other
events are linked only in a time sequence.

Focus on Joe. Listen to the sentences that describe what


will happen in the future if he decides to invest all of his
money in the stock market. Note how different
conditionals are used to express likely and unlikely
assumptions.
[likely]: If + subj. + V -> subj. + modal/(d)modal + V
[less likely]: If + subj. + V(d) ->subj. + (d)modal + V

Student Follow-up
1. List three connected events in Harrys life, and then in
Joans life. Is one event the cause of the other? If
yes, indicate which event is the cause of the other.
2. Are there any events that are not causally connected to
any other? How are they connected?
Harry was injured in an accident. He was good at
learning languages.

If his investments fail, he could lose everything.


If his investments failed/were to fail, he could lose
everything.

Goal

Focus 2

Students will understand when a supposition (if) is


considered more or less likely to happen.

Language Focus

Student Follow-up

Speculating about what could have happened in the past,


but didnt.

Present a plan that depends on the weather. Use


conditionals to express likely and unlikely changes.

Listening Task

If it doesnt rain, well be able to play tennis. We can


also go swimming. On the other hand, if it rained, we
could all go to a movie or visit a museum.

Focus on Harry and Joan. Study the sentences that


describe what could have happened in the past (but
didn't). (Harry could have felt sorry for himself.)
Note the use of these two conditional structures:
1.
2.

Describe a recent event that could have had a


different outcome.
Had I gotten up earlier at 7:00, I wouldnt have
been late to the meeting.
Write a paragraph about something you didnt do, but
wish you had, and give reasons.
I wish I had studied English more seriously. If I
had, I might have gotten a better job.

Focus 4

If + subj. + had + (not) + V(n) --->


subj. + V(d) modal + (not) + have+V(n)
Had + subj. + (not) + V(n) -->
subj. + V(d) modal + (not) + have+V(n)

Language Focus
Expressing degrees of certainty and necessary conditions
for something to happen in the future.

If he had not been injured, he wouldnt have had to use a


wheelchair.
Had he not studied hard and learned five languages,
Harry wouldn't have been able to become a translator.

Listening Task
Focus on Sandra. Listen carefully as Sandra considers the
future consequences of selling and not selling her
company. The use of will rather than would//might
/could indicates a greater certainty that an event will
happen if a condition is met. Unless is used to indicate
that a situation will occur only if certain conditions are
met. Unless means if . . . not in most cases.
If Sandra refuses their offer, the other company will
compete against her.
Unless she accepts their offer, the other company will
compete against her.

Goal
Students will not confuse contrary-to-fact
speculations with factual statements.

14

Module 7:

Unit 1, Life Choices

If she refused their offer, she'd have to work harder.


Unless she agrees to stay on for a year, they won't buy
her business.

Student Follow-up
1. Use conditionals to speculate on what you will do next
weekend or far into the future.
If I finish my work, I'll go to the movies on Saturday.
If Mary would come with me, I would go to the concert in
the park on Sunday.
I won't go to the beach unless the weather is warm.
2. Write a one-page paper about what you would do if
you were in Sandras position. Explain all the
consequences of your actions.

Focus 5
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

15

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
7 (1)

Life Choices:

Exercise A

Match the description with the picture of the appropriate person.

Harry ____

Joan ____

Joe ____

Sandra ____

a) She used to work at a travel agency. If she had taken the higher paying job, she wouldn't be as
happy now.
b) She owns a small printing company. If she sells her company, she will be forced to make
changes. She might have to lay off some employees.
c) He and a group of friends are thinking of starting their own translation company. Though he
wishes he could walk, he is looking forward to the future.
d) He had to close his cafe.
retire.

7 (1)

Life Choices:

If he invests in the stock market, he might make enough money to

Exercise B

Complete the sentence with the appropriate word or phrase. Hint: Although both choices
may be grammatical, only one is consistent with the stories in the Life Choices lesson.
1. Sandra would never know what she could have done on her own (if, unless)___________ she sold
her business to the larger company.
2. Joan accepted the job at Ace Health (because, even though) ________________ the pay was low.
3. Another coffee shop opened up across the street. (As a result, Because)_____________, Joe lost
some of his customers.
4. (While, Even though)_________________ Joan was working at the travel agency, her agency was
bought by another company.
5. Sandra won't receive 10% of the larger company (if, unless) ___________ she agrees to sell her
business.
6. Harry was able to get a job as a translator (because, unless) __________________ he was fluent
in five languages.

16

Module 7:

Unit 1, Life Choices

Practice Exercises
7 (1)

Life Choices:

Exercise C

Match the sentence from the top of the page with the best sentence ending from the bottom of
the page. Write the number of the sentence next to its sentence ending.

1. Had Harry spent his life feeling sorry for himself . . .


2. Joan wouldn't have been depressed . . .
3. Sandra will have to work harder . . .
4. If a coffee shop hadn't opened up across the street . . .
5. Joan took the job at Ace Health . . .
6. If Joe's investments fail . . .
(Sentence Endings)
____ . . . Joe might not have had to close his cafe.
____ . . . he wouldn't have been a successful translator.
____ . . . because she wanted a challenge.
____ . . . if they compete against her.
____ . . . he could lose everything.
____ . . . if she hadn't lost her job.

17

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
7 (1)

Life Choices:

Exercise D

Rewrite the conditional without using if.


Example:
Original: If the car hadn't been going so fast, it wouldn't have gone out of control.
Rewrite: Had the car not been going so fast, it wouldn't have gone out of control.

1. If Joan hadn't joined the company, it wouldn't have doubled in size.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
2. If the other coffee shop hadn't opened up across the street, Joe might not have had to close his
business.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
3. If Harry had not studied foreign languages, he would not have been able to become a translator.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
4. Joan's job would not have been eliminated if another company hadn't bought her agency.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
5. Joan thinks things would not have turned out so well if she hadn't taken a chance.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

18

Module 7:

Unit 1, Life Choices

Practice Exercises
7 (1)

Life Choices:

Exercise E

Rewrite the conditional using if.


1. Had Joan not liked the idea of working for a small company, she would not have taken the job at
Ace Health.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
2. Had the factory not had high levels of pollution, it would not have had to reduce its operations.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
3. Had Joe's prices been lower, he might not have lost so much business.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
4. Had Harry not been injured, he wouldn't have to use a wheelchair.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
5. Had Joan not worked so hard, she might not have become a vice-president of the company.

______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

19

New Dynamic English

2. Epidemic
Our Changing Lives; Fighting Infections; The Adaptability of Life; Preparing for
Our Future; and Sentence Reordering
This unit focuses on listening for specific points of information in a presentation. Students are
asked to listen for the main idea or a supporting idea as indicated by a prompt at the top of the
screen. This is followed by a comprehension task before continuing the presentation. As the
shuffler level increases, the listening prompts will change. It is necessary to go through each
lesson at least three times to cover the different listening prompts.
In each of the four presentation sections, the target language models
and vocabulary are presented. When these lessons are completed,
students should do the Sentence Reordering lesson. This lesson
helps students better understand how sentences are linked and
organized in a presentation. Highlighted words in the text show how
sentence order is indicated.
Goals:
To be able to listen for specific points in a presentation.
To be able to summarize the main points in a presentation.
To be able to recognize the difference between the main idea and supporting ideas.
To be able to make a short, well-organized presentation.
Objective 1: To understand and express descriptive information in the form of an adjective
clause (which, that) as a means to express more complex ideas.
Objective 2: To understand and express how things are classified and organized into general and
specific cases, with more detailed descriptions becoming less general. (Some diseases An
example of such a disease is polio, a disease which has killed millions.)
Objective 3: To understand how ideas can be linked by using reference language such as pronouns
(they, these, those) and logical connectors (however, for example, as a result).

20

Module 7:

Unit 2, Epidemic

Learning Points
classification and exemplification
(such as, both, for example, are used to, that which some kinds, one type)
Many diseases, such as smallpox and pneumonia, are now under control. Smallpox and pneumonia
are both diseases. Polio, for example, is a viral disease that attacks the nervous system. Antibiotics
are used to treat bacterial infections, such as pneumonia. Polio is a viral disease that has been brought
under control. Some kinds of infections come from viruses. HIV, for example, is a virus.
Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection that has killed millions. An antibiotic is a type of drug. Drugs
which used to be effective no longer work.
present perfect tenses to express a result have+V(n), have+been+V(n)
Better communications and transportation have given us a global economy. Medical science has made
great progress. Modern drugs have made it easier to treat a cold. The development of vaccines and
antibiotics have helped to control the spread of infectious
Because of the success of the polio
vaccine, polio has been brought under control. Powerful antibiotics have also been developed.
Polio is a disease that has killed millions. The E.coli bacteria has become a threat. Genetic
differences have helped us to adapt. Adaptability has resulted in more resistant bacteria. Some
bacteria have become stronger. Throughout history, epidemics have caused many deaths.
Modernization has increased the threat of a global epidemic.
can and could to show potentiality and past ability
If your heart wears out, you can get a new one. If your kidney fails, you can still live and maybe even
receive a transplant. If an infection cannot be controlled, it can/could cause an epidemic. Compared
to how it used to be, an epidemic could spread more quickly now. When travel was slow and difficult,
a deadly epidemic couldnt quickly spread. Now, however, a serious disease could spread around the
world with a few days. Epidemics could be confined more easily in the past. There is a real concern
that a worldwide epidemic could break out. This epidemic could threaten our survival.
adjective clauses
Diseases which wiped out populations just a hundred years ago are now under control. The products
we use come from around the world. Polio, for example, is a viral disease that attacks the nervous
system. Polio is a viral disease that has been brought under control. Tuberculosis is a bacterial
infection that has killed millions. To kill or control a disease, it is necessary to kill or control the
infection which causes it. A drug which kills 90% of a particular type of bacteria may leave stronger
bacteria that are resistant. Drugs which used to be effective no longer work.
logical relations and sentence connecting
(for example, as a result, also, one, other, these, this, another, it, too, they, however)
Better communications and transportation, for example, have given us As a result, in every house
there are products Along with changes in technology, the worlds population continues
Powerful antibiotics have also been developed. One great success has been Other kinds of
infection come from These antibodies will Another approach is to interfere This can be
done by It makes it far more difficult to survive. Like human beings, they can adapt too. Now,
however, a serious disease could spread around the world within a few days.
passives with perfect tenses, be used + infinitive, and can/could
Polio has been brought under control. Powerful antibiotics have also been developed. Antibiotics are
used to treat bacterial infections. Sometimes a drug can be used to fight an infection. Epidemics could
be controlled more easily in the past. If an infection cannot be controlled, it can cause an epidemic.

21

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Begin with Our Changing Lives, followed by Fighting Infections. Focus on active listening, or listening
for a specific item of information or idea. Ask the students to take notes, and then ask them to identify
the main ideas in each section. List the main ideas on the blackboard. Have students check to see that
their notes include these main ideas.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, and using the list of main ideas, have students discuss and practice summarizing
each of the two lessons.
In a large class, and using the list of main ideas, have the class answer comprehension questions about
each section and construct a vocabulary list, including other medical terminology of importance: sore
throat, headache, vitamins, parts of the body, etc.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
After reviewing Listening Focus 1, go through the lessons again, this time focusing on supporting ideas
and examples. Focus on the language of classification and exemplification (see Learning Points for this
lesson). Have the students practice summarizing the information, paying particular attention to giving
evidence and examples.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation and Oral Practice:
In The Adaptability of Life and Planning for Our Future focus on how the ordering of sentences is
indicated by logical connectors, pronouns, and causal/logical relations. See Learning Points.
Step 7: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 8: Presentation
Review Listening Focus 3.

Introduce the Sentence Reordering lesson and assign Listening Focus 4.

Language Extension
Once the unit is mastered, have the students extend the language with two or more of the following
classroom activities. If further preparation is necessary, have the students work in pairs or groups first.
Classroom Activity 1: Present (orally or written) a global, national, or local issue of importance.
presentation should include the following:
a.

The

Statement of the problem or issue: e.g., Pollution, Population, Bullying, Crime and safety,
Global warming, An asteroid hitting the Earth, Sources of energy, Racism, International
relations, Cloning, Genetic engineering, etc.
Example: Sooner or later, as our Earth travels around the sun, we are certain to be hit
by an asteroid or comet.

22

Module 7:

Unit 2, Epidemic

b.

Illustration or example of the problem to show why it is important:


Example: According to scientists, if an asteroid a mile in diameter hit the earth, it could
wipe out all life on Earth.

c.

Consequence of not dealing with the problem and recommendations for what to do.
Example: Though the probability of this happening soon is very small, there is a chance that
it could happen within our lifetime. Now that we have the technical capability, we should
begin to prepare for such an event, etc.

For the above presentation, students should use sources such as the Internet, newspapers, or other
reference materials to find the facts necessary to support their presentation.
Classroom Activity 2: Think about how technology has changed our lives in the past 150 years.
reasons and examples why you think our lives have gotten better or worse.

Give

Classroom Activity 3: Think about how technology may change our lives in the next 100 years.
kinds of changes would be good? What kinds of changes would be bad?

What

Classroom Activity 4: Research Assignment


Choose a disease, such as polio or tuberculosis, and give an explanation of what it is, its treatment, and its
effects on human populations throughout history. Use reference materials to find the facts necessary to
support your presentation.
Classroom Activity 5: Research Assignment
Explain how a virus or bacterium adapts to a changing environment. Use reference materials to find the
facts necessary to support your presentation.
Classroom Activity 6: Research Assignment
Explain what the bodys immune system is and how it works to fight off an infection. Use reference
materials to find the facts necessary to support your presentation.
Classroom Activity 7: Research Assignment
Explain how infections can spread from person to person. What are some of the ways we can protect
ourselves from being infected? Use reference materials to find the facts necessary to support your
presentation.

23

New Dynamic English

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)

Another approach is to interfere with a viruss


ability to reproduce and spread. This can be done
by injecting various substances into the body.

Our Changing Lives


Our lives are changing. New technologies are
developing every day, changing the ways we live
and think. As a result, in every house there are
products from around the world.

The Adaptability of Life


Life is adaptable. This has helped humans to
survive in many different situations. In any group
of people there are genetic differences. As a result,
some people will be more resistant to a new disease
than others.

Along with changes in technology, the world


population continues to grow. People are living
longer. Diseases which wiped out populations just
a hundred years ago are now under control.

Fighting Infections

The adaptability of life also has a bad side. It


makes it far more difficult to control diseases.
Bacteria and viruses are both life forms. Like
human beings, they can adapt too. A drug that kills
99% of a particular type of bacteria may leave
stronger bacteria that are more resistant. As these
stronger bacteria reproduce and spread, drugs that
used to be effective no longer work. This means
that new drugs or other means of control need to be
developed.

There have been many great successes in history.


In the field of medical science, there have been
many great discoveries. The development of
vaccines and antibiotics has helped to control the
spread of infectious diseases.

Of course, if an infection cannot be controlled, it


can cause an epidemic. An epidemic occurs when
a disease spreads to many people. Epidemics have
occurred throughout history. In some cases,
epidemics have resulted in many deaths.

Polio, for example, is a viral disease that attacks the


nervous system. Because of the success of the
polio vaccine, polio has been brought under control.

Preparing for Our Future

Medical science has made great progress. If your


heart wears out, you can get a new one. If your
kidney fails, you can still live, and maybe even
receive a transplant. Modern drugs have made it
easier to treat a cold or get over the flu. Many
diseases, such as pneumonia and small pox, are now
under control or wiped out entirely.

In preparing for our future, we need to consider


epidemics and how to control them. It used to be
that diseases were confined to a small area. Travel
was slow and difficult. A deadly epidemic in
Europe couldnt quickly spread to South America.
Now, however, a serious disease could spread
around the world within a few days.

Powerful antibiotics have also been developed.


Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections,
such as pneumonia.
Drugs and vaccines work together with our bodys
immune system to fight infection. Some kinds of
infection come from viruses. HIV, for example, is
a virus. Other kinds of infection come from
bacteria. Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection that
has killed millions. And recently, the E.coli
bacteria has become a threat.

There is a real concern that a worldwide epidemic


could break out. This epidemic could threaten our
survival. Medical scientists and public health
officials in many countries are now studying this
issue. They want to develop policies and plans to
be prepared for such an event.

To cure or control a disease, it is necessary to kill or


control the infection which causes it. Sometimes a
drug can be used to fight an infection. For
example, antibiotics are often used to fight common
infections, such as pneumonia.

In the struggle against disease, national boundaries


mean nothing. Diseases dont stop at the borders
between nations. Therefore, we need to think and
act on a global scale. Clean water supplies, air
quality in airplanes, and effective vaccination
policies are worldwide issues.

For some diseases, a vaccine is made by using a


weakened form of a virus. When injected into the
body, the vaccine causes the immune system to
create antibodies. These antibodies will prevent or
fight off infection.

The threat of a global epidemic is another example


of how modernization is bringing us together. We
must learn to live together more effectively than we
24

Module 7:

Unit 2, Epidemic

An epidemic could threaten our survival.


We need to develop policies to be prepared for an
epidemic.
Scientists are studying the issue of how to prepare
for an epidemic.
The struggle against disease is a global issue.
National boundaries cannot stop an epidemic.
Modernization has increased the threat of a global
epidemic.
To build a better future we need to work together.
We need global policies to prevent the spread of
disease.

have in the past. As with many important issues,


the best approach is to use good judgment. If we
work together, we can build a better future.
Question Summary

(Answer Key)

This is about technology and change.


New technology is changing our lives.
The products we use come from around the world.
The worlds population continues to grow.
Some diseases are now under control.
People are living longer because of changes in
technology.
This is about how science has changed our lives.
If your kidney fails, you can still live.
Pneumonia and small pox are both diseases.
Many diseases are under control because of medical
science.
Vaccines and antibiotics are used to control the
spread of diseases.
Polio is a viral disease that has been brought under
control.
One great success has been the development of
vaccines.
Viruses and bacteria can both cause infections.
Our body's immune system fights infections.
HIV is a virus.
We must kill or control an infection to cure or
control a disease.
Antibodies fight infection.
A virus can reproduce and spread.
One way to control a virus is to stop it from
reproducing.
Drugs can be used to fight an infection.
An antibiotic is a type of drug.
Adaptability has helped us to survive.
Genetic differences have helped us to adapt.
In any group of people there are differences.
Adaptability has resulted in more resistant bacteria.
Adaptability is both good and bad.
Drugs which used to be effective no longer work.
Some bacteria have become stronger.
Throughout history epidemics have caused many
deaths.
Epidemics occur when a disease spreads to many
people.
An epidemic can be prevented if an infection can be
controlled.
Compared to how it used to be an epidemic could
spread more quickly now.
When travel was slow and difficult epidemics could
be confined.
Epidemics could be confined more easily in the past.

Sentence Reordering

(Answer Key)

New technologies are developing every day,


changing the ways we live and think. Better
communications and transportation, for example,
have given us a global economy. As a result, in
every house there are products from around the
world.
Some kinds of infection come from viruses. HIV,
for example, is a virus. Other kinds of infection
come from bacteria. Tuberculosis is a bacterial
infection that has killed millions.
To cure or control a disease, it is necessary to kill or
control the infection which causes it. Sometimes a
drug can be used to fight an infection. For
example, antibiotics are often used to fight common
infections such as pneumonia.
In preparing for our future we need to consider
epidemics and how they spread. It used to be that
diseases were confined to a small area. A deadly
epidemic in Europe couldnt quickly spread to South
America. Now, however, a serious disease could
spread around the world within a few days.
In the struggle against disease, national boundaries
mean nothing. Diseases dont stop at the borders
between nations. Therefore, we need to think and
act on a global scale.
In the field of medical science, there have been
many important discoveries. The development of
vaccines and antibiotics has helped to control the
spread of infectious diseases. Polio, for example,
is a viral disease that attacks the nervous system.
Because of the success of the polio vaccine, polio
has been brought under control in most parts of the
world.
25

New Dynamic English

For some diseases a vaccine is made by using a


weakened form of a virus. When injected into the
body, the vaccine causes the immune system to
create antibodies. These antibodies will prevent or
fight off infection.
Life is adaptable. For humans, adaptability has
been a key to survival. In any group of people
there are genetic differences. As a result, some
people will be more resistant to a new disease than
others.
Bacteria and viruses are both life forms. Like
human beings, they can adapt too. A drug that kills
99% of a particular type of bacteria may leave
stronger bacteria that are resistant. As these
stronger bacteria reproduce and spread, drugs which
used to be effective no longer work.
There is a real concern that a worldwide epidemic
could break out. This epidemic could threaten our
survival. Medical scientists and public health
officials in many countries are now studying this
issue. They want to develop policies and plans to
be prepared for such an event.

26

Module 7:

Unit 2, Epidemic

Focused Listening
Focus 3

Focus 1
Language Focus

Listen to Our Changing Lives and Fighting Infections.


Listen for the main ideas in each section. How do you
know these are the main ideas?

Show how sentences are linked by causal relationships,


pronouns, and other logical connectors.

The first section is about how technology is changing our


lives.
The next section says that along with changes in
technology, the worlds population is growing.

Listening Task
Focus on how adaptability has both positive and negative
effects on human survival in The Adaptability of Life and
Preparing for Our Future. Logical connectors
(therefore, as a result) and pronouns (it, they, these)
indicate that one statement follows from another, and the
order cannot be reversed. Note the use of make and
cause to express causation.

Goal
To identify the main ideas in a presentation.

Student Follow-up
1. List the main ideas in each section.
2. Are the main ideas in each section connected? Does
one have to come before another? Give examples.
We could talk about the changing population before we
talk about changes in technology: Along with the
worlds increasing population, technology is changing
our lives.

The adaptability of life has a bad side.


It makes it more difficult to control diseases.
Diseases dont stop at the borders between nations.
Therefore, we need to think and act on a global scale.

Goal
Students will understand different ways of connecting
sentences to show a logical flow of ideas. Linking
words should reinforce the flow of ideas to make
comprehension easier and for emphasis.

Focus 2
Language Focus
Expressing supporting ideas (evidence) and examples.
Note the use of the present perfect tense, conditionals, and
phrases such as: such as, other kinds, for example, to give
evidence and examples that support the main ideas.

Student Follow-up
1. List the negative and positive effects of the
adaptability of life on human survival.
2. What are negative and positive effects of better
technology on public health and human survival?
Support your statements with examples that contrast
the present with the past.
3. Do the written follow-up Exercises for this unit.
4. Do the Sentence Reordering lesson.

Modern drugs have made it easier to treat a cold.


The development of vaccines and antibiotics has helped to
control the spread of infectious diseases.
If your kidney fails, you can still live.
Many diseases, such as small pox, are now under control.

Focus 4

Listening Task
In Our Changing Lives and Fighting Infections, listen for
the supporting ideas and examples. How are they
different from the main ideas?

Language Focus
Building long sentences by using descriptive clauses
instead of separate sentences.

Goal

Listening Task

Students will begin to see how an idea is developed in


a series of sentences: main ideas, evidence, and
examples.

Go through each section again. Make a list of five or


more descriptions that explain or specify. In particular,
note the use of which and that.

Student Follow-up

Polio is a viral disease that attacks the nervous system.


Diseases which wiped out populations just a hundred
years ago are now under control.
Drugs which used to be effective no longer work.

Give evidence and examples for one of the following


statements about your own life:
(1) Technology has changed my life a lot.
(2) Technology hasnt really changed my life at all.

27

New Dynamic English

Student Follow-up
1. Use descriptive clauses to complete the following
sentences:
Im the kind of person who ... (enjoys being with
friends.)
I like people who ...
I dont like to do things that ...
I enjoy discussing issues which ...
2. Write a one page paper about what you think is an
important global issue.

Focus 5
Language Focus
Language Mastery

Listening Task
Review all of the lessons in this unit several times.
Practice recording 10~15 sentences each time, so that you
can say these sentences fluently and with confidence.
When your Completion Percentage is 80-100%, take the
Mastery Test. Try to get a score higher than 90%.

28

Module 7:

Unit 2, Epidemic

Practice Exercises
7 (2)

Epidemic:

Exercise A

Fill in the blank with the expression that best fits the
context provided.
1. Sometimes drugs can be used to fight an infection.
(For example, As a result) ____________________ antibiotics are used to fight common
infections such as pneumonia.
2. (Because of, Therefore) _________________ the concern that a worldwide epidemic could
break out, medical scientists and public health officials are developing plans to be prepared for
such an event.
3. Like human beings, bacteria and viruses also have the ability to adapt.
(Therefore, For example) _____________________, it is very difficult to control diseases.
4. Diseases dont stop at the borders between nations.
(Because, Therefore)____________________ we need to think and act on a global scale.
5. Some kinds of infection come from viruses.
HIV, (as a result, for example) ___________________ is a virus.
6. (Unless, If) ________ we work together, we can build a better future.

7 (2)

Epidemic:

Exercise B

Fill in the blanks with the form of the verb (present or present perfect) that best fits the context.
Medical science (make) ___________________ great progress. If your heart (wear out)
_____________, you can get a new one. Modern drugs (make) ________________ it easier
to treat a cold or get over the flu.

Many diseases (be) ______________ now under control or

wiped out entirely.

29

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
7 (2)

Epidemic:

Exercise C

The words on the right are examples of the terms on the left.
corresponding example.

7 (2)

Match the term with its

1. Virus

______ polio

2. Viral disease

______ E. coli

3. Bacteria

______ antibiotics

4. Bacterial disease

______ tuberculosis

5. Treatment (drug)

______ HIV

Epidemic:

Exercise D

Complete each sentence with the appropriate adjective clause.

1. Polio is a viral disease ______________________________________________.


2. Scientists have developed many new drugs ______________________________.
3. Some drugs, ___________________________________, are no longer effective.
4. Global policies ___________________ need to be developed as soon as possible.
5. Infections ____________________________________ are called viral infections.
(Adjective clauses)
(a) . . which used to work
(b) . . that attacks the nervous system
(c) . . which are helping us control the spread of diseases
(d) . . that can help reduce the danger of an epidemic
(e) . . which come from viruses

30

Module 7:

Unit 2, Epidemic

Practice Exercises

7 (2)

Epidemic:

Exercise E

Fill-in the blanks with the choice that best indicates the ordering of the sentences.

1. For some diseases ________ is made by using a weakened form of a virus. When injected into
the body, __________ causes the immune system to create antibodies. _________ antibodies
will prevent or fight off infection.
(a) a vaccine

(b) the vaccine

(c) these

(d) some

2. _________ of infection come from viruses. HIV, __________, is a virus. ___________ of


infection come from bacteria.
(a) One kind

(b) Some kinds

(c) for example

(d) Other kinds

3. _______ that diseases were confined to a small area. A deadly epidemic in Europe _______
quickly spread to South America. Now, __________, a serious disease could spread around
the world within a few days.
(a) It used to be

(b) couldnt

(c) however

(d) therefore

4. In the struggle against disease, national boundaries mean nothing. Diseases dont stop at the
borders between nations. _________, we need to think and act on a global scale.
(a) however

(b) therefore

(c) in order to

31

(d) besides

New Dynamic English

3. Space and Time Sequences


Presentation; Speaking Practice; Space Game; and Time Game
This unit focuses on spatial arrangements, specifying time and action sequences, and giving
instructions that require certain conditions to be met. Once the language is comprehended,
students must make inferences, solve a problem, and then arrange a sequence of objects on
screen.
In the Presentation lesson, the target language models and vocabulary are presented, with
comprehension checks and Glossary support. When this is completed, students may try the
Speaking Practice lesson, where they will be presented with a sequence which they should
describe by either using the mouse to click on the correct choice or by clearly speaking their
answer using the Speech Recognition feature of the program. When these two lessons are
completed, students should try the Space and Time Games to test their understanding. If they
have difficulty, they should review the Presentation lesson again.
Goals:
To be able to use a description instead of a name to specify an object.
To be able to express logical alternatives (one of, either) and exclusions (neither).
To be able to understand and give instructions which involve a condition or exception.
To be able to understand and indicate the correct sequence of actions and events.
Objective 1: To understand and make specific reference to something by using descriptive
phrases (the red-haired woman) instead of a name.
Objective 2: To understand and give instructions which involve logical alternatives and
qualified choices (not unless, unless, except for, if A then B, if either of them, etc.)
Objective 3: To understand how verb tenses and time phrases are used to indicate relationships in
time (was still V(ing) when ..., had just V(n) when...).

32

Module 7:

Unit 3, Space and Time Sequences

Learning Points
logical specification and reference
(nobody, neither of them, on either side, one of them, the person on the left, the bald man, as far away
as possible, anywhere, the child who isnt in the middle, a woman, the red-haired woman)
Move the bald man next to the woman with glasses. Put one of the children in the middle unless
somebody is already there. Put the child who isnt in the middle on the far right. Put the other child
as far right as possible. Dont put Nicole anywhere except next to the red-haired woman. The
bearded man has a woman on either side of him.
conditional action
(not unless, if, so that, only if, even if, etc.)
Move the red-haired woman so that the bearded man has a woman next to him on either side. If
either of the men is in the center, move him to the far left. As long as it isn't Kathy, put one of the
children between the center and the far left. Put Jimmy on the far right unless he is in the middle.
Move the bald man next to the woman with glasses, but only if the person in the middle is a man. Put
Sharon on the far left even if someone is in the center.
qualification and exception
(if, except, except for, besides, but, unless)
Dont put her anywhere except on the far left. They are children, except for the adult in the middle.
Besides the one in the middle, they're children. The red-headed woman is on the right, but not all the
way. Jeff left the office before Sharon did, but not until after Nicole. Put one of the children in the
middle unless somebody is already there. If the red-haired woman is on the left, put Kathy next to
her.
past perfect tense V(d) + have+V(n), V(d) + have+V(n) be+V(ing)
Sharon still hadn't come and Nicole was already working when Jeff got there. By the time her car
broke down it had already started to rain. It had been raining for about ten minutes when her car
broke down. It didn't start to rain until after her car broke down and she had telephoned for a repair
truck. Her car had broken down and it was starting to rain when she telephoned for help. Sharon
had just arrived when Jeff came in the door.
time sequences, phrases, and adverb clauses
(by the time that, not until, still, already, when..., while..., etc.)
Put Nicole on the left unless somebody is already there. They couldn't leave until after Jeff left.
Nicole was still working when Sharon left. By the time Dave arrived, everybody else was there.
Sharon still hadn't come and Nicole was already working when Jeff got there. By the time her car
broke down it had already started to rain. It had been raining for about ten minutes when her car
broke down. She was talking on the car phone when it started to rain. While she was talking on the
car phone, it started to rain. As she was talking on the phone she realized that it was beginning to
rain. After stopping for gas she called her husband and said she would be late. Sharon arrived just
before Jeff did.

33

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Go through the Presentation lesson once in class, focusing on logical specification and reference, such as
neither, either, on the far left, one of the two women, etc. and time sequences, such as still, already, etc.
Step 2: Oral Practice
In pairs, or small groups, have students practice describing different spatial arrangements. For example,
each pair should give an example of how to use neither, on either side, one of them, etc.
Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 in the lab or at home.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice
Briefly introduce the Speaking Practice lesson and the Space Game lesson. Focus on conditional action.
In pairs or small groups, have students illustrate how to give conditional instructions which use the target
language such as: even if, if, not unless, unless, etc.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 2 and Listening Focus 3 in the lab or at home.
Step 6: Presentation
Focus on the language of temporal sequences. Briefly introduce the Time Game, and assign students to
do Listening Focus 4 and Listening Focus 5 in the lab or at home.

Language Extension
Once the lessons have been presented and practiced, the class should try the following class activities:
Classroom Activity 1: Spatial Arrangement Game 1
Divide the class into two teams, team A and team B, and nominate five class members who will be the
characters who will be arranged. Lets assume the characters are: Steve, Ellen, Mary, Bob, and
Sachiko,
1. On index cards, hand out 10 arrangements such as the following to both teams:
a. (Ellen) (
)(
)(
) ( Steve )
(Steven is on the far right and Ellen is on the far
left.)
b. (Steve) ( Bob ) (
) (Ellen) (Sachiko)
(There isnt anyone in the middle.)
c. (
) (Mary ) (Bob ) (Ellen) (
)
(There is a woman on either side of Bob.)
2. Each team studies the arrangements and writes out several general and specific descriptions for each.
They may NOT use names. To specify each character, they should use a description, such as the girl
with glasses, but only one specific description for each character is allowed.
3. For each arrangement, have the characters stand in the correct order.
4. The teams then give two descriptions of the arrangement. If a description is TRUE, the team gets a
point. If it is FALSE, the team loses a point. Once a description is given by one team, it may not be
used by the other team, so the teams should take turns.
Example: (
)(
) (Sachiko) (
)(
Bob
)
Team A: A woman is in the middle and a man is on the far right.
(general)
Team B: The woman with black hair is in the middle and the taller man is on the far right.
Team B: There isnt anybody between the woman and the man.
Team A: One of the two people is the middle, and the other is on the far right.
(There isnt anybody on the far left nor on either side of the middle.)
(Neither the man nor the woman is on the far left or on either side of the middle.)

34

(specific)

Module 7:

Unit 3, Space and Time Sequences

Classroom Activity 2: Spatial Arrangement Game 2


Divide the class into two teams. Each team nominates five team members who will be the characters who
will follow the instructions given by the other side.
1. Each team writes out five 5-part instructions using the other teams characters. For example: If
nobody is in the middle, the woman with glasses should go to the far left. If someone is on the far
left, she should move to the middle. If nobody is in the middle, one of the men should go there.
The man in the red shirt should go to the far right unless nobody is in the middle. If nobody is
between the woman and the man, the girl with the longest hair should go there.
2. Someone from Team A gives the instructions, repeated twice, and the characters from Team B must
follow them. When the first series of instructions is completed, it is Team Bs turn to give instructions,
and the characters from Team A follow them, etc
3. If a set of 5 instructions is followed correctly, each team gets 5 points. If an instruction is incorrect, the
team giving the instruction loses one point, loses its turn, and the other team is given a point. If an
instruction is given correctly but followed incorrectly, the team giving the instruction gets a point; the
team following the instructions loses one point and is given a second try. If the second attempt is also
incorrect, the team giving the instructions is given another point, the team following the instructions
loses another point, and the turn is over.
4. The team with the highest number of points wins.
Classroom Activity 3: Time Sequence Game
Divide the class into two teams. Each team nominates five team members who will be the characters who
will position themselves in the correct order of events as given by the other side.
1. Each team writes out five 3-part narratives using the other teams characters. For example:
Bob didnt arrive at the party until after Jean and Mary, but before John and Paul.
1. ______
2. _______
3. Bob
4. _______
5. _______
Jean was already there when Mary arrived.
1. Jean
2. Mary
3. Bob
4. _______
5. _______
Paul still hadnt arrived when John finally got there.
1. Jean
2. Mary
3. Bob
4. John
5. Paul.
2. Someone from Team A reads each sentence twice, and the characters from Team B must arrange
themselves into the correct sequence. When the first sequence is completed, it is Team Bs turn, and
the characters from Team A arrange themselves in the required order.
3. If a set of 3 sentences is followed correctly, each team gets 3 points. If a sentence is incorrect, the team
giving the sequence loses one point, loses its turn, and the other team is given a point. If a sequence is
given correctly but followed incorrectly, the team giving the sequence gets a point; the other team loses
a point and is given a second try. If the second attempt is also incorrect, the team giving the sequence
is given another point, the team making the mistake loses another point, and the turn is over.
4. The team with the highest number of points wins.

35

New Dynamic English

The two children are next to each other.


It started to rain just after her car broke down.
It was raining until the tow truck arrived.
She had just gotten gas when it started to rain.

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)


Presentation
Neither one of them is in the middle. Neither of
them is an adult. A child is on either side of the
red-haired woman. Neither of the children is in the
center. One of them is on the far right and one of
them is on the far left. The person in the middle is
neither a child nor a woman. One of the children is a
girl, and the other is a boy.

Space Game (sample moves)


Put Nicole on the left unless somebody is already
there.
If nobody is in the middle, put David there.
Move the bald man next to the woman with glasses,
but only if the person in the middle is a man.
If neither of the children is in the middle, put David
next to Jimmy.
If either of the children is in the middle, put Jeff
next to Jimmy.
Put Jimmy on the far right unless he is in the middle.
Put the child who isn't in the middle on the far right.
With only one move, arrange it so that both of the
children are next to a man.

They are children, except for the adult in the middle.


Except for the woman in the middle, they don't have
red hair. They are as close together as possible.
They are as far away from each other as possible.
There isnt anybody in the middle. There are
people on the left and right, but nobody in the
center.
There is a child on either side of Sharon. The little
girl is neither in the middle nor next to David. One
of the children is next to Jeff. One of the two
people on the left is a woman. The red-headed
woman is on the right, but not all the way.

Don't put Sharon anywhere except on the far left.


Put Sharon on the far left even if someone is in the
center.
Move the red-haired woman so that the bearded man
has a woman next to him on either side.
If either of the two men is on the left, put the other
man in the center.
Move the woman with glasses as far away from the
bearded man as possible.
As long as it isn't Kathy, put one of the children
between the center and the far left.
Put Jeff anywhere you can except next to Jimmy.

Nicole was still working when Sharon left. Sharon


had just arrived when Jeff came in the door. By
the time Nicole arrived, Jeff was already working.
There wasn't anyone there when Sharon arrived at
the office.
It was raining until the tow truck arrived. While
she was talking on the car phone, it started to rain.
The tow truck still hadn't come when it started to
rain. By the time her car broke down it had already
started to rain. It had been raining for about ten
minutes when her car broke down.
As she was talking on the phone she realized that it
was beginning to rain.

Time Game (sample sequences)


Jeff left the office before Sharon did, but not until
after Nicole.
Nicole and Sharon couldn't leave until after Jeff left.
Nicole was still working when Sharon left.
By the time Dave arrived everybody else was there.
Sharon still hadn't come and Nicole was already
working when Jeff got there.

Nicole and Sharon couldn't leave until after Jeff left.


Except for Jeff, nobody was at the office when
Sharon arrived. By the time Dave arrived
everybody else was there.

The office was empty when Sharon got to work.


Jeff was surprised when he found Sharon already at
work.
By the time Nicole arrived, Jeff was already
working.
Except for Jeff, nobody was at the office when
Sharon arrived.

Speech Practice
Neither one of them is in the middle.
Neither of them is an adult.
A child is on either side of the red-haired woman.
They are as far away from each other as possible.
They are as close together as possible.
One of the two people on the left is a woman.
Neither of the adults is next to the girl.
There isnt anybody in the middle.

By the time her car broke down it had already


started to rain.

36

Module 7:

Unit 3, Space and Time Sequences

It had been raining for about ten minutes when her


car broke down. Luckily she was able to call for a
repair truck.
It didn't start to rain until after her car broke down
and she had telephoned for a repair truck.
Her car had broken down and it was starting to rain
when she telephoned for help.
She was talking on the car phone when it started to
rain.
While she was talking on the car phone, it started to
rain.
A few minutes later she stopped for gas and the rain
stopped.
As she was talking on the phone she realized that it
was beginning to rain.
Since she was low on gas she stopped at a gas
station.
It was already raining when she stopped for gas.
After stopping for gas she called her husband and
said she would be late.
Luckily, the rain didn't start until after the tow truck
arrived.
While she was driving home, it started to rain.
A few minutes later her car broke down so she used
her car phone to call for a tow truck.
The tow truck still hadn't come when it started to
rain.

37

New Dynamic English

Focused Listening

Goal
Students will be able to understand and express time
sequences.

Focus 1

Student Follow-up

Focus on the spatial relationships in the Presentation


lesson. In this lesson you will hear a sentence and then
see the spatial arrangement that it describes. When you
first hear a sentence, pause the program and try to imagine
the spatial arrangement it describes. Then continue the
program to view the arrangement to see if you had the
right idea. If you are unsure of the meaning, use the
ABC button to see the text and click on the highlighted
words for more examples.

1. Put three of the characters in order, from 1-3. Then


write a one sentence narrative which defines the
sequence in time through a series of actions or states.
(1) Sharon (2) Jeff
(3) Nicole
Jeff arrived before Nicole, but Sharon was already there.
When Jeff arrived, Sharon was already there and Nicole
still hadnt come.
By the time Jeff arrived, Nicole still hadnt come, but
Sharon was already working.

Neither of the children is in the center.


There is a child on either side of the red-haired woman.
There isnt anyone in the middle.

2. Using the language from this lesson, describe two time


sequences from your own life.
By the time I graduated from high school, I already had a
job.
I didnt start studying English until I was in high school.

Goal
To describe spatial arrangements using physical
description and relative position

Student Follow-up
1. List two ways of describing each of the characters.
the little boy
the little girl
the woman with glasses
the red-haired woman
the man in the space suit

Focus 3

one of the two children


the other child
one of the women
the woman in the middle
the bald man

In the Speaking Practice lesson, decide which of the


phrases correctly describes the situation on the screen.
Speak your answer clearly when the Speech Meter
appears. If you do not choose the correct answer, or if
your speech is not clear enough, you will be asked to try
again. You may also click on the answer if you have
difficulty being recognized or if there isnt a microphone.

2. List two ways to describe each of the five spatial


positions.

For more information on how to use Speech Recognition,


you may use the pull-down help menu at the top of the
screen in each lesson, or refer to How to Use Speech
Recognition in the Study Guide.

in the center, on the far left, between the center and the
far left, second from the right, all the way to the right, etc.

Focus 2

Goal

Review the spatial relationships in the Presentation, and


then focus on the temporal sequences. Some of the
sentences refer to the order in which three characters leave
or arrive at their office. Note the use of words and
phrases such as: still, already, just, until, by the time
that, when, etc.

The focus of this lesson is to have students practice


speaking clearly, a necessary skill for giving accurate
instructions.

Student Follow-up
Review the Presentation lesson, and practice saying
each sentence. Record your voice by clicking on the
Record button, and compare it to the native speaker by
clicking on the Headphones button (to hear yourself)
and the Repeat button (to hear the native speaker).

Nicole was still working when Sharon left. Sharon had


just arrived when Jeff came in the door. By the time
Nicole arrived, Jeff was already working. There wasn't
anyone there when Sharon arrived at the office.
By the time her car broke down, it had already started to
rain.

38

Module 7:

Unit 3, Space and Time Sequences

Focus 4
Student Follow-up

In the Space Game, follow the instructions and see if you


can score over 500.

Using the language of this lesson, write out a series of


step-by-step instructions for how to do something,
such as: how to serve a tennis ball, how to swing a
golf club, how to make a turn while skiing, how to
make a cake, how to print something from the Internet,
how to send an e-mail, how to change lanes while
driving, how to build a fire without a match, how to
swim, how to ride a bicycle, how to walk, or how to
change a tire on a car.
Take the tennis ball and throw it about two feet above
your head. While the ball is going up, take your racket
back and bend your elbow so the racket is pointing down.
When the ball reaches the highest point, etc.

Please remember to click on the PASS button if there is


no correct move to make.

Language Focus
Note how if and unless determine whether or not to
make a move.
If nobody is in the center, put David there.
Put Nicole on the left unless somebody is already there.

Goal
Students will understand how to follow and give
instructions which involve a pre-condition or
qualification.

Student Follow-up
Using the language of this lesson, write out a series of
step-by-step instructions for negotiating the sale or
purchase of something.
If they order twenty units, offer them a ten percent
discount. Dont give them more than a twenty percent
discount unless they buy at least fifty units. If they
refuse, ask them for a counter proposal. For example,
we can give them a larger discount if they pay in advance
or if they agree to buy at least 100 in the next six months.

Focus 5
In the Time Game, follow the instructions and see if you
can score over 350. Arrange the objects in the correct
time sequence showing, for example, which character left
or arrived at the office first, second, or last.
If you need to hear a sentence more than once, please
remember to click on the Repeat button.

Language Focus
Note how words such as still and already help reinforce
the time sequence.
Nicole was still working when Sharon left.
Nicole was already working when Jeff got there.

Goal
Students will understand how to follow a narrative
and/or give instructions which involve a time
sequence.

39

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
7 (3)

Space and Time:

Exercise A

Use the following sentences to determine the spatial arrangement of the characters.
arrangement fits all of the sentences.
One of the blanks will remain empty.

Only one

1. None of the adults is in the middle.


2. One of the children is on the far right.
3. Jeff and Jimmy are as far away from each other as possible.
4. If Jeff is on the far left, Kathy is in the middle.
5. The space between Nicole and Kathy is empty.
6. David is next to Jimmy unless Jimmy is in the middle.
7. Except for Sharon, the people on the right are male.

_________ _________

Nicole

_________

David

_________

Sharon

40

_________

Jeff

_________

Jimmy

_________

Kathy

Module 7:

Unit 3, Space and Time Sequences

Practice Exercises
7 (3)

Space and Time:

Exercise B

Read the short paragraphs and specify the order of events.


a) Sharon had just arrived when Jeff came in the door. By the time Nicole got to work,
Jeff had already been working for two hours.

(Specify the order of arrival of the three workers.)


1. __________

2. __________

3. __________

b) Sharon couldnt leave until after Nicole left. When Sharon left, Jeff was still working.

(Specify the order of departure of the three workers.)


1. __________

2. __________

3. __________

c) Her car had broken down, so she telephoned for a tow truck. Fortunately, it didnt start to rain
until after the tow truck arrived.

(Order the events by giving each one a number.)


______ She telephoned for the tow truck.
______ It started to rain.
______ Her car broke down.
______ The tow truck arrived.
d) As she was talking on the telephone she realized it was beginning to rain. By the time she
got gas, the rain had already stopped.

(Order the events by giving each one a number.)


______ She got gas.
______ She was talking on the telephone.
______ It started to rain.
______ It stopped raining.

41

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises

7 (3)

Space and Time:

Exercise C

Fill in the blanks with the correct choice.

1. _________ she was driving home, it started to rain. _________ she was low on gas, she
decided to stop for gas. _________ stopping for gas, she noticed that the rain had stopped
and it was beginning to snow. It was ________ snowing when she finally got home.
Fortunately, she had gotten home safely, so she was finally able to relax.

(a) while

(b) during

(c) since

(d) after

(e) still

(f) already

2. ________ landing at the airport, we took a taxi into the city. _______ we were traveling
along the expressway, I suddenly felt ill. That was ________ I realized that I had been infected
by the virus. From what I had read about the epidemic, this virus could spread very quickly.
If so, I had probably _______ infected my friend, and the taxi driver as well. I wasnt sure
what to do next. Perhaps it was best not to wait ______ we got to the hotel to tell them.

(a) while

(b) after

(c) since

(d) when

(e) until

(f) already

3. _______ my trip I saw many interesting things and ate lots of good food. Unfortunately,
just _______ I got to Athens, my passport was stolen. _______ I couldnt leave without it,
I had to change my schedule and go to the embassy. Two days later, I had a new passport,
and I was on my way again. I had a wonderful time!

(a) while

(b) during

(c) since

(d) after

42

(e) until

(f) already

Module 7:

Unit 4, Review Exercises

4. Review Exercises for Module 7


When Units 1-3 are completed, it is important to review the main points even while beginning to work on Module
8. The following lessons help students refocus on some of the main language points that are covered and
included in the Mastery Tests. These lessons should be done on a frequent basis.

Dictations
Dictations focus on important language at the word and phrase level. Detailed instructions for doing the
dictations can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down Help screens (This Lesson), once you are
in the Dictations lesson. The Dictations for Module 7 are as follows:
Dictation 1

Dictation 4

1. He was hit by a car while running alongside a road.


2. If he hadn't been running near a road, he wouldn't have
been hit by a car.
3. It went out of control because it was going too fast.
4. If the car hadn't been going too fast, it wouldn't have
gone out of control.

1. They like the way Sandra runs the company, so they


want her to stay.
2. If they didn't like the way she runs the company, they
wouldn't want her to stay.
3. They won't buy her company unless she agrees to stay.
4. If she doesn't agree to stay, they won't buy her company.

Dictation 2

Dictation 5

1. He can't walk because he was injured in an accident.


2. If he hadn't been injured, he could walk.
3. He has to use a wheelchair because he was injured in an
accident.
4. If he hadn't been injured, he wouldn't have to use a wheel
chair.

1. Modern drugs have made it easier to treat a cold or get


over the flu.
2. Sometimes a drug can be used to fight an infection.
3. For example, antibiotics are often used to fight common
infections such as pneumonia.
4. Many diseases, such as pneumonia and small pox, are
now under control or wiped out entirely.

Dictation 3
1. She lost her job because the agency she worked for was
bought by another company.
2. She wouldn't have lost her job if the agency hadn't been
bought by another company.
3. Her job was eliminated because another company bought
the agency.
4. Her job wouldn't have been eliminated had another
company not bought the agency.

Dictation 6
1. In preparing for our future we need to consider
epidemics and how they spread.
2. It used to be that diseases were confined to a small area.
3. A deadly epidemic in Europe couldn't quickly spread to
South America.
4. Now, however, a serious disease could spread around the
world within a few days.

Fill-Ins
This lesson reviews some of the main grammar points that have been introduced in Units 1-3. Detailed
instructions for doing the Fill-Ins (with Speech Recognition) can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help screens (This Lesson) once you are in the Fill-Ins lesson. Please note that the highlighted words
in the answer sentences are linked to the Glossary. Sample sentences from the Fill-Ins lesson are:
(1) If they compete against her, she'll have to work harder. (3) He was hit by a car that had gone out of control.
(5) He could be a translator even if he couldn't walk. (7) If he hadn't been injured he could walk. (9) She
wouldn't have been depressed had she not lost her job. (11) He won't lose money unless stock prices go down.
(13) Joe's coffee shop was doing well until the other coffee shop opened. (15) There have been many great
successes in history. (17) Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection that has killed millions. (18) Sometimes a drug
can be used to fight an infection. (20) Drugs which used to be effective no longer work. (23) Epidemics could be
confined more easily in the past. (24) An epidemic could threaten our survival. (25) They are children, except
for the adult in the middle. (28) Nicole was still working when Sharon left.

43

New Dynamic English

Speech Practice
In addition to developing oral fluency, this lesson provides a means to review and focus attention on many of the
key language points developed in Units 1-3, especially Conditionals. Detailed instructions for using Speech
Recognition and for doing the Speech Practice lesson can be found in the Study Guides and also in the pull-down
Help screens.
This Speech Practice lesson has four sections: Sentence Reading, Answering Questions, Conditionals, and
Speech Quiz. Please note that the Score for the Speech Quiz is designed so that students can try to increase their
personal scores each time they do the quiz, rather than as a test. A record of each score can be found in the
Student Records.

5. Video Interactions, Module 7


This lesson shows a variety of native speakers in the following
situations: business and personal telephone conversations, a
dinner conversation and an interview. Students may view each
scene in a presentation mode, and also in an interactive mode
where the students can interact with the native speakers through
Speech Recognition (or mouse click) choices.
Detailed instructions for this lesson, and also for Speech
Recognition, can be found in the Study Guides and also in the
pull-down Help screens once you enter the lesson.
Each scene illustrates important language, such as phrases for using the telephone, and conditionals, one of the
main focus points for this module. Each scene can easily be role-played or can serve as a model for students to
write their own situation.
Business Telephone (Key Expressions)

Interview with an Actor

You've got a call on line three. Do you want to take it?


No, not right now. Could you take a message? Could
you find out who it is please? (polite requests)
He said it was important. (reported speech)
Okay, put him through. Ill take it.

Do I have to be truthful?
That's up to you. Whatever you decide is okay.
If you weren't an actor, what would you like to be?
I'd want to be a musician or a singer. (conditional)
How about something like a doctor or businessperson?
I'd prefer to do something where I could...
If you could live anywhere except where you live now,
where would it be? (conditional)
Let's see. You know, I think it might be nice to..
I think I could get a modeling job there.
I suppose I'd have to learn the language.
If you were really in trouble, who would you go to for help?
I wouldn't go to them unless everything else failed.

Do I have any messages?


Just a minute. Let me check... You've got two messages,
and a package.
Could you send them up to my room please?
Certainly sir. Ill send them up right away.
Thank you

A Telephone Invitation
I hope you can come... You can, can't you? (tag question)
When did you say it was? (reported speech)
I really wish I could, but I'm afraid I can't.
I've got to
meet a friend of mine for dinner.
Why don't you bring... (suggestion)
I'm sure she would
enjoy it. Can't you come? (negative question)
Let me call my friend and see what he says. If he says
okay, maybe we'll come. (conditional)
Well, I'll look forward to meeting him.
Maybe we'll see you tomorrow night then.
Great! See you then.

A Dinner Conversation
Well, what is it about the job that you like?
It would be fun working there. (implied conditional)
I'd be doing all sorts of different things.
So?
It's the money that bothers me. They said that was as much
as they could pay. (reported speech)
I've got to decide in the next day or two.
If you want my advice, I'd say you should give it a try.

44

Module 8 Lesson Map

Module 7 Summary - New Dynamic English 4


Vocabulary through Module 7:

approximately 2,000 words

Summary of Verbs, Regular and Irregular in each Unit


Regular Verbs
(1) Choices
accept
love
accomplish
miss
advise
need
agree
offer
apply for
open
appreciate
plan
arrange
print
close
promote
compete
reduce
consider
refuse
control
start
decide
stay on
die
stop
double
try
drop
turn out
eliminate
use
enjoy
walk
fail
want
focus
wish
force
wonder
happen
work
help
worry
injure
invest
join
learn
like
listen
live
look back
look for
look forward
look like

(2) Epidemic

(3) Space and Time

act
adapt
attack
cause
change
confine
continue
create
develop
fail
help
increase
inject
interfere
kill
live
need to
occur
prepare
prevent
receive
reproduce
study
survive
threaten
treat (a cold)
use
wipe out
work

arrange
arrive
call for
move
rain
realize
start
stop
talk
telephone
use
work

45

New Dynamic English

Irregular Verbs, their Past Tense and Past Participle forms


V

Lessons

be able to
become
be under control

(1,3)
(1,2)
(2)

begin
bring
break down
break out
build
buy
come
cut (costs)
do
drive
feel
feel sorry for
fight
fight off
find
get
get over (the flu)
give
go
go ahead
go out of control
grow
have
have to
hit
hurt
keep
lay off
leave
let
let go (fire)
lose
make (a decision)
make (causative)
mean
put
read
run (a shop)
say
see
sell
spend
spread
take a chance
take a risk
take (the job)
take pride in
think (about)
wear out
win

(1,2)
(1,2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(1)
(1,2,3)
(1)
(1,2,3)
(3)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(2)
(1)
(1,2,3)
(2)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(3)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(2)
(3)
(1)
(1)
(3)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1,2)
(2)
(1)

V(d) Past
was/were able to
became
was/were under
control
began
brought
broke down
broke out
built
bought
came
cut
did
drove
felt
felt sorry for
fought
fought off
found
got
got over
gave
went
went ahead
went out of control
grew
had
had to
hit
hurt
kept
laid off
left
let
let go
lost
made
made
meant
put
read
ran a shop
said
saw
sold
spent
spread
took a chance
took a risk
took (the job)
took pride in
thought (about)
wore out
won

46

V(n) Participle
been able to
become
been under control
begun
brought
broken down
broken out
built
bought
come
cut
done
driven
felt
felt sorry for
fought
fought off
found
gotten/got
gotten/got over
given
gone
gone ahead
gone out of control
grown
had
had to
hit
hurt
kept
laid off
left
let
let go
lost
made
made
meant
put
read
run a shop
said
seen
sold
spent
spread
taken a chance
taken a risk
taken (the job)
taken pride in
thought (about)
worn out
won

Module 8 Lesson Map

Module 8 Lesson Map


Unit 1:

The Secret Code


Setting a Trap
The Suspects
The Investigation
Focus Exercises
Guilty or Not Guilty?

Unit 2:

Matrix Vocabulary and Matrix Game


Historical Figures
A World Timeline
News Events
Great Accomplishments
Regions of the World

Unit 3:

UFOs:

For and Against

Presentation
For or Against?
Drakes Equation
Clocks and Rulers
Sentence Reordering Exercise

Unit 4:

Review Exercises (for Units 1-3)


Dictations
Fill-In Exercises w/SR
Speech Practice Exercises w/SR
Sentence Reading
Answering Questions
Inferences
Speech Quiz

Unit 5:

Video Interactions w/SR


Business Telephone
Friends on the Telephone
A UFO Interview
News Conference

47

New Dynamic English

1. The Secret Code


Setting a Trap; The Suspects; The Investigation; Focus Exercises; and Guilty or Not
Guilty?
In the context of solving a mystery, this unit focuses on making
inferences about what may or may not have happened in the past. In
Setting a Trap, The Suspects, and The Investigation, the language
models are presented along with comprehension checks. When these
three lessons are completed, students should do the Focus Exercises
lesson, which gives them practice making inferences. In the final
lesson, Guilty or Not Guilty, students decide which of the suspects
committed the crime. If their choices are correct, the rest of the lesson
is unlocked and one of two solutions is revealed. If their choices are incorrect, the lesson is
locked, and the students must review the previous lessons before they can try again.
Goals:
To be able to make inferences about a past sequence of events.
To be able to explain why and how a set of facts leads to a range of possible conclusions.
To be able to use language as a problem solving tool.
To be able to make inferences with different degrees of certainty.
Objective 1: To understand and express different degrees of logical connection between a series
of events in the past, using the modals (must, could, might, may, etc.) and logical connectives such
as as a result, even though, and unless.
Objective 2: To understand and express the difference between past conditionals and contraryto-fact conditionals when making inferences, such as:
If + subj. + V(d) --> subj. + V(d) modal + have+V(n) (past conditional and inference)
If + subj. + V(d)+ have+V(n) --> subj. + V(d) modal + have+V(n) (contrary to fact).

48

Module 8:

Unit 1, The Secret Code

Learning Points
adverb and noun clauses
Bob became suspicious that someone had gotten in to his drawer. It looked as if things had been
moved around. He wasnt sure if anyone had looked in the book. Only a few people could have
known that the book even existed. It kept a record of when the files were opened. Bob found out that
someone was getting into his files. He was sure that whoever it was had a copy of his key. He
couldnt figure out how they could have gotten it. It could detect when the drawer was opened. He
discovered that someone had accessed his files twice during the weekend
past possibilities
Someone may have opened the drawer. He may have been able to access the files because he knows a
lot about computers. She might have been at the office before 11:00 on Saturday. One possibility is
that a competitor sent someone to break in. The only way to have gotten in was if the drawer wasnt
locked. If it was before 11:00, it could have been Shirley.
past conditionals (in contrast to contrary-to-fact conditionals)
If + subj. + V(d) subj. (modal) have+V(n)
If she went to the office (if she had gone), she couldnt have been there past 11:00. They couldnt
have known about the book unless someone told them (had told them). The only way to have gotten in
was if the drawer wasnt locked (hadnt been locked). If the drawer was unlocked, the thief must have
done it during the day. If the files were accessed (had been accessed) after 2:00 on Saturday, it
couldnt have been Leslie.
modals, degrees of certainty and logical necessity in making inferences and predictions
(would, could, must have, could have, may have)
Suddenly he realized what must have happened. There are several companies that would be interested
in the project. Bob thinks they would pay a lot. Theres no way they could have known about Bobs
book. Shirley couldnt have been at the office at either time. Whoever wrote the program must have
known about computers. Since nobody opened Bobs drawer, there must have been another way to get
the codes.
passives, past perfect passive be+V(n), V(d) have+V(n) be+V(n)
He found that the files were accessed twice over the weekend. It looked as if things had been moved
around. It could detect when the drawer was opened. It kept a record of when the files were opened.
He checked to see when his desk drawer had been opened.
past perfect in past narrative and reported speech V(d) have+V(n)
He became suspicious that someone had gotten into his drawer. It looked as if things had been moved
around. He wasnt sure if anyone had looked in the book. He told several people that he had solved
the problem.

49

New Dynamic English

Classroom and Language Extension Activities


Step 1: Presentation
Introduce the Setting a Trap lesson in class, focusing on adverb and noun
clauses in sentences such as Bob became suspicious that someone had gotten in
to his drawer. Use Questions and Answers to get the students to think about
the problems in the story.
Step 2:

Oral Practice

In pairs, or small groups, have students practice summarizing the story.


Step 3: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 1 and Listening Focus 2.
Step 4: Presentation and Oral Practice:
Briefly review the The Suspects lesson, and then introduce the Investigation
lesson focusing on past possibilities, past conditionals/inferences, and modals.
In pairs or small groups, have students make inferences about each of the characters.
Step 5: Listening Focus
Assign students to do Listening Focus 3.
Step 6: Presentation
As a class, focus on the evidence and make inferences. Pay attention to the logical force of each
inference and the modals, such as must have or may have. Introduce the Guilty or Not Guilty lesson,
and ask students who already know the solution to keep quiet. Assign students to do Focus 4.

Follow-up
Once the lessons of the unit have been completed, assign the Practice Exercises.

Language Extension
Extend the language of this unit with two or more of the following classroom activities. If further
preparation is necessary, have the students work in pairs or groups first.
Classroom Activity 1: Answer the question:
would it be? and explain why.
Classroom Activity 2:
decision that you did.

If you could do one thing in your life over again, what

Think of a decision you had to make in the past. Explain why you made the

Classroom Activity 3: Video Project


Have the class write and produce a short mystery involving a crime, with witnesses and a suspect. Put
the suspect on trial. Two students should act as prosecuting attorneys and two students should act as
defense attorneys. Other students can be the witnesses and members of the jury. Then film the
meeting of the jury to decide the guilt or innocence of the defendant.
Classroom Activity 4: Movie Viewing
View a movie about a trial, such as Twelve Angry Men, or The Verdict. Present the key evidence
in the trial and explain why the evidence was important.
Classroom Activity 5: Book Report
Read a mystery book, such as an Agatha Christie mystery, or Sherlock Holmes. Summarize the story
and present the key evidence that leads to a solution.

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Module 8:

Unit 1, The Secret Code

Key Sentences (Partial Transcript)

the passwords and wrote them into his book.


he locked the drawer.

Setting a Trap

Early Monday morning, Bob arrived at the office


and checked his computer. He discovered that
someone had accessed files twice during the
weekend. He looked at the times and made a note
of them. Then he checked to see when his desk
drawer had been opened. To his surprise however,
nobody had opened it. There was no record on the
computer of entry into the drawer.

Bob is an engineer at Ace Electronics. He is the


lead researcher on an important project for the
company. The purpose of the project is to develop
a more efficient way to store energy, such as in very
small batteries. The project is nearing completion.
If it's successful it could bring a lot of business to
his company. Because of its importance, only a few
people are familiar with its details.

Then

Suddenly he realized what must have happened.


He still isn't sure who did it however. See if you can
find out who it is and how they did it.

Bob keeps his work on the company's computer


network. The only person who has complete access
to it is him. In order to access his personal files, it's
necessary to use a password.

The Suspects
There are several suspects: Dan Carter, Leslie Ho,
Shirley Long, and Phil Rose. Each of these people
has known about the project for at least six weeks.
That was when Bob first noticed that something was
wrong. Another possibility is that a competitor sent
someone to break in.

About six weeks ago Bob became suspicious that


someone had gotten into his desk drawer. He
wasn't sure, but it looked as if things had been
moved around. In his drawer, Bob kept a small code
book. In the book he kept the passwords necessary
to access his project files. He generally changed
the passwords every week or two, and the book was
where he wrote them down. He wasn't sure if
anyone had looked in the book. But, if someone
did, he wanted to find out who it was.

Shirley
Shirley is a computer programmer. She is very
smart, and she knows a lot about computer security.
She has been with the company for six months.
She used to work for a competitor, before Phil hired
her.

Only a few people could have known that the book


even existed. The first thing he did was write a
program that monitored access to his files. It kept
a record of when the files were opened. It also made
a record of any passwords which were used.

Shirley left for a vacation in Europe early Saturday


afternoon. Her flight left at 1:00 p.m. and she
checked in around noon. It takes at least an hour to
drive from the office to the airport.

Within a few days Bob found out that someone was,


in fact, into his files. This confirmed his
suspicions, so he continued to monitor the situation.
He thought about changing the lock on his desk
drawer, but decided against it. He didn't want the
guilty person to know that he was suspicious.

Phil
Phil Rose is Bob's boss. He is quite wealthy and
unmarried. Phil has recently been critical of the
company. He has met with several competitors to
discuss a possible sale of the company.

The files were usually accessed at night or on the


weekend. Since several of the people in his group
worked late at night and on weekends, he couldn't be
sure who it was. He was sure that whoever it was
had a copy of his key. He couldn't figure out how
they could have gotten it.

He doesn't know much about computers or


programming. He played golf on Saturday and
went to a concert Saturday night. He worked at the
office on Sunday afternoon for a couple of hours.
He met Shirley more than a year ago when she
worked for a competitor.

Last Thursday night he installed a silent alarm in his


desk drawer. It could detect when the drawer was
opened and would transmit the information into
another computer. Then, on Friday he told several
people that he had solved an important problem
related to the project. Before leaving, he changed

Dan
Dan Carter is a brilliant engineer, but a little strange,
and he likes to gamble. Dan and Leslie don't
appear to get along, but they often work together.

51

New Dynamic English

It couldnt have been Shirley unless she did it with


someone else.
If Shirley went to the office on Saturday, it must
have been at least an hour before her flight left.
If Shirley went to the office on Saturday, she might
have gotten the codes.
If Shirley didn't go to the office on Saturday, it
could have been Leslie or Dan.
Whoever got the codes might have written a
program to get them.
Phil couldn't have written the program.
If the files were accessed after 2:30 on Saturday, it
couldn't have been Leslie.
The woman with the large hat might have been
Shirley or Leslie.

He was at the office on Friday night and after 2:00


on Saturday afternoon. He says he was sick on
Sunday, but Bob thinks he went to a horse race.
Several competitors have tried to hire him. Bob
worries about his gambling debts.
Leslie
Leslie is an excellent employee, but she has personal
problems. According to Shirley, Leslie's husband
is very sick, and they need money. She left earlier
than usual on Friday to be with her husband.
Leslie was with her husband at a hospital until 11:00
on Saturday morning. She came to the office on
Saturday after leaving the hospital. It takes twenty
minutes to drive to the office from the hospital.
Several companies have tried to hire her, but she
seems happy at Ace.

Guilty or Not Guilty


Here is additional information that will help you to
make a final decision.

Competitors
There are several competitors who would be
interested in the project. Bob thinks they would
pay a lot of money for the details. Shirley used to
work for one of them. Several of the competitors
have tried to hire Dan and Leslie. Phil has met
with several of them. There's no way they could
have known about Bob's book. Bob doesn't know
if they are aware of Dan's gambling problem.

The program then shows one of the following two options,


and the students must choose the correct solution based
on all the evidence.

Option A:
On Saturday, files accessed at 9:30 a.m.
On Sunday, files accessed at 2:45 p.m.

The Investigation

Option B:
On Saturday, files accessed at 3:00 p.m.
On Sunday, files accessed at 2:45 p.m.

Here are some of the facts that Bob found. He


found that the files were accessed twice over the
weekend. They were accessed once on Saturday and
again on Sunday. Nobody opened Bob's desk
drawer where the new codes were written down.

If Option A, then the guilty parties are Shirley and


Phil. If Option B, then the guilty parties are Dan
and Phil
Solution for Option A: Shirley and Phil.
Shirley and Phil are planning to leave Ace and get
married. They are getting information for the
company Shirley used to work for. Shirley
discovered Bob's code book six weeks ago while he
was in a meeting. The drawer was unlocked, so
she didn't need a key. When she realized that he
often changed the codes, she wrote a program to
find the codes. The program recorded the first and
last 500 keystrokes entered on Bob's computer each
day. With that data, it was possible to find the
passwords by doing a simple search. On Saturday
she came to the office, ran the program, and got the
passwords. She wrote them down and left them in
Phil's office. Then she went to the airport. On
Sunday, Phil used the passwords to access the files.
He used the Internet to send them to the competitor.

Video cameras showed that Leslie left at 2:30 and


Dan left around 4:30 on Saturday afternoon. A
woman came to the office on Saturday morning, but
it isn't clear who it was because she was wearing a
large hat. It doesn't show when she left. Phil was at
the office on Sunday afternoon.
Sample Inferences:
If it was Shirley, she couldnt have done it alone.
If it was Shirley, someone else must have helped
her.
Since nobody opened Bobs drawer, there must have
been another way to find the codes.
If the files were accessed after 2:30 on Saturday, it
couldn't have been Leslie.
If the drawer was unlocked, then the thief must have
done it during the day.
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Module 8:

Unit 1, The Secret Code

Money had already been put into a Swiss bank


account.
Solution for Option B: Dan and Phil
Phil and Dan are planning to leave Ace and join a
competitor. Dan needed money to pay off his
gambling debts, so it was easy for Phil to get him to
help.
Phil discovered Bob's code book six weeks ago
while Bob was in a meeting. The drawer was
unlocked. When Phil realized that the codes were
being changed, Dan wrote a program to find the
codes. On Saturday Dan got the passwords from
Bob's computer. He had to be careful, so he waited
until Leslie left. Then he wrote them down and left
them in Phil's office.

53

New Dynamic English

Student Follow-up

Focused Listening
Focus 1

1. Use the past tense to narrate a series of three or more


events. Try to create a sense of suspense, as in a
mystery story.

Focus on Setting a Trap. Listen carefully to the story,


and make notes of the important points. These will help
you in your investigation.

I heard something move in the other room. I got up and


went to the door. Suddenly the door opened and I saw
a ghost!

Listen for language where Bob wasnt sure about


something, or where a possibility is being presented.

2. In your series of three or more events, try using the


past perfect tense in one or more places. How does it
change the feeling of the narrative?

He became suspicious that someone had gotten into his


drawer.
It looked as if things had been moved around.
He wasnt sure if anyone had looked in the book.

I had heard something move in the other room when I


got up and went to the door. Suddenly the door opened
and I saw a ghost.
I heard something move in the other room. I got up and
had gone to the door when suddenly the door opened
and I saw a ghost.

Goal
To become familiar with how to present an uncertain
set of events in the past.

Student Follow-up

3. In the same series of three or more events, try using


other ways to present the events. Which one do you
like best?

1. List four possibilities that are presented in the story


and indicate what you think actually happened in each
case.
2. Write a summary of the key events in the story,
including a timeline.

After hearing something move in the other room I got up


and went to the door. Suddenly the door opened and I
saw a ghost!

Focus 3

Focus 2

Focus on The Investigation, and then the Focus Exercises.


Make a note of any new information, for example that the
files were accessed on both Saturday and Sunday. You
should use all of your notes when making inferences in
this lesson.

Focus on The Suspects. Click on each suspect and listen


carefully to the information provided. You will also see
information about each suspect in notes on the screen. In
order to prepare for the next section, The Investigation,
you should make a summary chart of who could have been
at the office at different times over the weekend.

Language Focus
Using cause/effect statements with modals and
conditionals to express logical inferences about the past.
The modals indicate the logical force of the inference.
must = necessity
might = possibility
could = potentiality/ability

Language Focus
Note how experience and action are expressed differently:
Experience: He has met with several competitors.
She used to work for a competitor.
Action/Event: She left for a vacation early Saturday
afternoon. He played golf on Saturday.

Please note the following:


It could have been Shirley (who did it) = Shirley could
have done it.
If it was Shirley (who did it) = If Shirley did it

In a narrative, the past tense V(d) is used to describe a


series of past events. The present perfect have+V(n)
and past perfect V(d) have+V(n) forms are used to
express experience or results, and do not carry a narrative
forward in time.

Goal
To understand the difference between a past
conditional and a contrary-to-fact conditional.

Goal
Students will learn how to carry a narrative forward in
time by using actions or events to establish specific
points in time. Use of the present perfect or past
perfect indicates a state of completion, but does not
directly express an action. The actions are implied
by the fact that they have happened.

To understand how modals express the logical force


of an inference.

54

Module 8:

Unit 1, The Secret Code

Student Follow-up
Present a plan for last week that depended on the
condition of something, such as the weather.
1. Assume that you dont know what the weather (or
condition) was, since you werent there. Use
conditionals to infer what may or may not have
happened.
2. Then assume that you know what the weather (or
condition) was, and express how things might have
been different than they were.
According to the plan, if it was really cold, they must have
come back early. If it was sunny, Im sure they played
volleyball. Even if it rained, they probably went on a
hike. Etc.
If it hadnt been so cold, they wouldnt have come back so
early. If it had been sunny, Im sure they would have
played volleyball. Even if it had rained, they probably
would have gone on a hike.

Focus 4
Focus on Guilty or Not Guilty. Listen carefully to the
additional piece of evidence. This provides the key to
making a final choice about who did the crime.
After you decide on the solution, mark guilty or not guilty
next to each suspect.
If you are correct, you will hear
additional information about the solution. If your
choices are incorrect, you must go back and review the
case before trying again. You will not be allowed to try
again until you have completely reviewed at least one
lesson, including True/False questions.
Please note that when you return to the Guilty or Not
Guilty lesson you may be presented with a different set of
facts as the final key, which means the solution may be
different. So please be careful.

Student Follow-up
1. Explain how you reached your verdict. Give a stepby-step analysis of the evidence that led you to your
conclusions and explain the inferences you made.
2. Write a one-page paper about what you would do if
you were in Bobs position. Explain all the
consequences of your actions.

55

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
8 (1)

The Secret Code:

Exercise A

Match the person with the correct statement about that person.
a. He couldnt have done it alone because he doesnt know anything about computers.
b. He might have done it since he needs to pay for gambling debts.
c. He installed an alarm in his drawer so he would know if it had been opened.
d. She might have done it because her husband is sick and they need money.
e. She couldnt have done it alone since she was in Europe on Sunday.

Phil _____

Shirley _____

Dan _____

Leslie _____

56

Bob _____

Module 8:

Unit 1, The Secret Code

Practice Exercises
8 (1)

The Secret Code:

Exercise B

Fill in the blanks with the verb form which best fits the context, either past or past perfect, active
or passive voice.
1. About six weeks ago Bob got suspicious that someone (get) ____________________ into his
drawer. He wasnt sure, but it looked as if things (move) _____________________. Bob
kept a small code book.

He generally (change) _________________________ the passwords

every week or two, and the book was where he wrote them down. He wasnt sure if anyone
(look) ____________________ in the book. The first thing he did was write a program that
monitored access to his files.

It kept a record of when the files (open) ___________________.

It also made a record of any passwords which (use) ________________________.

2. Early Monday morning Bob (arrive)______________________ at the office and checked


the computer.

He discovered that someone (access) _______________________ his files

twice during the weekend. He looked at the times and (make) _______________________
a note of them. Then he (check) ________________________ to see when his drawer
(open) ____________________________.

3. He was sure that whoever (break in) ________________________ had a copy of his key.
He couldn't figure out how they (can) _________________ have gotten it. He (think)
_____________________ about changing the lock on his desk drawer, but he
(decide) _____________________ against it. He didn't want the guilty person to know
that he was suspicious.

57

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
8 (1)

The Secret Code:

Exercise C:

Making Inferences

Read the facts, and then choose the strongest inference (negative or positive) that can be made from
the facts provided. Use only the facts provided below.
1. Facts: No one opened the desk drawer containing the new codes. The files had been accessed,
and the codes were the only way to access the files.
a. There might have been another way to access the codes.
b. There must have been another way to access the codes.
c. There couldnt have been another way to access the codes.

2. Facts: Whoever wrote the program knows about computers. Dan knows a lot about computers.
Phil doesnt know anything about computers.
a. Dan must have written the program.
b. Phil might have written the program.
c. Phil must not have written the program.

3. Facts: Shirleys flight left at 1:00 p.m., and she checked in around noon. It takes at least an hour
to drive from the office to the airport.
a. Shirley might have been in the office at 11:30 a.m.
b. Shirley must have been in the office at 9:00 a.m.
c. Shirley couldnt have been in the office at noon.

4. Facts: Dan was in the office after 2:00 p.m. on Saturday afternoon but not on Sunday. Leslie was
also in the office on Saturday afternoon. Phil went into the office for a couple of hours on Sunday
afternoon, but he wasnt in the office on Saturday. The files were accessed on both days.
a. If the files were accessed on Saturday morning, it might have been Dan.
b. Since the files were accessed on both days, neither Dan nor Phil could have done it alone.
c. Dan must have done it if the files were accessed on Saturday afternoon.

5. Facts: Leslie was with her husband at the hospital until 11:00 a.m. She came into the office on
Saturday after leaving the hospital. Leslies husband is very sick, and they need money.
a. Leslie must have done it because she and her husband need money.
b. Since Leslie needs money, she might have done it.
c. Leslie couldnt have done it if the files were accessed Saturday afternoon.

58

Module 8:

Unit 1, The Secret Code

Practice Exercises
8 (1)

The Secret Code:

Exercise D

Complete the sentences with the correct ending.


sentence ending.

Write the number of the sentence next to its

1. The project is nearing completion. If its successful . . .


2. Because of its importance . . .
3. In order to access the files, . . .
4. He became suspicious . . .
5. In the book he kept the passwords . . .
6. He wasnt sure if . . .
7. Only a few people could have known . . .
8. It kept a record of when . .
9. He didnt want the guilty person to know . . .
10. He couldnt figure out . . .

(Sentence Endings)
____ . . . only a few people are familiar with its details.
____ . . . that someone had broken into his drawer.
____ . . . its necessary to use a password.
____ . . . anyone had looked in the book.
____ . . . necessary to access the project files.
____ . . . it could bring a lot of business to the company.
____ . . . that the book even existed.
____ . . . the files were opened.
____ . . . how they could have gotten the key.
____ . . . that he was suspicious.

59

New Dynamic English

Practice Exercises
8 (1)

The Secret Code:

Exercise E

Complete the sentences with the correct ending.


sentence ending.

Write the number of the sentence next to its

1. There are several competitors . . .


2. Nobody opened Bobs desk drawer, . . .
3. When she realized that he often changed the codes, . . .
4. If she went to the office on Saturday . . .
5. He may have been able to access the files . . .
6. They couldnt have known about Bobs book . . .
7. Since nobody opened Bobs drawer, . . .
8. Whoever wrote the program . . .
9. The only way to have gotten into the drawer without a key was . . .
10. He might have done it . . .

(Sentence Endings)
____ . .