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STRUCTURAL: Chapter 4: Harmonic Response Analysis (UP19980818)

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Chapter 4: Harmonic Response Analysis


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4.1 Definition of Harmonic Response Analysis


Any sustained cyclic load will produce a sustained cyclic response (a harmonic response) in a structural
system. Harmonic response analysis gives you the ability to predict the sustained dynamic behavior of
your structures, thus enabling you to verify whether or not your designs will successfully overcome
resonance, fatigue, and other harmful effects of forced vibrations.

4.2 Uses for Harmonic Response Analysis


Harmonic response analysis is a technique used to determine the steady-state response of a linear
structure to loads that vary sinusoidally (harmonically) with time. The idea is to calculate the structure's
response at several frequencies and obtain a graph of some response quantity (usually displacements)
versus frequency. "Peak" responses are then identified on the graph and stresses reviewed at those peak
frequencies.
This analysis technique calculates only the steady-state, forced vibrations of a structure. The transient
vibrations, which occur at the beginning of the excitation, are not accounted for in a harmonic response
analysis (see Figure 4-1).
Figure 4-1 (a) Typical harmonic response system. Fo and
are known. uo and
unknown. (b) Transient and steady-state dynamic response of a structural system.

are

Harmonic response analysis is a linear analysis. Any nonlinearities, such as plasticity and contact (gap)
elements, will be ignored, even if they are defined. You can, however, have unsymmetric system
matrices such as those encountered in a fluid-structure interaction problem (see Chapter 4 of the ANSYS
Coupled-Field Analysis Guide). Harmonic analysis can also be performed on a prestressed structure,
such as a violin string (assuming the harmonic stresses are much smaller than the pre-tension stress).

4.3 Commands Used in a Harmonic Response


Analysis
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You use the same set of commands to build a model and perform a harmonic response analysis that you
use to do any other type of finite element analysis. Likewise, you choose similar options from the
graphical user interface (GUI) to build and solve models no matter what type of analysis you are doing.
Section 4.7, "Sample Harmonic Response Analysis (Command or Batch Method)," shows you the
sequence of commands you would issue (either manually or while running ANSYS as a batch job) to
perform an example harmonic response analysis. Section 4.6 "Sample Harmonic Response Analysis
(GUI Method)," shows you how to execute the same sample analysis using menu choices from the
ANSYS GUI. (To learn how to use the commands and GUI selections for building models, read the
ANSYS Modeling and Meshing Guide.)
For detailed, alphabetized descriptions of the ANSYS commands, see the ANSYS Commands Reference.

4.4 The Three Solution Methods


Three harmonic response analysis methods are available: full, reduced, and mode superposition. (A
fourth, relatively expensive method is to do a transient dynamic analysis with the harmonic loads
specified as time-history loading functions; see Chapter 5 for details.) The ANSYS/LinearPlus program
allows only the mode superposition method. Before we study the details of how to implement each of
these methods, let's explore the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

4.4.1 The Full Method


The full method is the easiest of the three methods. It uses the full system matrices to calculate the
harmonic response (no matrix reduction). The matrices may be symmetric or unsymmetric. The
advantages of the full method are:

It is easy to use, because you don't have to worry about choosing master degrees of freedom or
mode shapes.
It uses full matrices, so no mass matrix approximation is involved.
It allows unsymmetric matrices, which are typical of such applications as acoustics and bearing
problems.
It calculates all displacements and stresses in a single pass.
It accepts all types of loads: nodal forces, imposed (non-zero) displacements, and element loads
(pressures and temperatures).
It allows effective use of solid-model loads.

A disadvantage of the full method is that no prestressed option is available. Another disadvantage is that
this method usually is more expensive than either of the other methods when you use the frontal solver.
However, when you use the JCG solver or the ICCG solver, the full method can be very efficient.

4.4.2 The Reduced Method


The reduced method enables you to condense the problem size by using master degrees of freedom and
reduced matrices. After the displacements at the master DOF have been calculated, the solution can be
expanded to the original full DOF set. (See Section 3.12, "Matrix Reduction," for a more detailed
discussion of the reduction procedure.) The advantages of this method are:

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It is faster and less expensive compared to the full method when you are using the frontal solver.
Prestressing effects can be included.

The disadvantages of the reduced method are:

The initial solution calculates only the displacements at the master DOF. A second step, known as
the expansion pass, is required for a complete displacement, stress, and force solution. (However,
the expansion pass might be optional for some applications.)
Element loads (pressures, temperatures, etc.) cannot be applied.
All loads must be applied at user-defined master degrees of freedom. (This limits the use of solidmodel loads.)

4.4.3 The Mode Superposition Method


The mode superposition method sums factored mode shapes (eigenvectors) from a modal analysis to
calculate the structure's response. Its advantages are:

It is faster and less expensive than either the reduced or the full method for many problems.
Element loads applied in the preceding modal analysis can be applied in the harmonic response
analysis via the LVSCALE command.
It allows solutions to be clustered about the structure's natural frequencies. This results in a
smoother, more accurate tracing of the response curve.
Prestressing effects can be included.
It accepts modal damping (damping ratio as a function of frequency).

Disadvantages of the mode superposition method are:

Imposed (non-zero) displacements cannot be applied.


When you are using PowerDynamics for the modal analysis, initial conditions cannot have
previously-applied loads.

4.4.4 Restrictions Common to All Three Methods


All three methods are subject to certain common restrictions:

All loads must be sinusoidally time-varying.


All loads must have the same frequency.
No nonlinearities are permitted.
Transient effects are not calculated.

You can overcome any of these restrictions by performing a transient dynamic analysis, with harmonic
loads expressed as time-history loading functions. Chapter 5 describes the procedure for a transient
dynamic analysis.

4.5 How to Do Harmonic Response Analysis


We will first describe how to do a harmonic response analysis using the full method, and then list the
steps that are different for the reduced and mode superposition methods.

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4.5.1 Full Harmonic Response Analysis


The procedure for a full harmonic response analysis consists of three main steps:
1. Build the model.
2. Apply loads and obtain the solution.
3. Review the results.

4.5.2 Build the Model


In this step, you specify the jobname and analysis title and then use PREP7 to define the element types,
element real constants, material properties, and the model geometry. These tasks are common to most
analyses. The ANSYS Modeling and Meshing Guide explains them in detail.

4.5.2.1 Points to Remember

Only linear behavior is valid in a harmonic response analysis. Nonlinear elements, if any, will be
treated as linear elements. If you include contact elements, for example, their stiffnesses are
calculated based on their initial status and are never changed.
Both Young's modulus (EX) (or stiffness in some form) and density (DENS) (or mass in some
form) must be defined. Material properties may be linear, isotropic or orthotropic, and constant or
temperature-dependent. Nonlinear material properties, if any, are ignored.

4.5.3 Apply Loads and Obtain the Solution


In this step, you define the analysis type and options, apply loads, specify load step options, and initiate
the finite element solution. Details of how to do these tasks are explained below.
Note-Peak harmonic response occurs at forcing frequencies that match the natural frequencies of your
structure. Before obtaining the harmonic solution, you should first determine the natural frequencies of
your structure by obtaining a modal solution (as explained in Chapter 3).
1. Enter the ANSYS solution processor.
Command(s):
/SOLU
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution
2. Define the analysis type and analysis options. ANSYS offers these options for a harmonic response
analysis:
Table 4-1 Analysis types and analysis options

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Option
New Analysis
Analysis Type: Harmonic
Response
Solution Method
Solution Listing Format
Mass Matrix Formulation
Equation Solver

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Command GUI Path


ANTYPE Main Menu>Solution>-Analysis Type-New Analysis
ANTYPE Main Menu>Solution>-Analysis Type-New
Analysis>Harmonic Response
HROPT Main Menu>Solution>Analysis Options
HROUT Main Menu>Solution>Analysis Options
LUMPM Main Menu>Solution>Analysis Options
EQSLV Main Menu>Solution>Analysis Options

Each of these options is explained in detail below.

4.5.3.1 Option: New Analysis [ANTYPE]


Choose New Analysis. Restarts are not valid in a harmonic response analysis; if you need to apply
additional harmonic loads, do a new analysis each time.

4.5.3.2 Option: Analysis Type: Harmonic Response [ANTYPE]


Choose Harmonic Response as the analysis type.

4.5.3.3 Option: Solution Method [HROPT]


Choose one of the following solution methods:

Full method
Reduced method
Mode superposition method

4.5.3.4 Option: Solution Listing Format [HROUT]


This option determines how the harmonic displacement solution is listed in the printed output
(Jobname.OUT). You can choose between real and imaginary parts (default), and amplitudes and phase
angles.

4.5.3.5 Option: Mass Matrix Formulation [LUMPM]


Use this option to specify the default formulation (which is element dependent) or lumped mass
approximation. We recommend the default formulation for most applications. However, for some
problems involving "skinny" structures such as slender beams or very thin shells, the lumped mass
approximation often yields better results. Also, the lumped mass approximation can result in a shorter
run time and lower memory requirements.
After you complete the fields on the Harmonic Analysis Options dialog box, click on OK to reach a
second Harmonic Analysis dialog box, where you choose an equation solver.

4.5.3.6 Option: Equation Solver [EQSLV]

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You can choose the frontal solver (default), the Jacobi Conjugate Gradient (JCG) solver, or the
Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient (ICCG) solver. The frontal solver is recommended for most
structural models.
3. Apply loads on the model.
A harmonic analysis, by definition, assumes that any applied load varies harmonically
(sinusoidally) with time. To completely specify a harmonic load, three pieces of information are
usually required: the amplitude, the phase angle, and the forcing frequency range (see Figure 4-2).

Figure 4-2 Relationship between real / imaginary components and amplitude/phase angle

The amplitude is the maximum value of the load, which you specify using the commands shown
in Table 4-2.
The phase angle is a measure of the time by which the load lags (or leads) a frame of reference.
On the complex plane (see Figure 4-2), it is the angle measured from the real axis. The phase
angle is required only if you have multiple loads that are out of phase with each other. For
example, the unbalanced rotating antenna shown in Figure 4-3 will produce out-of-phase vertical
loads at its four support points. The phase angle cannot be specified directly; instead, you specify
the real and imaginary components of the out-of-phase loads using the VALUE and VALUE2
fields of the appropriate load commands. Figure 4-2 shows how to calculate the real and
imaginary components.
The forcing frequency range is the frequency range of the harmonic load (in cycles/time). It is
specified later as a load step option with the HARFRQ command.
Figure 4-3 An unbalanced rotating antenna will produce out-of-phase vertical loads at its four
support points

Note-A harmonic analysis cannot calculate the response to multiple forcing functions acting
simultaneously with different frequencies. An example of this is two machines with different rotating
speeds running at the same time. However, POST1 can be used to superimpose these two load cases for
the total response.
Table 4-2 summarizes the loads applicable to a static analysis. Except for inertia loads, you can define
loads either on the solid model (keypoints, lines, and areas) or on the finite element model (nodes and
elements). For a general discussion of solid-model loads versus finite element loads, see Chapter 2 of the
ANSYS Basic Analysis Procedures Guide.
Table 4-2 Loads applicable in a harmonic response analysis

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Cmd
Family

Load Type

Category

Displacement (UX, UY, UZ,


ROTX, ROTY, ROTZ)
Force, Moment (FX, FY, FZ,
MX, MY, MZ)

Constraints D

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GUI Path

Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>Structural- Displacement


Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>Forces
F
Structural- Force/Moment
Surface
Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>Pressure (PRES)
SF
Loads
Structural- Pressure
Temperature (TEMP)
Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>Body Loads BF
Fluence (FLUE)
Structural- Temperature
Inertia
Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>Gravity, Spinning, etc.
Loads
Structural -Other
In an analysis, loads can be applied, removed, operated on, or listed.
Applying Loads Using Commands
Table 4-3 lists all the commands you can use to apply loads in a harmonic response analysis.
Table 4-3 Load commands for a harmonic response analysis
Load Type

Solid Model
Entity
or FE

Displacement

Solid Model

Keypoints DK

DKDELE DKLIST DTRAN

Solid Model
Solid Model

Lines
Areas

DL
DA

DLDELE DLLIST DTRAN


DADELE DALIST DTRAN

Finite Elem

Nodes

DDELE

DLIST

DSCALE

Solid Model
Finite Elem
Solid Model
Solid Model

Keypoints
Nodes
Lines
Areas

FK
F
SFL
SFA

FKDELE
FDELE
SFLDELE
SFADELE

FKLIST
FLIST
SFLLIST
SFALIST

FTRAN
FSCALE
SFTRAN
SFTRAN

Finite Elem

Nodes

SF

SFDELE

SFLIST

SFSCALE

Finite Elem

Elements SFE

SFEDELE SFELIST SFSCALE

DSYM
DCUM
FCUM
SFGRAD
SFGRAD
SFGRAD
SFCUM
SFGRAD
SFBEAM
SFFUN
SFCUM

Keypoints BFK

BFKDELE BFKLIST BFTRAN -

Lines
BFL
Areas
BFA
Volumes BFV

BFLDELE BFLLIST BFTRAN BFADELE BFALIST BFTRAN BFVDELE BFVLIST BFTRAN -

Force
Pressure

Temperature
Solid Model
Fluence
Solid Model
Solid Model
Solid Model

Apply

Delete

List

Operate

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Apply
Settings

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Finite Elem
Finite Elem

Inertia

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Nodes
BF
BFDELE BFLIST BFSCALE BFCUM
Elements BFE
BFEDELE BFELIST BFSCALE BFCUM
ACEL
OMEGA
DOMEGA
CGLOC
CGOMGA
DCGOM

Applying Loads Using the GUI


All loading operations (except List; see below) are accessed through a series of cascading menus. From
the Solution menu, you select the operation (apply, delete, etc.), then the load type (displacement, force,
etc.), and then the object to which you are applying the load (keypoint, line, node, etc.).
For example, to apply a displacement load to a line, follow this GUI path:
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>-Structural-Displacement>
On lines

4.5.3.7 Listing Loads


To list existing loads, follow this GUI path:
GUI:
Utility Menu>List>Loads>load type
4. Specify load step options. The following options are available for a harmonic response analysis:
Table 4-4 Load step options
Option
General Options
Number of Harmonic
Solutions
Stepped or Ramped
Loads
Dynamics Options
Forcing Frequency
Range
Damping

Command GUI Path

NSUBST
KBC

HARFRQ

Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step OptsTime/Frequenc>Freq & Substeps


Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step OptsTime/Frequenc>Time & Time Step/Freq & Substeps
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step OptsTime/Frequenc>Freq & Substeps

ALPHAD
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts- Time/Frequenc>
BETAD
Damping
DMPRAT

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Output Control Options


Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts-Output Ctrls>Solu
Printout
Database and Results
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts-Output Ctrls>DB/
OUTRES
File Output
Results File
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts-Output
Extrapolation of Results ERESX
Ctrls>Integration Pt
Printed Output

OUTPR

4.5.3.8 General Options


General options include the following:

Number of Harmonic Solutions [NSUBST]


You can request any number of harmonic solutions to be calculated. The solutions (or substeps)
will be evenly spaced within the specified frequency range [HARFRQ]. For example, if you
specify 10 solutions in the range 30 to 40 Hz, the program will calculate the response at 31, 32,
33, ..., 39, and 40 Hz. No response is calculated at the lower end of the frequency range.

Stepped or Ramped Loads [KBC]


The loads may be stepped or ramped. By default, they are ramped, that is, the load amplitude is
gradually increased with each substep. By stepping the loads [KBC,1], the same load amplitude
will be maintained for all substeps in the frequency range.

Note-Surface and body loads do not ramp from their previous load step values, except for those applied
to PLANE2, SOLID45, SOLID92, and SOLID95 element types. The remaining element types always
ramp from zero or from the value specified via BFUNIF.

4.5.3.9 Dynamics Options


Dynamics options include the following:

Forcing Frequency Range [HARFRQ]


The forcing frequency range must be defined (in cycles/time) for a harmonic analysis. Within this
range, you then specify the number of solutions to be calculated.

Damping
Damping in some form should be specified; otherwise, the response will be infinity at the resonant
frequencies. ALPHAD and BETAD result in a frequency-dependent damping ratio, whereas
DMPRAT specifies a constant damping ratio to be used at all frequencies. See Section 5.12.3,
"Damping," for further details.

Note-If no damping is specified in a direct harmonic analysis (full or reduced), the program uses zero
damping by default.

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Alpha (Mass) Damping [ALPHAD]


Beta (Stiffness) Damping [BETAD]
Constant Damping Ratio [DMPRAT]

4.5.3.10 Output Controls


Output control options include the following:

Printed Output [OUTPR]


Use this option to include any results data on the output file (Jobname.OUT).

Database and Results File Output [OUTRES]


This option controls the data on the results file (Jobname.RST).

Extrapolation of Results [ERESX]


Use this option to review element integration point results by copying them to the nodes instead of
extrapolating them (default).

5. Save a back-up copy of the database to a named file. You can then retrieve your model by re-entering
the ANSYS program and issuing RESUME.
Command(s):
SAVE
GUI:
Utility Menu>File>Save as
6. Start solution calculations.
Command(s):
SOLVE
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution>-Solve-Current LS
7. Repeat steps 3 to 6 for any additional loads and frequency ranges (that is, for additional load steps). If
you plan to do time-history postprocessing (POST26), the frequency ranges should not overlap from one
load step to the next. Another method for multiple load steps, which allows you to store the load steps
on files and then solve them at once using a macro, is described in the ANSYS Basic Analysis
Procedures Guide.
8. Leave SOLUTION.

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Command(s):
FINISH
GUI:
Close the Solution menu.

4.5.4 Review the Results


Results from a harmonic analysis are written to the structural results file, Jobname.RST. They consist of
the following data, all of which vary harmonically at each forcing frequency for which the solution was
calculated:

Primary data
Nodal displacements (UX, UY, UZ, ROTX, ROTY, ROTZ)
Derived data
Nodal and element stresses
Nodal and element strains
Element forces
Nodal reaction forces
etc.

If you defined damping in the structure, the response will be out-of-phase with the loads. All results are
then complex in nature and are stored in terms of real and imaginary parts. Complex results will also be
produced if out-of-phase loads were applied.

4.5.4.1 Postprocessors
You can review these results using either POST26 or POST1. The normal procedure is to first use
POST26 to identify critical forcing frequencies-frequencies at which the highest displacements (or
stresses) occur at points of interest in the model-and to then use POST1 to postprocess the entire model
at these critical forcing frequencies.

POST1 is used to review results over the entire model at specific frequencies.
POST26 allows you to review results at specific points in the model over the entire frequency
range.

Some typical postprocessing operations for a harmonic response analysis are explained below. For a
complete description of all postprocessing functions, see Chapter 3 of the ANSYS Basic Analysis
Procedures Guide.

4.5.4.2 Points to Remember

To review results in POST1 or POST26, the database must contain the same model for which the
solution was calculated.
The results file (Jobname.RST) must be available.

Using POST26

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POST26 works with tables of result item versus frequency, known as variables. Each variable is
assigned a reference number, with variable number 1 reserved for frequency.
1. Define the variables using these options:
Command(s):
NSOL for primary data (nodal displacements)
ESOL for derived data (element solution data, such as stresses)
RFORCE for reaction force data
GUI:
Main Menu>TimeHist Postpro>Define Variables
Note-The FORCE command allows you to choose the total force, static component of the total force,
damping component, or the inertia component.
2. Graph the variables (versus frequency or any other variable). Then use PLCPLX to work with just
the amplitude, phase angle, real part, or imaginary part.
Command(s):
PLVAR, PLCPLX
GUI:
Main Menu>TimeHist Postpro>Graph Variables
Main Menu>TimeHist Postpro>Settings>Graph
3. Get a listing of the variable. To list just the extreme values, use the EXTREM command. Then use
the PRCPLX command to work with amplitude and phase angle or real and imaginary part.
Command(s):
PRVAR, EXTREM, PRCPLX
GUI:
Main Menu>TimeHist Postpro>List Variables/List Extremes
Main Menu>TimeHist Postpro>Settings>List
Many other functions, such as performing math operations among variables (in complex arithmetic),
moving variables into array parameters, moving array parameters into variables, etc., are available in
POST26; see Chapter 6 of the ANSYS Basic Analysis Procedures Guide for details.
By reviewing the time-history results at strategic points throughout the model, you can identify the
critical frequencies for further POST1 postprocessing.
Using POST1

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1. Read in results for the desired harmonic solution. You can use the SET command for this purpose,
but it will read in either the real component or the imaginary component, not both at the same time. The
true magnitude of the results is given by an SRSS (square-root-of-sum-of-squares) combination of the
real and imaginary components (see Figure 4-2) and can be done for specific points in the model in
POST26.
2. Display the deformed shape of the structure, contours of stresses, strains, etc., or vector plots of vector
items [PLVECT]. To obtain tabular listings of data, use PRNSOL, PRESOL, PRRSOL, etc.

4.5.4.3 Option: Display Deformed Shape


Command(s):
PLDISP
GUI:
Main Menu>General Postproc>Plot Results>Deformed Shape

4.5.4.4 Option: Contour Displays


Command(s):
PLNSOL or PLESOL
GUI:
Main Menu>General Postproc>Plot Results>-Contour Plot-Nodal Solu or Element Solu
Use these options to contour almost any result item, such as stresses (SX, SY, SZ...), strains
(EPELX, EPELY, EPELZ...), and displacements (UX, UY, UZ...).
The KUND field on PLNSOL and PLESOL gives you the option of overlaying the undeformed
shape on the display.

4.5.4.5 Option: Vector Plots


Command(s):
PLVECT
GUI:
Main Menu>General Postproc>Plot Results>-Vector Plot-Predefined
Use PLNSOL or PLESOL to contour almost any result item, such as stresses (SX, SY, SZ...),
strains (EPELX, EPELY, EPELZ...), and displacements (UX, UY, UZ...).

4.5.4.6 Option: Tabular Listings

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Command(s):
PRNSOL (nodal results)
PRESOL (element-by-element results)
PRRSOL (reaction data) etc.
NSORT, ESORT
GUI:
Main Menu>General Postproc>List Results>Nodal Solution
Main Menu>General Postproc>List Results>Element Solution
Main Menu>General Postproc>List Results>Reaction Solution
Use the NSORT and ESORT commands to sort the data before listing them.
Many other functions, such as mapping results on to a path, transforming results to different coordinate
systems, load case combinations, etc., are available in POST1; see Chapter 3 of the ANSYS Basic
Analysis Procedures Guide for details.
See the ANSYS Commands Reference for a discussion of the ANTYPE, HROPT, HROUT, HARFRQ,
DMPRAT, NSUBST, KBC, NSOL, ESOL, RFORCE, PLCPLX, PLVAR, PRCPLX, PRVAR,
PLDISP, PRRSOL, and PLNSOL commands.

4.6 Sample Harmonic Response Analysis (GUI


Method)
In this sample problem, you will determine the harmonic response of a two-mass-spring system.

4.6.1 Problem Description


Determine the response amplitude (Xi) and phase angle (
below when excited by a harmonic force (F1sin

i) for each mass (mi)of the system shown

t) acting on mass m1.

4.6.2 Problem Specifications


Material properties for this problem are:
m1 = m2 = 0.5 lb-sec2/in
k1 = k2 = kc = 200 lb/in
Loading for this problem is:
F1 = 200 lb

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The spring lengths are arbitrarily selected and are used only to define the spring direction. Two master
degrees of freedom are selected at the masses in the spring direction. A frequency range from zero to 7.5
Hz with a solution at 7.5/30 = 0.25 Hz intervals is chosen to give an adequate response curve. POST26
is used to get an amplitude versus frequency display.

4.6.3 Problem Diagram


Figure 4-4 Two-Mass-Spring-System Diagram

4.6.3.1 Set the Analysis Title


1. Choose menu path Utility Menu>File>Change Title.
2. Type the text "Harmonic Response of Two-Mass-Spring System" and click on OK.

4.6.3.2 Define the Element Types


1. Choose menu path Main Menu>Preprocessor>Element Type> Add/Edit/Delete.
2. Click on Add. The Library of Element Types dialog box appears.
3. Scroll down the list on the left to "Combination" and select it.
4. Click once on "Spring-damper 14" in the list on the right.
5. Click on Apply.
6. Scroll up the list on the left to "Structural Mass" and select it.
7. Click once on "3D mass 21" in the list on the right.
8. Click on OK. The Library of Element Types dialog box closes.
9. Click on Close in the Element Types dialog box.

4.6.3.3 Define the Real Constants


1. Choose menu path Main Menu>Preprocessor>Real Constants.
2. Click on Add. The Element Type for Real Constants dialog box appears.
3. Click once on Type 1 to highlight it.
4. Click on OK. The Real Constants for COMBIN14 dialog box appears.
5. Enter 200 for the spring constant (K) and 0.1 for the damping coefficient (CV1). Click on OK.

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6. Repeat steps 2-4 for Type 2, MASS21.


7. Enter .5 for mass in X direction and click on OK.
8. Click on Close to close the Real Constants dialog box.

4.6.3.4 Create the Nodes


1. Choose menu path Main Menu>Preprocessor>-Modeling-Create> Nodes>In Active CS.
2. Enter 1 for node number.
3. Enter 0, 0, 0 for the X, Y, and Z coordinates, respectively.
4. Click on Apply.
5. Enter 4 for node number.
6. Enter 1, 0, 0 for the X, Y, and Z coordinates, respectively.
7. Click on OK.
8. Choose menu path Utility Menu>PlotCtrls>Numbering. The Plot Numbering Controls dialog box
appears.
9. Click once on "Node numbers" to turn node numbers on.
10. Click on OK.
11. Choose menu path Main Menu>Preprocessor>-Modeling-Create> Nodes>Fill between Nds. A
picking menu appears.
12. In the ANSYS Graphics window, click once on nodes 1 and 4 (on the left and right sides of the
screen). A small box appears around each node.
13. Click on OK on the picking menu. The Create Nodes Between 2 Nodes dialog box appears.
14. Click on OK to accept the default of 2 nodes to fill. Nodes 2 and 3 appear in the graphics window.

4.6.3.5 Create the Spring Elements


1. Choose menu path Main Menu:Preprocessor>-Modeling-Create> Elements>-Auto NumberedThru Nodes. A picking menu appears.
2. In the graphics window, click once on nodes 1 and 2.
3. Click on Apply. A line appears between the selected nodes.
4. Click once on nodes 2 and 3.

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5. Click on Apply. A line appears between the selected nodes.


6. Click once on nodes 3 and 4.
7. Click on OK. A line appears between the selected nodes.

4.6.3.6 Create the Mass Elements


1. Choose menu path Main Menu>Preprocessor>-Modeling-Create> Elements>Elem Attributes.
2. Enter 2 for element type number.
3. Enter 2 for real constant set number and click on OK.
4. Choose menu path Main Menu>Preprocessor>-Modeling-Create>
Elements>-Auto Numbered-Thru Nodes. A picking menu appears.
5. In the graphics window, click once on node 2.
6. Click on Apply.
7. Click once on node 3 and click on OK.

4.6.3.7 Specify the Analysis Type, MDOF, and Load Step Specifications
1. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>-Analysis Type-New Analysis.
2. Click once on "Harmonic" and click on OK.
3. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>Analysis Options.
4. Click once on "Full" to select the solution method.
5. Click once on "Amplitud + phase" to select the DOF printout format and click on OK.
6. Click OK in the Full Harmonic Analysis dialog box.
7. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts-Output Ctrls>Solu Printout.
8. Click on "Last substep" to set the print frequency and click on OK.
9. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts- Time/Frequenc>Freq & Substeps.
10. Enter 0 and 7.5 for the harmonic frequency range.
11. Enter 30 for the number of substeps.
12. Click once on "Stepped" to specify stepped boundary conditions.

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13. Click on OK.

4.6.3.8 Define Loads and Boundary Conditions


1. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>-Structural- Displacement>On Nodes. A
picking menu appears.
2. Click on Pick All. The Apply U, ROT on Nodes dialog box appears.
3. In the scroll box for DOFs to be constrained, click once on "UY" to highlight it (make sure no other
selections are highlighted).
4. Click on OK.
5. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>-Structural- Displacement>On Nodes. A
picking menu appears.
6. In the graphics window, click once on nodes 1 and 4.
7. Click on OK. The Apply U, ROT on Nodes dialog box appears.
8. In the scroll box for DOFs to be constrained, click once on "UX" to highlight it and click once on
"UY" to de-select it.
9. Click on OK.
10. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>-Loads-Apply>-Structural -Force/ Moment>On
Nodes. A picking menu appears.
11. In the graphics window, click once on node 2.
12. Click on OK. The Apply F/M on Nodes dialog box appears.
13. In the scroll box for direction of force/moment, click once on "FX."
14. Enter 200 for the real part of force/moment and click on OK.

4.6.3.9 Solve the Model


1. Choose menu path Main Menu>Solution>-Solve-Current LS.
2. Review the information in the status window and click on Close.
3. Click on OK on the Solve Current Load Step dialog box to begin the solution.
4. When the solution is finished, a dialog box stating "Solution is done!" appears. Click on Close.

4.6.3.10 Review the Results

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For this sample, you will review the time-history results of nodes 2 and 3.
1. Choose menu path Main Menu>TimeHist Postpro>Define Variables. The Defined Time-History
Variables dialog box appears.
2. Click on Add. The Add Time-History Variable dialog box appears.
3. Click on OK to accept the default of Nodal DOF result. The Define Nodal Data dialog box appears.
4. Enter 2 for reference number of variable.
5. Enter 2 for node number.
6. Enter 2UX for the user-specified label.
7. In the scroll box on the right, click once on "Translation UX" to highlight it.
8. Click on OK.
9. Click on Add in the Defined Time-History Variables dialog box. The Add Time-History Variable
dialog box appears.
10. Click on OK to accept the default of Nodal DOF result. The Define Nodal Data dialog box appears.
11. Enter 3 for reference number of variable.
12. Enter 3 for node number.
13. Enter 3UX for the user-specified label.
14. In the scroll box on the right, click once on "Translation UX" to highlight it.
15. Click on OK.
16. Click on Close.
17. Choose menu path Utility Menu>PlotCtrls>Style>Graphs. The Graph Controls dialog box
appears.
18. In the scroll box for type of grid, scroll to "X and Y lines" to select it.
19. Click on OK.
20. Choose menu path Main Menu>TimeHist Postpro>Graph Variables. The Graph Time-History
Variables dialog box appears. Your graph should look like this:

21. Enter 2 for 1st variable to graph.

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22. Enter 3 for 2nd variable to graph.


23. Click on OK. A graph appears in the graphic window.

4.6.3.11 Exit ANSYS


You are now finished with this sample problem.
1. In the ANSYS Toolbar, click on Quit.
2. Choose the save option you want and click on OK.

4.7 Sample Harmonic Response Analysis


(Command or Batch Method)
You can perform the example harmonic response analysis of a two-mass-spring system by using the
following ANSYS commands instead of the GUI.
/PREP7
/TITLE, Harmonic response of a two-mass-spring system
ET,1,COMBIN14,,,2
ET,2,MASS21,,,4
R,1,200 ! Spring constant = 200
R,2,.5 ! Mass = 0.5
N,1
N,4,1
FILL
E,1,2
E,2,3
! Spring element
E,3,4
! Spring element
TYPE,2
REAL,2
E,2
! Mass element
E,3
! Mass element
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,HARMIC
! Harmonic response analysis
HROPT,FULL
! Full harmonic response
HROUT,OFF
! Print results as amplitudes and phase angles
OUTPR,BASIC,1
NSUBST,30
! 30 Intervals within freq. range
HARFRQ,,7.5
! Frequency range from 0 to 7.5 HZ
KBC,1
! Step boundary condition
D,1,UY,,,4
! Constrain all 44 DOF
D,1,UX,,,4,3
! Constrain nodes 1 and 4 in UX
F,2,FX,200
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST26
NSOL,2,2,U,X,2UX! Store UX Displacements
NSOL,3,3,U,X,3UX
/GRID,1 ! Turn grid on

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/AXLAB,Y,DISP
PLVAR,2,3
FINISH

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! Y-axis label disp


! Display variables 2 and 3

4.8 Where to Find Other Examples


Several ANSYS publications, particularly the ANSYS Verification Manual, describe additional harmonic
analyses.
The ANSYS Verification Manual consists of test case analyses demonstrating the analysis capabilities of
the ANSYS family of products. While these test cases demonstrate solutions to realistic analysis
problems, the ANSYS Verification Manual does not present them as step-by-step examples with lengthy
data input instructions and printouts. However, most ANSYS users who have at least limited finite
element experience should be able to fill in the missing details by reviewing each test case's finite
element model and input data with accompanying comments.
The following list shows you the variety of harmonic analysis test cases that the ANSYS Verification
Manual includes:
VM19 Random Vibration Analysis of a Deep Simply-Supported Beam
VM76 Harmonic Response of a Guitar String
VM86 Harmonic Response of a Dynamic System
VM87 Equivalent Structural Damping
VM88 Response of an Eccentric Weight Exciter
VM90 Harmonic Response of a Two-Mass-Spring System
VM176 Frequency Response of Electrical Input Admittance for a Piezoelectric Transducer
VM177 Natural Frequency of a Submerged Ring
VM183 Harmonic Response of a Spring-Mass System
VM203 Dynamic Load Effect on Simply-Supported Thick Square Plate

4.9 Reduced Harmonic Response Analysis


The reduced method, as its name implies, uses reduced matrices to calculate the harmonic solution. The
procedure for a reduced harmonic analysis consists of five main steps:
1. Build the model.
2. Apply the loads and obtain the reduced solution.

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3. Review the results of the reduced solution.


4. Expand the solution (expansion pass).
5. Review the results of the expanded solution.
Of these, the first step is the same as for the full method. Details of the other steps are explained below.

4.9.1 Apply Loads and Obtain the Reduced Solution


By reduced solution, we mean the degree of freedom solution calculated at the master DOF. The tasks
required to obtain the reduced solution are as follows:
1. Enter the ANSYS solution processor.
Command(s):
/SOLU
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution
2. Define the analysis type and options. Options for the reduced solution are the same as described for
the full method except for the following differences:

Choose the reduced solution method.


You can include prestress effects [PSTRES]. This requires element files from a previous static (or
transient) analysis that also included prestress effects. See "Prestressed Harmonic Response
Analysis" for details.

3. Define master degrees of freedom. Master DOF are essential or dynamic degrees of freedom that
characterize the dynamic behavior of the structure. For a reduced harmonic response dynamic analysis,
master DOF are also required at locations where you want to apply forces or non-zero displacements.
See Section 3.12, "Matrix Reduction," for guidelines to choose master DOF.
4. Apply loads on the model. Harmonic loading is the same as described for the full method, except for
the following restrictions:
Only displacements and forces are valid. Element loads such as pressures, temperatures, and
accelerations are not allowed.
Forces and non-zero displacements must be applied only at master DOF.
5. Specify load step options. These are the same as described for the full method except that the
OUTRES and ERESX commands are not available. The OUTPR command controls the printout of the
nodal solution at the master DOF [OUTPR,NSOL,ALL (or NONE)].
6. Save a copy of the database.

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Command(s):
SAVE
GUI:
Utility Menu>File>Save as
7. Start solution calculations.
Command(s):
SOLVE
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution>-Solve-Current LS
8. Repeat steps 4 through 7 for any additional loads and frequency ranges (that is, for additional load
steps). If you plan to do time-history postprocessing (POST26), the frequency ranges should not overlap
from one load step to the next. Another method for multiple load steps, which allows you to store the
load steps on files and then solve them at once using a macro, is described in the ANSYS Basic Analysis
Procedures Guide.
9. Leave SOLUTION.
Command(s):
FINISH
GUI:
Close the Solution menu.

4.9.2 Review the Results of the Reduced Solution


Results from the reduced harmonic solution are written to the reduced harmonic displacement file,
Jobname.RFRQ. They consist of displacements at the master DOF, which vary harmonically at each
forcing frequency for which the solution was calculated. As with the full method, these displacements
will be complex in nature if damping was defined or if out-of-phase loads were applied. You can review
the master DOF displacements as a function of frequency using POST26. (POST1 cannot be used,
because the complete solution at all DOF is not available.)
The procedure to use POST26 is the same as described for the full method, except for the following
differences:

Before defining the POST26 variables, use the FILE command to specify that data are to be read
from Jobname.RFRQ. For example, if HARMONIC is the jobname, the FILE command would
be: FILE,HARMONIC,RFRQ. (By default, POST26 looks for a results file, which is not written
by a reduced harmonic solution.)

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Only nodal degree of freedom data (at master DOF) are available for processing, so you can use
only the NSOL command to define variables.

4.9.3 Expand the Solution (Expansion Pass)


The expansion pass starts with the reduced solution and calculates the complete displacement, stress,
and force solution at all degrees of freedom. These calculations are done only at frequencies and phase
angles that you specify. Therefore, before you begin the expansion pass, you should review the results of
the reduced solution (using POST26) and identify the critical frequencies and phase angles.
An expansion pass is not always required. For instance, if you are interested mainly in displacements at
specific points on the structure, then the reduced solution could satisfy your requirements. However, if
you want to determine displacements at non-master DOF, or if you are interested in the stress solution,
then you must perform an expansion pass.

4.9.3.1 Points to Remember

The .RFRQ, .TRI, .EMAT, and .ESAV files from the reduced solution must be available.
The database must contain the same model for which the reduced solution was calculated.

4.9.3.2 Expanding the Modes


1. Re-enter the ANSYS solution processor.
Command(s):
/SOLU
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution
Note-You must explicitly leave SOLUTION (using the FINISH command) and re-enter (/SOLUTION)
before performing the expansion pass.
2. Activate the expansion pass and its options. ANSYS offers these options for the expansion pass:
Table 4-5 Expansion pass options
Option
Expansion Pass On/Off
No. of Solutions to
Expand
Freq. Range for
Expansion
Phase Angle for
Expansion

Command GUI Path


EXPASS Main Menu>Solution>-Analysis Type-ExpansionPass
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step OptsNUMEXP
ExpansionPass>Range of Solu's
NUMEXP Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step OptsExpansionPass>Range of Solu's
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step OptsHREXP
ExpansionPass>Range of Solu's

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Stress Calculations
On/Off
Nodal Solution Listing
Format

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NUMEXP Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step OptsEXPSOL ExpansionPass>Range of Solu's


HROUT

Main Menu>Solution>Analysis Options

Each of these options is explained in detail below.

4.9.3.3 Option: Expansion Pass On/Off [EXPASS]


Choose ON.

4.9.3.4 Option: Number of Solutions to Expand [NUMEXP,NUM]


Specify the number. This number of evenly spaced solutions will be expanded over a frequency range
(specified next). For example, NUMEXP,4,1000,2000 specifies four solutions in the frequency range
1000 to 2000 (that is, expanded solutions at 1250, 1500, 1750, and 2000).

4.9.3.5 Option: Frequency Range for Expansion [NUMEXP, BEGRNG, ENDRNG]


Specify the frequency range. See the example above. If you do not need to expand multiple solutions,
you can use EXPSOL to identify a single solution for expansion (either by its load step and substep
numbers or by its frequency value).

4.9.3.6 Option: Phase Angle for Expansion [HREXP]


If multiple solutions are to be expanded over a frequency range [NUMEXP], we suggest that you
request both the real and imaginary parts to be expanded [HREXP,ALL]. This way, you can easily
combine the two parts in POST26 to review the peak values of displacements, stresses, and other results.
If, on the other hand, a single solution is to be expanded [EXPSOL], you can specify the phase angle at
which peak displacements occurred using HREXP,angle.

4.9.3.7 Option: Stress Calculations On/Off [NUMEXP or EXPSOL]


You can turn off stress and force calculations if you are not interested in them. Default is to calculate
stresses and forces.

4.9.3.8 Option: Nodal Solution Listing Format [HROUT]


Determines how the harmonic displacement solution is listed in the printed output (Jobname.OUT). You
can choose between real and imaginary parts (default), and amplitudes and phase angles.
3. Specify load step options. The only options valid for a harmonic expansion pass are output controls:

Printed Output
Use this option to include any results data on the printed output file (Jobname.OUT).

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Command(s):
OUTPR
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts-Output Ctrls>Solu Printout

Database and Results File Output


Use this option to control the data on the results file (Jobname.RST).

Command(s):
OUTRES
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts-Output Ctrls>DB/Results File

Extrapolation of Results
Use this option to review element integration point results by copying them to the nodes
instead of extrapolating them (default).

Note-The FREQ field on OUTPR and OUTRES can be only ALL or NONE.
Command(s):
ERESX
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution>-Load Step Opts-Output Ctrls>Integration Pt
4. Start expansion pass calculations.
Command(s):
SOLVE
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution>Current LS
5. Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 for additional solutions to be expanded. Each expansion pass is stored as a
separate load step on the results file.
Caution: Subsequent spectrum analyses expect all expanded modes to be in one load step.

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6. Leave SOLUTION. You can now review results in the postprocessor.


Command(s):
FINISH
GUI:
Close the Solution menu.

4.9.4 Review the Results of the Expanded Solution


Results from the expansion pass are written to the structural results file, Jobname.RST. They consist of
the following data, calculated at each frequency for which the solution was expanded:

Primary data
Nodal displacements (UX, UY, UZ, ROTX, ROTY, ROTZ)
Derived data
Nodal and element stresses
Nodal and element strains
Element forces
Nodal reaction forces
etc.

You can review them using POST1. (If you expanded solutions at several frequencies, you can also use
POST26 to obtain graphs of stress versus frequency, strain versus frequency, etc.)
The procedure to use POST1 (or POST26) is the same as described for the full method, except for one
difference: if you requested expansion at a specific phase angle [HREXP,angle], there is only one
solution available for each frequency. Use the SET command to read in the results.

4.9.5 Sample Input


A sample input listing for a reduced harmonic response analysis is shown below:
! Build the Model
/FILNAM,...
! Jobname
/TITLE,...
! Title
/PREP7
! Enter PREP7
----! Generate model
--FINISH
! Apply Loads and Obtain the Reduced Solution
/SOLU
! Enter SOLUTION
ANTYPE,HARMIC
! Harmonic analysis
HROPT,REDU
! Reduced method
HROUT,...
! Harmonic analysis output options
M,...
! Master DOF
TOTAL,...
D,...
! Constraints
F,...
! Loads (real and imaginary components)

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HARFRQ,...
DMPRAT,...
NSUBST,...
KBC,...
SAVE
SOLVE
FINISH

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! Forcing frequency range


! Damping ratio
! Number of harmonic solutions
! Ramped or stepped loads
! Initiate multiple load step solution

! Review the Results of the Reduced Solution


/POST26
FILE,,RFRQ
! Postprocessing file is Jobname.RFRQ
NSOL,...
! Store nodal result as a variable
PLCPLX,...
! Define how to plot complex variables
PLVAR,...
! Plot variables
PRCPLX,...
! Define how to list complex variables
PRVAR,...
! List variables
FINISH
! Expand the Solution
/SOLU
! Re-enter SOLUTION
EXPASS,ON
! Expansion pass
EXPSOL,...
! Expand a single solution
HREXP,...
! Phase angle for expanded solution
OUTRES,...
SOLVE
FINISH
! Review the Results of the Expanded Solution
/POST1
SET,...
! Read results for desired frequency
PLDISP,...
! Deformed shape
PRRSOL,...
! List reactions
PLNSOL,...
! Contour plot of nodal results
----! Other postprocessing as desired
--FINISH

See the ANSYS Commands Reference for a discussion of the ANTYPE, HROPT, HROUT, M,
TOTAL, HARFRQ, DMPRAT, NSUBST, KBC, FILE, NSOL, PLCPLX, PLVAR, PRCPLX,
PRVAR, EXPASS, EXPSOL, HREXP, PLDISP, PRRSOL and PLNSOL commands.

4.9.6 Mode Superposition Harmonic Response Analysis


The mode superposition method sums factored mode shapes (obtained from a modal analysis) to
calculate the harmonic response. It is the only method allowed in the ANSYS/LinearPlus program. The
procedure to use the method consists of five main steps:
1. Build the model.
2. Obtain the modal solution.
3. Obtain the mode superposition harmonic solution.
4. Expand the mode superposition solution.

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5. Review the results.


Of these, the first step is the same as described for the full method. The remaining steps are described
below.

4.9.7 Obtain the Modal Solution


Chapter 3 describes how to obtain a modal solution. You should keep in mind the following additional
points:

The mode extraction method should be subspace, Block Lanczos, reduced, or PowerDynamics.
(The other two methods, unsymmetric and damped, do not apply to mode superposition.)
Note-If PowerDynamics was used for the modal solution, no non-zero loads or displacements are
allowed (that is, only u=0 is valid as the initial condition).

Be sure to extract all modes that may contribute to the harmonic response.
For the reduced mode extraction method, include those master degrees of freedom at which
harmonic loads will be applied.
If you need to apply harmonically varying element loads (pressures, temperatures, accelerations,
etc.), you must specify them in the modal analysis. The loads are ignored for the modal solution,
but a load vector will be calculated and written to the mode shape file (Jobname.MODE). You can
then use this load vector for the harmonic solution.
The modes need not be expanded for the mode superposition solution. (If you want to review
mode shapes, however, you must expand the mode shapes.)
The model data (e.g., nodal rotations) should not be changed between the modal and harmonic
analyses.

4.9.8 Obtain the Mode Superposition Harmonic Solution


In this step, the program uses mode shapes extracted by the modal solution to calculate the harmonic
response. The mode shape file (Jobname.MODE) must be available, and the database must contain the
same model for which the modal solution was obtained. If the modal solution was performed using the
subspace or block Lanczos method using the default mass formulation (not the lumped mass
approximation), the full file (Jobname.FULL) must also be available. The following tasks are involved:
1. Enter SOLUTION.
Command(s):
/SOLU
GUI:
Main Menu>Solution
2. Define the analysis type and analysis options. These are the same as described for the full method,
except for the following differences:

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Choose the mode superposition method of solution [HROPT].


Specify the modes you want to use for the solution [HROPT]. This determines the accuracy of
the harmonic solution. Generally, the number of modes specified should cover about 50 percent
more than the frequency range of the harmonic loads.
Optionally, cluster the solutions about the structure's natural frequencies [HROUT] for a
smoother and more accurate tracing of the response curve.
Optionally, at each frequency, print a summary table that lists the contributions of each mode to
the response [HROUT].

3. Apply loads on the model. Harmonic loading is the same as described for the full method, except for
the following restrictions:

Only forces, accelerations, and a load vector created in the modal analysis are valid. Use the
LVSCALE command to apply the load vector from the modal solution.
If mode shapes from a reduced modal solution are being used, forces may be applied only at
master DOF.

4. Specify load step options. These are the same as described for the reduced method except that you can
also specify modal damping [MDAMP]. See Section 5.12.3 for details about damping. The NSUBST
command specifies the number of solutions on each side of a natural frequency if the clustering option
[HROUT] is chosen. The default is to calculate four solutions, but you may specify any number from 2
to 10.
5. If you used either the subspace or the Block Laczos option for the modal analysis (MODOPT,SUBSP
or MODPT,LANB), you may use a nodal component with the OUTRES,NSOL command to limit the
displacement data written to the reduced displacement file Jobname.RFRQ The expansion pass will only
produce valid results for those nodes and for those elements in which all of the nodes of the elements
have been written to the .RFRQ file. To use this option, first suppress all writing by invoking
OUTRES,NSOL,NONE, then specify the item(s) of interest by invoking
OUTRES,NSOL,ALL,component. Repeat the OUTRES command for any additional nodal
components that you want to write to the .RFRQ file.
6. Save a copy of the database.
Command(s):
SAVE
GUI:
Utility Menu>File>Save as
7. Start solution calculations.
Command(s):
SOLVE
GUI:

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Main Menu>Solution>-Solve-Current LS
8. Repeat steps 3 to 6 for any additional loads and frequency ranges (that is, for additional load steps). If
you plan to do time-history postprocessing (POST26), the frequency ranges should not overlap from one
load step to the next.
9. Leave SOLUTION.
Command(s):
FINISH
GUI:
Close the Solution menu.
The mode superposition harmonic solution is written to the reduced displacement file, Jobname.RFRQ,
regardless of whether the subspace, Block Lanczos, reduced, or PowerDynamics method was used for
the modal solution. You will therefore need to expand the solution if you are interested in stress results.

4.9.9 Expand the Mode Superposition Solution


The procedure for the expansion pass is the same as described for the reduced method. Jobname.TRI
from the modal analysis is needed only if the reduced eigenvalue extraction method was used. The
output from the expansion pass includes the structural results file, Jobname.RST, containing expanded
results.

4.9.10 Review the Results


Results consist of harmonically varying displacements, stresses, and reaction forces at each forcing
frequency for which the solution was calculated. You can review these results using POST26 or POST1,
as explained for the reduced method.

4.9.11 Sample Input


A sample input listing for a mode superposition harmonic response analysis is shown below:
! Build the Model
/FILNAM,...
! Jobname
/TITLE,...
! Title
/PREP7
! Enter PREP7
----! Generate model
--FINISH
! Obtain the Modal Solution
/SOLU
! Enter SOLUTION
ANTYPE,MODAL
! Modal analysis
MODOPT,REDU
! Reduced method
M,...
! Masters

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TOTAL,..
D,...
SF,...
SAVE
SOLVE
FINISH

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! Constraints
! Element loads
! Initiate modal solution

! Obtain the Mode Superposition Harmonic Solution


/SOLU
! Enter SOLUTION
ANTYPE,HARMIC
! Harmonic analysis
HROPT,MSUP,...
! Mode superposition method; number of modes to use
HROUT,...
! Harmonic analysis output options; cluster option
LVSCALE,...
! Scale factor for element loads
F,...
! Nodal loads
HARFRQ,...
! Forcing frequency range
DMPRAT,...
! Damping ratio
MDAMP,...
! Modal damping ratios
NSUBST,...
! Number of harmonic solutions
KBC,...
! Ramped or stepped loads
SAVE
SOLVE
! Initiate solution
FINISH
! Review the Results of the Mode Superposition Solution
/POST26
FILE,,RFRQ
! Postprocessing file is Jobname.RFRQ
NSOL,...
! Store nodal result as a variable
PLCPLX,...
! Define how to plot complex variables
PLVAR,...
! Plot variables
FINISH
! Expand the Solution (for Stress Results)
/SOLU
! Re-enter SOLUTION
EXPASS,ON
! Expansion pass
EXPSOL,...
! Expand a single solution
HREXP,...
! Phase angle for expanded solution
SOLVE
FINISH
! Review the Results of the Expanded Solution
/POST1
SET,...
! Read results for desired frequency
PLDISP,...
! Deformed shape
PLNSOL,...
! Contour plot of nodal results
--FINISH

See the ANSYS Commands Reference for a discussion of the ANTYPE, MODOPT, M, TOTAL,
HROPT, HROUT, LVSCALE, F, HARFRQ, DMPRAT, MDAMP, NSUBST, KBC, FILE, NSOL,
PLCPLX, PLVAR, EXPASS, EXPSOL, HREXP, SET, and PLNSOL commands.

4.10 Other Analysis Details


4.10.1 Prestressed Harmonic Response Analysis
A prestressed harmonic response analysis calculates the dynamic response of a prestressed structure,

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such as a violin string. This capability is available only for the reduced method and for the mode
superposition method. It is assumed that the harmonically varying stresses (which are superimposed on
the prestress) are much smaller than the prestress itself.

4.10.1.1 Prestressed Reduced Harmonic Response Analysis


The procedure to do a prestressed reduced harmonic analysis is essentially the same as that for any other
reduced harmonic analysis except that you first need to prestress the structure by doing a static analysis:
1. Build the model and obtain a static solution with prestress effects turned on [PSTRES,ON]. The
procedure to obtain the static solution is explained in Chapter 2.
2. Re-enter SOLUTION and obtain the reduced harmonic solution, also with prestress effects turned on
(reissue PSTRES,ON). Files Jobname.EMAT and Jobname.ESAV from the static analysis must be
available.

4.10.2 Prestressed Mode Superposition Harmonic Response


Analysis
In order to include prestress effects in a mode superposition analysis, you must first do a prestressed
modal analysis. See Chapter 3 for details. Once prestressed modal analysis results are available, proceed
as for any other mode superposition analysis.

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