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Multisensory Teaching Accommodates the 12 Ways of Learning

Teachers are always trying to reach more learners and improve retention. One of the best ways
to do this is to employ a variety teaching methods. This involves integrating the 12 ways of
learning into instruction. Here is an infographic that reviews the 12 ways of learning and
provides some statistics on how learning improves when teachers implement multisensory
instruction.
Here is an image of the same infographic that can be shared on Pinterest.

Here are direct links to:

A free Prezi on multisensory teaching

A free video on the 12 Ways of Learning

The Eclectic Teaching Approach

I hope you found this to be informative and inspiring. If you have any thoughts you would like
to share, please leave a comment below this blog post.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz
Posted by Erica Warren at 6:30 AM
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Labels: Eclectic Teaching Approach, learning styles, Multisensory

Saturday, March 8, 2014


Kinesthetic Reading Remediation

Many students struggle with reading and the learning


process can become discouraging and difficult. However, integrating kinesthetics as well as
other ways of learning can make the process both enjoyable and memorable.
Mastering the Vocabulary
One common problem is mastering the vocabulary behind reading. Words like syllable, vowel,
and consonant are abstract terms for many young learners and without an understanding of and

recognition of these distinctions, students build their knowledge on a weak foundation.


How Can You Teach the Terms in a Multisensory Fashion?
The last two weeks, I video-taped a couple sessions with one of my students and then created a
short YouTube video. In these lessons, we tapped into all 12 ways of learning and as you can
she, her enthusiasm is contagious. The process addressed the following modalities:

1. Visual
2. Auditory
3. Tactile
4. Kinesthetic
5. Sequential
6. Simultaneous
7. Reflective
8. Verbal
9. Interactive
10. Direct Experience
11. Indirect Experience

12. Rhythmic/Melodic
Here is a link to our YouTube video or view is below. I hope you enjoy it and also integrate the
ideas into your own lessons.
If you like the bouncy chairs, they are called Zenergy Ball Chairs:
Safco Products Zenergy Ball Chair, Black

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz
Posted by Erica Warren at 6:17 PM
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Labels: kinesthetic learners, Multisensory, Reading

Friday, February 14, 2014


Strategies for Teaching the Different Types of Angles and Lines

Using multisensory instruction always makes a lesson more engaging and fun for students. In
fact, one of my favorite learning modalities to integrate into instruction is kinesthetics or
movement. For many learners having to sit still is not conducive for learning, and other children
just need to get their bodies moving and their blood circulating from time to time to fully focus
on a lesson.
One of my favorite topics to teach are the different type of angles and lines. I like to cover these
concepts with a multisensory and interactive PowerPoint that I created, then I get the students to
use chants as well as their bodies to encode the information. Just this week I created a free
YouTube video, where I share some fun activity ideas for lines and angles.
If you like the video and would like to also acquire my multisensory PowerPoint presentation,
Click Here to learn more.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz

Posted by Erica Warren at 4:33 PM


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Labels: Math, Multisensory

Friday, December 20, 2013


Multisensory Teaching Accommodates the 12 Ways of Learning

To be a true multisensory teacher, it is important to be aware of all 12 Ways of Learning. The


Eclectic Teaching Approach merges the theories of cognitive styles, multiple intelligences,
information processing, and multisensory learning to reveal 12 diverse and distinctive ways of
processing and encoding information. Each of these learning modalities lie on a continuum and
individuals have their own profiles that are based on cognitive strengths, preferences as well as
exposure to each methodology. By learning about the Eclectic Teaching Approach, teachers,
therapists, parents and even employers can be more mindful of their expectations as well as their
lesson or training approach. Then, by evaluating preferences, instruction and assignments can be
tailored for groups or individuals resulting in optimal learning.
What are the 12 Ways of Learning?

If you would like to view a FREE Prezi on the 12 Ways of Learning, Click here.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go

to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l


earningtolearn.biz

Posted by Erica Warren at 8:00 AM


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Labels: Eclectic Teaching Approach, Multisensory

Friday, August 9, 2013


Mathemagic: Multisensory and Mindful Math Strategies Tailored for the
Individual

Many students struggle with the steps required to complete mathematical problems.
They may forget the concept, miss a step, mis-sequence the steps, misread a sign, or
struggle with writing out or lining up the numbers. In fact, even if a student has
understood and executed a problem with precision, it doesnt mean that they will retain
that information at a later time. So what can we do to help these students to encode,
into long-term memory, the steps required to complete math computations?

The 3 Key Components for Effective Math Instruction


1.

Go multisensory: Integrate as many of the 12 Ways of processing as you can into your
instructional plan: Visual, Auditory, Tactile, Kinesthetic, Sequential, Simultaneous,

2.

3.

Reflective, Verbal, Interactive, Indirect Experience, Direct Experience, and Rythmic


Melodic. To learn more about this click here
Teach metacognitive and mindful strategies: Metacognition refers to the act of
thinking about thinking, or the cognition of cognition. It is the ability to control your own
thoughts. Mindfulness refers to being completely aware of the present moment, as well
as maintaining a non-judgmental approach. It helps to develop emotional intelligence
and it instructs students to pay attention on purpose. Whats more, mindfulness can
help improve memory, test scores, classroom behaviors and stress management. To
learn more about this click here
Integrate creativity: Integrating creative lessons and assignments into the curriculum
allows students to incorporate their imagination and encourages active participation.
Creative assignments also increase motivation for many students.

Creating a Math Manual:


One of the most effective strategies I have ever employed with students is creating a
math manual. This assignment or project unites the three components of effective
math instruction and also brings the fun factor into the classroom. This can be
completed throughout the academic year and checked for accuracy so that students
can use this resource for tests, midterms, finals, and even state exams.

What Format Should be Used?


Students can create the manual by hand or on a computer. It can be presented in a
photo album, a blank book, a binder, or a notebook.

Creating the Cover:


I encourage all of my students to come up with their own unique, creative name and
cover for their math manual. In my illustration at the top of this blog, I called it
Mathemagic: A Magical Math Manual.

Create a Sequence of Color Coded Steps:


Each student should write out the required steps to complete the problem. This can be
done in a linear fashion, a numbered list, a web or flow chart. I also encourage students
to color code the steps as this can also enhance memory.

Use Mnemonics:
Memory strategies are tools that help students organize information before they file it
away in their memory banks. I encourage my students to create their own memory
strategies and to use both visual and auditory mnemonics.

Complete a Sample Problem:


Ask the students to provide a color-coded sample problem that illustrates the needed
steps to complete a problem.

Other Options:
Ask your students to create a song, poem, or rhyme with or without a dance routine to
define the steps. Integrating songs, rhymes and kinesthetics offers further modalities
that will help to encode computation skills.

Sample Math Manual Page:

I hope you found this helpful! If you would like a free copy of this division strategy, click
here or on the image above.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz
Posted by Erica Warren at 7:23 PM
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Labels: Math, Mindfulness, Multisensory

Saturday, June 1, 2013


Student Mind Maps: Revealing the Remedial Needs of Struggling Writers

Having an understanding of how each student processes information and


conceptualizes ideas is key in the remedial writing process. Students can
think in a sequence of images, a series of words, webs of pictures, an outline
of phrases, a collage of imagery, a patchwork of terms, movie-like scenes
and more. By evaluating the ways your students conduct the process, you
can help them to tweak their method so that writing can become a fluid and
enjoyable process. This can be done through discussion, but what I find to
be most helpful is having your student(s) conduct a drawing of how their
mind works a mental mind map.
I discovered the utility of this mindful approach when working with a
student, JT. Time and time again, JT struggled to get his ideas on paper, and
beginning the process was always a chore. Whats more, first drafts tended
to be a hodgepodge of overlapping ideas. We often referred to JTs
difficulties as road blocks, and when I finally asked JT to draw what it was
like in his mind to write, we discovered a very different issue. JT didnt
suffer with writers block, he experienced more of a writers bottleneck. The
term bottleneck is a metaphor that is often used to describe the traffic
congestion created when construction takes a multilane road and limits
travel to a single lane. Soon traffic gets backed up and travel becomes slow
and frustrating. It comes literally from the slow rate of liquid outflow from a
bottle, as it is limited by the width of the exit the bottleneck. JTs
challenge was not a result of a lack of words and ideas as we once thought.
Instead, he was overwhelmed with competing and overlapping ideas as
represented in the image on this page. JT drew a complex web of lines that
was dotted with what he described as both good and bad ideas. Also, he
remarked that darker lines represent stronger ideas. Once I saw the image,
it all made sense. JT is highly intelligent, but he also has ADHD as well as
dyslexia. Now it is clear how these diagnoses impact his writing. JT is
bombarded with a plethora of ideas and he has difficulty funneling and
organizing his thoughts into an ordered sequence of words. When he writes,
he too becomes frustrated with the slow and labored process of writing in a
linear fashion. Whats more, his dyslexia, which impacts his spelling, is an
added hurdle and annoyance that distracts him during the writing process.
So now that I know JTs challenge, what can I do to help him?
1) From the very beginning, I can help JT to define the main ideas and topic
sentences.
2) I can also encourage him to use graphic organizers or programs such as
Inspiration to help JT to categorize his supporting details and examples.
3) I can offer JT a computer with a spell check and word prediction software.
4) When conducting research papers, I can help JT define each main idea on
a different colored index card. Then, JT can organize each nugget of

information onto the best colored index card so that all the supporting
details and examples are categorized under the same color as the most
appropriate main idea. Then, I can let him sequence the supporting details
and examples in an orderly fashion by arranging the cards. Finally, when JT
is ready to type his paper, he can alter the font color to match the colored
index cards so that he can be sure to get all the correct details and examples
under the best main idea. Once the paper is complete, JT can select the
whole document and change the font color back to black.
I hope you will try having your students draw their own mental mind maps.
Allowing them to show the workings of their inner mind will not only help
others remediate areas of difficulty, but it will help each individual have a
better understanding of and power over his or her own ways of processing.
I would love to hear your thoughts.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz

Posted by Erica Warren at 8:56 AM


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Labels: Mind Maps, Multisensory, Teaching Advice

Wednesday, May 15, 2013


11 End of the Year Activities Using Balls and Balloons

http://learningspecialistmaterials.blogspot.com/
Balls and balloons offer a cheap and fun way to complete your school year. Whats more
integrating balls and balloons brings a tactile, playful, and kinesthetic modality into the
classroom. Balls and balloons can be used to review the academic content, as well as
mindfulness activities and keepsakes. Below is featured a variety of entertaining, multisensory
ideas.
Reviewing Key Topics from the School Year
These games can be played with an entire class in a large circle facing one another, or you can
break the students into small groups or pairs.
1) Parts of Speech Game: Place the parts of speech on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass
the balloon or ball to one another. Instruct them to say aloud the first part of speech they see.
Then ask them to provide a word that is an example of that part of speech. Players can not repeat
a word that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.
2) Figurative Language Game: Place the figurative language terms on a balloon or ball. Have
the students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first
figurative language term they see. Then ask them to provide a phrase that is an example of that
type of figurative language. Players can not repeat a figurative language example that has already
been used. If they do, they are out of the game.
3) Types of Syllables Game:

http://learningspecialistmaterials.blogspot.com/
Place the syllable types on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to one
another, and instruct them to say aloud the first syllable type that they see. Then ask them to
provide a word that is an example of that type of syllable. Players can not repeat a word that has
already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.
4) Vowel Combinations or Vowel Teams Game:
Place the vowel combinations on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to
one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first vowel combination that they see. Then ask
them to provide a word that uses that vowel combination. Players can not repeat an example that
has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.
5) Types of Sentences: Place the types of sentences on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass
the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first sentence type that they
see. Then ask them to provide a sentence that illustrates that sentence type. Players can not repeat
a sentence that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.
6) Main Ideas and Details: Place main ideas on a balloon or ball. Main ideas could include
transportation, colors, vacation spots and so forth. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to
one another, and instruct them to say aloud the main idea that they see. Then ask them to provide
a detail that would be properly categorized under that main idea. Players can not repeat a detail
that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.
7) What I Learned: Have the students sit in a circle facing one another. Explain that the only
person who can speak is the one holding the ball. Toss the ball to one of your students and ask
them to share the most important thing they learned over the school year. When they are finished
talking, have them toss the ball to another student. Continue until all the students have an
opportunity to share their thoughts.
8) My Favorite Lessons: Have the students sit in a circle facing one another. Explain that the
only person who can speak is the one holding the ball. Toss the ball to one of your students and
ask them to share their favorite lesson from the whole school year. Ask them to also share why
they like it so much. When they are finished talking, have them toss the ball to another student.
Continue until all the students have an opportunity to share their thoughts.
9) What I Like About Me and You: Have the students sit in a circle facing one another. Explain

that the only person who can speak is the one holding the ball. Toss the ball to one of your
students and ask them to share one thing that they like about themselves and one thing that they
like about the person who tossed them the ball. When they are finished talking, have them toss
the ball to another student. Continue until all the students have an opportunity to share their
thoughts.
10) Memory Balls: Give each student a blank inflatable ball, such as a beach ball. Provide
permanent markers and let the students go around and sign each others balls. They can leave
short messages too. Be sure to say that all messages must be positive.
11) Why Im Special Balls: Before you begin this activity, ask your students to help you
create a list of positive adjectives that can describe people. Place this list where all the students
can see it. Now, give each of your students a blank beach ball or balloon. Provide permanent
markers and have the students go around and write a positive adjective that describes the person
on the ball or balloon to whom it belongs. Encourage the students to come up with unique
adjectives by looking at each ball and coming up with something new.
If you would like to learn about some of my other popular games. Go to:
http://goodsensorylearning.com There, you can even download freebies on some of my product
pages.
I hope you enjoy these games!! I would love to hear you thoughts.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz
Posted by Erica Warren at 4:00 PM
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Labels: Multisensory, Teaching Advice, Teaching Strategies

Friday, April 19, 2013


Learning Place Value with Pompoms and Pill Boxes

Bringing a tactile, visual and experiential component into math instruction can bring the fun
factor into your lessons. In addition, incorporating multisensory dynamics into lessons makes
them more memorable and concrete.
This activity is great for math centers, a classroom activity or individual remediation.
When I teach place values, I like to engage my students with colorful pompoms and pill boxes!
You can usually find pill boxes and bags of assorted pompoms at a Dollar Store. With a few
color coded labels, that cover the days of the week, your pill boxes can be transformed into
pompom compartments. I like to put a single color in each compartment and I color code the
labels to match. This makes it easy for students to reassemble the activity for the next person.
Also, make sure to vary the number of pompoms in each partition. I like to make a variety of
difficulty levels for the students and use the seven boxes as follows:

Millions, Hundred Thousands, Ten Thousands, Thousands, Hundreds, Tens, Ones

Hundreds, Tens, Ones, Decimal, Tenths, Hundredths, Thousandths

Decimal, Tenths, Hundredths, Thousandths, Ten Thousandths, Hundred Thousandths,


Millionths

I also like to provide a laminated sheet so students can record answers


with a dry erase marker or I place the answer sheet in a dry erase pocket. Students can check
their answers with an answer sheet or a barcode on the back of the pill box.
If you would like this activity, you can create it yourself. However, this activity, as well as the
score sheets, are included in my popular publication, Place Value Panic Game, and Instruction.
To learn more, Click Here.
http://goodsensorylearning.com/collections/math-3/products/measurement-memory-strategiespowerpoint-digital-download

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you
can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz
Posted by Erica Warren at 7:00 AM
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Labels: Math, Multisensory

Sunday, March 10, 2013


Using Beach Balls for Comprehension

I just love to use balls for


teaching students. It's a great way to accommodate and
engage your kinesthetic and tactile learners, and it always
brings the fun factor into your lesson! I often purchase
beach balls at the dollar store and use permanent markers
to write down different, reading, writing, grammar, and
math concepts.
Here are a few things that I use balls for:

parts of speech

multiplication

touch math

vowel combinations

types of sentences

letters

blending

writing prompts

But for those of you who would like to buy ready made
options, I just came across these nifty products
on Amazon. I included the links below.
If you use balls for other lessons, please share your ideas.
Cheers, Erica
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational
materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director
of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and
services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.com www.dyslexiamaterials.com and
www.learningtolearn.biz
Posted by Erica Warren at 11:30 AM
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Labels: Games, Multisensory

Tuesday, November 20, 2012


Learning Style Inventories Can Help with the College Process

Here is an interesting article about how uncovering ones learning style can help with the college
process. It was printed in the New York Times - Monday November 19th 2012.
http://thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/19/college-search-based-on-learning-style/commentpage-1/#comment-155872
One great inventory to consider for this purpose is my Eclectic Learning Profile. Come check it
out: http://goodsensorylearning.com/eclectic-learning-profile.html

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials
at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to
Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you

can go
to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.l
earningtolearn.biz
Posted by Erica Warren at 6:00 PM
Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest
Labels: learning styles, Multisensory
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Dr. Erica Warren erica@goodsensorylearning.com

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5 Paragraph Essay Freebie

Free Following Directions Sample Activities

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Eclectic Learning Profile

Categorizing, Paragraph Building and Transitional Word


Activities

Making Inferences

Making Connections

Place Value Golf

Following Directions Activities

Measurement Memory Strategies

Reversing Reversals Primary

Why Should We Learn About Angles

Monster Multiplication

Word Shuffle

GSL Reading Assessment

Vowel Combinations Made Easy

Reading Games

Teaching Visualization

Reading Games 2

Reading Board Games

Alphabet Roundup

Abstract Thinking and Multiple Meanings

Reversing Reversals

5 Ws Detective

Piggy Banking

The 4 Types of Sentences

Hey What's the Big Idea

Planning, Time Management and Organization for Success

My Pet PEMDAS

Place Value Panic

Multisensory Multiplication and Division to Melodies CD MMDM

Kangaroo Metric Conversions

College Essay Workshop

Eclectic Teaching Approach

Noodle the Noun Hound

Preppy the Preposition Penguin

Fraction Golf, Hockey and More

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