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REPUBLIKA SRBIJA

VISOKA KOLA PRIMENjENIH STRUKOVNIH STUDIJA


VRANjE

SEMINARSKI RAD
PREDMET: ENGLESKI JEZIK 1
TEMA: PESTICIDES

PROFESOR: dr. Maja Stanojevi Goci


STUDENT: Milica Blagojevi, 80/ZS

Vranje, 2015/16

CONTENTS:
Contents:................................................................................................................ 2
1. Introduction........................................................................................................ 3
2. The definition of pesticides................................................................................ 5
3. Uses.................................................................................................................... 7
4. Amount used...................................................................................................... 8
5. Benefits.............................................................................................................. 9
6.Effects of pesticides on health........................................................................... 10
6.1 Long-term effects..................................................................................................... 10

7. Effects of pesticides on the enviroment........................................................... 12


8. Pests................................................................................................................. 15
9. Conclusion...................................................................................................... 16
9. ........................................................................................................ 17
10. Literature........................................................................................................ 18

1. INTRODUCTION
Pesticides are substances meant for attracting, seducing, and
then destroying, or mitigating any pest. They are a class of biocide.
The most common use of pesticides is as plant protection products
(also known as crop protection products), which in general protect
plants from damaging influences such as weeds, fungi, or insects.
This use of pesticides is so common that the term pesticide is often
treated as synonymous with plant protection product, although it is in
fact a broader term, as pesticides are also used for non-agricultural
purposes.
The
term
pesticide
includes
all
of
the
following: herbicide, insecticide, insect growth regulator, nematicide,
termiticide, molluscicide, piscicide, avicide, rodenticide,
predacide, bactericide,insect
repellent, animal
repellent, antimicrobial, fungicide, disinfectant (antimicrobial),
and sanitizer.
In general, a pesticide is a chemical or biological agent (such as
a virus, bacterium, antimicrobial,
or disinfectant)
that
deters,
incapacitates, kills, or otherwise discourages pests. Target pests can
include
insects,
plant pathogens,
weeds, mollusks, birds, mammals, fish, nematodes (roundworms),
and microbes that destroy property, cause nuisance, or spread
disease, or are disease vectors. Although pesticides have benefits,
some also have drawbacks, such as potential toxicity to humans and
other species. According to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent
Organic Pollutants, 9 of the 12 most dangerous and persistent organic
chemicals are organochlorine pesticides.

picture
1.1 A LiteTrac fourwheeled
selfpropelled
crop
sprayer
spraying
pesticide
on a field

picture 1.2 A cropduster spray


ing
pesticide on
a field

2.
THE

DEFINITION OF PESTICIDES
The Food
and
Agriculture
Organization (FAO)
has
defined pesticide as: any substance or mixture of substances
intended for preventing, destroying, or controlling any pest, including
vectors of human or animal disease, unwanted species of plants or
animals, causing harm during or otherwise interfering with the
production, processing, storage, transport, or marketing of food,
agricultural commodities, wood and wood products or animal
feedstuffs, or substances that may be administered to animals for the
control of insects, arachnids, or other pests in or on their bodies. The
term includes substances intended for use as a plant growth
regulator, defoliant, desiccant, or agent for thinning fruit or
preventing the premature fall of fruit. Also used as substances applied
to crops either before or after harvest to protect the commodity from
deterioration during storage and transport.
4

Type of pesticide

Target pest group

Herbicides

Plant

Algicides or Algaeci
Algae
des
Avicides

Birds

Bactericides

Bacteria

Fungicides

Fungi and Oomyc


etes

Insecticides

Insects

Miticides or Acarici
des

Mites

Molluscicides

Snails

Nematicides

Nematodes

Rodenticides

Rodents

Virucides
Viruses
Pesticides
can
be
classified
by
target organism (e.g., herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticide
s, and pediculicides[4][6] - see table), chemical structure (e.g.,
organic, inorganic, synthetic, or biological (biopesticide), although the
distinction can sometimes blur), and physical state (e.g. gaseous
(fumigant)). Biopesticides include
microbial
pesticides
and
biochemical pesticides. Plant-derived pesticides, or "botanicals", have
been
developing
quickly.
These
include
the pyrethroids, rotenoids, nicotinoids, and a fourth group that
includes strychnine and scilliroside.:
Many pesticides can be grouped into chemical families. Prominent
insecticide
families
include organochlorines, organophosphates,
and carbamates. Organochlorinehydrocarbons (e.g., DDT) could be
separated into dichlorodiphenylethanes, cyclodiene compounds, and
other related compounds. They operate by disrupting the
sodium/potassium balance of the nerve fiber, forcing the nerve to
transmit continuously. Their toxicities vary greatly, but they have
been phased out because of their persistence and potential
to bioaccumulate.[9]:239240 Organophosphate and carbamates larg
ely replaced organochlorines. Both operate through inhibiting the
enzymeacetylcholinesterase, allowing acetylcholine to transfer nerve
impulses indefinitely and causing a variety of symptoms such as
weakness or paralysis. Organophosphates are quite toxic to
vertebrates, and have in some cases been replaced by less toxic
carbamates.[9]:136137 Thiocarbamate and dithiocarbamates are
subclasses of carbamates. Prominent families of herbicides include
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phenoxy and benzoic acid herbicides (e.g. 2,4-D), triazines


(e.g., atrazine),
ureas
(e.g., diuron),
and
Chloroacetanilides
(e.g., alachlor). Phenoxy compounds tend to selectively kill broad-leaf
weeds rather than grasses. The phenoxy and benzoic acid herbicides
function similar to plant growth hormones, and grow cells without
normal cell division, crushing the plant's nutrient transport system.
[9]:300 Triazines
interfere
with
photosynthesis.[9]:335 Many
commonly used pesticides are not included in these families,
including glyphosate.
Pesticides can be classified based upon their biological mechanism
function
or
application
method.
Most
pesticides
work
by poisoning pests. A systemic pesticide moves inside a plant
following absorption by the plant. With insecticides and most
fungicides, this movement is usually upward (through the xylem) and
outward. Increased efficiency may be a result. Systemic insecticides,
which poison pollen and nectar in the flowers[citation needed], may
kill bees and other needed pollinators[citation needed].
In 2009, the development of a new class of fungicides called
paldoxins was announced. These work by taking advantage of natural
defense chemicals released by plants called phytoalexins, which fungi
then detoxify using enzymes. The paldoxins inhibit the fungi's
detoxification enzymes. They are believed to be safer and greener.

3. USES
Pesticides are used to control organisms that are considered to
be harmful. For example, they are used to kill mosquitoes that can
transmit potentially deadly diseases like West Nile virus, yellow fever,
and malaria. They can also kill bees, wasps or ants that can cause
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allergic reactions. Insecticides can protect animals from illnesses that


can be caused by parasites such as fleas. Pesticides can prevent
sickness in humans that could be caused bymoldy food or diseased
produce. Herbicides can be used to clear roadside weeds, trees and
brush. They can also kill invasive weeds that may cause
environmental damage. Herbicides are commonly applied in ponds
and lakes to control algae and plants such as water grasses that can
interfere with activities like swimming and fishing and cause the
water to look or smell unpleasant. Uncontrolled pests such as
termites and mould can damage structures such as houses. Pesticides
are used in grocery stores and food storage facilities to
manage rodents and insects that infest food such as grain. Each use
of a pesticide carries some associated risk. Proper pesticide use
decreases these associated risks to a level deemed acceptable by
pesticide
regulatory
agencies
such
as
the United
States
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Pest Management
Regulatory Agency (PMRA) of Canada.
Pesticides can save farmers' money by preventing crop losses to
insects and other pests; in the U.S., farmers get an estimated fourfold
return on money they spend on pesticides. One study found that not
using pesticides reduced crop yields by about 10%. Another study,
conducted in 1999, found that a ban on pesticides in the United
States may result in a rise of food prices, loss of jobs, and an increase
in world hunger.
DDT, sprayed on the walls of houses, is an organochlorine that has
been used to fight malaria since the 1950s. Recent policy statements
by the World Health Organization have given stronger support to this
approach.. However, DDT and other organochlorine pesticides have
been banned in most countries worldwide because of their
persistence in the environment and human toxicity. DDT use is not
always effective, as resistance to DDT was identified in Africa as early
as 1955, and by 1972 nineteen species of mosquito worldwide were
resistant to DDT.

4. AMOUNT USED
In 2006 and 2007, the world used approximately 2.4 million
tonnes (5.2 billion pounds) of pesticides, with herbicides constituting
the biggest part of the world pesticide use at 40%, followed by
insecticides (17%) and fungicides (10%). In 2006 and 2007 the U.S.
used approximately 0.5 million tonnes (1.1 billion pounds) of
pesticides, accounting for 22% of the world total, including 857
million pounds of conventional pesticides, which are used in the
agricultural sector (80% of conventional pesticide use) as well as the
industrial, commercial, governmental and home & garden
sectors.Pesticides are also found in majority of U.S. households with
78 million out of the 105.5 million households indicating that they use
some form of pesticide. As of 2007, there were more than 1,055
active ingredients registered as pesticides, which yield over 20,000
pesticide products that are marketed in the United States.
The US used some 1 kg (2.2 pounds) per hectare of arable land
compared with: 4.7 kg in China, 1.3 kg in the UK, 0.1 kg in Cameroun,
5.9 kg in Japan and 2.5 kg in Italy. Insecticide use in the US has
declined by more than half since 1980, (.6%/yr) mostly due to the
near phase-out of organophosphates. In corn fields, the decline was
even steeper, due to the switchover to transgenic Bt corn.
For the global market of crop protection products, market analysts
forecast revenues of over 52 billion US$ in 2019.

5. BENEFITS
There are two levels of benefits for pesticide use, primary and
secondary. Primary benefits are direct gains from the use of
pesticides and secondary benefits are effects that are more longterm.
Primary benefits
1. Controlling pests and plant disease vectors
Improved crop/livestock yields
Improved crop/livestock quality
Invasive species controlled
2. Controlling human/livestock disease
organisms
Human lives saved and suffering reduced
Animal lives saved and suffering reduced
Diseases contained geographically

vectors

and

nuisance

3. Controlling organisms that harm other human activities and


structures
Drivers view unobstructed
Tree/brush/leaf hazards prevented
Wooden structures protected
Monetary
Every dollar ($1) that is spent on pesticides for crops yields four
dollars ($4) in crops saved. This means based that, on the amount of
money spent per year on pesticides, $10 billion, there is an additional
$40 billion savings in crop that would be lost due to damage by
insects and weeds. In general, farmers benefit from having an
increase in crop yield and from being able to grow a variety of crops
throughout the year. Consumers of agricultural products also benefit
from being able to afford the vast quantities of produce available
year-round. The general public also benefits from the use of
pesticides for the control of insect-borne diseases and illnesses, such
as malaria. The use of pesticides creates a large job market, which
provides jobs for all of the people working within the industry.

6.EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ON HEALTH


Pesticides may cause acute and delayed health effects in people
who are exposed. Pesticide exposure can cause a variety of adverse
health effects, ranging from simple irritation of the skin and eyes to
more severe effects such as affecting the nervous system, mimicking
hormones causing reproductive problems, and also causing cancer. A
2007 systematic reviewfound that "most studies on non-Hodgkin
lymphoma and leukemia showed positive associations with pesticide
exposure" and thus concluded that cosmetic use of pesticides should
be decreased. There is substantial evidence of associations between
organophosphate
insecticide
exposures
and
neurobehavioral
alterations. Limited evidence also exists for other negative outcomes
from pesticide exposure including neurological, birth defects, fetal
death,
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends limiting exposure
of children to pesticides and using safer alternatives:
The
World
Health
Organization
and
the UN
Environment
Programme estimate that each year, 3 million workers in agriculture
in the developing world experience severe poisoning from pesticides,
about 18,000 of whom die. Owing to inadequate regulation and safety
precautions, 99% of pesticide related deaths occur in developing
countries that account for only 25% of pesticide usage. According to
one study, as many as 25 million workers in developing countries
may suffer mild pesticide poisoning yearly.
One study found pesticide self-poisoning the method of choice in one
third of suicides worldwide, and recommended, among other things,
more restrictions on the types of pesticides that are most harmful to
humans.
A 2014 epidemiological review found associations between autism
and exposure to certain pesticides, but noted that the available
evidence was insufficient to conclude that the relationship was
causal.

6.1 Long-term effects


Cancer
Many studies have examined the effects of pesticide exposure on the
risk
of
cancer.
Associations
have
been
found
with: leukemia, lymphoma, brain, kidney, breast, prostate, pancreas, l
iver, lung, and skin cancers. This increased risk occurs with both
residential and occupational exposures. Increased rates of cancer
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have been found among farm workers who apply these chemicals. A
mother's occupational exposure to pesticides during pregnancy is
associated with an increases in her child's risk of leukemia, Wilms'
tumor, and brain cancer. Exposure to insecticides within the home
and herbicides outside is associated with blood cancers in children.
Neurological
Evidence links pesticide exposure to worsened neurological
outcomes. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease is 70% greater
in those exposed to even low levels of pesticides. People with
Parkinson's were 61% more likely to report direct pesticide
application than were healthy relatives. Both insecticides and
herbicides
significantly
increased
the
risk
of
Parkinson's
disease. There are also concerns that long-term exposures may
increase the risk of dementia.
The United States Environmental Protection Agency finished a 10-year
review of the organophosphate pesticides following the 1996 Food
Quality Protection Act, but did little to account for developmental
neurotoxic effects, drawing strong criticism from within the agency
and from outside researchers. Comparable studies have not been
done with newer pesticides that are replacing organophosphates.
Reproductive effects
Strong evidence links pesticide exposure to birth defects, fetal
death and altered fetal growth. In the United States, increase in birth
defects is associated with conceiving in the same period of the year
when agrochemicals are in elevated concentrations in surface
water. Agent Orange, a 50:50 mixture of 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D, has been
associated
with
bad
health
and
genetic
effects
in Malaya and Vietnam. It was also found that offspring that were at
some point exposed to pesticides had a low birth weight and had
developmental defects.
Fertility
A number of pesticides including dibromochlorophane and 2,4-D has
been associated with impaired fertility in males. Pesticide exposure
resulted in reduced fertility in males, genetic alterations in sperm, a
reduced number of sperm, damage to germinal epithelium and
altered hormone function.
Other
Some studies have found increased risks of dermatitis in those
exposed.
Additionally, studies have indicated that pesticide exposure is
associated with long-term health problems such as respiratory
problems,
including
asthma, memory
disorders
and depression. Summaries
of
peer-reviewed
research
have
11

examined the link between pesticide exposure and neurologic


outcomes and cancer, perhaps the two most significant things
resulting in organophosphate-exposed workers.
According to researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH),
licensed pesticide applicators who used chlorinated pesticides on
more than 100 days in their lifetime were at greater risk of diabetes.
One study found that associations between specific pesticides and
incident diabetes ranged from a 20 percent to a 200 percent increase
in risk. New cases of diabetes were reported by 3.4 percent of those
in the lowest pesticide use category compared with 4.6 percent of
those in the highest category. Risks were greater when users of
specific pesticides were compared with applicators who never applied
that chemical.

7. EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ON THE ENVIROMENT


The environmental impact of pesticides consists of the effects of
pesticides
on
non-target species.
Over
98%
of
sprayed insecticides and 95% of herbicides reach a destination other
than their target species, because they are sprayed or spread across
entire agricultural fields. Runoff can carry pesticides into aquatic
environments while wind can carry them to other fields, grazing
areas, human settlements and undeveloped areas, potentially
affecting other species. Other problems emerge from poor production,
transport and storage practices. Over time, repeated application
increases pest resistance, while its effects on other species can
facilitate the pest's resurgence.
Each pesticide or pesticide class comes with a specific set of
environmental concerns. Such undesirable effects have led many
pesticides to be banned, while regulations have limited and/or
reduced the use of others. Over time, pesticides have generally
become less persistent and more species-specific, reducing their
environmental footprint. In addition the amounts of pesticides applied
per hectare have declined, in some cases by 99%. However, the
global spread of pesticide use, including the use of older/obsolete
pesticides that have been banned in some jurisdictions, has increased
overall.
Pesticide/class

Effect(s)

Organochlorine DD
T/DDE

Egg shell thinning in raptorial birds


Endocrine disruptor
Thyroid disruption properties in rodents, birds,
12

amphibians and fish


Acute mortality attributed to inhibition of
acetylcholine esterase activity
:DDT

Carcinogen
Endocrine disruptor

:DDT/Diclofol, Diel
drin andToxaphene

Juvenile population decline and adult mortality in


wildlife reptiles

:DDT/Toxaphene/P
arathion

Susceptibility to fungal infection

Triazine

Earthworms became infected with monocystid


gregarines

:Chlordane

Interact with vertebrate immune systems

Carbamates, the
phenoxy herbicide
2,4-D, and atrazine

Interact with vertebrate immune systems

Anticholinesterase

Bird poisoning
Animal infections, disease outbreaks and higher
mortality.

Organophosphate

Thyroid disruption properties in rodents, birds,


amphibians and fish
Acute mortality attributed to inhibition of
acetylcholine esterase activity
Immunotoxicity, primarily caused by the
inhibition of serine hydrolases or esterases
Oxidative damage
Modulation of signal transduction pathways
Impaired metabolic functions such
as thermoregulation, water and/or food intake
and behavior, impaired development, reduced
reproduction and hatching success in
vertebrates.

Carbamate

Thyroid disruption properties in rodents, birds,


amphibians and fish
Impaired metabolic functions such
as thermoregulation, water and/or food intake
and behavior, impaired development, reduced
reproduction and hatching success in
vertebrates.
Interact with vertebrate immune systems
13

Acute mortality attributed to inhibition of


acetylcholine esterase activity
Phenoxy herbicide
2,4-D

Interact with vertebrate immune systems

Atrazine

Interact with vertebrate immune systems


Reduced northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens)
populations because atrazine
killed phytoplankton, thus allowing light to
penetrate the water column and periphyton to
assimilate nutrients released from the plankton.
Periphyton growth provided more food to
grazers, increasing snail populations, which
provide intermediate hosts for trematode.

Pyrethroid

Thyroid disruption properties in rodents, birds,


amphibians and fish

Thiocarbamate

Thyroid disruption properties in rodents, birds,


amphibians and fish

Triazine

Thyroid disruption properties in rodents, birds,


amphibians and fish

Triazole

Thyroid disruption properties in rodents, birds,


amphibians and fish
Impaired metabolic functions such
as thermoregulation, water and/or food intake
and behavior, impaired development, reduced
reproduction and hatching success in
vertebrates.

Nicotinoid

respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, and


immunological toxicity in rats and humans
Disrupt biogenic amine signaling and cause
subsequent olfactory dysfunction, as well as
affecting foraging behavior, learning and
memory.

Imidacloprid,
Impaired foraging, brood development, and
Imidacloprid/pyreth colony success in terms of growth rate and new
roid -cyhalothrin
queen production.
Thiamethoxa

High honey bee worker mortality due to homing


failure (risks for colony collapse remain
controversial)

Spinosyns

Affect various physiological and behavioral traits


of beneficial arthropods,
particularly hymenopterans
14

Bt corn/Cry

Reduced abundance of some insect taxa,


predominantly
susceptible Lepidopteran herbivores as well as
their predators and parasitoids.

Herbicide

Reduced food availability and adverse secondary


effects on soil invertebrates and butterflies
Decreased species abundance and diversity in
small mammals.

Benomyl

Altered the patch-level floral display and later a


two-thirds reduction of the total number of bee
visits and in a shift in the visitors from largebodied bees to small-bodied bees and flies

Herbicide and
planting cycles

Reduced survival and reproductive rates in seedeating or carnivorous birds

8. PESTS
Type

Action

Algicides

Control algae in lakes, canals, swimming pools,


water tanks, and other sites

Antifouling agen Kill or repel organisms that attach to underwater


ts
surfaces, such as boat bottoms
Antimicrobials

Kill microorganisms (such as bacteria and viruses)

Attractants

Attract pests (for example, to lure an insect or


rodent to a trap). (However, food is not considered
a pesticide when used as an attractant.)

Biopesticides

Biopesticides are certain types of pesticides derived


from such natural materials as animals, plants,
bacteria, and certain minerals

Biocides

Kill microorganisms

Disinfectants an Kill or inactivate disease-producing microorganisms


15

d sanitizers

on inanimate objects

Fungicides

Kill fungi (including blights, mildews, molds, and


rusts)

Fumigants

Produce gas or vapor intended to destroy pests in


buildings or soil

Herbicides

Kill weeds and other plants that grow where they


are not wanted

Insecticides

Kill insects and other arthropods

Miticides

Kill mites that feed on plants and animals

Microbial
pesticides

Microorganisms that kill, inhibit, or out compete


pests, including insects or other microorganisms

Molluscicides

Kill snails and slugs

Nematicides

Kill nematodes (microscopic, worm-like organisms


that feed on plant roots)

Ovicides

Kill eggs of insects and mites

Pheromones

Biochemicals used to disrupt the mating behavior of


insects

Repellents

Repel pests, including insects (such as mosquitoes)


and birds

Rodenticides

Control mice and other rodents

16

9. CONCLUISON
A large part of the success of the surveys carried out by the
farmers should be contributed to the training methodology used. The
participatory and practical way of working stimulated the farmers to
become actively involved and helped them take ownership of the
survey. The farmers were not being studied, but they conducted the
study. They collected their own data, analyzed these data, and
presented the results to other farmers.
This approach is of direct benefit to the farmers themselves, but it
can also be of interest to government agencies such as the Ministry of
Public Health and the Ministry of Agriculture.
Existing health statistics on pesticide poisoning include only the most
serious cases that are brought to the attention of hospitals and health
clinics, many of which are suicide attempts. Thousands of cases of
occupational poisoning have never entered the statistics, as farmers
dont seek medical attention for relatively minor symptoms. Existing
health statistics therefore seriously underestimate the problems
caused by pesticides.
Thus these data collected by farmers give a much clearer picture of
pesticide related problems than currently existing official statistics.
Use of this methodology at a larger scale will give a better indication
of how pesticides are poisoning the enviroment, people and the
health of farmers themselves.

9.


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10. LITERATURE
1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_effects_of_pesticides
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_impact_of_pesticides
3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pesticide
4. http://www.nysipm.cornell.edu/publications/eiq/conclusions.asp

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