Anda di halaman 1dari 24

The Method for Beginning Guitarists

Kale Good

Part I.

The Basics

Lesson 1 Adduction
The object of this exercise is to adduct the fingers, that is to pull them toward each other as you use them, and to pass
smoothly from finger to finger with no excess motion.
Only the very tips of the fingers should touch the strings.
The arm should hang relaxed directly below the hand at all times, the wrist should remain as unbent as possible
throughout, much as it is when the arm hangs at rest at your side.
The lower finger is slowly placed on the string while the higher note is still sounding and the higher finger is gently
relaxed just as the lower note is played. (lower and higher = pitch!)
Each time you cross to a new string the arm moves slightly up or down from the elbow, carrying the relaxed finger
over the new string, while the previous note is still sounding; the arms motion will carry the thumb along with it.
The thumb will remain lightly held approximately behind the second finger, the thumbs tip joint unflexed!
The thumb should not be opposed, that is rolled inward toward the center of the palm, if the thumb is pressed at all
it should roll slightly away from the center of the palm, so there is no pressure on the carpal tunnel.

4 2

4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2
4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2

2

4
3
2
1
2
3
5
5
4

This example is about as high a fret as is practical on an acoustic or classical guitar. One may begin on even smaller
frets with an electric guitar or a guitar with a cut-away.
Continue on the next lower fret:

4 2

4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2
4 2
4 2
4 2 4 2

4

5
3
2
1
2
3
5
4 2

Move down one fret at a time until you you finish at the first fret:

42
8

4 2

3
2

1. Adduction
When appropriate, continue high on the neck in whole tones, moving gradually down the neck as above. Most people
can play 4 to 1 in whole tones almost immediately.

4 1

4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1
4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1

5
3
2
1
2
3
5
4 1

3 to 1 will take a little longer,

3 1

3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1
3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1

5
3
2
1
2
3
5
3 1

And finally, 4 to 2 will take considerable time and patience to progress to the whole tone,

4 2

4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2
4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2

5
3
2
1
2
3
5
4 2

Eventually, you will want to master 4 to 1 at a minor third.

4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 1

42

5
5 4 3 2

2
3
1
4
4 1

4 1

4 1

These exercises are only played with the non-adjacent pairs of fingers; 4 to 2, 3 to 1, and 4 to 1. Once fluent they can
be reverse; 2 to 4, 1 to 3, and 1 to 4.

Lesson 2 lilypond-book pdf latex-progra


lily-output-dir=ly-pdf $$i
2.1. A Song on Two Strings

Ode To Joy
Beethoven

= 100
5

13

0
3

0
3

3 3

0 1 0
1

1 1

0 1 0
3

3
0

0
3

1 1

2.2. Tuning the guitar


There are three basic pieces of knowledge you need before
you can tune your guitar successfully. In addition to these
three pieces of knowledge, there are some tips and pointers
that will help you succeed in tuning your own guitar.
First, you need to understand how to read a tuner. The
fuel-gauge graphic Figure 2.1 shows a typical tuner. The
string is in tune when the tuner is centered. If it is on the
Figure 2.1.: A Basic Tuner
left, the string is flat. This means it is too low in pitch and
needs tightening. If the string is on the right, the string is
sharp. It is too tight and needs loosening. Next, you need to know the names of the strings. Figure 2.2 has the name of each
string listed at the top.
Finally, you need to know how to adjust the tension on the strings. This is done by turning the tuners, located on the
headstock. Turning the tuners counter-clockwise tightens. Clockwise motion loosens the strings.

Basic Procedure
1. Play a string.

2. lilypond-book pdf latex-program=xelatex lily-output-dir=ly-pdf $$i

AA /B

BC C /D

D D /E

EF F /G

G G /A

Table 2.1.: All The Notes


2. Make sure that the note indicated on the tuner is the correct note for the string you are tuning.
3. Observe the tuners reading and adjust accordingly. Repeat until you are in tune
If the tuner displays an incorrect note, use Table 2.1 to correct it. The table lists all the notes from low (flat) to sharp (high).
If you are tuning to E and the tuner reads D, youre very flat. Tighten the string until the gauge reads E, then use the basic
procedure until you are in tune (notes joined by / indicate a single note that has two names).

Tips
Tuning your guitar every day will make the tuning task easier and faster, as well as making you sound better.
Make sure that you are turning the right tuner! This can be
done by following the string up to the correct tuning peg.
I advise doing this until you are very comfortable. If you
dont, you might have the same experience that I had when
I was learning: Broken Strings!
Some tuners dont have a gauge, but use blinking lights instead. The faster the light is blinking, the further out of tune
you are. As you get closer to in tune, the blinking will slow
down.

2.3. Using
the Metronome
Figure 2.2.: String Names

Talk about how to use a metronome and metronome marks.


This should really come after the exercise, but Im having
some formating issues.

2.4. Finger
Independence

The Creepy Crawler Exercise

= 80

10

2. lilypond-book pdf latex-program=xelatex lily-output-dir=ly-pdf $$i

2.5. Technical
Goals of Book 1
Exercise

Completion

Adduction Exercises
Tuning Using an Electric Tuner
Chromatic Finger Permutations
7th Chords: A7, E7, D7
D Major Scale
Using a Metronome
Strumming Patterns: 8ths & Ties
Alternate Picking
Major Chords: A, D, E
Major Chord G
Scale: C Major
Strumming Variations: Boom-Chuck, Chunka-Chunka
Chromatic Finger Variations 8ths @ 80 bpm

Lesson 3 i
3.1. Developing Pick Accuracy

Prelude
Kale Good

= 88
5

13

10

0
0

0
0

3
0

3
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

2
0

0
0

0
0

10

2
0

5
0

10

5
0

12
0

0
0

12

8
0
0

0
0

10
0

0
0

0
0

7
0
0

0
0

3.2. Lateral Independence

5 Chord Prep Exercises: Level One

2
2
2

2
2
2

3
2

2
2
2

2
2

2
2

Achieve buzz tones and bell tones while switching between note-pairs within a bar. Note that these are three separate
exercises rather than one continuous exercise.

3.2.1. Under Pressure


I can still vividly remember my time in college driving to my guitar instructors house for our weekly lessons. Most of the
year I drove there with the heat blazing, trying to make sure my fingers stayed warm so that I could play my best. Regardless
of how well I had prepared, I always seemed to play the small (and large) mistakes that I fixed over the course of the week.
Now that Im a teacher, I see this often with my own students. One of the most common comments I get is I played this
better at home. Students often feel like this is the musicians version of The dog ate my homework (and seem to worry
that I dont believe them), but the truth of the matter is that every musician has experienced this in their own lessons. Ive
found that it is relatively easy to tell the dierence between a student who has not practiced and a student who is having
diculty. Which is to say: Relax, I believe you when you tell me you had it right at home!

3. i
There is a saying that the best playing gets done in the practice room, and its true! As soon as we step outside of the practice
room, we are under pressure to perform according to the exceptions of the audience, whether it is a teacher, some friends, or
an arena of adoring fans.
While there is a lot to be said for learning to deal with the nervous feelings and nervous energy that accompany a performance, today I want to focus on a dierent way that you can prepare for outside-the-practice-room playing. In this
newsletter, I want to show you how you can practice playing under pressure. This is, after all, the situation we encounter as
soon as we leave the warm, comfortable cocoon of our practice room.
Record yourself: Knowing that youll have to listen back to yourself playing, mistakes and all, is a great way to add
some pressure (it also has a ton of other benefits)
Play x-number of times in a row, without mistakes: If youve told yourself that you wont stop practicing until you
play 10 times in a row without mistakes, youre going to be under a lot of pressure by the time you play 9 times in a
row correctly. Number 10 better be right, or else your back at 0!
Play Cold: Our best playing happens when were all warmed up; unfortunately, guitar lessons usually get started o
cold. Find out what happens when you try to play without any warm up, and investigate how you can prepare for
playing cold.
Tell a partner/roommate/parent that you will do a chore for them for a week (or a few days, depending on the chore)
if you make a mistake while playing the piece: This makes you accountable to someone else, much like a lesson or
performance. For added diculty, tell them that you have to play x number of times in a row!
These four pointers can help you prepare for under-pressure situations from lessons to performances and beyond. Use them
to help avoid the biggest source of in-lesson frustration.

Lesson 4 i
4.1. More Fingers, More Strings

Aura Lee
Traditional

13

= 144
1

0
3

0
2

0
3

10

Lesson 5 Four Finger Chromatic Exercises in Scales


The following groups may be played from the sixth string to the first and back,
beginning in the high positions near the body and working gradually downward to
the first position.

1234

2341

3412

4123

1324

2413

3241

4132

1423

2314

3142

4213

Keep the weight on each finger until the next is placed, then relax it. There is
no need to actively pick up that is to say to extend the relaxing finger.

1342

2134

3421

4213

1243

2431

3124

4312

When changing strings, shift the whole arm straight up and down from the
elbow; the thumb will follow. There is no need to bend the wrist or lift the
elbow outward.

1432

2143

3214

4321

Keep the weight of the arm under your hand at all times, with the thumb
approximately behind the second finger.

Place each finger on its tip, adducting it. As you progress to the wider frets
you may place the first finger flat, in a hinge bar. This will help keep the forearm suppine, the elbow relaxed, and
make placement of the fourth finger much easier, in addition to being a valuable skill in itself.
A number of dierent right hand techniques may be used over time as the left
hand becomes more fluent.
One may also combine these with slurring, shifting or other left hand skills.
As the scales become more familiar, use the rhythms below to build up speed.
Aim to achieve 80 bpm with the final rhythm by then end of this book.

Rhythms for Speed


0 1
0 2
0
3

0
3

0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3

0 0 2 2 3 3
3 3

11

0 2 3
3

Lesson 6 i
A7

E7

V Chord

IV Chord
Table 6.1.: Your First Chords

6.1. Introduction To Rhythms


wave your arm around and say these rhythms:
|: Pie Apple Pie Pie :|
|: Pie Apple Pie Apple :|
|: Pie Pie Apple Apple :|
|: Pie Apple Apple Apple :|
Figure 6.1.: Basic Rhythms

D Major Scale
0 2 3
0 2
0 2 4

2 0
2 0
4 2 0

Figure 6.2.: Apple Pie Rhythms


12

Lesson 7

5 Chord Prep Exercises: Level Two

2
2

2
3

2
2

1
2

1
2

2
3

3
2

2
1

2
2

2
2

13

Lesson 8 i

Name
Whole Note/Rest
Half Note/Rest
Quarter Note/Rest

Note

Rest

Value

4 Pies

Table 8.1.: Notes, Rests, and Their Time Values

14

2 Pies
1 Pie

8. i

?????? ?????

11

??

0
0

2
4

2
4

15

0
4

0
2

Lesson 9
Kale! Centerline Images!

I Chord

V Chord

IV Chord

(The Tonic Chord)

(The Dominant Chord )

(The Subdominant Chord)

Table 9.1.: Primary Chords in A Major

9.1. Chords: An Introduction


The names above the chord charts in Table 9.1 are the absolute name of the chords. These chords are always A, D, and E,
no matter what key you play in. The names below are the relative names of the chords when playing in the key of A. These
names tell us about the relationship between the chords. These relationships will change depending on what key we are in.
Consequently, the relative names will change to fit the key we are playing in. To sum it up, the absolute name can never
change, the relative name can.
Place your fingers on the frets and strings indicated. Strum through the strings, being careful to play the open strings
indicated by an o above the nut and avoiding open strings with an x above the nut.
These chord diagrams have the root note indicated in red. The root note is the note from which the chord gets its name;
the root note of the A major chord is A. Some chords seem to have more than one root note indicated; the duplications are
simply the root note in a higher or lower octave.
The basic chords are made of a root note, a third, and a fifth. Well talk about this more when we look at intervals and
minor chords

9.2. Chord Exercises: Changes


Talk about it. 1 minute changes primarily.

9.3. Tone Production on The guitar


Talk about it. Also, talk about reviewing previous songs

16

Lesson 10

song

0
2

0
1

4
0

0
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
9

11

13

0
0
6
7

0
0

0
6

0
0

0
2

0
0

0
2

1
2

10.1. D Major: More

D Major Extension

0 2 3 5 3 2 0
3

3 2 0 2 3

10.1.1. G major Chord Prep Exercises


Here they are!

17

0
1
2

Lesson 11

??? ??? ????? ?????

0
2
0

0
4

Note

Rest

Value

Whole Note/Rest

4 Beats

Eighth Note/Rest

Name

Quarter Note/Rest

3 0

Half Note/Rest

0
2
0

3 0
2

Table 11.1.: Notes, Rests, and Their Time Values

18

2 Beats
1 Beat
1/2 Beat

11. i

???? ??? ? ?????? ????

2
2

19

Lesson 12

|: Pie Pull Apple Apple :|


|: Pie Pull Pie Apple :|
|: Pie Apple Pull Pie :|
|: Apple Apple Pull Pie :|
Figure 12.1.: Basic Rhythms

C Major
0
0
0

0
2

0
3

0
3

Figure 12.2.: Ties

20

Lesson 13

G Major

D Major

Primary Chords in The Key


of G

C Major

I Chord

V Chord

IV Chord

(Tonic)

(Dominant)

(Subdominant)

Table 13.1.: Primary Chords in G Major


The Primary Chords in the Key of G require the largest amount of cross-fretboard finger independence yet! The G chord
has many varieties; Ive chosen one here that will allow you to keep a finger down, at least between some of the changes! Use
the skills and tool-sets youve acquired in improving your other chord changes; 1-minute changes and using chord changes
during your rhythm guitar practice are both great ways to get these changes integrated into your playing. As you might of
guessed by now, well be looking at some songs with these chords in them in a few weeks, but this time, it will be Choose Your
Own Adventure! The songs are really exciting (read: they are by people who arent old enough to be your grandparents-or
even your parents). But until then, you can do rework some of the songs we previously learned and play them with your new
chords.

Figure 13.1.:

21

Lesson 14

Soldier's Joy

0
2

Traditional

3
2

2
4

0
0
2

3
2

2 2

2 0

0
3

2.

1.

0 2 3 5
2
3
3 3
0 2
3

11

15

0 2 3 5

0 2 3 5
2

0 2

1. 2.

2 0

0
3

22

3 3

0 2

3 3

Lesson 15

i The Blues in A

Rhythm: Chunka Chunka!


I | IV | I | I |
IV | IV | I | I |
V | IV | I | V |
alternate last line:
V | IV | I fancy stu | more fancy stu |
fancy stu can be either a turn around or an ending.

A7

I Chord

E7

V Chord
Table 15.1.: 7th chords in A

23

D7

IV Chord

Lesson 16

The End

16.1. This is the end! Good work.


You know how to read basic rhythms. You know a nice handful of chords and a couple of songs you can strum around the
campfire. Your fingers are getting faster and faster, your picking is getting more and more agile. You know a nice number of strumming patterns, and you can spice em up with the Boom-Chuck and the Chunka-Chunka strumming pattern
variations. And you had fun getting here. Awesome!
Now move on to book 2 and continue the awesomeness.

24