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M S RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

BANGALORE
(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)

SYLLABUS
(For the Academic year 2015 2016)
V & VI Semester, B E

Civil Engineering Department

History of the Institute:


M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology was started in 1962 by the late Dr. M.S. Ramaiah, our Founder
Chairman who was a renowned visionary, philanthropist, and a pioneer in creating several landmark
infrastructure projects in India. Noticing the shortage of talented engineering professionals required to
build a modern India, Dr. M.S. Ramaiah envisioned MSRIT as an institute of excellence imparting
quality and affordable education. Part of Gokula Education Foundation, MSRIT has grown over the
years with significant contributions from various professionals in different capacities, ably led by Dr.
M.S. Ramaiah himself, whose personal commitment has seen the institution through its formative
years. Today, MSRIT stands tall as one of Indias finest names in Engineering Education and has
produced around 35,000 engineering professionals who occupy responsible positions across the globe.
History of Department:
The Civil Engineering Department was started in the year 1971. Master program M Tech in Structural
Engineering was started in the year 1984. Another milestone was achieved in the year 1994; the
department was recognized as Research Center. Over four decades the department has carved its niche
in the areas of academics, research, consultancy, collaborative projects, and publications. The
department was awarded distinction of 5 years of accreditation by NBA when it was evaluated for
third time. Over 12 research scholars have been awarded Ph.D. degree and more than 18 research
scholars are pursuing Ph.D. and M.Sc. degree in Engineering. Over 250 technical papers in the reputed
journals and conferences are the outcome of active research of the department. The Department holds
a patent for Total Replacement of Sand in Concrete by Pond Ash (Patent No 244063). The department
has been actively involved in conducting conferences, workshops, FDPs, Site Visits, Project Tours
and several students related programs to provide a platform for sharing and spreading the latest
developments in the field of Civil Engineering.

Sl.
Name
No.
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34

Dr. R. Prabhakara
Dr. C.G. Puttappa
Dr. Raja Gopal Reddy
Dr. K.P. Nagaraja
Dr. S.M. Naik
Dr. E.T. Arasu
Dr. H. Narendra
Sri B.G. Jagadeesh Kumar
Sri K.V. Manjunath
Dr. B. Umadevi
Sri V Harish
Smt. T.GeethaKumari
Smt. Usha. C
Smt B Suguna Rao
Smt N Sreelatha
Sri R Mourougane
Smt. Jyothi Roopa.S K
Smt. J. Sumalatha
Smt.Jyothi.M.R
Ms.Swathi.T.S
Sri.R. Manjunath
Sri. PrasanthSunagar
Sri. Anil Kumar R
Niranjan G Hiremath
Dr H.U.Raghavendra
Sri Basavanagowda G M
Sri Santhosh D
Sri Nambiyanna B
Sri Raje Gowda
Sri Harish M L
Sri Vinod kumar H A
Sri Charan Prasad M
Smt Shilpa D N
Smt Nagashree B

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Ms. Kavitha G
Sri. S.Padmanathan
Sri. Mithun. C
Sri. Pramod Kumar.M
Sri. K.F.Jojo
Sri. M.Sreedhara
Sri. M.Chandrashekaraiah
Sri. R.Sreenivasan
Sri. Noorul Haq
B C Honnalinge Gowda

Qualification
FACULTY LIST
PhD
PhD
PhD
PhD
PhD
PhD
PhD
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
PhD
M.E (Ph.D)
M.E (Ph.D)
M.E (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M.E (Ph.D)
M.E (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech
M. Tech
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
PhD
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. E (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech (Ph.D)
M. Tech
M. Tech
M. Tech
STAFF LIST
B.Com
M.A
B.E
Diploma
SSLC
SSLC
SSLC
SSLC
PUC
SSLC
3

Designation
Professor & Head
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Associate Prof
Associate Prof
Associate Prof
Associate Prof
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
Asst Professor
SDA
SDA
Instructor
Instructor
Mechanic
Mechanic
Mechanic
Mechanic
Mechanic
Attender

VISION AND MISSION OF THE INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT

THE VISION OF MSRIT


To evolve into an autonomous institution of International standing for imparting quality technical
education.

THE MISSION OF THE MSRIT


MSRIT shall deliver global quality technical education by nurturing a conducive learning environment for
a better tomorrow through continuous improvement and customization.

QUALITY POLICY
We at M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore strive to deliver comprehensive, continually
enhanced, global quality technical and management education through an established Quality
Management system Complemented by the Synergistic interaction of the stake holders concerned.

THE VISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING


To become a premier department to impart state of the art, technical knowledge and professional skills
through an effective learning system with research ambience to produce global quality Civil Engineers

for sustainable society.

THE MISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING


To transform young minds into productive Civil Engineers using basic technical knowledge and

professional skills through contemporary curriculum and effective learning systems.


To develop technology competencies to transfer the knowledge and skill in challenging applications such
as analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of life line Civil Engineering projects.
To inculcate collaborating research capabilities through exposure to the modern engineering tools and
techno innovative Process
projects toof
become
globally
Civil
Engineers
imbibed
with ethical values and
deriving
the competent
vision and
mission
of the
department
leadership capabilities.

Process of deriving the vision and mission of the department is shown in Figure below

Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs)


Bachelor of engineering graduates of Civil Engineering program of M S Ramaiah Institute of
Technology should attain the following PEOs within three to five years of graduation.
PEO 1

Application of contemporary civil engineering knowledge and skills for the socioeconomic development through projects.

PEO 2

Transferring the technical knowledge for optimal solution in analysis, design,


implementation and maintenance of lifeline Civil Engineering projects.

PEO 3

Involvement in research and techno-innovative projects of globally competitive

PEO 4

Effective communication and professional skills along with ethical values to work
in multi-disciplinary environments with better managerial skills.

Process of Deriving the PEOs of the programme

The programme outcomes of the Bachelor degree in Civil Engineering;


a.

Application of mathematics, science and engineering knowledge applicable to civil engineering


to solve engineering problems.

b.

Conduct experiments, investigate complex field problems to analysis and interpret the
experimental data.

c.

Analysis and design of a system, component, or process to meet the desired economic, social
and environmental needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety.

d.

Assessment on the need for the research and usage of research methods for an optimum solution
in Civil engineering practice.

e.

Usage of modern engineering tools and skills to give solution to complex problems in the field of
Civil engineering.

f.

Demonstration of Civil engineering knowledge and skills to assess societal, legal and cultural
issues related to civil engineering practices.

g.

Identify Civil engineering issues and giving solutions in the environmental context for the
sustainable development.
6

h.

Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities in professional practice of civil


engineering.

i.

Effective functioning of both individually and in a team, in multidisciplinary environments.

j.

Communicate effectively and good presentation skills.

k.

Understanding of the engineering and management principles required for project and finance
management.

l.

Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

Process of deriving the Programme Outcomes


The Programme outcomes are defined taking into account the feedback received from faculty,
alumni, Industry and also from guidelines put across by regulatory/professional bodies and
graduate attributes which are in line with programme educational objectives. The following
Figure indicates the information flow.

CORRELATION BETWEEN THE POS AND THE PEOS


The correlation between the Programme outcomes and Program Educational objectives are
mapped in the Table shown below:
Correlation between the POs and the PEOs
Sl.
No.

Programme Educational Objectives

Programme Outcomes
a

h i

Application of Civil engineering


knowledge and skills to analyze and
1

design of real life problems with the

X X X

consideration of socio-economic and

X X X

environmental aspects for the sustainable


development.
Perception on contemporary technical
2

knowledge for innovative thinking,

creativity and research in Civil

X X X X

engineering.
Effective communication and professional
3

skills along with professional ethics to

integrate the technical knowledge with

professional practice.
Engage in life-long learning to have
4

competency in handling the professional

X X

X X

tasks and enterprising.


Curriculum Breakdown Structure:
The curriculum of Civil Engineering programme is so structured to include all the courses that
together satisfy the requirements of the programme and specific criteria prescribed by the
Professional Bodies The Course code, Course title, the number of contact hours and the
number of credits for each course are given in the following table. The courses are grouped
in line with the major components of the curriculum namely: (i) Mathematics and Basic
sciences, (ii) Basic Engineering courses, (iii) Humanities and Social Sciences, (iv)
Professional core courses, (v) Electives (Department and Open Electives).

Breakup of Credits for BE Degree Curriculum. ( I to VIII Semester)


Sem

HSS

BS

ES

PCS

Professional

Other

Project /

Total

Electives

Electives

Seminar/

Credits

Internship
I

II

06

20

24

III

04

21

IV

25

25

25

VI

21

04

25

VII

14

08

03

25

VIII

08

17

25

Total

06

24

24

106

20

03

17

200

50
25
25

HSS- Humanities and Social Sciences

- 06

BS - Basic Sciences (Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry)

- 24

ES - Engineering Sciences (Materials, Workshop, Drawing, Computers).

- 24

PCS- Professional Core Subjects

- 106

Prof. Ele - Professional Electives, relevant to the chosen specialization branch.

- 20

Other Ele - Elective Subjects, from other technical and / or emerging subject Areas.

- 03

Project / Seminar-Project Work, Seminar or Internship in industry or elsewhere.

- 17

Board of Studies for the Term 2015-2016

1. Head of the Department concerned:

Dr. R. Prabhakara

2. At least five faculty members at different


levels covering different specializations

Dr.C.G.Puttappa, Dr Raja Gopal reddy, Dr.E.T.Arasu,

constituting nominated by the Academic

Dr.H.Narendra Sri. R Mourougane and Smt. Srilatha N

Council
3. Special invitees

Sri. A.T.Samul, STUP Consultant, Bangalore.

Dr. Katta Venkataramana, professor, Dept. of Civil Engg,


4. Two experts in the subject from outside

NITK, surathkal.

the college
Dr. V.Ramachandra , Assistant Vice President (Technical),
Ultratech Cement Ltd & ACCE representative, Bangalore.
5.

One expert from outside the college,

nominated by the Vice Chancellor


6.

Dr Sitharam, IISc, Bangalore

One representative from

industry/corporate sector allied area relating

Mr Atul Gopinath, Managing Director

to placement nominated by the Academic

Bhagirath Construction Company, Bangalore

Council

7. One postgraduate meritorious alumnus

Dr Prasanth Talkad, Group General Manager

to be nominated by the Principal

Sarathy GeoTech & Engineers (p) Ltd, Bangalore

10

M. S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE


(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)
SCHEME OF TEACHING FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016
5th SEMESTER B.E.
Sl

Subject

Credits*

Teaching

Subject

Marks

Contact

No

Code

Department

Total

Hours

CIE

SEE

Total

CV 501

Structural Analysis II

Civil

50

50

100

CV 502

Transportation Engineering II

Civil

50

50

100

CV 503

Environmental Engineering II

Civil

50

50

100

CV 504

Geotechnical Engineering I

Civil

50

50

100

CV 505

Hydrology & Water Resources Engg

Civil

50

50

100

CV 506

Design of RC Elements

Civil

50

50

100

CV 507L

Highway Engineering Laboratory

Civil

50

50

100

CV 508L

Concrete Laboratory

Civil

50

50

100

18

25

30

Total

800

6TH SEMESTER B.E.


Sl

Subject

No

Code

CV 601

2
3

Credits*

Teaching

Subject

Marks

Contact

Department

Total

Hours

CIE

SEE

Total

Geotechnical Engineering II

Civil

50

50

100

CV 602

Design of Structural Steel Elements

Civil

50

50

100

CV 603

Irrigation Engg. & Hyd. Structures

Civil

50

50

100

CV 604

Engg Management and Entrepreneurship

Civil

50

50

100

CV 605

Design and detailing of R.C. Structures

Civil

50

50

100

50

50

100

50

50

100

50

50

100

19

25

29

Elective I

CVPE 661

Matrix method in Structural Analysis

Civil

CVPE 662

Design of Formwork and Scaffolding

Civil

CVPE 663

GIS and Remote Sensing

Civil

CVPE 664

Highway Geometric Design

Civil

CVPE 665

Solid Waste Management

Civil

CVPE 666

Applied Hydraulics

Civil

CVPE 667

Green Building Technology

Civil

CV 607L

Detailing of RC & Steel Structural Elements

Civil

CV 608L

Environmental Engineering Laboratory

Civil

Total

* L: Lecture

T: Tutorial

11

P: Practical

800

TITLE: STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS-II


CODE: CV501
Total contact hrs: 56
SEE Marks: 100

CREDITS: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES


1. Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics and engineering in calculating slope,
deflection, bending moment and shear force using Slope deflection equation and Moment
distribution method.
2. Ability to identify, formulate and solve problems in structural analysis.
3. Ability to analyse structural system and interpret ate data.
4. Ability to use the techniques, such as stiffness and flexibility methods to solve engineering
problem.
5. Ability to communicate effectively in design of structural elements.
UNIT I
SLOPE DEFLECTION METHOD: Introduction, Sign convention, Development of slope
deflection equation, Analysis of continuous beams, Analysis of orthogonal rigid plane frames
including sway frames with kinematic indeterminacy 3.
UNIT II
MOMENT DISTRIBUTION METHOD: Introduction, Definition of terms, Development of
method, Analysis of continuous beams, Analysis of orthogonal rigid plane frames including sway
frames with kinematic indeterminacy 3.
UNIT III
MATRIX METHOD OF ANALYSIS (Flexibility method): Introduction, Axes and Coordinates,
Flexibility matrix, Analysis of continuous beam and plane trusses using system approach, Analysis
of simple orthogonal rigid frames using system approach.
UNIT IV
MATRIX METHOD OF ANALYSIS (Stiffness method): Introduction, Stiffness matrix, Analysis of
continuous beam and plane trusses using system approach, Analysis of simple orthogonal rigid
frames using system approach.
UNIT V
PLASTIC METHODS OF ANALYSIS: Introduction and Basic concepts of plastic analysis, shape
factors of simple sections. Equilibrium and Mechanism methods, Collapse loads for simple and
continuous beams.
Text books:
1. Negi and Jehangir, Basic Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill, Publication company
Ltd.
2. Gupta SP, GS Pandit and R.Gupta, Theory of Structures Vol 2, Tata McGgraw Hill
publication company Ltd.

12

Reference Books:
1. J. Sterling Kinney, Indeterminate structural analysis, Oxford of IBH Publishing
Company.
2. Norris Wilbur JK, Elementary structural analysis, Mcgraw Hill International Book
edition.
3. Ashok K jain, Advanced structural analysis, Nemchand of Bros, Roorkee, India.
Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignment and self study/
case studies.
Course assessment and evaluatio

Direct Assessment Methods

What
Internal
assessment
tests
CIE

SEE

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

To
whom

Class-room
open book
assignment
Case
analysis
Surprise
quiz

Twice
Students

Students feedback

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

1, 2, &3

20

Assignment
reports

4,5

---

--

---

--

End of course
(Answering 5
out of 10
questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

End of course
survey

When/ Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all COs

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

Students
End of course

13

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage : 40%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage : 30%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage : 25%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage : 15%)
Course outcome addressed:
Understands what different types of displacement methods in different concrete
structures. PO { a,b,e,i}
Understands how to solve different deflection related to continuous and rigid beams. PO
{ c,d,f,g,h}
Understands how to control the deflections and displacements using matrix method of
analysis. PO { e,f,I,j}
Understands the concept of plastic method of analysis for simple and continuous beams.
PO { I,j,k,l}

14

TITLE: TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING II


Sub Code: CV502
Credits: 4:0:0
No. of Contact hours = 56
Duration of Exam = 3 hours
SEE Marks =50
CIE :50
Course Objectives:
1. To provide the students with basic knowledge of different components of railway track and
their requirements.
2. To provide students the knowledge on the geometric features of railways along with
computational capabilities of the same.
3. To provide the students the knowledge on importance of airway system and characteristics of
aircrafts and planning for geometric details of runways.
4. To provide the students with knowledge about harbors and components
5. To provide the knowledge about problems that exists in urban transportation system. Various
mass transport facilities
Course Contents:
UNIT - I
Advantages of railways as transportation mode, Typical cross sections, suitability of different gauges,
Coning of wheels, components of the permanent way - Rails, Sleepers, Ballast and Fixtures - functions,
types, requirements.
UNIT - II
Traction and Tractive resistance, Gradients, super elevation, cant deficiency, Negative super elevation,
speed restriction on turn outs, Design of turn outs, points and crossings. Salient features of Metro
transport.
UNIT - III
Features & Role of Airways in transportation, Aircraft characteristics, Air transportation planning, site
selection, Airport components and diagram, basic length and corrected length of runway length,
Taxiway - Turning radius, exit taxiway, design factors and elements.
UNIT - IV
Harbors- types, components, Natural phenomenon affecting the design of harbors. Wind, wave and
tides. Currents, Breakwaters - types, wharf and quays, Jetties and piers. Dry dock and wet docks,
spillways, navigational aids.
UNIT - V
Urban Transportation Systems - advantages of mass transportation, general transportation problems in
urban centers, interrelationship between land use and transportation, urban road patterns, at grade and
grade separated junctions, ITS and its applications.
Reference Books:
1. Railway Engineering - Saxena and Arora, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, New Delhi
2. Indian Railway Track M M Agarwal, Jaico Publications, Bombay
3. Airport Planning and Design Khanna Arora and Jain, Nem Chand Bros, Roorkee 58
4. Doks and Tunnel Engineering R Srinivasan, Charaotar Publishing House
5. Docks and Harbour Engineering H P Oza and G H Oza Charaotar Publishing House
6. Traffic Engineering & Transport Planning L.R. Kadiyali, Khanna Publishers.

15

Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignments and self study cases.

What

Internal
assessment
tests

Direct Assessment Methods

CIE

Class-room
test/
assignment
Case
analysis
Surprise
quiz

SEE

When /
Where
To
(Frequency
whom
in the
course)
Thrice
(Average of
the best two
will be
computed)
Twice
(Average of
the two will
be
Student
computed)
s
--

Standard
examination

Indirect Assessment
Method

Students feedback

End of course
survey

Student
s

Max
Evidence
marks collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

Covers all COs

20

Assignment
reports

Covers all COs

Case
solutions
Quiz
answers

--

End of
course
(Answering
5 out of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

Middle of
the course

Feedback
forms

End of
course

Questionnair
e

---

Covers all COs


Covers all COs
and delivery of
the course
Covers all COs
and effectiveness
of delivery of
instructions and
assessment
methods.

Course Outcomes:
1. The students will be able to identify different components of railway track and select right
materials for construction. PO { b,d}
2. The students will be able to compute the various geometric features of railways for a given set
of requirements. PO { a,e}
3. The students will be able to understand the importance of airway system and characteristics of
aircrafts and involve in planning of airport facilities. PO { a,f}
4. The students will be able to understand the facilities at harbors construct the same. PO {f.l }
5. The students will be able to understand the problems that exist in urban transportation system.
Also involve in planning of urban transport facilities. PO { a,h,f}

16

TITLE: ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING- II


Sub Code: CV 503
Total contact hours 42
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 3:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Coarse Objectives:
1. Ability design drainage plans for collection and conveying wastewater and storm water from
the community.
2. Apply the knowledge of fluid mechanics in the design of wastewater conduits.
3. Ability to design the wastewater treatment plant and its maintenance.
4. Ability to create working drawing of building Drainage.
UNIT- I
Introduction: Basic definitions, Need for wastewater collection, conveyance, treatment and disposal,
Types of Sewerage Systems. Quantity of sewage- Dry weather flow and factors affecting dry weather
flow, Flow variations and their effects on design of sewerage system, Computation of design flow,
Estimation of storm flow by Rational Method, time of concentration and return period.
UNIT- II
Design of Sewers: Hydraulic formulae for velocity, Effects of flow variations on velocity, Selfcleansing and Non-Scouring velocities, Hydraulic Design of circular sewers. Types of sewer materials
(concrete, PVC, HDPE, CI and stoneware,) used, Advantages and disadvantages of materials,
Suitability of sewer materials for different purpose. Laying, jointing of sewers and testing of sewers.
UNIT- III
Sewer appurtenances: Street inlets, Catch basins, Manhole and Drop Manhole. Analysis of sewagePhysical, Chemical and Biological Characteristics with emphasis on BOD and COD, Concepts of
Aerobic and Anaerobic activity, Sampling, Problems on BOD. Effluent standards.
UNIT- IV
Treatment of sewage: Flow diagram of Municipal Sewage Treatment plant. Primary treatmentScreening, Grit chamber and Primary Sedimentation tank, Design circular sedimentation tank. Theory
and operation of Trickling Filter and types of Trickling Filters, Design of single stage Trickling Filter.
Activated Sludge Process and its modifications, Design aspects of Activated Sludge Process and
Design of conventional activated sludge process.
UNIT- V
Sludge Digestion, sludge drying beds, other methods of sludge disposal, onsite treatment methods.
Building Drainage - Principles of plumbing, types and location of different types of traps. Pipes and
fittings. System of plumbing- one and two pipe system. Plumbing fixtures-closets and urinals. House
drainage plan.
Text Books:
1. Garg. S. K., (2011) Sewage Disposal and Air Pollution Engineering, Khanna Publishers, New
Delhi
2. Punmia. B.C. (2010) and Ashok Jain, Environmental Engineering II, Lakshmi Publications,
New Delhi

17

Reference Books:
1. Manual on sewerage and Sewage Treatment, (2010) CPHEEO, Ministry of Urban
Development, New Delhi.
2. Metcalf and Eddy Inc., (2004) Wastewater Engineering Treatment and Reuse, 4th Edition,
Tata McGraw Hill, India,
3. Panchdhari A.C., (2005) Water supply and Sanitary Installations, New Age International
Publishers, New Delhi.
Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, model building, visit to
wastewater treatment facility, class activity, assignment and self-study.
Course assessment and evaluation:
What
To
whom
Internal
assessment
tests

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Direct Assessment Methods

CIE

Class-room
open book
assignment

Students

Model or
Site visit

When/ Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

1, 2, & 3

10

Assignment
reports

Once

10

Model or
Report

5
--

SEE

End of course
(Answering 6
out of 8
questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

Students feedback
End of course
survey

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all COs

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

Students
End of course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage : 35%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage : 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage : 25%)
Analysing and evaluating the related information (Weightage : 40%)

18

Coarse outcomes:
1. The Graduate will develop the ability to differentiate different types of conveyance systems
of wastewater and storm water PO {b,c,g }
2. The Graduate will have the knowledge of different sewer pipe material and their design. PO
{ b,c,d,i}
3. The Graduate will be able to demonstrate purpose of different sewer appurtenances and able
to analyze wastewater for different parameters PO { b,c,f}
4. The Graduate will have the ability to design the wastewater treatment plant. PO { e,f,g,h,i}
5. The Graduate will be able to create house drainage plans PO { f,I,l}

19

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING I
Sub Code: CV 504
Total contact hours 42+28
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 3:1:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives
1. Students will be able to understand the formation of soils, their classification and what
properties make them different from other soils, which soil is suitable for what application.
2. Students will be able to analyze the field soil with respect to its ability to allow the passage of
water through it, the effect of water on stresses caused in the soil at any depth and its practical
significance
3. Students would be able to appreciate the significance of field density, how to improve it using
mechanical means so that it can support heavy buildings/ structures safely.
4. Students will be able to predict the possible settlements of structures founded on clayey soils
and how much time it takes to settle.
5. Students will understand the most important engineering property of soils called shear strength
and how to determine the same using different laboratory experiments, which is very essential
while designing the foundations of structures.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION : Formation of soils, Phase Diagram, Definitions of Voids ratio, Porosity,
Percentage Air voids, Air content, Degree of saturation, Moisture content, Specific gravity, Bulk
density, Dry density, Saturated density, Submerged density and their inter relationships. Problems.
INDEX PROPERTIES OF SOILS AND THEIR DETERMINATION: Index Properties of soils
Water content, Specific Gravity, Particle size distribution, Relative Density, Consistency limits and
indices, in-situ density. Laboratory methods of determination of index properties of soils: Moisture
content, Specific Gravity, Particle size distribution by Sieve analysis and Hydrometer analysis, In-situ
density by core cutter & sand replacement methods, Relative Density, Liquid Limit by Casagrandes
method and Cone penetration method, Plastic limit and shrinkage limit determination. Importance of
index properties in foundation design.
UNIT II
CLASSIFICATION OF SOILS: Purpose of soil classification, basis for soil classification, Particle
size classification - MIT classification and IS classification, Unified soil classification and IS
classification Plasticity chart and its importance, Field identification of soils.
SOIL WATER & PERMEABILITY: Free water, held water adsorbed water & capillary water,
Capillary phenomenon, Darcys law- assumptions and validity, coefficient of permeability and its
determination in laboratory, factors affecting permeability, permeability of stratified soils, Seepage
velocity, Superficial velocity and coefficient of percolation. Importance of permeability in stability
analysis of slopes & earthen dams.
UNIT III
STRESSES IN SOILS &SEEPAGE ANALYSIS: Effective stress concept - total pressure and
effective stress, quick sand phenomenon. Laplaces equation, assumptions and limitations,
characteristics and uses of flow-nets. Estimation of quantity of seepage for Dams and sheet pile walls.
Determination of phreatic line in earth dams with horizontal filter near the toe. Importance of flownets & & hydraulic gradient in stability analysis of slopes & earthen dams.
COMPACTION OF SOILS: Definition, Principle of compaction, Standard and Modified proctors
compaction tests, factors affecting compaction, effect of compaction on soil properties, types of field

20

compaction, Field compaction control, Proctors needle, principles of dynamic compaction & vibroflotation.
UNIT IV
CONSOLIDATION OF SOILS: Definition, Mass-spring analogy, Terzaghis one dimensional
consolidation theory-assumption and limitations (no derivation),Normally consolidated, under
consolidated and over consolidated soils, pre-consolidation pressure and its determination by
Casagrandes method. Consolidation characteristics of soil (C c, av, mv and Cv),. Laboratory one
dimensional consolidation test for determination of - compression index, and coefficient of
consolidation ( by square root of time fitting method and logarithm of time fitting method).
UNIT V
SHEAR STRENGTH OF SOILS: Concept of shear strength, Mohrs strength theory, Mohrcoulomb theory, conventional and modified failure envelops, Total and effective shear strength
parameters, Concept of pore pressure, Sensitivity and Thixotropy of clay. Determination of shear
parameters using - Direct shear test, Unconfined compression test and Triaxial compression test; Shear
strength tests under different drainage conditions, importance of pore pressure & shear strength in
geotechnical applications.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Gopal Ranjan and Rao A.S.R. (2000), Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics,
New Age
International (P) Ltd., New Delhi.
2. Ramamurthy T.N. & Sitharam T.G. (2010), Geotechnical Engineering, S. Chand &
Company, New Delhi.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Alam Singh and Chowdhary G.R. (1994), Soil Engineering in Theory and Practice CBS
Publishers and Distributors Ltd., New Delhi.
2. Murthy V.N.S. (1996) Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, 4 th Edition, UBS
Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi.
Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, power point presentations, class room interaction.
Semester End Examination:
There will be ten questions with two questions from each unit. Students have to answer any one
question from each of the units.

21

Indirect Assessment
Direct Assessment Methods
Methods

Course assessment and evaluation


What
To
who
m

CIE

Internal
assessment
tests
Surprise
quiz
/Assignmen
t

SEE

Stude
nts

Max
mark
s

Evidence
collected

Thrice
(Average of the
best two will be
considered)

30

Blue books

C.O.s 1, 2, 3 &
4

Two

20

Answer
sheets

--

Answer
scripts

Covers all C.O.s

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

End of course
(Answering 5 out of 100
10 questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

Students feedback

End of course
survey

When/ Where
(Frequency in the
course)

Stude
nts
End of course

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage : 30%)
Understanding the different aspects and theories of the course (Weightage : 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage : 40%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage : 10%)
Course outcomes addressed
1. Students would understand the significance of various properties of soils and their relation to the
formation of soils. PO { b }
2. Students would apply the knowledge gained in assessing the engineering properties and how to
use them in practice. PO { b }
3. Students would understand the significance of compaction & consolidation of soils and their
effects on soil behavior. PO { a,b }
4. Students would be able to determine the shear strength of soils keeping in mind the actual field
conditions with respect to drainage conditions available in the field. PO { a,b,d }

22

TITLE: HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING


Sub Code: CV 505
Total contact hours 42
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 3:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives
This course is designed to present
The principles underlying surface and groundwater hydrology
Literature, measurement techniques, data sources, analytical methods and theories used to
understand flows of water on the earths surface
Mechanisms and pathways of water storage, transport and transformation in the landscape
Application of these principles to solve hydrologic problems

UNIT I
Precipitation and catchment: Introduction. Hydrologic cycle, World water budget. Precipitation
Forms, Types, Measurement of precipitation, Hyetograph, Rain gauge network, Mean precipitation
over an area, Estimation of missing rainfall data, Double mass curve technique, Return period, Plotting
positions, I.D.F. curves, PMP, Problems on frequency analysis. Catchment definition, stream pattern,
description of the basin.
UNIT II
Abstractions and Runoff: Introduction. Abstractions Evaporation, Factors affecting evaporation,
Measurement of evaporation using evaporation pans, Methods of reduction of reservoir evaporation,
Transpiration, Evapotranspiration, Estimation of evapotranspiration. Infiltration Infiltration capacity,
Infiltration rate, Measurement of infiltration, Infiltration indices. Runoff Introduction, Types of
runoff, Factors affecting runoff, Basin yield, Rainfall-runoff correlation, Estimation of runoff with
empirical equations Dickens formula, Ryves formula and Inglis formula.
UNIT III
Stream flow and Hydrographs; Stream classification of stream, stream gauging, measurement of
discharge, stage-discharge relations. Introduction, Hydrograph Definition, Factors affecting flood
hydrograph, Components of a hydrograph, Base flow separation, Effective rainfall, Unit HydrographDefinition, Assumptions and Limitations of Unit hydrograph, Derivation of units of hydrograph, Unit
hydrograph from complex storms, Unit hydrograph of different durations , S - Curve method.
UNIT IV
Groundwater Hydrology: Introduction. Occurrence and movement of ground water Vertical
distribution of groundwater, Aquifers, Specific retention, Specific yield, Darcys Law, Hydraulic
conductivity, Transmissivity. Well Hydraulics - Steady-radial flow into a confined aquifer, Thiems
equation, Steady-radial flow into an unconfined aquifer. Groundwater recourses of India, Artificial
recharge.
UNIT V
Water resources Engineering: Introduction. Floods Flood estimation, Rational method, PMF,
Levees and flood walls. Reservoir Planning- Types of reservoirs, Investigations for reservoir
planning, Selection of site for a reservoir, Zones of storage in a reservoir, Reservoir yield, Mass
curve and Demand curve, determination of reservoir capacity using mass curve, Flood routing
reservoir routing by ISD method, Reservoir losses, Useful life of a reservoir, numerical problems.
23

Principles of Sediment transportation, Water Resources development in India and Inter-state water
disputes
Text Books:
1. K. Subramanya, Engineering Hydrology, Tata McGrawHill
2. P. Jayarami Reddy, Hydrology, Laxmi Pulication
Reference Books:
1. P.N Modi, Irrigation, Water resources and Water power Engineering, Standard book house.
2. Lingsey, Franzini, Water recourses Engineering, McGrawHill
Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignment and self study
cases.
Course assessment and evaluation
What
To
whom
Internal
assessment
tests

Indirect Assessment
Direct Assessment Methods
Methods

CIE

Class-room
open book
assignment

Students

Quiz test
Surprise
quiz
SEE

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

1, 2, &3

10

Assignment
reports

10

MCQ

5
--

End of course
(Answering 6
out of 8
questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

Students feedback

End of course
survey

When/ Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)
Once

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all COs

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

Students
End of course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage : 20%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course(Weightage : 30%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course(Weightage : 30%)
Analysing and evaluating the related information (Weightage : 20%)

24

Course outcome addressed:


Understands what is the importance of Hydrology in Civil Engg. PO { a,c,g}
Understands how the water is distributed on the earth surface. PO { b,d,e,f }
Understands how the streamflow is originated and thereby runoff & floods. PO { b,i,f }
Understands the availability and movement of groundwater. PO { }
Understands and analyses the planning of water resources projects. PO {}

25

TITLE: DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE ELEMENTS


Sub Code: CV 506
Total contact hours 56
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives:

To provide basic knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering in the areas of limit state
of collapse and serviceability of R C elements.
Enable the students to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems of R C elements
subjected to flexure, shear and torsion.
To give procedural knowledge to design a system, component or process as per needs and
specifications of R C elements such as beams, slabs, columns and footings subjected to various
load combinations with different boundary conditions.
To imbibe the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal provisions
in the analysis, design and detailing of R C elements for strength and durability.
To show the impact of engineering solutions on the society and also will be aware of
contemporary issues regarding failure of structures due to wrong design, use of poor quality of
materials and faulty construction methods.
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of R C elements who can participate and
succeed in competitive examinations.

Course Contents:
UNIT I
Introduction to limit state design: Philosophy and principle of limit state design along with the
assumptions, Partial safety factors Characteristic Load and Strength. Introduction to stress block
parameters, Concept of balanced, under and over reinforced sections Limit state of collapse in flexure
of rectangular and flanged sections with examples. Limit state of collapse in flexure of rectangular and
flanged sections with examples. Limit state of collapse in shear and torsional strength of sections with
examples. Problems on Limit state of collapse in shear and torsional strength of sections with
examples.
UNIT II
Serviceability limit states: Introduction to working stress method, Elastic behaviour of rectangular
section, Under, Balanced and Over reinforced sections. Simple Problems on Flexural strength,
Deflection and cracking in beams using IS Code provisions. Deflection and cracking codal
provisions, Deflection control in design and problems, Problems on Calculations of deflections,
Problems on Calculations of deflections, Calculations of crack width, Calculations of crack width
UNIT III
Limit state design of beams: Design of singly Reinforced Beams, Singly Reinforced Beams problem
solving, Design of Doubly Reinforced Beams and problem solving Design of Flanged Beams T and L
beams including Problem solving, Types of shear failures Design for shear strength, Types and
design of shear reinforcement with problem solving, Analysis of Torsional moment Torsional shear
stress, Reinforcement for Torsion
UNIT IV
Limit state design of slabs and stairs: Introduction to one way and two way slabs, Design of one way
cantilever slab, simply supported slab, continuous slab Design of two way slabs. Design of two way
26

slabs, Introduction to stair cases and design of dog legged stair, Design of dog legged stair, Design of
open well stair cases, Importance of bond, anchorage, lap length etc
UNIT V
Limit state design of columns and footings: Design of short axially loaded RC columns with problems,
RC Columns with uniaxial moment including Problems, RC Columns with biaxial moments and
problems, Design concepts of footing (Limit state), Isolated footings with axial load square type.
Isolated footings with axial load Rectangular, Isolated footings with axial load and moment.
Note: Students have to be taken to construction sites to give the demonstrative examples of structural
elements such as columns, beams, slab, staircase, etc,..
Text books:
1. UNNIKRISHNAN PILLAI AND DEVADAS MENNON, Design Of Reinforced Concrete
Structures Tata McGraw Hill Publications.
2. VERGHESE P C, Limit State Design Of Reinforced Concrete, Prentice Hall of India, New
Delhi
Reference books:
1. SINHA S N, Reinforced Concrete Design, Tata McGraw Hill Publications
2. KARVE S R AND SHAH V L, Limit State Theory And Design Of Reinforced Concrete
VidyarthiPrakashan, Pune
3. PARK AND PAULAY, Reinforced Concrete, John Wiley and Sons
4. PUNMIA B C, JAIN A K AND JAIN A K, Reinforced Concrete Design, Lakshmi
Publications, New Delhi
5. JAIN A K, Limit State Method of Design, Nem Chand and Brothers, Roorkee

Direct Assessment Methods

Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignments, site visits and self
study cases.
Course Assessment and Evaluation:
When / Where Max
Contributing
To
Evidence
What
(Frequency in
mark
to Course
whom
collected
the course)
s
Outcomes
Thrice(Averag
Internal
e of the best
Covers all
assessment
30
Blue books
two will be
COs
tests
computed)
Twice(
ClassAverage of the
Assignment
Covers all
20
CIE room test/
two will be
reports
COs
assignment
computed)
Students
Case
-Case solutions -analysis
Surprise
-Quiz answers -quiz
End of course
Standard
(Answering 5
Answer
Covers all
SEE examinatio
100
out of 10
scripts
COs
n
questions)

27

Indirect Assessment
methods

Students feedback

Middle of the
course

Feedback
forms

End of course

Questionnaire

Students
End of course
survey

Covers all
COs and
delivery of the
course
Covers all
COs and
effectiveness
of delivery of
instructions
and assessment
methods.

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components (Blooms
taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 10%)
Understanding the course contents (Weightage: 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 50%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 20%)
Course Outcomes:
The students will reproduce the basic knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering in
the areas of limit state of collapse and serviceability of R C elements. PO {}
The students will identify, formulate and solve engineering problems of R C elements subjected
to flexure, shear and torsion. PO {}
The students will demonstrate the procedural knowledge to design a system, component or
process as per needs and specifications of R C elements such as beams, slabs, columns and
footings subjected to various load combinations with different boundary conditions. PO {}
Students will practice the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal
provisions in the analysis, design and detailing of R C elements for strength and durability. PO
{}
Students will evaluate the impact of engineering solutions on the society and also will be aware
of contemporary issues regarding failure of structures due to wrong design, use of poor quality
of materials and faulty construction methods. PO {}
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of R C elements who can participate and
succeed in competitive examinations. PO {}

28

TITLE: HIGHWAY ENGINEERING LABORATORY


Sub Code: CV 507L
Total contact hours 14
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 0:0:2
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives:
i.
The students will be capable of testing the road aggregates and bitumen for their suitability as
road material.
ii. The students will be capable of testing the soil for its strength in order to use as subgrade soil
for pavements.
Course Contents:
1. Tests on Aggregates:
i. Aggregate Crushing Value Test
ii. Los Angeles Abrasion Test
iii. Aggregate Impact Test
iv.
Shape tests (Flaky, Elongation, Combined Index, Angularity number)
v.
Specific gravity and water Absorption Test
2. Tests on Bituminous Materials and Mixes:
i. Specific Gravity Test,
ii. Penetration Test,
iii. Ductility Test,
iv.
Softening point Test,
v.
Flash and fire point Tests,
vi.
Viscosity Test
vii.
Marshall Stability tests
3. California Bearing Ratio test on subgrade soil
4. Traffic studies: Volume and speed studies.
Reference Book:
1. Relevant IS Codes and IRC Codes.
2. Highway Material and Pavement Testing Laboratory ManualBy S.K Khanna, C.E.G.Justo,
and A.Veeraragavan, Revised 5th Edition 2009, Nemi Chand & Bros.
Course Delivery and Evaluation:
The significance and method of evaluating the properties of road materials is explained and students
perform the experiments and report the results with suitable comments on results. The experiments
are evaluated regularly and reduced to 30 marks and one test at the end of the course for 20 marks
thus total of 50 internal marks.
Course Outcome:
i.
The students will be able to test the road aggregates and bitumen for their suitability as road
material. PO {}
ii. The students will be able to test the soil for its strength in order to use as subgrade soil for
pavements. PO {}

29

TITLE: CONCRETE LABORATORY


CODE: CV508L
SEE Marks: 100
No of sessions required: 14

CREDITS: 0:0:2
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50 MARKS

Course Objectives:
To provide the basic knowledge of science and engineering of concrete properties related to
civil engineering problems.
Ability to identify, formulate and solve problems in strength of concrete.
Ability to effectively present research to professional and engage in lifelong learning with the
advances in concrete technology.
Ability to communicate effectively in the design of concrete structures.
List of Experiments:
1. Test on specific gravity and water absorption of fine and course aggregate.
2. Test on grading analysis of fine and course aggregate.
3. Test on Bulk density of fine, course aggregate and bulking of fine aggregate
4. Test on Specific gravity and fineness of cement
5. Test on Normal consistency and initial and final setting time of cement.
6. Test on Soundness of cement
7. Test on compressive strength of mortar.
8. Mix design of concrete-Fresh concrete: Slump , compaction factor, vee bee test and flow test.
9. Properties of hardened concrete -Compressive strength and flexural strength, Split tensile
strength, relation between them and codal provision.
10. Non destructive test on hardened concrete using rebound hammer and pandit.
Text Books:
1. Shetty M.S, Concrete Technology , S. Chand & Co. Ltd, New Delhi.
2. Mehta P.K, Properties of Concrete , Tata McGraw Hill Publications, New Delhi.
Reference Books:
1. Neville AM, Properties of Concrete, ELBS Publications, London.
2. Relevant BIS codes.
Course outcome addressed:
Understands the properties of various constituents of concrete. PO { a}
Understands how modern instruments helpful for the experimenting the strength of concrete.
PO { a,b}
Understands the importance of experiments in behavioral aspect of ingredients of concrete.
PO { a,b}
Understands field application of properties of concrete and implementation of it at site. PO
{ e}

30

TITLE: GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING II


Sub Code: CV 601
Total contact hours 56
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives

Students will be able to understand the significance of investigation of soil in the field and
various methods to carry on the investigation
Students will be able to analyze the stresses caused in the soil at various points below any
structure/ foundation and how important it is to know this.
Students would be able to appreciate why and where we need to provide retaining walls, how
to design them to be stable and safe
Students will be able to analyze and predict the possible instability of slopes, how to make
them stable.
Students will appreciate the most important parameter called SBC of soils, which is used while
designing the shallow foundations of structures. In case the soil is soft or loads are too heavy,
they will be able to design pile foundations.

UNIT I
SUBSURFACE EXPLORATION Importance of exploration program, Methods of exploration:
Boring, sounding tests. Types of samples- undisturbed, disturbed and representative samples,
Samplers, sample disturbance, area ratio, Recovery ratio, clearances, Typical bore log, Number and
depth of borings for various civil engineering structures. Soil exploration report, importance of
drainage & dewatering during laying of foundations.
STRESSES IN SOILS: Boussinesqs theory assumptions, Equations for concentrated, line , strip,
and circular loads. Pressure bulb, Derivation for circular load area with UDL only. Newmarks chart
and its application. Westergards theory. Pressure distribution diagrams, contact pressure below
foundations, effect of loss of contact on foundations.
UNIT II
LATERAL EARTH PRESSURE Active and Passive earth pressures, Earth pressure at rest, Earth
pressure coefficient. Earth pressure theories- Rankines and Coulombs theories assumptions and
limitations, Lateral earth pressure in cohesive and cohesion-less soils. Graphical solutions for active
earth pressure (cohesion-less soil only) Culmans and Rebhans graphical methods.
UNIT III
STABILITY OF EARTH SLOPES Types of slopes, causes of failure and type of failure of finite
slopes. Definition of factor of safety, Stability of finite - Method of slices, Friction Circle method,
Fellineousmethod , using Taylors stability number.
UNIT IV
BEARING CAPACITY OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS: Definitions of ultimate, net and safe
bearing capacities, Allowable bearing pressure. Terzaghis bearing capacity equations-assumptions
and limitations, IS Codes bearing capacity equations, Bearing capacity of footings subjected to
eccentric loading. Effect of ground water table on bearing capacity. Standard penetration test - Bearing
capacity based on corrected SPT value.
31

FOUNDATION SETTLEMENT: Calculation of settlement - immediate, consolidation and secondary


settlements (no derivations), differential settlement, tilt, permissible settlements & tilts as per B.I.S.
UNIT V
DEEP FOUNDATIONS Deep foundations - Types of Deep Foundations; Load Transfer in Pile
Foundations, Classification of pile foundations based on load transfer only; Ultimate bearing capacity
of different types of piles in different soil conditions, Bearing capacity & settlement of Pile groups
TEXT BOOKS :
1. Punmia B.C. (2005), Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engg., 16 thEdition,Laxmi Publications Co.
, New Delhi.
2. GopalRanjan and Rao A.S.R. (2000), Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics,New Age International
(P) Ltd., New Delhi.
REFERENCES BOOKS:
1. Bowles J.E. (1996), Foundation Analysis and Design 5th Edition, McGrawHill Pub. Co. New
York.
2. Alam Singh and Chowdhary G.R. (1994), Soil Engineering in Theory and Practice CBS
Publishers and Distributors Ltd., New Delhi.
3. Murthy V.N.S. (1996) Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, 4 th Edition, UBS Publishers
and Distributors, New Delhi.
4. Arora K.R., Soil Mechanics & Foundation Engineering, Standard Publishers & Distributors, New
Delhi.
Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, power point presentations, class room interaction,
assignments and self study.

Indirect Assessment
Direct Assessment Methods
Methods

Course assessment and evaluation


What
To
whom

CIE

Internal
assessment
tests
Surprise
quiz

SEE

Students

Students feedback

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

COs 1, 2, 3 & 4

Answer
sheets

--

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all COs

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

Two
End of course
(Answering 6
out of 8
questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

End of course
survey

When/ Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice
(Average of
the best two
will be
computed)

Students
End of course

32

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage : 30%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course(Weightage : 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course(Weightage : 40%)
Analysing and evaluating the related information(Weightage : 10%)
Course outcomes addressed:
1. Will be able to analyze any field situation with the knowledge gained. PO {b,c,d}
2. Will be able to design the foundations for any structure in any field/soil. PO {a,b,c,e}
3. Will be in a position to assess the stability of slopes & retaining walls. PO {b,c}
4. Will be confident to say how safe or stable is a structure. PO {b,c,e}

33

TITLE: DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL STEEL ELEMENTS


Sub Code: CV 602
Credits:3 :1:0
Total contact hours 56
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
SEE Marks: 100
CIE: 50
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To provide basic knowledge in the areas of limit state method and the concept of design of
structural steel elements.
Enable the students to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems in steel structural
elements subjected to tension, compression and flexure.
To give procedural knowledge to design a system, component or process as per needs and
specifications of steel elements such as beams, tension members, compression members,
bolted and welded connections subjected to various load combinations.
To imbibe the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal
provisions in the analysis, design and detailing of steel elements.
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of structural steel elements who can
participate and succeed in competitive examinations
UNIT I
BOLTED CONNECTION: Introduction, Design Philosophies, Limit State Method, Concepts in
design of connections, codal provisions, Usage of HSFG bolts. Transfer of forces, in bolted
connections. Failure of bolted connections, simple and eccentric bolted connections, Prying forces,
Beam to beam to column connections.
UNIT II
WELDED CONNECTIONS: Concepts in design of connections, Codal provisions, types of welds,
Defects in welds, simple and eccentric welded connections, Beam to beam and beam to column
connections.
UNIT III
TENSION MEMBERS: Introduction, Types of sections, Grades of steel, Codal provision, shear lag
and block shear, Analysis & Design of tension members with different cross sections, Lug angles.
UNIT IV
COMPRESSION MEMBERS: Codal provisions, Slenderness ratio, Analysis and design of simple
compression members (angles and I-Sections), built up cross section Lacings and battens, Column
splices, Column bases and Gusseted bases (Bolted and welded connections)
UNIT V
FLEXURAL MEMBERS: Codal provision, Lateral buckling, Web buckling and crippling, Analysis
of laterally restrained and unrestrained beams. Design of restrained simple beams and built-up beams.
Text Books:
1. Subramanian .N, Design of Steel Structures, Oxford University Press, New Delhi
2. K.S. Duggal, Design of Steel Structures, Tata Mcgraw Hill, New Delhi
Reference Books:
1. Gaylord and Gaylord, Design of Steel Structures, Mcgraw Hill Publications, New York.
2. Relevant IS Codes: IS800, 2007, SP:6 (Part I) Structural Engineering Hand Book, BIS, New
Delhi.

34

Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignment and self study
cases.
Course assessment and evaluation
What

To
whom
Internal
assessment
tests

Indirect Assessment
Direct Assessment Methods
Methods

CIE

Class-room
open book
assignment
Case
analysis
Surprise
quiz

SEE

Students

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

1, 2, &3

10

Assignment
reports

Once

10

Case
solutions

--

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all COs

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

End of course
(Answering 5
out of 10
questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

Students feedback

End of course
survey

When/ Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)

Students
End of course

Course Outcomes:
The students will reproduce the basic knowledge in the areas of limit state method and the
concept of design of structural steel elements. PO { a,e}
The students will identify, formulate and solve engineering problems in steel structural
elements subjected to tension, compression and flexure. PO { a,e}
The students will demonstrate the procedural knowledge to design a system, component or
process as per needs and specifications of steel elements such as beams, tension members,
compression members, bolted and welded connections subjected to various load combinations.
PO { a,j}
Students will practice the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal
provisions in the analysis, design and detailing of steel elements. PO { f}
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of structural steel elements who can
participate and succeed in competitive examinations. PO { a

35

TITLE: IRRIGATION ENGINEERING AND HYDRAULIC STRUCTURES


Subject Code: CV 603
Total contact hrs - 42
SEE Marks: 100

Credit: 3:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

COURSE OBJECTIVES
Ability to apply the knowledge of Irrigation in the practical civil engineering problems.
Ability to identify, formulate and solve problems in field Irrigation.
Ability to analyze the behavior of systems of irrigation, head works, dams.
Ability to use the techniques, skills to formulate and solve engineering problems.
Ability to engage in lifelong learning with the advance in Irrigation.
UNIT I
Irrigation and Water Requirement of Crops: Introduction. Irrigation Definition, Necessity and
Benefits and ill-effects of irrigation, Types of irrigation systems, Various irrigation methods. Water
Requirement of Crops Classification of soil water, Soil moisture constants, Depth of water applied
and Frequency of irrigation, Crop seasons, Crop period and Base period, Duty, Delta, G.C.A., C.C.A.,
Intensity of irrigation, PET, Irrigation Efficiencies. Irrigation requirements of crops.
UNIT II
Design and Regulation of Irrigation Canals: Introduction. Classification of irrigation canals. Design of
Canals Silt theories, Kennedys theory, Design procedure by Kennedys theory , Laceys theory,
Regime channels, Regime conditions, Cross-Section of regime channel, Laceys regime equations,
Comparison between Kennedys and Laceys theory, Drawbacks in Laceys theory. Canal Regulation
- Canal Fall, Necessity and location of canal fall, Types of falls, Hydraulic design principles for Notch
type and Sarda type of Drop. Canal Regulators Cross Regulator, Head Regulator, Functions of
Regulators.
UNIT III
Cross-Drainage Works: Cross-Drainage Works Types of Cross-Drainage Works, Classification of
Aqueducts and Syphon Aqueducts, Factors affecting suitability of Aqueduct and Syphon Aqueduct.
Features of design of C-D Works. River Engineering- Introduction, Classification and River Training
works.
UNIT IV
Head Works :Introduction, Types of headworks, Components of Diversion Head Works, Weir and
Barrages, Theories of Seepage Design of Impervious floor using Blighs theory, Introduction to
Khoslas theory. Design of Vertical Drop weir. Storage headworks-Dams, Classification and Selection
of site for a dam, Types of Earthen dams, Causes of failure of Earthen dams.
UNIT V
Gravity Dams: Gravity Dam Forces acting on a gravity dam, Vertical stress at the base of the dam
& Middle-third rule, Elementary profile of a gravity dam, Practical profile of a gravity dam, Design of
dam by Gravity method, Joints, Keys, Water stops and Galleries. Spillways Essential requirements
of a spillway, Spillway capacity, Types of spillways. Stilling basins.
Text Books:
1. Modi.P.N, Irrigation water resources and water power engineering., Standard Book House, New
Delhi.
36

2. Sharma.R.K , Test book of Irrigation Engineering and Hydraulic structures, Oxford and IBH
Publishing co, New Delhi.
Reference Books :
1. Garg SK, Irrigation Engineering and Hydraulic Structures, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.
2. Sahastrabudhe, Irrigation Engineering and Hydraulic Structures, DhanpatRai Publications Ltd,
New Delhi.
Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignment and self study
cases.

Course assessment and evaluation


What
To
whom
Internal
assessment
tests

Indirect Assessment
Direct Assessment Methods
Methods

CIE

Class-room
open book
assignment
Case
analysis
Surprise
quiz

SEE

Students

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

1, 2, &3

10

Assignment
reports

Once

10

Case
solutions

--

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all COs

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

End of course
(Answering 5
out of 10
questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

Students feedback

End of course
survey

When/ Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)

Students
End of course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 50%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage: 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 20%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 10%)

37

PROGRAMMES OUTCOME ADDRESSED:


Graduate will develop the knowledge of applications of Irrigation Engineering in practical
field. PO {a,b,d}
Graduate will demonstrate the ability to analyze, formulate and solve the problems related to
civil engineering irrigation. PO {c,f,g}
Graduate will be able to communicate in both verbal and written form with the public. PO
{e,h,i}
Graduate will develop confidence for self education and ability for lifelong learning and
earning. PO {g,i,j}
Graduate can compete and succeed in competitive examinations. PO {k,l,c}

38

Title: Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship


Subject Code: CV604
Total contact hrs- 42
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 3:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives
1. Students will be able to analyze the feasibility of a project and calculate rate of interest, taxes
and capital recovery for different civil engineering projects.
2. Students will be able to perform critical sensitivity analysis which is extremely important for
decision making and for solving problems with many variables in transportation and
assignment models so that the problems are readily solvable.
3. Students will be able to know the selection of different equipment its performance and
efficiency in different kinds of Work Activities, Scheduling and controlling along with resource
allocation, time-cost tradeoff.
4. Students will be able to know the process and purpose of planning, organization along with
leadership qualities and co-ordination of projects.
UNIT 1
INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING ECONOMICS: Project Feasibility Economic and Financial
Time value of Money, Cash flow diagram Interest formulae , Basis for comparison of
alternatives benefit cost ratio , Present worth Future worth Annual equivalent, capital recovery ,
Rate of return, Depreciation and taxes, Break-even analysis.
UNIT 2
LINEAR PROGRAMMING: Linear Programming: Introduction, problem formulation, graphical
method of LP-, Standard form of LPP, Simplex method- Maximization case, Simplex algorithm
Minimization case, Transportation and Assignment models-problems.
UNIT 3
CONSTRUCTION MECHANIZATION: Introduction to mechanization, Mechanization through
construction equipment: earth excavation, moving and hauling, aggregate manufacturing; concrete
production and placement- types of equipment, trench-less technology. Factors for selecting equipment
and performance and economic life
UNIT 4
CONSTRUCTION PLANNING: Basic Concepts in the Development of Construction Plans - Choice
of Technology and Construction Method - Defining Work Tasks - Defining Precedence Relationships
among Activities - Estimating Activity Durations Estimating Resource Requirements for Work
Activities, Scheduling and controlling- Introduction-CPM and PERT, resource allocation, time-cost
tradeoff
UNIT 5
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY AND MANAGEMENT: Management- Meaning nature and
characteristics of Management, Scope and functional areas of management Management as a science,
art or profession, Planning- importance and purpose of planning process, steps in planning,
Organization-purpose, principles of organization Types of organization, Directing and controllingmeaning, Leadership styles, Coordination-meaning, importance ,techniques.

39

Text Book:
1. Subramanian K, Construction Management, Anuradha Publications Madras.
2. Peurifoy R L, Construction Planning Equipments and Method, McGraw Hill Publication 3rd
Edition. New Delhi
3. Management and Entrepreneurship NVR Naidu, I K international New Delhi
Reference Books:
1. Construction Project Management by N K Jha, Pearson, 1st edition New Delhi (2011)
2. Project Management for construction by Tung Au, Prentice hall, London, 2nd edition (1989)
Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignment and self study cases.
To
whom

What

Direct Assessment Methods

Internal
assessment
tests

CIE

Class-room
test/
assignment
Case
analysis
Surprise
quiz

SEE

Student
s

Standard
examination

Indirect Assessment
Method

Students feedback

End
of
survey

course

When / Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

Max
mark
s

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course Outcomes

30

Blue books

Covers all COs

Twice(Average
of the two will 20
be computed)

Assignment
reports

Covers all COs

--

--

Case
solutions
Quiz
answers

End of course
(Answering 5
100
out
of
10
questions)

Answer
scripts

Middle of the
course

Feedback
forms

End of course

Questionnai
re

Student
s
-

--Covers all COs


Covers all COs
and delivery of
the course
Covers all COs
and effectiveness
of delivery of
instructions and
assessment
methods.

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components (Blooms
taxonomy) such as:
1. Remembering the course contents (Weightage : 40%)
2. Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage : 20%)
3. Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage : 20%)
4. Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage : 20%)
40

Course outcome addressed:


1. Understands what construction projects. PO {}
2. Understands how to tackle different construction projects and solving it. PO {}
3. Understands how to manage the locally available resources and allocating them. PO {}
4. Understands different planning techniques at present day and possible solutions in the in the
present and in the future. PO {}
5. Understands how by way of education, public participation, scientific practice, awareness, law
and by engineered systems, so that the construction completes in planned way. PO {}

41

TITLE: DESIGN & DETAILING OF RC STRUCTURES


Subject Code: CV 605
Total contact hrs - 56
SEE Marks: 100

Credit: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To provide basic knowledge in the areas of limit state method and the concept of design of RC
structural.
Enable the students to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems in RC structures.
To give procedural knowledge to design a system, component or process as per needs and
specifications of RC structures likes Retaining wall, Footing, Water tanks, Bunker & Silo and
chimney.
To imbibe the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal provisions
in the analysis, design of RC structures.
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of RC structures elements who can
participate and succeed in competitive examinations.
COURSE CONTENTS:
UNIT I
Retaining walls: Design of Cantilever Retaining wall and Counter fort retaining wall
UNIT II
Footings: Design of Rectangular slab and beam type combined footing. Design of Raft foundation
UNIT III
Water Tanks: Design of circular water tanks resting on ground(Rigid and Flexible base). Design of
rectangular water tanks resting on ground.
UNIT IV
Design of flat slabs ,interior panel and exterior panel.
UNIT V
Design of portal frames with fixed and hinged based supports, Design of Slender columns
subjected to axial load and biaxial bending.
Text Books:
1. Reinforced Concrete Structures, Vol-II- B C Punmia :Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd, New Delhi.
2. Limit State Design of Reinforced Concrete Vol-II- P C Varghese: Prentice Hall of India (P) Ltd,
New Delhi.
Reference Books:
1. Plain and Reinforced Concrete Vol-II- Jai Krishna and Jain,:Nem Chand Bros, Roorkee.
2. Analysis of Structures- Vol-II :Vazirani V N & M MRatwani : Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.
Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignments, site visits and self
study cases.

42

Course Assessment and Evaluation:


To
whom

What

Direct Assessment Methods

Internal
assessment
tests

CIE

Class-room
test/
assignment
Case
analysis
Surprise
quiz

SEE

Student
s

Standard
examination

Indirect Assessment
Method

Students feedback

End of course
survey

When / Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)

Max
mark
s

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

Covers all COs

20

Assignment
reports

Covers all COs

--

--

End of course
(Answering 5
out of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

Middle of the
course

Feedback
forms

End of course

Student
s

Case
solutions
Quiz
answers

--Covers all COs

Covers all COs


and delivery of
the course
Covers all COs
and effectiveness
Questionnai of delivery of
re
instructions and
assessment
methods.

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:

Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 10%)


Understanding the course contents (Weightage: 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 50%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 20%)

Course Outcomes:
The students will reproduce the basic knowledge in the areas of limit state method and the concept of
RC structural.
The students will identify, formulate and solve engineering problems in RC structures. PO { b }
The students will demonstrate the procedural knowledge to design a system, component or process
as per needs and specifications RC structures likes Retaining wall, Footing, Water tanks, Bunker
& Silo and chimney. PO {c }
Students will practice the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal
provisions in the analysis, design of RC structures. PO { g }
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of RC structures elements who can
participate and succeed in competitive examinations. PO { a }
43

TITLE: MATRIX METHODS IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS


CODE: CVPE 661
Total contact hrs: 56
SEE Marks: 100

CREDITS: 4 - 0 - 0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course objectives:
1. To provide the students with basic knowledge of structural systems and application of the
concepts of flexibility and stiffness matrices for simple elements
2. Ability to apply the knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering to flexibility and
stiffness matrices to solve problems in trusses, beams and rigid frames
3. Ability to apply the knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering to direct stiffness
methods to solve problems in trusses, and beams
4. To provide the students with basic knowledge of various storage schemes and standard
commercial packages
Course contents:
UNIT I
Introduction: Structural systems, Geometrical and material nonlinearities, Static and Kinematic
indeterminacy, Concepts of stiffness and flexibility, Flexibility and stiffness matrices of truss and beam
elements, Energy concepts, Principle of minimum potential energy and minimum complementary
energy.
UNIT II
Element Flexibility Method: Transformation of system forces to element forces in flexibility method,
Assembly of structure flexibility matrix in element flexibility method, Flexibility method applied to
trusses, continuous beams and rigid frames.
UNIT III
Element Stiffness Method: Transformation from system forces to element forces in stiffness method,
Assembly of structure stiffness matrix in element stiffness method. Stiffness method applied to trusses,
continuous beams and rigid frames.
UNIT IV
Direct Stiffness method: Local and Global coordinate systems, Stiffness matrices of truss and beam
elements in global coordinates, Analysis of trusses and beams by Direct Stiffness method
UNIT V
Storage Techniques: Half band, skyline storage, Equation solvers, Frontal solvers, Bandwidth
consideration, Algorithms and flow charts, Solution of equations, Uses of commercial packages
Text Books :
1. Weaver W and Gere J H, Matrix Analysis of Framed Structures, CBS Publications, New Delhi
2. Rajasekaran S, Computational Structural Mechanics , PHI, New Delhi
References :
1. Pundit and Guptha, Theory of Structures, Vol II, TMH Publications, New Delhi
2. A K Jain, Advanced Structural Analysis, Nemchand Publications, Roorkee
3. C S Reddy, Basic Structural Analysis, TMH Publications, New Delhi

44

Indirect Assessment
methods

Direct Assessment Methods

Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignments and self study cases.
Course Assessment and Evaluation:
When / Where Max
Contributing
To
Evidence
What
(Frequency in mark
to
Course
whom
collected
the course)
s
Outcomes
Thrice(Averag
Internal
e of the best
Covers
all
assessment
30
Blue books
two will be
COs
tests
computed)
Twice(
Class-room
Average of the
Assignment
Covers
all
20
CIE open book
two will be
reports
COs
assignment
Student computed)
Case
s
-Case solutions -analysis
Surprise
-Quiz answers -quiz
End of course
Standard
(Answering 5
Answer
Covers
all
SEE
100
examination
out
of
10
scripts
COs
questions)
Covers
all
Middle of the
Feedback
COs
and
Students feedback
course
forms
delivery of the
course
Covers
all
Student
COs
and
s
effectiveness
End
of
course
End of course
Questionnaire of delivery of
survey
instructions
and assessment
methods.
Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components (Blooms
taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 5%)
Understanding the course contents (Weightage: 25%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 50%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 20%)

45

Course Outcomes:
Students will acquire the basic knowledge of structural systems and application of the concepts
of flexibility and stiffness matrices for simple elements PO {}
Students will have the ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems with
respect to flexibility and stiffness matrices as applied to trusses, beams and rigid frames PO
{}
Students will have the ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems with
respect to direct stiffness methods as applied to trusses, and beams PO {}
Students will have the ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems with
respect to various storage schemes and standard commercial packages PO {}

46

TITLE: DESIGN OF FORMWORK AND SCAFFOLDING


CODE: CVPE662
Total contact hrs: 56
SEE Marks: 100

CREDITS: 4: 0: 0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

To provide basic knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering in design of formwork


& scaffolding.
Enable the students to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems of design of form
work and scaffolding elements subjected to axial, flexure, shear and torsion.
To give procedural knowledge to design a system, component or process as per needs and
specifications of formwork elements such as beams, slabs, columns and footings subjected to
various load combinations with different boundary conditions.
To imbibe the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal provisions
in the analysis, design and detailing of formwork and scaffolding design.
To show the impact of engineering solutions on the society and also will be aware of
contemporary issues regarding failure of structures due to wrong design, use of poor quality of
materials and faulty construction methods.
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of formwork & scaffolding elements who
can participate and succeed in competitive examinations.

COURSE CONTENTS:
UNIT - I
FORM MATERIALS AND PRESSURES ON FORMWORK: Lumber Types Finish
Sheathing boards - Working stresses Repetitive member stress Plywood Types and grades
Textured surfaces and strength Reconstituted wood Steel Aluminum Form lining materials
Hardware and fasteners Nails in Plywood Bolts lag screw and connectors Bolt loads. Pressures
on Formwork - Concrete density Height of discharge Temperature Rates of Placing Consistency
of concrete Live loads and wind pressure Vibration Hydrostatic Adjustment for non standard
condition.
UNIT - II
SHORES AND FORM DESIGN: Simple wood stresses Slenderness ratio Allowable loads
Tubular steel shores - Patented shores Site Preparation - Size and spacing Steel Tower Frames
Safety practices Horizontal shoring for multi-levels More concentrated shore loads - T-heads
Two tier wood shores Ellis shores Dayton sure grip and Baker Roos shores Safway Symons
shores Beaver Advance shores - Dead shores Raking and Flying shores Basic simplification
Beam formulas Allowable stresses
UNIT-III
PLANNING, SITE EQUIPMENT AND PLANT FOR FORM WORK: Overall Planning
Detailed Planning Standard units Corner units Schedule for column formwork Formwork
elements Planning at Tender stage Development of basic system Planning for maximum reuse
Economical form construction Planning examples Crane size, effective scheduling estimate
Recheck plan details Detailing the forms. Crane arrangement Site layout plan Transporting plant
Formwork beams Formwork ties Wales Scaffold frames - Form accessories Vertical transport
tableform work.
47

UNIT - IV
Deflection bending lateral stability Shear, Bearing Examples in wall forms Slab forms Beam
form Ties, Anchors and Hangers Column forms Examples in each.
UNIT - V
DOME FORMS, TUNNEL FORMS, SLIPFORMS AND SAFETY PRACTICES FOR
SCAFFOLDS: Shells of translation and revolution - Hemispherical Parabolic - Barrel vaults
Hypar Shells Conoidal Shells - Folded plates Shell form design Building the form Placing
concrete Strength requirements Tunnel forming components Curb and Invert forms Arch and
Wall forms - Telescopic forms Concrete placement methods Cut and Cover construction
Continuous Advancing slope method - Bulk head method General design considerations influence
of placing equipment Tolerances Form construction for Shafts. Slipforms Principles Types
Advantage Functions of various components Planning of Slipform operations Desirable
characteristics of concrete Common problems faced Safety in slip forms - Special structures built
with Slipform Technique Codal provisions Types of scaffolds Putlog and Independent scaffold
Single pole scaffolds Fixing ties Spacing of ties - Plan Bracing Knots Safety nets.
Reference Books:
1. Robert L. Peurifoy and Garold D. Oberlender, Formwork for Concrete Structures,
Third Edition McGraw-Hill, 1996.
2. Hurd, M.K., Formwork for Concrete, Special Publication No. 4 Sixth Edition, American
Concrete Institute, Detroit, 1995.
3. Michael P. Hurst, Formwork, Construction Press, London and New York, 1997.
4. Austin, C.K., Formwork for Concrete, Cleaver Hume Press Ltd., London 1996.
5. Tudor Dinescu and ConstantinRadulescu, Slipform Techniques, Abacus Press, Turn
Bridge Wells, Kent, 1992.
6. Guide for Concrete Formwork, American Concrete Institute Detroit, Michigan, 1996.
7. Safety Requirements for Scaffolding, American National Standards Institute, New York,
1994.
Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignments, site visits and self
study cases.

Course Assessment and Evaluation:

Direct Assessment Methods

What

To
whom

Internal
assessment
tests
CIE

Class-room
test/
assignment
Case
analysis

Student
s

When / Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)

Max
mark
s

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

Covers all
COs

20

Assignment
reports

Covers all
COs

--

Case solutions

--

48

Indirect Assessment
Method

SEE

Surprise
quiz

--

Quiz answers

--

Standard
examination

End of course
(Answering 5
out of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all
COs

Students feedback

Middle of the
course

Feedback
forms

End of course

Questionnaire

Student
s
End of course
survey

Covers all
COs and
delivery of the
course
Covers all
COs and
effectiveness
of delivery of
instructions
and assessment
methods.

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components (Blooms
taxonomy) such as:

Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 10%)


Understanding the course contents (Weightage: 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 50%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 20%)

Course Outcomes:

The students will reproduce the basic knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering in
the design of formwork and scaffolding. PO {}
The students will identify, formulate and solve engineering problems of formwork and
scaffolding design elements subjected to axial, flexure, shear and torsion. PO {}
The students will demonstrate the procedural knowledge to design a system, component or
process as per needs and specifications of formwork and scaffolding elements such as beams,
slabs, columns and footings subjected to various load combinations with different boundary
conditions. PO {}
Students will practice the culture of professional and ethical responsibilities by following codal
provisions in the analysis, design and detailing of formwork and scaffolding elements for
strength and durability. PO {}
Students will evaluate the impact of engineering solutions on the society and also will be aware
of contemporary issues regarding failure of structures due to wrong design, use of poor quality
of materials and faulty construction methods. PO {}
To provide factual knowledge on analysis and design of formwork and scaffolding elements
who can participate and succeed in competitive examinations. PO {}

49

TITLE: GIS & REMOTE SENSING


CODE: CVPE663
Total contact hrs: 56
SEE Marks: 100

CREDITS: 4 - 0 - 0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives

Students will be able to learn theoretical and technical concepts of remote sensing, image
processing and Geographic Information System
Students will be able to appreciate the applications of remote sensing and GIS in civil
engineering and earth resources management
Students will be able to get an exposure to latest softwares and techniques, which are being
used in industry, for various engineering applications
Students will be able to demonstrate ability to effectively present research to professional and
lay audiences in written and oral form

UNIT I
Introduction to Remote Sensing
Principles of Remote sensing, Interactions between matter and electro-magnetic radiation, Energy
interaction in the atmosphere, Energy interactions with the earths surface- spectral reflectance curves,
Aerial Photography, Elements of photogrammetry, Visual interpretation
UNIT II
Sattelites and Data Products
Types of sensors- passive sensors and active sensors, Spectrometer, Sensor resolution- spectral,
Spatial, radiometric and temporal, Photograph v/s image, Types of platforms- airborne remote sensing,
Space borne remote sensing, Multispectral , Thermal and Hyperspectral remote sensing, Microwave
remote sensing- SAR and SLR, Laser Altimetry,
Image Classification: Supervised, unsupervised, Analysis of hyperspectral data, change detection
studies
UNIT III
Introduction to Geographic Information System
Introduction to GIS principles , Raster and Vector-based GIS and data structures,Spatial data sources,
Generation of thematic maps, Georeferencing, Digitization ,Data Editing, Edge Matching and
Mosaicing, Linking Spatial and Non Spatial Data,
UNIT IV
Data formats, Geo-databases, Database concepts, Database management in GIS, Data manipulations:
attribute operations, area/distance calculations, overlay analyses.Map Projections, Surface mapping,
Interpolation (including TIN), digital elevation model ( DEM), Terrain classification- slope aspect,
angle of incidence etc, Varigram and Kriging , Regression and correlation analysis
UNIT V
Applications of Remote Sening and GIS in Civil Engineering
Applications in Water Resources, Transportation, Environmental Engineering, Urban Landscapes,
Vegetation , Soil , Minerals and Geomorphology
GPS -- Distance measurement, Area Measurement, Ground truth Radiometer, Hands on experience
on Commercial GIS software (Arc GIS and ERDAS)
50

Text Books:
1. Lillesand T.M., Kiefer. R.W., and Chipman. J.W., Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation,
Wiley Publications
2. Kang-tsung-Chang Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, TMH Publishers
Reference Books:
1. George Joseph , Fundamentals of Remote Sensing.
2. J.B. Campbell , Introduction to Remote Sensing.
3. CP Lo Albert K W Yeung, Concepts and Techniques of Geographic Information Systems,
2005 Prantice Hall of India.
4. Geographical Information Systems Principles and Applications, Volume I edited by David J.
Maguire, Micheal F Goodchild and David W Rhind, John Wiley Sons. Inc., New York 1991.

Indirect Assessment
Direct Assessment Methods
Methods

Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, power point presentations, class room interaction,
assignment and self study cases.
Course assessment and evaluation
What
To
When/ Where
Max
Evidence
Contributing to
whom
(Frequency in
marks collected
Course
the course)
Outcomes
Thrice(Averag
Internal
e of the best
assessment
30
Blue books Covers all COs
two will be
tests
computed)
CIE
Twice(
Average of the
Assignment
Assignment
10
Covers all COs
two will be
reports
Students
computed)
Surprise
Once
10
Quiz papers Covers all COs
quiz
End of course
Standard
(Answering
Answer
SEE
100
Covers all COs
examination
one question
scripts
from each unit)
Middle of the
Feedback
Students feedback
-course
forms
End of course
survey

Students
End of course

Questionnaire

--

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
(Blooms taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 50%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage: 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 20%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 10%)

51

Course outcome addressed:


Understands the advantages of using remote sensing over conventional methods. PO {}
Understands electromagnetic radiation and its various interactions PO {}
Understands the various sensors and platforms used in remote sensing process PO {}
Understands the concept of GIS and its applications PO {}
Understands how remote sensing and GIS can be used in various civil engineering
applications PO {}

TITLE: HIGHWAY GEOMETRIC DESIGN


Subject Code: CVPE664
Total Contact hours = 56
3 hours
CIE Marks = 50

Credits: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE =
SEE Marks = 100

Course Objectives:
1. To provide the students with basic knowledge of pavement surface characteristics affecting
performance and typical cross sections and various elements of highways.
2. To provide the students the knowledge of sight distance, safe overtaking and analyses using
knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering solve problems related to horizontal
alignment.
3. To provide the students with knowledge to understand various types of at grade and grade
separated intersections and design the relevant features.
Course Contents:
UNIT - I
Importance of Highway Geometric Design, Elements, Factors affecting, Pavement Surface
Characteristics, Camber, Right of Way, Road Margins, Carriageway, Kerbs, Formation, Typical
Highway Cross-Sections.
UNIT - II
Sight Distances - Stopping Sight Distance, Overtaking Sight Distance, sight distance at Uncontrolled
Intersections, Design Speed, and Super elevation

UNIT - III
52

Horizontal Curves, Extra Widening, Transition Curves, Set-back Distances, Gradients and Grade
Compensation, Summit Curves, salient features and geometric standards for hill roads
UNIT - IV
Intersections at Grade, manoeuvres and Conflict Areas, Traffic Islands, Intersection Forms, Rural and
Urban Road Intersections, Speed change & Right-turn lanes, Channelization, Medians, Rotary
Intersection, Mini Round-About Highway Lighting.
UNIT - V
Grade Separated Intersections Types of Overpasses and Underpasses, Bus Stops, Pedestrian
Facilities, Highway Drainage surface and Sub-Surface Drainage System, Drainage of Slopes, Road
Construction in Water-Logged Areas.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Principle and Practice of Highway Engineering Kadiyali L R & Lal N B, Khanna
Publications, New Delhi.
2. Highway Engineering Khanna & Justo, Nem chand & Brothers
3. Relevant IRC Codes
Reference Books:
1. Subramanyam. K.P, Transportation Engineering, Scitech Publications, Chennai.
2. Khanna SK and Justo CEG, Highway Material Testing Laboratory Manual, Nemchand and
Bros. Roorkee.
3. Kadiyali L.R, Highway Engineering, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi
Course delivery:
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignments and self study cases.
To
whom

What
Internal
assessment
tests

Indirect
Assess Direct Assessment Methods
ment
Method

CIE

SEE

Class-room
test/
assignment
Case
analysis
Surprise
quiz

Student
s

Standard
examination

Students feedback

Student
s

When / Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)

Max
mark
s

Evidence
collected

Contributing to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

Covers all COs

20

Assignment
reports

Covers all COs

--

--

End of course
(Answering 5
out of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

Covers all COs

Feedback
forms

Covers all COs


and delivery of
the course

Middle of the
course
53

Case
solutions
Quiz
answers

---

End of course
survey

End of course

Questionnai
re

Covers all COs


and effectiveness
of delivery of
instructions and
assessment
methods.

Course Outcomes:
1. The students will be capable of identifying highways types and other features and their
behavior. PO { a,b}
2. The students will be capable of analyzing sight distances and suggest safe geometric design
elements for vehicle movement along horizontal and vertical alignments. PO { b,c}
3. The students will be able to analyse traffic flow and design the grade separated intersections.
PO { e}

54

TITLE: SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT


Subject Code: CVPE 665
Total contact hrs - 56
SEE Marks: 100

Credit: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives

Students are provided with knowledge of waste characterization and the laws for municipal
solid waste management, for handling of biomedical wastes and for handling of plastic wastes.
Students are provided with knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering for effective
solid wastes collection systems, for waste collection route optimization and for processing of
solid waste.
Students are provided with knowledge of design composting systems, maintain and operate the
aerobic and anaerobic composting process for effective organic waste recycling.
Students are provided with knowledge to manage construction and operations of landfill
facilities, energy recovery systems and management of leachate systems.
Students are provided with knowledge the working, operation and maintenance of incinerators
and air pollution control equipments.

UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO SOLID WASTES: Definition of solid wastes, classification and characteristics
of solid wastes, Municipal Solid Waste (Management and Handling ) Rules, Biomedical Waste
Handling Rules and Recycled Plastic usage Rules.
UNIT II
COLLECTION OF SOLID WASTE: Systems of collection of solid wastes, transfer stations, collection
equipments, route optimization techniques and numerical problems on route optimization. Processing
techniques of solid wastes (principle of operation and function only).
UNIT III
COMPOSTING: Composting, factors affecting composting process, aerobic and anaerobic
composting, Indore and Bangalore method of composting, mechanical composting process, vermincomposting.
UNIT IV
LANDFILLS: Sanitary landfilling trench method, area method, ramp method and pit method. Factors
considered for a landfill site selection, Cell design, leachate collection systems, control of gas
movement and gas recovery systems.
UNIT V
INCINERATION: Incineration process, factors affecting incineration process, and air pollution
prevention in incinerators, pyrolysis process. Plastic waste, Biomedical Waste and its Impact on
Human Health. Industrial Solid waste recycling and recovery-electronic industry, sugar industry and
thermal power plants.
Text Books:
1. George Tchobanoglouset.al., Integrated Solid Waste Management, Mc-Graw-Hill, Inc. New
York, 1993.
2. Howard S.Peavyet.al., Environmental Engineering, Mc-Graw-Hill Book Company, New
York, 1985.
55

Reference Books
1. A.D. Bhide and B.B.Sudareshan, Solid Waste management in Developing Countries,
NEERI, Nagpur 1983.
2. Environmental Engineering (Vol II)- S.K Garg Khanna Publishres, New Delhi 2009.
3. Robert A. Corbit, Standard Handbook of Environmental Engineering, Mcgraw Hill Inc, New
Delhi,1990.
4. P. AarneVesilind, William Worrel and Reinhart, Solid Waste Engineering, Thomson Brooks,
Cole.
5. Manual on Municipal Solid Waste Management, CPHEEO, Ministry of Urban Development,
Govt. of India, 2000.
6. Management and Handling Rules for Municipal Solid Waste and Biomedical Waste and Plastic
Waste, MOEF publications.

Indirect Assessment
Methods

Direct Assessment Methods

Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignment and self-study cases.
Course assessment and evaluation
When/ Where
Contributing
To
Max
Evidence
What
(Frequency in
to Course
whom
marks
collected
the course)
Outcomes
Thrice
Internal
(Average of
assessment
the best two
30
Blue books
1, 2, 3,4 &5
tests
will be
computed)
CIE
Problem
solving on
Once
10
Note books
2
route
Students
optimization
Case
Once
10
Note books
3&4
analysis
End of course
(Answering 5
Standard
Covers all
SEE
questions out
100
Answer scripts
examination
COs
of 10
questions)
Students feedback

Middle of the
course

Feedback forms

--

End of course

Questionnaire

--

Students
End of course
survey

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components (Blooms
taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 30%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage: 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 30%)
Analysing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 20%)
56

Course outcome addressed:


Student will be able to understand components of solid waste management and the laws
governing it. PO {}
Students will analyse the solid waste collection systems and propose route optimization
techniques and processing of solid wastes. PO {}
Students will be able to design, operate and maintain of landfills and composting units. PO
{}
Students will evaluate the techniques of operation and maintenance of incinerators. PO {}

57

TITLE: APPLIED HYDRAULICS


Subject Code: CVPE 666
Total contact hrs - 56
SEE Marks: 100

Credit: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives
After the completion of this course, the students will be able to
1. Understand Boundary layer theory and Drag & lift with their applications in Civil Engg.
2. Flow characteristics in open channels.
3. Analyze gradually-varied, rapidly-varied, and unsteady flow and sediment transport in open
channels.
4. Perform one-dimensional modeling of flow in open channels
5. Understand unsteady flow at canal regulation and other places where the surge phenomena is
involved
UNIT I
Boundary Layer Theory and Drag & Lift:Introduction. Laminar and Turbulent flows. Boundary LayerDefinition, Thickness of B.L, Boundary Layer along a long thin plate and its characteristics, Prandtls
Boundary layer equations, Laminar boundary layer, Turbulent boundary layer. Laminar sub-layer,
Separation of boundary layer, Methods of controlling boundary layer. Flow Around Submerged
Objects: Introduction. Drag and Lift - Definitions, Types of drag, Dimensional analysis of drag and
lift, Drag on a sphere, cylinder, flat plate and airfoil, Lift on a circular cylinder and airfoil.
UNIT II
Energy and Momentum Principles in Open Channel Flow: Introduction, Classification of flow in open
channels, Types of channels, Velocity distribution in channel section, Pr. Distribution in open channel,
Energy and Momentum principles, Description of sp. energy curve, channel transitions, Metering
flumes Venturi flume, Standing wave flume.
UNIT III
Gradually Varied Flow in Open Channel: Introduction. Dynamic equations of Gradually Varied Flow,
Characteristics of flow profiles, Control sections, Analysis of flow profiles- Gradually Varied Flow
computations, Practical applications.
UNIT IV
Rapidly Varied Flow in Open Channels: Introduction. Hydraulic Jump - Momentum equation for the
Jump, Classification of Jumps, characteristics of jump in a rectangular channel, Hydraulic jump as an
energy dissipater, Location of the j jump. Rapidly Varied Flow computations, Flow over spillways and
weirs.
UNIT V
Unsteady Flow in Open Channel Flow: Introduction, Dynamic equation for unsteady flow,
Monoclinical rising wave, Wave propagation, Surges in open channels, Flood Routing Channel
routing, Muskingum method.
Text Books:
1. P.N. Modi&S.M.Seth, Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machines, Standard
Book House New Delhi
2. K. Subramanya, Flow in Open Channel Flow, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd.
New Delhz
58

Reference Books:
1. V.T.Chow, Open Channel Hydrulics, McGraw Publishing Company Ltd. New York.

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Direct Assessment Methods

Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, assignment and self-study cases.
Course assessment and evaluation
When/ Where
Contributing
To
Max
Evidence
What
(Frequency in
to
Course
whom
marks collected
the course)
Outcomes
Thrice(Averag
Internal
e of the best
assessment
30
Blue books
1, 2, &3
two will be
tests
computed)
Twice(
CIE
Class-room
Average of the
Assignment
open book
10
4
two will be
reports
assignment
Students computed)
Quiz test
Once
10
MCQ
5
Surprise
-quiz
End of course
Standard
(Answering 6
Covers all
SEE
100
Answer scripts
examination
out
of
8
COs
questions)
Middle of the
Students feedback
Feedback forms -course
Students
End
of
course
End of course
Questionnaire
-survey
Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components (Blooms
taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 20%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage: 30%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 20%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 30%)
Course outcome addressed:
Understands the characteristics of pressure drag and friction drag. PO {}
Understands how the energy and momentum principles can be applied in open channel flow.
PO {}
Understands and analyses the flow characteristics of open channel flow. PO {}
Understands the rapidly varied flow in both steady and unsteady flow conditions. PO {}
Analyzing and applying various flow principles of open channel flow applicable to Civil Engg..
PO {}

59

TITLE: GREEN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY


Code: CVPE 667
Total contact hours 56
SEE Marks: 100

Credits: 4:0:0
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
CIE: 50

Course Objectives:
1 A fundamental understanding of sustainable building development, principles, approaches,
guidelines and evaluation methods.
2 An ability of sustainable building design procedures, methodologies, key elements,
architectural knowledge, and engineering skills.
3 Ability to design green building taking into consideration of local climatic conditions and local
materials.
4 Has the ability to create sustainable communities

Course Contents:
UNIT 1
Introduction. Need for green building- Impact of building industry on energy resources, natural
resources and environment. Green building-definition. Principles of green building. Concept of
Embodied energy and calculation. Life cycle assessment. Consideration while selecting material and
design for longevity.
UNIT 2
Building envelope- Conventional materials and Use of low energy materials - Base materials for RCC
and Steel systems. Alternatives to structural systems, masonry, mortar, plastering, roofing, ceiling,
paving, flooring, doors, windows and wood work. Smart materials. Low energy construction- low
energy material, locally sourced material and recycled material
UNIT 3
Sustainable siting of building. Orientation of the building. Use of natural light, solar heat and
ventilation. Fenestration and shading. Effective cooling and heating systems-solar passive techniques
of heating and cooling in a building design. Methods of minimizing load on Conventional systemsLandscaping, water bodies. Building form-surface to volume ratio.
UNIT 4
Thermal Insulation for roof and walls. Glazing and shading systems. Building finishes. Effective
electrical systems- photovoltaic systems. Efficient HVAC systems. Efficient lighting system- efficient
bulbs, occupancy sensor systems and light sensors. Efficient motors. Energy auditing and Certification
systems-GRIHA and LEED
UNIT 5
Conserving water in building- Water efficient fixtures- flow restrictors, sensors, no water fixtures.
Alternatives for secondary uses. Rain water harvesting, solar water heaters and solar cooking. Low
flush toilets, grey water recycling. Onsite treatment. Eco-friendly toilets. Reducing irrigation water
requirements. Vertical farming. Xeriscaping.

60

References:
1 Prof. Dr. Michael Bauer, Peter Msle and Dr. Michael Schwarz (2010) Green Building
Guidebook for Sustainable Architecture Springer.
2. Tom Woolley, Sam Kimmins, Paul Harrison and Rob Harrison (2001) Green Building
Handbook Volume 1-Spon Press.
3. Editor: MiliMajumdar, (2002) Energy-efficient buildings in India Tata Energy Research
Institute.
4. TERI Sustainable Building Design Manual- Volume I & II Tata Energy Research Institute.
Course delivery
The course will be delivered through lectures, class room interaction, model building, class activity,
assignment and self-study.
Course assessment and evaluation
What

To
whom
Internal
assessment
tests

Direct Assessment Methods

CIE

Class-room
open book
assignment

Students

Site visit

SEE

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Students feedback
course

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to
Course
Outcomes

30

Blue books

1, 2, &3

10

Assignment
reports

Once

10

End of course
(Answering 5
100
out
of
10
questions)
Middle of the
course

Standard
examination

End
of
survey

When/ Where
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)
Twice(
Average of the
two will be
computed)

Report to be
5
submitted
-Answer scripts

Covers
COs

Feedback
forms

--

Questionnaire

--

all

Students
End of course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components (Blooms
taxonomy) such as:
Remembering the course contents (Weightage: 35%)
Understanding the different divisions of the course (Weightage: 20%)
Applying the knowledge acquired from the course (Weightage: 25%)
Analyzing and evaluating the related information (Weightage: 40%)

61

Course outcomes:
1. The Graduate will develop the knowledge about green building concepts PO {}
2. The Graduate will have ability to analyze different alternative building materials which will
be suitable for specific climate and in an environmentally sustainable manner. PO {}
3. The Graduate will be able to demonstrate different green building design techniques using
sustainable architecture. PO {}
4. The Graduate will have the ability to design the building in an environmentally responsible
and with sustainable approach. PO {}
5. The Graduate will be able create a building which will reduce impact on the environment.
PO {}

62

TITLE: DETAILING OF RC AND STRUCTURAL STEEL ELEMENTS


CODE: CV 607L
Total contact hrs: 14
SEE Marks: 50

CREDITS: 0 - 0 - 2
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
CIE: 50

Course objectives:
1. To provide the students with basic knowledge in detailing of RC and structural steel elements.
2. Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams in the area of detailing of RC and
structural steel elements.
3. Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering.
4. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility in the areas of reinforcement detailing
and connection detailing in the steel structures using codal provisions.
5. Ability to communicate effectively the detailing of RC and structural steel elements.
6. To provide the students with basic knowledge of various standard commercial packages
Course contents:
Part A
1. Beams : Simply supported, Cantilever and Continuous
2. Slabs : One-way, Two-way and One-way continuous
3. Staircase: Dog legged
4. Cantilever Retaining wall,
5. Counter fort retaining wall
6. Circular Water tanks, Rectangular Water tank
7. Raft Foundation
Part B
8. Beam to beam connections by bolted and welded connection
9. Beam to column connection by bolted connection
10. Beam to column connection by welded connection
11. Built up Columns with Lacings
12. Built up Columns with battens
13. Column bases and Gusseted bases with bolted connections
14. Column bases and Gusseted bases with welded connections
Text Books:
1 Structural Design & Drawing Reinforced Concrete & Steel- N. Krishnaraju, University Press.
2. Structural Design and Drawing- Krishnamurthy -, (Concrete Structures), CBS publishers, New
Delhi. Tata Mc-Graw publishers.
References:
1. Reinforced Concrete Structures - B.C. Punmia Laxmi Publishing Co.
2. Reinforced Concrete Design S.N.Sinha, McGraw Hill Education.
3. Subramanian .N, Design of Steel Structures, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
4. K.S. Duggal, Design of Steel Structures, Tata Mcgraw Hill, New Delhi.
Course Outcomes:
1. Students will acquire the basic knowledge in detailing of RC and structural steel elements.
PO {}
2. Students will have the ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams in the area of
detailing of RC and structural steel elements. PO {}
63

3. Students will have the ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering. PO {}
4. Students will have the ability to identify and use the standard commercial packages. PO {}

64

TITLE: ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY


Code: CV608L
Credits: 0:0:2
No. of sessions required: 14
Duration of SEE: 3hrs
SEE Marks: 100
CIE: 50
Course learning objectives:
1. Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics and engineering in the calculation of
Characteristics of water and waste water (pH, Acidity, Alkalinity, Total solids, Dissolved
oxygen, BOD, COD etc.)
2. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility in the areas of testing.
3. Ability to communicate effectively the characteristics of samples.
4. The broad education to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and
societal context with respect to problems
5. Ability to life-long learning with the advances in testing.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS:
1. Determination of pH, Alkalinity and Acidity
2. Determination of Chlorides, available chlorine in bleaching powder and residual chlorine.
3. Determination of Dissolved Oxygen and BOD.
4. Determination of COD
5. Determination of Turbidity and Jar Test for Optimum Dose of alum.
6. Determination of Iron.
7. Determination of Nitrates/ Fluoride
8. Determination of Solids in Sewage: Total Solids, Suspended Solids, Dissolved Solids, Volatile
Solids, Fixed Solids and Settle able Solids.
9. Determination of particulates in air using high volume air sampler
10. determination of noise levels in the locality
11. Visit to sewage treatment plant.
12. Repetition
13. Test
14. Viva & Gate preparation
Course Outcomes:
Ability to analyze the water and waste water samples and classify them. PO {}
Ability to identify the potable water. PO {}
Ability to provide the type of treatment required. PO {}

65