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ENGSAFE

EV
Risk Analysis of the Household

Submitted by:
PATAWARAN, Joanna Maria D.
11139145

Submitted to:
Dr. Nenet Graza

Submitted on:
June 20, 2014

I.

Introduction

The probability of harm or injury (physical, psychological, social, or economic) occurring as a result of
participation in a research study. Both the probability and magnitude of possible harm may vary from minimal to
significant. Federal regulations define only "minimal risk."1

Once a hazard has been identified, you are required to assess for risk. A hazard is anything, including work
practices or procedures that have the potential to harm the health or safety of a person, or to cause damage to
property. Risk is the chance of the injury or damage happening, and how severe the injury or damage might be. For
example, water left on the floor is a hazard, with the risk being that a slip and fall is likely to occur and could result
in breaking a bone and/or soft tissue injury. Risk assessment is making a judgement about how dangerous a risk
associated with a hazard is. This must be done in consultation with the people who may be exposed to the risk.2
A risk assessment determines:
- What kind of risks there are
- The likelihood of risk
- The severity of the risk
- Priorities and plans for risk control

A major benefit of risk assessment is to prevent or minimize risks. A research from UC Irvine came up with
ways to minimize risk. These proposed ways can be done by performing a risk assessment like the next pages to
come.

Ways to Minimize Risk (UC Irvine):

1.

Provide complete information in the protocol regarding the experimental design and the scientific rationale
underlying the proposed research, including the results of previous animal and human studies.

2.

Assemble a research team with sufficient expertise and experience to conduct the research.

3.

Ensure that the projected sample size is sufficient to yield useful results.

4.

Collect data from standard-of-care procedures to avoid unnecessary risk, particularly for invasive or risky
procedures (e.g., spinal taps, cardiac catheterization).

5.

Incorporate adequate safeguards into the research design such as an appropriate data safety monitoring
plan, the presence of trained personnel who can respond to emergencies, and procedures to protect the
confidentiality of the data (e.g., encryption, codes, and passwords).

II.

Objectives
1. To identify the possible hazards in the household;
2. To establish the threats posed by each identified hazard;
3. To ascertain the impacts of the threats and their frequencies of occurrence;
4. To rate the impacts and their frequencies of occurrence;
5. To evaluate the risk levels and present them in a summary table; and
6. To prepare the concluding statements and the recommendations for risk reduction

III.

Observations and Sample Calculations

The assessed venue of the following risk assessment is a household, specifically a condominium unit. Risk can
be measured by means of rating the level and frequency of a specific situation or phenomenon and multiplying both
ratings to get the Risk Rating. Using Figures 1 and 2, we can determine the level of Risk in the household by using it
as a basis of risk factor.
The assessed household is not that big so fewer risks are involved. The following tables will show the risk
assessment data and results.
PROBABILITY

RATING

CONSEQUENCE/IMPACT

Almost Certain

Death

Likely

Major Injuries

Notable Chance

Notable Injuries

Unlikely

Minor Injuries

Near Impossible

Insignificant

Figure 1

The riskiest part of the household is its location. The condominium is located on an earthquake line.
Earthquakes frequent this area and the heavy impact will affect the household because of its location. Overall, the
household is safe to live in.

IV.

Summary of Risk Evaluation

Figure 2

FREQUENCY

5
4

1
2

6
12
> 12

V.

1
3
SEVERITY

5
4

5
5

LOW
MEDIUM
HIGH

Conclusions and Recommendations

The evaluated condominium is deemed as a fairly safe environment to live in. Because of the small
space, less risks are involved which makes a perfect place for a person to live in. The only problem is that
the building is lying on a fault line, but from the 20 years the resident has been living in this condominium,
a low intensity earthquake as only occurred once and fortunately, no damaging earthquakes has presented
yet. All of the risk ratings do not step on the high rage so no immediate attention is needed.

It is recommended to be updated with earthquake announcements and check the sockets all the time
and kitchen equipment. Also, because of the limited space, it is also advised to overcrowd. A condominium
is an ideal living space for a person living alone.

VI.

References links

http://www.haccohs.adhc.nsw.gov.au/risk_management_process/risk_assessment#sthash.V9E9T8cU.dpuf

http://www.research.uci.edu/compliance/human-research-protections/irb-members/assessing-risks-andbenefits.html