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Four Types of Climate in the Philippines

The four general types of climate in the Philippines, based on seasonal rainfall distribution are
as follows:

Type I - Two pronounced seasons, dry and wet, with maximum rain period from June
to September and a dry season which lasts for three to six months.

There are 2 distinct seasonsthe dry and the wet. The dry season is from
November to April; the wet season occurs during the rest of the year. Regions
in the western part of Luzon, Mindoro Occidental, Negros provinces, and
Palawan have this type of climate.

Type II - No dry season with a very pronounced maximum rain period that occurs in
December and January.

There is no pronounced dry season. Some rains fall throughout the year. The
parts of the Philippines that experience this type of climate include a great
portion of Eastern Mindanao, Catanduanes, Sorsogon, eastern part of Albay
province, and the eastern and northern parts of Camarines Norte and
Camarines
Sur.

Type III - No very pronounced maximum rain period, with a short dry season lasting
from one to three months.

Wet and dry seasons are not pronounced. It is relatively dry from November
to April, and relatively wet during the rest of the year. Regions that fall under
this type include: Southern and Central Cebu, eastern part of Palawan,
western part of Cagayan, Isabela, Nueva Vizcaya, Eastern Mountain
Province, Southern Quezon, Masbate, Romblon, Northern Panay, and
Eastern Negros.

Type IV - Rainfall more or less evenly distributed throughout the year.

Rainfall is more or less evenly distributed throughout the year. The regions
with this type of climate include most of Central, Eastern, and southern
Mindanao, Western Leyte, Northern Cebu, Batanes, Northeastern Luzon,
Southwestern Camarines Norte, western part of Camarines Sur, Albay,
Marinduque, Western Leyte, Northern Cebu, and Bohol.

According to climatologists, climate depends on three factorslatitude, height of the


land above sea level (altitude), and land and water forms around the place.
1. LATITUDE. The equator is an imaginary line that divides the earth into the
Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere. The equator receives direct
sunlight. The temperature in places near the equator is high. The suns rays near or
in the polar regions are weaker for the suns rays to spread at a wider area. This is
why the temperature in polar regions is lower than the temperature in regions near
the
equator.

2. ALTITUDE. Altitude or elevation refers to the height of a place above the sea level.
The climate in high places is cooler than the climate in lowlands. As height
increases, air becomes thinner or less dense. Less dense air cannot hold much heat.
Thus, higher elevation means cooler temperature. For every 1,000 feet in height or
elevation,
the
temperature
drops
by
3.5
degree
Centigrade.
3. BODIES OF WATER. They affect the climate of a place. Places near bodies of
water are cooler than areas surrounded by other land areas. This is because land
absorbs and loses heat quickly, while water absorbs and loses heat slowly.

PAGASA divides the climate of the country into two seasons, using rainfall and temperature as
basis:
Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Rainfall
Temperature

Key:

Blue: Rainy
Yellow: Dry

Cool: Green
Hot: Red

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec