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Pittsfield Public Schools

Fiscal Year 2017 Budget


Pittsfield Public Schools
269 First Street
Pittsfield, Massachusetts 01201
Tel. 413.499.9502

0
www.pittsfield.net

Table of Contents
School Committee ........................................................................................................................................... 6
District Leadership Team ................................................................................................................................ 7
Introductory Section........................................................................................................................................ 8
Budget Message from the Superintendent .................................................................................................... 9
Budget Process Timeline .............................................................................................................................. 10
School Committee Budget Calendar ............................................................................................................ 11
History of Budget Staffing ............................................................................................................................ 12
The Big Picture .............................................................................................................................................. 13
Revenue Summary by Fund FY12 - FY16.................................................................................................... 14
Expense Summary by Fund FY12 FY16 ................................................................................................... 14
Tax Base and Rate Information - FY03 FY16 ............................................................................................ 15
Property Tax Base History ........................................................................................................................ 15
Tax Rate Trend by Class .......................................................................................................................... 16
The Budget in Context ................................................................................................................................. 16
FY16 Cuts ................................................................................................................................................ 16
FY17 Budget Priorities ................................................................................................................................. 17
Budget Priorities ....................................................................................................................................... 18
FY17 Budget Drivers .................................................................................................................................... 18
Contractual Obligations ............................................................................................................................ 18
Community School positions .................................................................................................................... 18
Increased Special Education Tuition Costs ............................................................................................... 18
Revenue Reductions .................................................................................................................................... 19
Kindergarten Grant ................................................................................................................................... 19
Federal E-rate Funding Program Change ................................................................................................. 19
Tuition Revolving Account Revenue ......................................................................................................... 19
FY17 Budget Savings .................................................................................................................................. 19
FY17 Position Reductions ........................................................................................................................ 19
Capital Improvement Requests Schools ................................................................................................ 20
Organizational Section .................................................................................................................................. 22
Organizational Chart................................................................................................................................. 23
2015-16 School Accelerated Improvement Plan

..................................................................................... 24

Area Served ................................................................................................................................................... 31


School Zones ............................................................................................................................................... 32
Elementary Schools.................................................................................................................................. 32
Middle Schools ......................................................................................................................................... 33
1

High Schools ............................................................................................................................................ 34


District FacilitiesElementary Schools..................................................................................................... 35
District FacilitiesElementary & Middle Schools ...................................................................................... 36
District FacilitiesHigh Schools & Other Facilities ................................................................................... 37
District FacilitiesOther Facilities ............................................................................................................ 38
Enrollment Section ........................................................................................................................................ 39
Enrollment Data ............................................................................................................................................. 39
Enrollment Trends by Middle School Grade Level ........................................................................................ 40
Enrollment Trends by High School Grade Level .......................................................................................... 40
Total Enrollment by Race ......................................................................................................................... 41
10 Year History Free/Reduced Lunch through 2014 .............................................................................. 43
Enrollment Projections .............................................................................................................................. 44
Programs & Services..................................................................................................................................... 48
Educational Programs .................................................................................................................................. 49
Curriculum Reading .................................................................................................................................... 49
Humanities ............................................................................................................................................... 49
Math and Science ..................................................................................................................................... 49
English Language Learners ......................................................................................................................... 50
First Languages of English Language Learners (ELLs) ............................................................................ 51
Special Education ........................................................................................................................................ 53
Career and Technical Education Programs .................................................................................................. 54
Alternative Education ................................................................................................................................... 54
Technology .................................................................................................................................................. 55
Co-Curricular Programs ............................................................................................................................... 58
After School 21st Century Programs....................................................................................................... 58
Summer Programs ................................................................................................................................... 58
Athletics ....................................................................................................................................................... 59
Adult Learning Center Programs and Services............................................................................................. 59
Operational Services .................................................................................................................................... 60
School Lunch and Breakfast Programs..................................................................................................... 60
Bus Operations......................................................................................................................................... 61
Custodial Services .................................................................................................................................... 62
Financial Section ........................................................................................................................................... 63
Expenditure Function and Classification ...................................................................................................... 64
Major Revenue Sources............................................................................................................................... 65
State Revenue ............................................................................................................................................. 65
2

Chapter 70 ............................................................................................................................................... 65
Circuit Breaker .......................................................................................................................................... 66
Local Revenue ............................................................................................................................................. 67
Other Revenue............................................................................................................................................. 67
Tuition Revenue ....................................................................................................................................... 67
Federal Revenue ......................................................................................................................................... 67
Medicaid Reimbursement ......................................................................................................................... 67
Grant Funding .............................................................................................................................................. 68
Budgets........................................................................................................................................................ 68
Operating Budget ......................................................................................................................................... 68
Net School Spending ................................................................................................................................... 69
Revolving accounts ...................................................................................................................................... 69
Tuition Revolving Accounts ...................................................................................................................... 69
Program Specific Revolving Accounts .......................................................................................................... 71
Adult Learning Center ............................................................................................................................... 71
Athletic Revolving Account ....................................................................................................................... 71
Career and Technical Education Revolving Accounts ............................................................................... 72
Circuit Breaker Revolving Account ........................................................................................................... 72
Community Correction Vocational Revolving Account .............................................................................. 73
Continuing Education Account .................................................................................................................. 73
Custodial Revolving Account .................................................................................................................... 73
Donation Account ..................................................................................................................................... 74
Drivers Education Revolving Account ...................................................................................................... 74
Enrichment Revolving Account ................................................................................................................. 74
Insurance Revolving Accounts.................................................................................................................. 75
Lost Book Revolving Account ................................................................................................................... 75
Professional Development Revolving Account.......................................................................................... 75
School Nutrition Service Program Account ............................................................................................... 76
Special Education Parent Advisory Council Revolving Account ................................................................ 77
Summer School Program Revolving Accounts ......................................................................................... 77
Testing Revolving Accounts ..................................................................................................................... 77
Transportation Revolving Account ............................................................................................................ 78
Informational Section .................................................................................................................................... 79
State Aid ...................................................................................................................................................... 80
FY2017 Local Aid Estimated Receipts for Pittsfield .................................................................................. 81
FY2017 Local Aid Assessments for Pittsfield ............................................................................................ 82
3

City and Town Contribution Required Contribution ................................................................................... 83


FY2017 Chapter 70 ...................................................................................................................................... 84
Chapter 70 Foundation Budget .................................................................................................................... 84
Chapter 70 Trends ...................................................................................................................................... 85
Pittsfield Chapter 70 Trends, FY93 to FY16.............................................................................................. 86
Foundation Budget Rates per Pupil Chapter 70 ..................................................................................... 87
Per Pupil Expenditures Comparisons ........................................................................................................... 88
Urban School Comparison........................................................................................................................ 88
Berkshire County School Comparison ...................................................................................................... 89
Per Pupil Expenditure Comparison to State .............................................................................................. 90
Grants .......................................................................................................................................................... 91
Grant Information Summary Report ............................................................................................................. 91
State Grants: ............................................................................................................................................ 92
State Grants - OTHER: ............................................................................................................................. 93
Federal Grants: ........................................................................................................................................ 95
Federal Grants - OTHER: ....................................................................................................................... 101
Private Grants: ....................................................................................................................................... 102
Summary of Grant Awards ..................................................................................................................... 104
Pittsfield Students to School Choice ....................................................................................................... 105
Pittsfield Students to Charter Schools..................................................................................................... 105
Pittsfield Students Gained by School Choice & Tuition ........................................................................... 106
School Choice & Charter Statistics by Grade.......................................................................................... 107
School Choice Comparisons to Urban Districts ...................................................................................... 108
Past Year School Choice Comparisons of Pittsfield and Other Berkshire County Districts ...................... 109
Per Pupil Expenditures in Berkshire County School Districts .................................................................. 110
Charter School Summary ........................................................................................................................... 111
Homeschooling .......................................................................................................................................... 112
Tuition Rates .............................................................................................................................................. 113
Career and Technical Education Enrollment by Program ........................................................................... 114
Pittsfield Public Schools - Custodial Staffing Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) ............................................... 118
Custodial Staffing (contd)....................................................................................................................... 119
Average Daily Meals .................................................................................................................................. 120
Food Service Program FY16 - Daily Avg. Number of Meals Served Compared to Student Enrollment ... 120
By School - FY16 Total Daily Average Number of Lunches Served ........................................................ 120
Athletics ..................................................................................................................................................... 121
Participation 2015 - 2016 ........................................................................................................................ 121
4

Athletic Budget ....................................................................................................................................... 122


District Facilities ......................................................................................................................................... 123
District FacilitiesVehicle Inventory .......................................................................................................... 123
Glossary ....................................................................................................................................................... 124

School Committee

Pittsfield Public Schools

Katherine Yon, Chairperson


Daniel Elias, Vice Chairperson
Cynthia Taylor, Clerk
Joshua Cutler
Pamela Farron
Anthony Riello
Mayor Linda Tyer, Member ExOfficio

District Leadership Team

Pittsfield Public Schools


Jason P. McCandless, Ed.D., Superintendent
Cabinet:
Joseph Curtis,

Kristen Behnke,

Richard Brady,

Deputy Superintendent

Asst. Supt. Business & Finance

Asst. Superintendent CTE

Harry Hayes,

Gretchen West,

Randy McLeod,

Dir. of Human Resources

Dir. of Special Education

Director of Technology

Principals: Elementary

Principals: Middle & High

Directors:

Brenda Kelley,

Gina Coleman, Ph.D.,

Paul Gage,

Allendale Elementary School

Herberg Middle School

Director, Adult Learning Ctr.

Candy Jezewski,

Linda Whitacre,

James Abel,

Capeless Elementary School

Reid Middle School

Director, Athletics

Kerry Light,

Matthew Bishop,

Susan Donnelly-Wendling,

Conte Community School

Pittsfield High School

Director, Bus Operations

Donna Baker,

John Vosburgh,

James Larrow,

Taconic High School

Director, Custodial Services

Executive Team:

Crosby Elementary School

Judy Rush,
Egremont Elementary School

Jennifer Stokes,
Morningside Comm. School

Aaron Dean,
Stearns Elementary School

Lisa Buchinski,
Williams Elementary School

Sylvana Bryan,
Director Food Services

Curriculum Coordinators:
Virginia Guglielmo-Brady, Ed.D.,
English Language Learners

Kathleen Latham,
Reading/Title I

Introductory Section

Budget Message from the Superintendent

Pittsfield Public
Schools
Administration Center
269 First Street
Pittsfield, MA 01201

Jason P. McCandless Ed.D.


Superintendent
413.499.9512 Fax 413.448.2643
jmccandless@pittsfield.net

www.pittsfield.net

Dear Pittsfield Public School Community,


As we once again work through the process of creating a roadmap for how we spend precious public
resourcesa budgetwe, once again, take pause to reflect on what we have and how grateful we are
for it, and what we need, and consider how to creatively and cost effectively make those needs reality.
Working towards the creation of the 2016-2017 academic and fiscal year budget plan, we do so
knowing that this work is complex, and incredibly important. We do so working to be prudent as well as
strategic, and keeping the following "must do's" in mind:

maintaining the staffing levels we need to serve a diverse student body in ways
promote safety, rigor and high achievement;
providing excellent, engaging standards-based teaching and learning materials to
students and teachers;
reducing the achievement gap that exists between our highest performing students
those who aspire to higher levels of achievement; and
further creating and enhancing a school district that is culturally competent, just
equitable--and strive to meet every child and every family where they are, and ensure
every family is treated with the respect they deserve.

that
our
and
and
that

As always, these interests compete for resources with hundreds of other interests and priorities. We
know that only through powerful partnerships between schools and among those in our community who
share our aims of creating a better Pittsfield will we find success in the 21st Century.
Thank you for being one of those partners in the crucial, transformative work of public education in the
City of Pittsfield.
Yours in education,

Jason P. McCandless
Superintendent of Schools

Budget Process Timeline

Annual Budget Process


with

Pittsfield School Committee


Fiscal Year Calendar: July 1st - June 30th
July
Student
Activity
External
Audit

August

September

Work on required End of


Year Report for previous
Fiscal Year

October

November

Complete
End of Year
Report and
Submit to
DESE

Annual External
Audit

December

January

February

End of Year
Report
External
Audit

May

June

Nine month
Budget
Projection to SC
for Acceptance

Ten month
Budget
Projection to
SC
(informational)

Eleven month
Budget
Projection to
SC
(informational)

Budget
Workshop and
Line Item Budget
Six month
Budget
Projection to
SC for
Acceptance

Monitoring of Accounts by Business Office

Admin Prep for next Fiscal Year Budget


begins

Admin Prep for next Fiscal Year Budget


continues:
- Budget Meetings with School Principals
and Leadership Team

Approval of
Budget
Calendar

10

April

SC Finance
Subcommittee
Meeting

Final
Expenditure
Report to SC

SC: School Committee

March

Previous Fiscal Year

Current Fiscal Year

Seven month
Budget
Projection to
SC
(informational)
Projections for
Enrollment and
Grants

Budget
Overview

Next Fiscal Year

Eight month
Budget
Projection to SC
(informational)

SC Public
Hearing on
Budget
Administration
Recommendations for Budget
Adoption
Budget Adoption
by SC

Books close for


Current Fiscal
Year
Public Hearing
at City Council
on Budget
----Final Approval
of City Budget
by City Council

School Committee Budget Calendar

Pittsfield School Committee


2017 Budget Calendar*
December

January

December 9

January 13
Budget Workshop

Regular Meeting

Budget Preview Date

February

March

April

May

June

Feb 10
Regular Meeting

Enrollment
Projections
&
Grants

Feb 24

April 13

Regular Meeting

Public Hearing Regular Meeting


(following)

Budget
Overview

March 9
Regular Meeting

Line Item Budget

April 27
Regular Meeting

May 1
Charter Requirement

School
Committee
Recommendations for
Budget
Adoption

FY17 Budget
Adoption

School Committee approval of Budget

No Later
than

June 1
Meeting with City Council

--------------Mayor to City Council for


Joint Budget Hearing

*Finance Subcommittee meeting dates to be determined.

11

History of Budget Staffing


Function
Total Staffing FTE
Instructional

Local Budget and Education Jobs and Grant only - Does not include other grants
FY12
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
874.50
900.50
950.90
937.40
933.75
973.25
720.25
744.25
782.25
769.50
765.85
803.35

FY06
871.85
720.10

Other School Services


(Bus Op and Attendance)
77.00
Operations/Maintenance
58.25
Central Administration
16.50
Total Cost of Wages
$38,252,143
including revolving account FTEs

79.00
58.75
16.50
$39,161,228

79.00
58.75
18.50
$41,279,754

90.40
58.75
19.50
$43,754,566

90.40
58.00
19.50
$44,267,466

91.40
56.00
20.50
$44,950,604

93.40
55.00
21.50
$45,917,029

FY13
935.75
770.15

FY14
953.35
788.65

93.10
52.00
20.50
$46,713,363

92.20
52.00
20.50
$47,600,833

Local Budget and Education Jobs Grant only Does not include other grant
1200.00

1000.00

Total Staffing FTE

800.00

Instructional
Other School Services (Bus
Op and Attendance)

600.00

Operations/Maintenance
Central Administration
400.00

200.00

0.00
FY06

12

FY07

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

FY15
951.35
785.65

FY16
927.10
770.40

92.20
83.20
53.00
53.00
20.50
20.50
$48,242,400 $50,074,430

The Big Picture


Our Mission: To serve our community and its children by creating a school
environment where lifelong learning is valued, excellence is expected, and
improvement is continuous; to meet the needs of each student by providing the
information, encouragement, support, and instruction required to meet or to
exceed the districts high expectations and rigorous academic demands; to
prepare every student for postsecondary education, career satisfaction, and
lifelong economic, social, and civic success.

13

Revenue Summary by Fund FY12 - FY16


Actual
FY2012

Actual
FY2013

Actual
FY2014

Actual
FY2015

Original
Budget
2016

General
Revolving
State Grants
Federal Grants
Food Services
Student Activities

$58,658,876
$1,808,483
$1,182,951
$6,651,098
$2,595,999
$314,952

$59,592,950 $62,063,045 $62,745,641 $64,868,169 *


$1,868,199
$2,636,566
$2,686,973
$2,022,360
$1,354,544
$1,429,832
$1,335,378
$1,180,594
$4,547,688
$5,871,281
$6,075,817
$5,512,551
$2,234,736
$2,885,625
$2,770,290
$2,775,430
$293,308
$509,528
$533,753
$345,000

Total

$71,212,359

$69,891,425 $75,395,876 $76,147,852 $76,704,104 *

Expense Summary by Fund FY12 FY16


Actual
FY2012

Actual
FY2013

Actual
FY2014

Actual
FY2015

Original
Budget
2016

General
Revolving
State Grants
Federal Grants
Food Services
Student Activities

$52,998,920
$1,568,163
$1,188,307
$7,391,154
$2,506,909
$305,000

$53,250,757 $55,697,123 $56,301,333 $64,868,169 *


$1,910,245
$2,281,660
$3,134,565
$2,022,360
$1,370,337
$1,546,675
$1,333,308
$1,180,594
$5,519,283
$5,712,597
$5,694,345
$5,512,551
$2,594,604
$2,600,866
$2,855,869
$2,775,430
$320,000
$265,991
$288,633
$345,000

Total

$65,958,453

$64,965,226 $68,104,912 $69,608,053 $76,704,104 *

$78,000,000
$76,000,000
$74,000,000
$72,000,000
$70,000,000
$68,000,000

$66,000,000
$64,000,000
$62,000,000
$60,000,000
$58,000,000
FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

2015

2016

Actual

Actual

Actual

Acutal

Original Budget

Revenue

Expendiutures

*Above figures include summer instructional payroll and accounts payable expenses paid after close of the fiscal year

14

Tax Base and Rate Information - FY03 FY16


Property is assessed at 100% of full and fair cash value.

SINGLE-FAMILY TAX BREAKDOWN


11,330
Single-family property parcels
Avg. single-family home assessment

$176,234

Average single-family tax bill - 2016

$3,306

Average single-family tax bill - 2015

$3,180

Average single-family tax bill - 2006

$2,345

1-year change in avg. tax bill

4%

10-year change in avg. tax bill

41%

Currently the City of Pittsfields Residential tax rate is ranked 55th in the State, while the Commercial
rate is ranked 3rd.
Source: http://www.bizjournals.com/boston/blog/bbj_research_alert/2016/01/massachusetts-property-tax-rates-in-2016-bytown.html

Property Tax Base History

15

Tax Rate Trend by Class

The Budget in Context


In FY16 the Pittsfield Public Schools cut $2 million dollars in staff and program expenditures as part of
the budget process. Due to contractual obligations, revenue decreases and additional budget
obligations, including projected utility increases and debt service on the school bus fleet, a level service
budget in FY16 would have yielded a $4M increase. To offset this increase to a $1.9M increase in the
city appropriation, the district cut just over $2M in staff and other instructional expenditures. Cuts were
made in areas that would have the least impact on students in the classroom. The district also
developed new collaborations with community partners, including Berkshire Children & Families and
Childcare of the Berkshires, to create new programming models that continue to provide services to
students but in new and more cost-effective ways. The list below details the final cuts made to the
budget.
FY16 Cuts
5 Central office positons: Early Childhood Coordinator, STEM Coordinator, Humanities
Coordinator, and 2 Instructional Technology positions
5 teachers at Reid (3 regular education and 2 special education teachers)
5 teachers at Herberg (3 regular education and 2 special education teachers)
4 teachers at Taconic
Attendance Paraprofessional at Pittsfield High School
The local budget portion of the Parent Child Home Program including 1 teacher and 3
paraprofessionals

16

Reduced the districts contribution to the Adult Education program to the state mandated match:
cut 2 teaching positions, and other supply costs
Restructured the teen parent tutoring program: cut 8 tutoring positions
Reduced homebound tutors by $57K
Reduced PPS promotion and public relations line by $10K
Split costs for the city and school Focus on Diversity position with the city, $12,500
Savings from moving special education teaching position to a grant
Cut co-curricular stipends at each secondary school, total $10K
Cut technology hardware by $40K
Reduced vocational equipment and supplies by $25K
Reduced testing and assessment account by $20K
Cut professional development spending, utilized funding for class size reduction, $250K
Moved a teaching and paraprofessional position to grant funds, $60K
Total removed from FY16 budget: $2,035,546

FY17 Budget Priorities


The district is not seeking to restore previous cuts in FY17. Instead, the district is focused on
maintaining core instructional services for students and complying with federal mandates.
The budget priorities of the district in FY17 flow from the Pittsfield Public Schools Accelerated
Improvement Plan and two tenets: the centrality of the classroom; and the centrality of the mandate.
The centrality of the classroom answers the question, What is needed for students and teachers to do
their work successfully? This includes a safe environment, a highly qualified teacher, a variety of
course options for students, classroom tools such as curriculum, textbooks, and technology. The
centrality of the mandate refers to both what is legally mandated by the state and federal government,
as well as our ethical obligation as educators to the 5,700 students who attend school in Pittsfield.
Legal mandates include individual instruction plans, compliance with Section 504 plans, state testing
and accountability requirements. Our obligation as educators includes providing physically and
emotionally safe and pleasant classrooms for every child in every school, a rich curriculum for all
students in all schools, learning opportunities for students both during and beyond the school day, and
a more diverse and culturally competent professional staff.
The Pittsfield Public Schools Accelerated Improvement Plan is a multi-year district improvement plan
with four strategic objectives:
1. Develop a systematic curriculum process that creates and sustains the consistent instruction of
the Massachusetts Standards in all classrooms in the Pittsfield Public Schools;
2. Develop, implement and evaluate a horizontally and vertically aligned consistent academic
student intervention program in support of student learning that will be utilized in all Pittsfield
Public Schools;
3. Develop and sustain multi-tiered interventions to provide safety nets that insure physically and
emotionally safe and supportive classrooms and schools; and
4. To become a more culturally literate and culturally competent school district and to continue to
recruit and hire educators at all levels who better mirror the diversity that is present in the City of
Pittsfield so that all students see, hear, and recognize professional educators who reflect them
and who represent the excellence toward which our students will aspire.
Work on all four strategic objectives began in the fall of the 2015-2016 school year. As part of strategic
objectives 1 and 2 the district is undertaking a yearlong Mathematics curriculum pilot with the goal of
selecting a new core curriculum to be purchased in FY18. A copy of the full Pittsfield Public Schools
Accelerated Improvement Plan, including action steps for each initiative begins on page 24 of this book.
17

Budget Priorities
On January 13, 2016 the Pittsfield School Committee heard budget requests directly from all twelve
school principals. Individual school budget requests were well-reasoned and aligned with school and
district improvement plans. However, the requests for all twelve schools totaled just over $2.8M, a near
impossibility within the citys budget constraints. From budget discussions with the principals and
administrative council, the district has identified several items as priorities for the FY17 budget.

Allendale Dean: $68K


Summer School Credit Recovery: $20K increase
Elementary School Secretary hours: $13K
- Office coverage during arrival and dismissal
0.5 FTE ELL Teacher at Crosby: $30K
Permanent Substitute Pool: $90K
- 10 positions to be shared district-wide
Career Counselors at PHS and Taconic: $44K
- Clerical unit positions

FY17 Budget Drivers


Contractual Obligations

$1.68M
As in most districts across the country, contractual obligations are the largest budget driver. Pittsfield
has settled contracts with three units: the United Educators of Pittsfield (teachers), the Pittsfield
Educational Administrators Association, and the Bus Drivers and Attendants. The school committee is
in negotiations with four units: Paraprofessionals, Clerical, Custodians, and Cafeteria. The total
anticipated cost for all contractual obligations is an increase of $1.68M.
Community School positions

$228K
The Community Coordinator positions have existed in the Pittsfield Public Schools for many years.
Several years ago the district began to pay for these positions through grant funds. Program changes
will not allow the grants to continue to fund these positions so they will be funded through the districts
budget in FY17.
Increased Special Education Tuition Costs

$440K
In the past few years the district has experienced a significant increase in the number and intensity of
students who are placed in out of district special education programs. The changes in this account are
coming from three areas: new students are entering out of district special education placements;
students already in placements are moving to more intensive and therefore more expensive
placements; and new students from outside of the district or state with an existing individualized
education program (IEP) for whom the district is now fiscally responsible. The growth in this area is a
reflection of the more intensive needs that we are seeing in the students in our district.
To put this tuition growth in context, Pittsfield still educates a larger percentage of our special education
students within the district as compared to other districts around the state. In budget terms, in FY14
Pittsfield spent 3.8% of total district funds in out of district special education tuition while the state
average is 6.5%. Even with the growth that the district is seeing in FY16 and FY17, Pittsfield will spend
approximately 4.8% on out of district special education tuitions, still well below the state average of
6.5%.
18

Revenue Reductions
Kindergarten Grant

$152K
As of this writing, the district is anticipating a $152K reduction in the Kindergarten grant based on the
Governors budget. The current Kindergarten grant of $288K funds teaching and paraprofessional
positions, as well as implementation of a comprehensive Kindergarten assessment. Under the
Governors budget, the district would be eligible to apply for a grant of $136K.
Federal E-rate Funding Program Change

$35K
The federal government is continuing the phase in of E-rate credit reductions. As part of a policy
change, the federal program is focusing on providing internet services to schools and eliminating
funding for traditional telephone services, web hosting services and mandated email archiving. The
Pittsfield Public Schools has taken advantage of e-rate funding for internet services for many years, but
will see a reduction of $35K in funding for traditional telephone, web hosting and email archiving
services. The operating budget appropriation for these utilities will increase by $35K in FY17 to fund
telephone services, websites and email archiving for the schools.
Tuition Revolving Account Revenue

$90K
The district had retained a balance in the tuition revolving accounts for many years. The balances
provided a safeguard for unexpected expenses that could occur throughout the year, similar to an
excess and deficiency account that is held in a regional school district. During the recent fiscal
downturn, and in collaboration with the city council, the district increased the amount of funding from
the revolving accounts, thus eliminating the balance that was carried as a safeguard from year to year.
In FY12 the district contributed $560K from the tuition revolving accounts. This amount was increased
to $710K in FY13 as the federal jobs aid funding ceased, and continued through FY16. In FY17 the
district will utilize all funds projected to be available at the end of FY16 towards the FY17 operating
budget, a total of $620K. For more information on the tuition revolving accounts, please see the
revenue section in this book.

FY17 Budget Savings


$600K
The district is fortunate to have some budget savings in FY17 due to new utility contracts for natural
gas and electricity. The natural gas contract begins in May 2016 for a period of three years. In FY17
Pittsfield Public Schools is able to reduce the line item for natural gas by $400K. The electricity
contract begins in December 2016, halfway through FY17, and the district is reducing the electricity
account by $60K.
FY17 Position Reductions
Three non-classroom positions will also be eliminated in the FY17 budget saving a total of $140K:
Technical Services Coordinator, IT department
Clerical position, IT department
Bus mechanic position, Bus operations
These positions were vacated through attrition, retirement and a staff person moving to another position
in FY16. No staff members will be cut as a result of these position reductions. The reduction of the bus
mechanic position is possible due to the new fleet of buses purchased in FY15. It is likely that this
position may need to be restored in a few years as the bus fleet ages and requires more maintenance.
19

Capital Improvement Requests Schools


Capital Improvement Requests from Schools FY17
School

Request

Taconic High School

None

Pittsfield High School

Diagonal parking/Appleton Avenue


Finish projector/whiteboard installation
Window repairs
Auditorium house light repair

Appliance removal and renovation


Language lab
Student bathroom remodel
Herberg Middle School

Swipe card access


Interior doors connecting science rooms
Re-sand, re-paint lines and re-seal gymnasium floor
Additional parking area adjacent to main front door parking area
Blacktop dirt area outside tennis and basketball courts
Improve drainage in main parking lot and yellow gated entrance area

Reid Middle School

Move sound system from stage to the control room at back of


auditorium
Repair sidewalk in front of theater doors frost heaves shifting
Sidewalk from parking lot to front of building
Handicap parking, front entrance near flag pole
Kitchen floor resurface
Auditorium second stage exit
Repair/adjust bleachers in gym to ensure student safety
Repair grease trap in kitchen
Provide handicap parking the rear of building
Gym floor sanded and refinished
Install new auditorium lights

Williams Elementary

Stearns Elementary School

Widen road with a curb cut at the south entrance near the gate leading
to the caf and garage
Construct a raised sidewalk along the south driveway leading to the
school
Playground inspection/repairs
Playground mulch
Paint hallways and classrooms
Clean soffits
Repave/repair pavement in back playground

Morningside Community School

Patch wall and paint in several areas


New carpet throughout building
Repair leaking windows
Replace ceiling tiles throughout the building
Pave area on Burbank Street and Side playground

20

Repair heating system


Telephone system upgrade to provide adequate lines in building
Egremont Elementary School

Odor in Grade 2 section of building


Replace 6 carpets per year
Paint hallway molding
Replace chalkboards with whiteboards
Paint classrooms

Crosby Elementary School

Replace broken windows


Remove all asbestos tiles
Intercom/Security system reliable communications to all areas
Window blinds
Remodel bathrooms
Additional Parking spaces
Energy efficient windows

Conte Community School

Replace carpet on first floor


Replace ceiling tiles in certain areas of building
Installation of window screens
Affix weather stripping on all outside doors
Repair 12 18 windws throughout the building
Purchase new Univent covers
Repair front entrance walkway

Capeless Elementary School

None

Allendale Elementary School

Repair clocks throughout building


Replace chalkboards with whiteboards

The items listed above have been submitted by the school principals to the Superintendent and
Assistant Superintendent for Business and Finance for consideration. These Administrators will then
prioritize the list and submit it to the City Building Maintenance Department for consideration of which
projects to fund in FY17. Final items to be funded will be determined as part of the Citys capital budget
review and approval process.

21

Organizational Section

Source: Painting Caitlyn S provided by unidentified student

22

Organizational Chart

23

2015-16 School Accelerated Improvement Plan

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Area Served
City of Pittsfield is the largest city and the county seat of Berkshire County,[1] Massachusetts, United
States. It is the principal city of the Pittsfield, Massachusetts Metropolitan Statistical Area which
encompasses all of Berkshire County. The population was 44,737 at the 2010 census.[2] Although the
population has declined in recent decades, Pittsfield remains the third largest municipality in western
Massachusetts, behind only Springfield and Chicopee.
Pittsfield operates a public school system which has over 5,700 students. There are eight elementary
schools (Allendale, Robert T. Capeless, Crosby, Egremont, Morningside, Silvio O. Conte, Stearns and
Williams), two middle schools (Theodore Herberg and John T. Reid), and two high schools (Pittsfield
High School and Taconic High School). The high schools both offer internal vocational programs.
Students also come to the high schools from neighboring Richmond. There are two parochial schools
(Saint Mark's for elementary and middle school students, and St. Joseph Central High School for high
school students) and one private school, Miss Hall's School, as well as an alternative school.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 42.5 square miles
(110.0 km2), of which 40.5 square miles (104.8 km2) is land and 2.0 square miles (5.2 km2), or 4.70%, is
water.
[1],[ 2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittsfield, Massachusetts

See the maps of the School Zones in the City on the next 3 pages.

31

School Zones
Elementary Schools

32

Middle Schools

33

High Schools

34

District FacilitiesElementary Schools


Allendale Elementary
Address: 180 Connecticut Avenue
Year Built: 1951
Addition:

10.9 acres

1999

Square Footage: 48,133


Grades: K 5

FY 2016 Enrollment: 292

Principal: Brenda Kelley

Capeless Elementary
Address: 86 Brooks Avenue
Year Built: 1951

Addition:

7.9 acres

2001

Square Footage: 38,654


Grades: K 5

FY 2016 Enrollment: 215

Principal: Candy Jezewski

Conte Community School


Address: 200 West Union Street
Year Built: 1974

15.0 acres

Square Footage: 69,518


Grades: Pre-k 5

FY 2016 Enrollment: 397

Principal: Kerry Light

Crosby Elementary
Address: 517 West Street
Year Built: 1962

37.5 acres

Square Footage: 69,826


Grades: 442

FY 2016 Enrollment: 442

Principal: Donna Baker

Egremont Elementary
Address: 84 Egremont Avenue
Year Built: 1951

10.6 acres

Addition: 1999
Square Footage: 63,879
Grades: K 5

FY 2016 Enrollment: 503

Principal: Judy Rush


35

District FacilitiesElementary & Middle Schools


Morningside Community School
Address: 100 Burbank Street
Year Built: 1975

5.4 acres

Square Footage: 69,654


Grades: PreK 5

FY 2016 Enrollment: 457

Principal: Jennifer Stokes

Stearns Elementary
Address: 75 Lebanon Avenue
Year Built: 1961

Addition:

9.5 acres

2001

Square Footage: 40,343


Grades: K 5

FY 2016 Enrollment: 227

Principal: Aaron Dean

Williams Elementary
Address: 50 Bushey Road
Year Built: 1957

11.9 acres

Multiple additionslatest: 2001


Square Footage: 48,337
Grades: K 5

FY 2016 Enrollment: 315

Principal: Lisa Buchinski

Herberg Middle School


Address: 501 Pomeroy Ave.
Year Built: 1953
Addition:

21.0 acres

2000

Square Footage: 107,640


Grades: 6 8

FY 2016 Enrollment: 638

Principal: Gina Coleman, Ph.D.

Reid Middle School


Address: 950 North Street
Year Built: 1953
Addition:

26.8 acres

2000

Square Footage: 115,036


Grades: 6 8

FY 2016 Enrollment: 549

Principal: Linda Whitacre


36

District FacilitiesHigh Schools & Other Facilities


Pittsfield High School
Address: 300 East Street
Year Built: 1931
Addition:

8.7 acres

1975

Square Footage: 203,051


Grades: 9 12

FY 2015 Enrollment: 899

Principal: Matthew Bishop

Taconic High School


Address: 96 Valentine Road
Year Built: 1969

50.0 acres

Square Footage: 189,686


Grades: 9 12

FY 2016 Enrollment: 731

Principal: John Vosburgh

Adult Learning Center


Address: 141 North Street
Leased Space: 2013
Square Footage: 10,000

FY 2016 Enrollment: 105+/Director: Paul Gage

Mercer Administration Building


Address: 269 First Street
Year Built: 1905 .90 acres
Square Footage: 17,653
Superintendent: Dr. Jason P. McCandless

37

District FacilitiesOther Facilities

Hibbard Stockroom
Address: 280 Newell Street
Year Built: 1924

1.8 acres

Square Footage: 31,519


Director: James Larrow

Bus Operations
Address: 442 Merrill Road
Leased Space
Square Footage: 10,000
Director: Susan Donnelly-Wendling

Cafeteria Services at Taconic High School


Address: 96 Valentine Road
Director: Sylvana Bryan

Student Resource Center


Address: 7 Whipple Street
Square Footage: 6,200
Jointly Managed with Berkshire County Sheriffs Office

Note: Square footage quoted for each building is from valuation records with the City.

38

Enrollment Section

39

Enrollment Data
Enrollment Trends by Elementary School Grade Level

Elementary School Enrollment Trends


Based on October 1 Data of Each Year

Allendale
Capeless
Conte
Crosby
Egremont
Morningside
Stearns
Williams

Enrollment Trends by Middle School Grade Level

Middle School Enrollment Trends


Based on October 1 Data of Each Year

Herberg
Reid

40

Enrollment Trends by High School Grade Level

High School Enrollment Trends


Based on October 1 Data of Each Year

Pittsfield High
Taconic High

Total Enrollment by Race

Pittsfield Public Schools Total Enrollment by Race October 1, 2015

41

Long Term Trends in Enrollment

Long Term Enrollment Trends. Statistical Comparisons - School Finance. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
3 Dec. 2014. <http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/statistics/>

42

10 Year History Free/Reduced Lunch through 2014


7000
6472

65.32%

6352

6234

6120 6072

5978 5985

6000

5883

5744

56.49% 55.69%
54.67% 55.17%

5000

43.52%

4000

49.65%
46.03%

2627

2575

2713

2817

3302

3268

3015

3385

60.00%

50.00%

3752

40.59% 40.54%
3000

5992

70.00%

40.00%

3276
30.00%

2000

20.00%

1000

10.00%

District Enrollment as pf
October 1 each year as
reported by DESE

Number of Students Receiving


Free/Reduced Lunch as of
10/31 of each year as
reported by Food Services
Dept.*
% Free/Reduced Lunch

*Note: Free/Reduced
Lunch in 2006 is as of May

0.00%
2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Year

2011

2012

2013

2014

5 Year History Free/Reduced Lunch


for Middle & High Schools
65.0%
60.6%
58.6%

60.0%
54.2%

55.0%

52.3%
49.7%

% of Free/Reduced Lunch

50.0%

45.0%

40.0%
2012

2013

2014
Year

43

2015

2016

Enrollment Projections
Allendale Elementary School
Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

K
1
2
3
4
5
Total

52
49
57
55
55
50
318

42
50
46
51
48
55
292

Sections

Class
Size

3
3
3
3
3
3

14.0
16.7
15.3
17.0
16.0
18.3

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment
40 est.
43
54
44
53
48
282

Sections

Class
Size

3
3
3
3
3
3

13.3
14.3
18
14.6
17.6
16.0

Sections

Class
Size

Capeless Elementary School


Grade
Integrated
PreK
K
1
2
3
4
5
Total

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

19

26

33
37
30
38
34
45
236

25
31
35
27
37
35
215

Sections
2 half-day
sessions
2
2
2
2
2
2

Class Size Guidelines:


Grades K-3
Grades 4 and 5
NAEYC Kindergarten
Quality Kindergarten Grant
MS/HS Academic Courses

44

Class
Size

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

13

20 est.

12.5
15.5
17.5
13.5
18.5
17.5

25 est.
24
30
34
29
36
198

18 Students/Class
22 Students/Class
1:12 Adults/Students
1:10 Adults/Students
1:24 Adults/Students

2 half-day
sessions
2
2
2
2
2
2

10
12.5
12.0
15
17.0
14.5
18

Silvio O. Conte Community School


Grade
PreK
Transitional
Kindergarten
*Head Start
K
1
2
3
4
5
Total

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

28

34

10

10

17
82
56
53
42
45
57
373

17
69
71
60
56
43
53
396

1
4
3
3
3
3
3

Sections Class Size

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

Sections

Class Size

34 Est.

17

10 Est.

10.0

17
70 Est.
70
72
55
53
42
406

1
4
3
3
3
3
3

17.0
17.5
23.3
24.0
18.3
17.6
14.0

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

Sections

Class Size

17.0
10.0
17.0
17.3
17.8
16.0
18.6
14.3
17.7

* These students are not included in state reporting.

John C. Crosby Elementary School


Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Substantially
Separate
PreK

75

91

7
Most
day

13

90 est.

7
Most
day

12.8

Substantially
Separate

79

89

11.1

69

8.6

K
1
2
3
4
5
Total

52
37
61
43
37
35
419

42
55
35
59
47
30
448

3
3
2
4
3
2

14
18.3
17.5
14.75
15.6
15

45 Est.
32
55
35
59
46
432

3
3
3
2
4
3

15.0
10.6
18.3
17.5
14.75
15.6

*3 Half Day Programs


Half-day Special Education
Half-day Regular Education

45

Sections Class Size

** K-1 Therapeutic
2 Therapeutic
3 Therapeutic
K Developmental

2-3 Developmental
4-5 Int. Impaired
3-4 Psychol-Linguistic

Egremont Elementary School


Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Sections

Class Size

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

Sections

Class Size

Intellectually
Impaired
Grades 3,4,5

12

10

10.0

10 Est.

10

K
1
2
3
4
5
Total

81
78
87
87
89
81
515

73
94
85
86
77
91
516

4
4
4
4
4
4

18.25
23.5
21.25
21.5
19.25
22.75

70 Est.
68
77
77
79
91
472

4
4
4
4
4
4

17.5
17.0
19.25
19.25
19.75
22.75

Morningside Community School


Grade
PreK
K
1
2
3
4
5
Therapeutic
Grade 4
Therapeutic
Grade 5
Total

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Sections

Class Size

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

Sections

Class Size

33
62
75
83
70
75
76

28
62
61
70
78
73
67

2
4
4
4
4
4
3

14
15.5
15.3
17.5
19.5
18.25
22.3

36 Est.
60 Est.
58
59
68
80
70

2
4
4
4
4
4
4

18
15
14.5
14.75
17.0
20.0
17.5

11*

10 Est.

10.0

10

10

6 Est.

6.0

485

*Grade 4/5 Number as of February 1, 2014

46

455

447

Stearns Elementary School


FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Sections

Class Size

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

Sections

Class Size

K
1
2
3
4
5
Substantially
Separate

44
36
29
34
39
32

35
46
30
29
32
39

2
2
2
2
2
2

17.5
23
15
14.5
16
19.5

35 Est.
33
47
30
28
32

2
2
2
2
2
2

17.5
16.5
23.5
15
14
16

19

23

11.5

24 Est.

12

Total

233

234

Grade

229
Williams Elementary School

Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

K
1
2
3
4
5
Total

60
49
64
50
53
58
334

51
63
53
54
63
59
343

Sections

Class Size

3
3
3
3
3
3

17.0
21.0
17.7
18.0
21.0
19.7

Herberg Middle School

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment
50 Est.
46
59
49
65
52
321

Sections

Class Size

3
3
3
3
3
3

16.6
15.3
19.6
16.3
21.6
17.3

Reid Middle School

Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

6
7
8
Total

213
216
203
632

212
208
218
638

225
211
205
641

6
7
8
Total

183
167
169
519

201
189
159
549

224
201
187
611

Pittsfield High School

Taconic High School

Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

Grade

FY 15
Enrollment
10/1/14

FY 16
Enrollment
10/1/15

Anticipated
FY 17
Enrollment

9
10
11
12
Total

221
252
222
232
927

234
215
228
222
899

218
227
212
231
888

9
10
11
12
Total

193
221
168
193
775

176
179
210
166
731

187
179
175
201
742

47

Programs & Services

48

Educational Programs
Curriculum
Reading
Pittsfield Public Schools offers extensive reading services that include core instruction and intervention
for students in grades pre K-8. All elementary schools have a certified reading specialist on staff. As of
the start of the 2014-2015 school year, all elementary schools have a new core program, Pearson
Reading Street. Pearson Reading Street offers teachers a comprehensive set of resources that links
with state standards and offers opportunities for differentiation and use of technology that is interactive
and engaging for all students. The district also offers to all elementary students Lexia Core5 Reading, a
technology based learning tool that supports students with reading skills development. Many staff in the
district are Wilson trained to offer more intensive intervention for students. Our middle schools offer a
variety of reading services including an online program, Virtual Reading Coach, that provides explicit
and in-depth reading instruction. The program is adaptive and offers an individualized learning
experience that enables students to advance their reading skills.
Humanities
English: The English curriculum is based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework and addresses
the need for students to be engaged in rigorous reading, discussions, and research, as well as the ability
to apply their skills to new, independent learning. Each grade has some common required readings for
all students, as well as choices for each quarter; students read a variety of classic, modern and multicultural literature. At the secondary level, students engage in rigorous argument and informative writing
assignments; they incorporate their narrative writing skills effectively into their writing. They use the
writing process of gathering their ideas, and then writing and revising drafts. At the high schools, both
AP Literature and AP Language are offered for our students.
History/Social Studies: The history and social studies curriculum is drawn from the Massachusetts
Frameworks for History and Social Studies as well as the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for
Literacy, which support the reading and writing skills needed in these subject areas. Elementary
students study specific historical events as well as Massachusetts and North American history. At the
middle schools, students study world geography, the continents, cultures, and world history. The district
is looking into developing a specific civics course for our middle school students. High school history
students engage in two years of United States History and at least one of World History. High school
students can take AP courses in European, World, and United States History, as well as, Psychology,
Government and Policies.
Math and Science
Pittsfield Public Schools provides a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)
educational program that is aligned with the current state Frameworks and strives to enable all students
to be successful as students and future citizens in these fields. The secondary schools mathematics
program prepares all students to meet the college and career readiness standards by grade twelve, and
also offers Advanced Placement studies in calculus and statistics. Science studies beginning in
kindergarten, are supported by elementary science specialists, and continue throughout a students
academic career. Both high schools offer various Advanced Placement science courses including AP
biology, chemistry, physics and environmental science.

49

English Language Learners


The Pittsfield Public Schools serves 329 students designated as English Language Learners (ELL)
across grades K-12. The following chart details the number of students by grade and the wide variety of
primary languages of ELL students and their families. In addition to providing ELL instruction, the
Pittsfield Public Schools provides translation and interpretation services to bilingual families, as required
by law, for parent meetings and documents related to a students education. The most common primary
language of ELL students is Spanish, but there are also a number of speakers of Chinese and French
languages.

See Graph on Next Page

50

First Languages of English Language Learners (ELLs)

(As of January 2016)

12

11
Vietnamese
10

Urdu
Turkish

Spanish
8

Portuguese

Other
Dialects

Languages

Grade Level

Russian

Gujarati
5
French
4

Creole
(Haitian)
Chinese

K
0

51

10

15

20

Number of Students

25

30

35

History of English Language Learners (ELLs)


Students whose primary language is not English are only designated as ELL students for the period of
time that they require specialized instruction or support in learning English. Once students become
proficient in academic English, they are no longer counted as ELL students; therefore, the count of ELL
students include only those students who are receiving English language education instructional
supports at a given time. The number of ELL students in the Pittsfield Public Schools has risen
significantly since 2002. The chart below details this growth.

Additionally, Pittsfield Public Schools has experienced a steady increase of Students with Limited or
Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE) ELL students. SLIFE students are identified through academic
transcript review and interviews with family members upon registration. A student should be identified
as SLIFE if all of the following criteria are met:

52

The student has been formally identified as an English Language Learner;


Is aged 8 21 years;
Entered a United States School after the second grade; or,
Exited the United States for six months or more;
Prior exposure to formal schooling is characterized by:
o No formal schooling; or,
o Interruptions in formal schooling, defined as at least two or fewer years of schooling than
their typical peers; or,
o Consistent, but limited formal schooling;

Functions two or more years below expected grade level in native language literacy relative to
typical peers;
Functions two or more years below expected grade level in numeracy relative to typical peers.

Special Education
The vision of the Special Education department is to minimize the disability and to maximize the
opportunities of Special Education students to receive a free and appropriate education in the least
restrictive environment. All students will have access to standards-based curriculum and will be
provided with research-based interventions to ensure that they graduate from high school and have
adequate transition plans. Special Education staff work with teachers, administrators and families to
ensure that Individual Education Programs (IEPs) are implemented with integrity.
As part of the goal of serving students in the least restrictive environment, Pittsfield Public Schools has
developed a continuum of services and placements as detailed in the list below. Providing many of the
required services within the district has proven to be cost effective, as most services can be delivered
at a lower cost than if the same services were contracted to an outside agency.

Transitional Kindergarten self-contained class at Conte Community School


Integrated Early Childhood PreSchool Programs at Capeless and Crosby Elementary Schools
Resource Room Programs at all eight Elementary Schools as well as the Middle Schools and
High Schools
Resource Suite Programs at Reid and Herberg Middle School
Psycholinguistic Class at Crosby Elementary
Classrooms that support developmental, Intellectual impairments and autism spectrum
disorders in self-contained classes at Crosby, Egremont, and Stearns Elementary Schools, as
well as Reid Middle School and Pittsfield High School
Therapeutic self-contained classes at Morningside Community School and Crosby
Elementary School
Adolescent Support Program at Pittsfield High School for students with emotional disabilities
and Department of Mental Health (DMH) Eligibility
Educational Options for Success (EOS) Programs at Reid and Herberg Middle School
o Tiers 1 and 2 at Reid Middle School
o Tiers 1, 2, 3 at Herberg Middle School
Educational Options for Success (EOS) Programs at Pittsfield High School and Taconic
High Schools (Tiers 1 and 2)
Educational Options for Success (EOS) Program at Student Resource Center (Tier 3)
Positive Options Program at Berkshire Community College
Career Exploratory program at Pittsfield High School and Taconic High School
Vocational programs at Pittsfield High School and Taconic High School
Work Study program at Pittsfield High School
Work Based Learning
Service Learning
Speech and Language services at all levels
Occupational Therapy services at all levels
Physical Therapy services at all levels
Services for Hearing and Visually Impaired students at all levels
School Adjustment Services at all levels
Tutorial services at all levels
BCBA (Board Certified Behavior Analyst) contracted services at all levels
Augmentative/Alternative Communication and Learning Services at all levels

The services provided and placements made must be based on individual students needs and not on
what currently exists in the district. Special education services are mandated by Massachusetts State
53

and Federal laws under 603 CMR 28.05 (7)(b) and the Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education
Act. Some students require services that are best provided at separate schools, such as Private Day or
Residential Schools. The District is responsible for the tuition and residential costs of such placements
unless fiscal responsibility is deemed to be shared with the state or another school district. The Special
Education Department annually files with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to
receive Circuit Breaker reimbursement for all high cost placements and services. For more information
on this reimbursement process, see the state revenue and revolving accounts section.

Career and Technical Education Programs


The Greek philosopher Heraclitus once said that the only thing that is constant is change. The proof of
that statement is very self-evident in our day-to-day lives. It is the rapidly evolving role of technology
that is one of the driving forces behind much of the change we experience each day. To compete in a
world where the economy and stable jobs rely on evolving technology, one has to be prepared. To give
our students that edge, Pittsfield Public Schools offers students twelve Career and Technical Education
programs that prepare them with training in technology and the skills needed to be successful when
competing in the job market.
In an effort to ensure our students are receiving an education that is meeting the high standards that
the state asks of all programs that are designated as Career and Technical Education programs, we
have changed as well. We are teaching to the latest curriculum frameworks. We are replacing dated
equipment with industry standard tools and practices, where needed. In order to give students the soft
skills that make them good employees, we have joined the Skills USA organization. We have added an
industry-recognized certification section to each program to demonstrate the students subject mastery.
Additionally, to teach students to be more than just information retrievers, we are integrating more
technology into classrooms and the shops so that they will become information users.
Striving to make our programs relevant to local employers and throughout the region, each program
has an advisory committee that includes members of the business community. The involvement of
industry and business, guides and improves our programs. We work closely with post-secondary
institutions and include their representatives as members of our advisory committee so that our
students will be prepared for education beyond high school. We have developed several articulation
agreements with a number of post-secondary education programs and colleges and, in addition to their
technical studies; our students carry an academic load that is nearly identical to that of the college
preparatory students.
The CTE programs offered by the district are open to Pittsfield students as well as to other students
from our surrounding communities in Berkshire County. We have developed a relationship with the
surrounding districts and have worked closely with both education and civic leaders to promote the
options for many students who wish to enroll in a vocational technical program of studies. We look
forward to developing the workforce of tomorrow for Berkshire County.

Alternative Education
The Alternative Education programs offered by Pittsfield Public Schools are built upon the belief that all
students can learn and succeed in a variety of ways. We strive to offer programs that are in our
communitys best interest and provide students with the opportunities to develop the skills needed for
college and career readiness. Our Alternative Education offerings serve at-risk, vulnerable and
disengaged students. They include programs that are both district run and contracted with community
providers. The goal of each program is to prepare students academically, socially and emotionally by
54

first meeting their immediate needs, and then by identifying alternative strategies to improve learning.
Approximately 800 students receive alternative education services that can include short-term
interventions like summer school and/or long-term placement into structured settings or programs.
Students may have characteristics that can range from having poor attendance, discipline issues,
failing grades or are credit deficient. Additionally, they may be in family crisis; referred for assistance
and do not qualify for special educational services; may have drug/alcohol abuse or
social/emotional/medical issues; or have poor peer relationships.
A variety of strategies and options are utilized by the Pittsfield Public Schools, including building-based
and offsite programs. These programs assist students through transition, suspension or tutoring,
provide programs for special populations, credit recovery, and an early college model.

Technology
The Pittsfield Public School district is committed to preparing children for this rapidly changing world by
teaching them the skills they need to be proficient and safe users of information, media and technology.
We strive to engage students in meaningful curriculum content through the purposeful and effective use
of technology. Teachers are provided technology resources to assist them in creating lessons that
reflect the personal learning styles, needs, and interests of their students. Administrative efficiency
depends on technology. Functions within the district range from student information management,
transportation, food services and library systems; including personnel and health services , accounting
and payroll benefits being digital. Our investment in technology enables every member of the Pittsfield
Public School community to communicate, learn, share, collaborate and create; to think and solve
problems; to assist with managing their work and lives. More importantly, we see technology as both
the driver of an evolution in teaching and learning, and the means to achieve that innovation.
When implemented well, technology is virtually transparenta tool used to improve learning.
Nevertheless, the infrastructure is essential towards meeting that goal, and the district has invested
accordingly:

All teachers are issued an Apple laptop


Every classroom in the district has both wired and wireless connectivity to the local network and
the Internet
All buildings have a high-speed, broadband connection to the Internet
Computer labs and/or mobile carts are available for student use in all schools
Every student and teacher has a local computer account and a district email account
Digital projectors are available in every school to enable computer shared content for
collaborative learning and exercises.

All teachers are given the opportunity and training to create a website for their classrooms. Simply
making technology available does not ensure that it will be used to maximum effectsupport staff is as
critical as the hardware and software. The district has a 9-person Technology Department that supports
14 buildings and networks, 7000 users, and nearly 5000 devices. A Help Desk is staffed full-time to
address questions promptly, resolve problems and repair equipment. The department encourages
teacher innovation by offering professional development in after school workshops, during in-service
days, as online tutorials, and through classroom modeling.

55

Developing a long-range plan for educational technology is difficult if not impossible given the quickly
evolving nature of that technology. Nevertheless, we have a framework for moving forward that
includes:

Continued investment in technology to support teaching and learningspecifically establishing


a fully funded renewal cycle
Increased professional development opportunities for teachersincluding an online self-paced
curriculum for technology integration skills
Progressive addition of mobile student computing devices as we move closer to a 1:1 model
Establishing Innovation Classrooms in every school that are equipped with cutting-edge
equipment that will offer teachers a laboratory for experimenting with tech integration

Education in the 21st century is a complex system, and in Pittsfield, technology will be the primary tool
in meeting that challenge.
School Technology Device Distribution

Graph includes all student devices currently in use, regardless of funding sources.
(This includes local operating budget, grants and private donations.)

56

25
25
50
25
25
25
25
25
45
29
175
235

ALC
Mercer

18

19

27

POP

Bus

755

139

971

Crosby
Egremont
Morningside
Stearns
Williams
Herberg
Reid
PHS
Taconic

57

303
213
391
439
488
448
235
315
632
547
897
732

2.0
1.4
2.3
1.8
2.1
1.6
1.9
2.7
2.1
2.0
1.6
1.3

21
16
34
38
39
38
18
21
51
49
78
68

1
2
2
12
11
4
4
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15
12

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1
1
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29

36

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Computing Device Distribution

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327
151
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359
335
659
652

49

10

43

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116

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56

3982

Co-Curricular Programs
After School 21st Century Programs
The Pittsfield Public Schools 21st Century Community Learning Centers Programs incorporates four
learning principles into its efforts learning that is meaningful, collaborative, supports mastery, and
expands horizons. 21st Century programs are currently operating at four schools: Pittsfield High, Reid
Middle, Herberg Middle and Conte Community Schools.
Our programs support these principles by:
Enabling young people to apply their academic skills to areas of interest and real world
problems
Promoting effective partnerships between schools, community-based agencies, and other public
and private entities
Providing creative and innovative out-of-school time programs that give young people hands on
project-based learning experiences that stimulate curiosity and enhance critical thinking skills
Creating opportunities for young people to develop leadership skills
Addressing the multiple needs of children, youth, and their families
These principles are well aligned with the 21st century learning skills and workforce skills that young
people will need to succeed in the years ahead.
Summer Programs
Each summer, Pittsfield Public Schools offers a variety of summer programs which serve approximately
1,300 students each year.
Programs include:
Academic summer school at the middle and high school levels
Transition programs for incoming 6th graders and 9th graders (high school freshmen)
21st Century Programs
A work and learning program focusing on tutoring, employment and job readiness
Adolescent Support Program
Academic Enrichment for English Language Learners (ELL) students
Programming at Crosby, Conte, Morningside Schools
Summer Special Education programs
Camp Vision for visually impaired students
Summer pre-school program
Tryouts and practice for fall athletic teams and summer athletic conditioning
Since 2011, grants and the district budget have supported summer school. Summer programs include
bussing, breakfast and lunch, whenever applicable.
In addition, the district operates a federally funded summer food program that serves free breakfast and
lunch to children in the community at four open sites in the City of Pittsfield. In 2015, Pittsfield Public
Schools Food Services served an average of 767 lunches and 324 breakfasts per day during the
summer.

58

Athletics
Pittsfield Public Schools offers the widest selection of varsity sports of any district in Berkshire County.
A total of 16 different sports are offered, including many programs with junior varsity level teams, as
well as varsity teams. There are 11 sports offered for girls, 11 sports offered for boys, and three coeducational teams (ice hockey, golf, and wrestling).
Pittsfield High School and Taconic High School field a combined 60+ teams each school year, with the
goal of enriching the educational experience and enhancing educational goals of student athletes by
providing activities that offer lifelong and life quality learning experiences. The highest participation
rates traditionally include the football, swimming and track programs.
Student athletic programs are funded through the district operating budget and student fees that fund
the athletic revolving account. The operating budget funds the athletic director and coaches salaries,
athletic transportation through the districts bus operations department, and rental fees for the ice
hockey and swim teams. The city budget supports athletic programs with field maintenance and
preparation through the city buildings and grounds maintenance department. All other costs are funded
through the athletic revolving account, including replacement safety equipment, Berkshire County and
other league fees, game officials, medical coverage, event management, and police security presence
at games. Athletic teams receive significant financial support for uniform replacement and additional
equipment through booster clubs for individual teams.

Adult Learning Center Programs and Services


Pittsfields Adult Learning Center is the largest provider of Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs in
Berkshire County. Since 1976, the Adult Learning Center has been offering free education classes and
support services for adults that have either not completed their high school education or speak English
with limited proficiency. The main funding for these programs comes from Massachusetts Department
of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) grants and matching funds from the Pittsfield Public
Schools.
The Pittsfield Adult Learning Center offers 8 different programs that meet the needs of a diverse
student population. The following programs are open to all eligible students during the academic year:
High School Equivalency (HiSet Prep), Adult Diploma, Adult Basic Education, Adult Secondary
Education, Adult Career Pathways, Digital Literacy, ABE Distance Learning, and English for Speakers
of Other Languages (ESOL). Currently the Adult Learning Center offers 14 core and non-core classes
that are scheduled throughout the school week (Monday - Friday, 8 am 3 pm). Overall, 141 students
were officially enrolled in at least one of the Adult Learning Center programs in FY15 and another 48
attended at least one academic class. In FY17, it is expected that the total student enrollment will
increase by 5%.
In FY15, 25 students passed the HiSet Exam (formerly GED exam) and another 14 students completed
the requirements for the Adult Diploma Program. Overall, 55% of the students were able to make at
least one academic level gain during the year. Based on the FY15 Massachusetts ESE Performance
Standards Report the Adult Learning Center achieved an Advanced rating in three of six performance
indicator areas and was ranked the second highest performing ABE program in Western
Massachusetts.

59

Operational Services
School Lunch and Breakfast Programs
All Pittsfield Public Schools participate in the national school lunch and breakfast program. The
programs serve an average of 5,635 meals per day. The schools food service program serves
students and staff. Current prices are $2.05 for lunch and $0.75 for breakfast for student meals and
$3.75 for lunch and $1.50 for breakfast for adult meals. In addition to the paid meal prices, the school
food service program receives state and federal reimbursement revenue for each meal served. The
charts below detail the current reimbursement rates.

Lunch Reimbursement Rates


State Share
Paid
Reduced
Free

Federal Share

$.06
$.06
$.06

$0.35
$2.73
$3.13

Total
$0.41
$2.79
$3.19

Breakfast Reimbursement Rates


Federal Non Severe Need
Paid
Reduced
Free

$0.29
$1.36
$1.66

Or

Federal Severe Need


$0.29
$1.69
$1.99

NOTE: Schools qualify for one reimbursement rate either severe or non-severe
depending on percentage of free/reduced students in school.

School food service programs are required to follow detailed nutritional guidelines in order to qualify for
state and federal reimbursement. We continue to implement new federal requirements that increase
the amount of whole grains, fruits and vegetables that students consume. The changes were
implemented slowly and over a couple of years in Pittsfield, in anticipation of the full implementation
year. Still, as with all programs that encourage students (and adults!) to eat their vegetables, the meal
plan changes have been received to varying fanfare by participants. It may take a number of years for
students to become accustomed to the new meal plan and for participation in the program to even out
after these sweeping changes.
This year Pittsfield Elementary Schools are participating in the free breakfast and lunch program under
the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP). Schools participating in CEP provide healthy breakfasts and
lunches to their students free of charge. It also allows the Pittsfield School Food Service to receive full
federal reimbursement for up to 100 percent of meals served. We have already seen an increase of
5.1% in lunch participation and an increase of 7.07% in breakfast participation for elementary schools.
In addition, Crosby Elementary School is scheduled to begin Breakfast in the Classroom by the end of
January. This will make breakfast available to even more students, a great way for them to start their
day.
In addition to the lunch and breakfast programs, the Districts Food Services Department runs a fresh
fruit and vegetable program in addition to the summer breakfast and lunch program. The fresh fruit and
vegetable offerings expose elementary students at Conte and Morningside Community Schools and

60

Crosby Elementary School to a wide variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. Students are provided a
fresh vegetable or fruit during snack time several times a week.
The summer food service program is a federally funded program which the Pittsfield Public Schools has
operated for 36 years. This offering provides free meals to children under age 18 and low cost meals
for accompanying adults. The program serves many of the districts summer educational programs for
students as well as providing meals at open sites in several locations throughout the community,
typically at Morningside Community School, Conte Community School, Dower Square Apartments and
the First United Church on Fenn Street. Additionally, it serves students at the YMCA and the Gladys
Allen Brigham Center summer camps and provides breakfast at the Boys and Girls Club to children
before they headed out to camp.
The Food Services Department seeks to source food locally whenever possible and practical, for
example, they purchase specialty breads and rolls through Richmond Bakery in Pittsfield, and apples
through Hilltop Orchards. Other examples of local produce sought to purchase whenever possible
include sweet potatoes, butternut squash and greens. Participation in the Department of Defense fresh
produce program allows us to procure regional fresh produce using our entitlement
dollars. Additionally, a partnership with the school gardens and student summer programs at Conte
and Crosby schools has provided the ability to serve the fresh garden produce to summer school
students. Recent grants with the Massachusetts Farm to School program have helped to provide
equipment and supplies to these school gardens to support this partnership.
New this year the Pittsfield Food Service Department was accepted into Project Breads Chef in School
program. Chefs in Schools is a culinary training program for school food service staff and runs in all 12
schools. The staff learn how to prepare new healthy cost effective recipes that students will eat.
Students then sample each new entre and provide feedback. This is state funded. Additional staff
training is available, as needed, and compliments the culinary training provided (i.e., time management,
use of herbs & spices, marketing and presentation skills).
Bus Operations
The Pittsfield Public Schools operates an in-house transportation services department. Bus operations
provide daily transportation to and from school for approximately 3,500 students each school day.
Additionally, students are transported for field trips, athletic events, work study programs, and extracurricular activities. Operating transportation services in house allows the district to alter services as
needed, such as for students moving between special education placements, and to develop
emergency bus routes for walkers on extremely cold winter days referred to as the Polar Express.
The Polar Express, introduced during the winter of 2015, operates when temperatures in winter are
extreme. Designated stops along normal walk routes have been established to provide shelter and
transportation those who are exposed to frigid conditions while walking to school.
Additionally, bus operations has traditionally provided services for community events including
transportation for parades, Welcome Home celebrations for the boys Little League All-Stars team,
girls softball team, and other events. Bus operations also serves as an integral part of the city and
school districts emergency planning for flooding and other emergencies.
The transportation services department operates a fleet of buses, a truck equipped with plow and
sander, and five other passenger vehicles, primarily used for transportation to out-of-district special
education placements.

61

Custodial Services
The Pittsfield Public Schools Custodial Department is responsible for cleaning and minor maintenance
of the school departments twelve schools, Mercer Administration Building and the Hibbard stockroom.
All schools have a day shift and second shift, with an additional third shift running at each high school.
The senior custodian at each school works with its respective staff to ensure a safe and healthy
environment for students, staff and the community. The custodial department works closely with the
city maintenance department and city grounds maintenance department, which are responsible for
building and grounds maintenance.

62

Financial Section

63

Expenditure Function and Classification


As a municipal school district the Pittsfield Public Schools utilizes the expenditure function and
classification system proscribed by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education (DESE). Under this system, district and municipal expenditures are classified by their
function: administrative, instructional, support services, etc. The classification descriptions below are
adapted from DESE guidance for state reporting on the financial end of year report.
1000 DISTRICT LEADERSHIP & ADMINISTRATION: Activities which have as their purpose the
general direction, execution, and control of the affairs of the school district that are system wide and not
confined to one school, subject, or narrow phase of school activity. The 1000 series includes
expenditures for school committee, central administration and the administration of district wide
informational technology.
2000 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES: Instructional activities involving the teaching of students,
supervising of staff, developing and utilizing curriculum materials and related services. Instructional
services directly attributable to schools must be reported on a school basis, while district-wide services,
such as supervisory may be reported on a district-wide basis. Expenditures in this classification include
salaries for teachers, guidance counselors, librarians, occupational and physical therapists, school
adjustment counselors, school administrators, and school expenses, e.g. textbooks and supplies.
3000 OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES: Other than instructional services, includes expenditures for
attendance and parent liaison services, nurses and nursing supplies, school transportation services,
and athletics.
4000 OPERATION & MAINTENANCE OF PLANT: Housekeeping activities relating to the physical
plant and maintenance activities for grounds, buildings and equipment. Expenditures classified as a
4000 expenditure must not exceed the per project dollar limit for extraordinary maintenance or for noninstructional equipment. This series includes custodial operations expenses, heating of buildings,
electricity, telephone, and information technology networking expenses.
5000 FIXED CHARGES: Retirement and insurance programs, rental of land and buildings, debt
service for current loans, and other recurring items, which are not generally provided for under another
function. The 5000 series includes employee separation costs such as contractual vacation and/or sick
leave buyback.
6000 COMMUNITY SERVICES: Services provided by the school district for the community as a whole,
or some segment of the community.
7000 ACQUISITION, IMPROVEMENT & REPLACEMENT OF FIXED ASSETS: Acquisition of land or
existing buildings, improvements of grounds, construction of buildings, additions to buildings,
remodeling of buildings, or acquisition of initial or additional non instructional equipment exceeding the
$5,000 unit cost and $100,000 extraordinary maintenance cost as defined in 603 CMR 10.00. The 7000
series includes the cost of school buses and other non-instructional vehicles.
8000 DEBT RETIREMENT & SERVICE: Retirement of debt and payment of interest and other debt
costs. Principal and interest on current loans are not part of this function, but are reported in fixed
charges (5400/5450).
9000 PROGRAMS WITH OTHER SCHOOL DISTRICTS: Transfers of payments to other school
districts or to non-public schools for services provided to students residing in the sending city or town.
The 9000 series includes the cost of private day and residential special education tuition costs

64

Major Revenue Sources


Education funding, ultimately, comes from the taxpayers, whether from businesses or individuals
through individual income taxes, corporate taxes, capital gains, sales tax, local business or residential
property taxes. The Pittsfield Public Schools receives revenue from a number of different sources to
support the mission of educating all students.

FY15 Total Spending on Education by


Revenue Source
State
(including grants),
$40,775,125
43.4%

Federal Grants,
$5,854,466
6.2%

City
(Operating and
Net School
Spending),
$446,651,264
49.6%

School
Choice/Tuition,
$710,000
0.8%

State Revenue
Chapter 70
The primary source of revenue is state revenue from the Chapter 70 program, which is the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts funding statute for public education. The Chapter 70 program was
established in 1993 as part of the Education Reform Act. Chapter 70 has three main components: (1) it
sets a foundation budget for each district based on its enrollment and student demographics; (2) it
determines a districts local contribution based on its relative wealth; and (3) the difference between a
districts foundation budget and its local contribution is its state aid amount.
The Chapter 70 program is funded annually through the state budget process. The formula is sensitive
to enrollment changes and utilizes enrollment information as of October 1 of the current school year in
setting a districts foundation budget for the next school year. There can also be significant differences
between the level of funding a district will receive from Chapter 70 through the state budget proposals
submitted by the governor, house and senate. These fluctuations may be the result of a change in the
inflation percentage used in the formula, the addition of a hold harmless clause for districts or a
minimum amount of increase per student, or because of a proposed change to the formula. In 2007,
the state legislature amended Chapter 70 to include the aggregate wealth model which sets a target
65

minimum and maximum level of state funding for school districts. Before the 2008 recession the state
legislature had intended to fully implement these targets over five years. How much progress is made
towards implementing these targets is still a part of the Chapter 70 funding formula and may account
for some of the differences that the district will see in state aid under various budget proposals.
Pittsfield Public Schools is a municipal school system. As such, any aid received through the state
Chapter 70 program is allocated to the City of Pittsfield and appropriated to the district through the local
budget process.
In Fiscal Year 2017 the state is seeking to change the metric for low income students. As part of the
Chapter 70 formula, districts receive additional state aid for each student who qualifies for free or
reduced lunch through the federal national school lunch program. A number of districts in the state
have implemented the federal Community Eligibility Program for breakfast and lunch, which provides no
cost meals to students who attend. Part of the funding for this program comes from the savings from
paperwork reduction; school districts and state and federal agencies no longer verify incomes and
families no longer complete and submit free and reduced lunch applications. As a result, the state does
not have current information for all districts on the number of students who qualify for free and reduced
lunch. The federal government has moved to direct certification for Medicaid or the Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program as the metric for low income for Title I grants. The state is also looking at
direct certification as a potential stand in for free and reduced lunch applications. In House 2, the
Governors budget, the new metric, termed economically disadvantaged would allocate different levels
of funding for economically disadvantaged students based on the relative concentration of poverty in
the district. Since the state aid formula is part of Massachusetts General Law, any change to the low
income metric will require a change in state law, likely as part of the budget process.
Circuit Breaker
The state also provides direct funding to school districts through the special education reserve account.
Commonly known as the circuit breaker, the program funds particularly high cost services to special
education students. The district submits cost information to the state on the services provided to
special education students, as proscribed in their individual education plans. The district is eligible to
receive reimbursement on services for an individual student that exceed four times the state foundation
per pupil spending rate for a given year, or approximately $42,000.
The statute that authorizes circuit breaker states that reimbursement will be 75% of this excess cost
amount over $42K, subject to appropriation. In recent years, as state revenues have fluctuated, the
appropriated amount has been projected by the state to reimburse as low as 40% or closer to the 75%
mark at 72%. In Pittsfield, this has meant a variance of approximately $500K. In addition to the
historical volatility in this account through the annual budget process, this account has also been cut
mid-year several times in recent years as part of the governors 9C cuts to balance the state budget. In
FY15 this account was cut by over $4M as part of mid-year 9C cuts.
In addition to the regular circuit breaker program, the state also funds a circuit breaker extraordinary
relief program. This program provides additional funds to districts with circuit breaker claims that are
25% higher than the previous year claims. Funds are received in the same year as the higher costs are
occurring and must be used within that year. Districts are notified about qualification and the amount of
funds to be received in late May or June.

66

For more information on circuit breaker funds, please turn to the revolving accounts section of this
budget book.

Local Revenue
Local revenue for the city is primarily generated through residential and commercial property taxes.
According to the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, the City of Pittsfield has raised the residential
tax levy by 2.6157% in FY14, 5.3% in FY15 and 3.74% in FY16. The commercial tax levy rate
increased 1.2894% in FY14, 4.0% in FY15 and 3.76% in FY16. The city was at $8.45 million below the
levy limit in FY15, and is still $6.79 million below the levy limit in FY16. This means that unlike many
cities and towns in Massachusetts, the city has not consistently raised taxes to the maximum allowable
levy over the years.

Other Revenue
Tuition Revenue
The district also generates revenue through tuition based fees for students who attend Pittsfield schools
from other area school districts for college preparatory programs, special education programs, and
career and technical education programs. Pittsfield Public Schools has a five-year tuition agreement
for Richmond students for fiscal years 2015-2019. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education annually sets the rate for vocational tuition for students participating in career and
technical education programs in Pittsfield. Tuition rates for regular education, special education and
other programs are set annually by the Pittsfield School Committee.
Tuition revenue for all students is deposited into the City of Pittsfield General Fund with three
exceptions. In accordance with an agreement between the city and the school district, revenue from
Richmond students is deposited into the Richmond tuition account. A second agreement stipulates that
if more than twenty out-of-district students enroll in the Pittsfield career and technical education
programs, revenue for twelve vocational students will be transferred to the districts revolving accounts.
Finally, revenue for students entering the district through the school choice program is deposited into
the school choice account in compliance with Massachusetts General Law Ch. 76 12B(o). More
information on the tuition accounts is included in the revolving accounts section of this book.

Federal Revenue
Federal funding of public education averages approximately nine percent of total spending in the
Pittsfield Public Schools and is primarily in the form of federal grants. Additional revenue is generated
to the citys general fund through the federal Center for Medicaid Services.
Medicaid Reimbursement
The Pittsfield Public Schools receives federal revenue in the form of Medicaid reimbursement for health
related supplies and services provided to students, e.g. occupational and physical therapy. The
documentation requirements for this federal reimbursement program are labor intensive, including
random time moment studies for district staff providing services and reporting of all eligible non-federal
spending on supplies and transportation. However, Medicaid reimbursement to the citys general fund
has exceeded $14 million since 1996 and averages approximately $350K per year.

67

Grant Funding
In addition to state and local aid, the Pittsfield Public Schools also receives a significant amount of
funding through federal, state and private grants. Federal grant funding consists of entitlement grants
and competitive grants. In recent years there has been a decline in entitlement grants and more
federal grants are beginning to be offered on a competitive basis. The Pittsfield Public Schools has
applied for and received a number of large, multi-year competitive grants, including Twenty-first
Century grants, the Carol M. White grant for Physical Education, the grant to Reduce Alcohol Abuse,
and the Safe Schools Healthy Students grant. The district will continue to seek competitive grants that
align with the mission of educating and engaging all students.
The districts largest federal grants are the Title I grant which funds additional supports for economically
disadvantaged students, the Special Education 94-142 grant, the Perkins Vocational grant and the
Adult Basic Education grant which funds non K-12 students at the Adult Learning Center. Additionally,
the district receives a number of state grants that fund salaries for Kindergarten teachers and
paraprofessionals, school nurses, and programs that encourage student engagement and
advancement in school.
Pittsfield Public Schools has increased its portfolio of private grants over the past few years with new
grants for summer programming through the Berkshire United Way, equipment grants through the
Mass Life Sciences Center and support for various programs and activities through generous local
donors and school business partners. More information on grant funding, including a complete list of
grants received in the current fiscal year is available in the informational section of this budget book.

Budgets
Total spending on education in the City of Pittsfield is through two primary budgets: the school districts
operating budget and the city budget. Additional spending on education also comes through direct
grants to the Pittsfield Public Schools.

Operating Budget
The Pittsfield Public Schools operating budget is approved annually by the Pittsfield School Committee.
The operating budget includes the city appropriation, which is a bottom-line figure approved annually by
the City Council, and an additional allocation from the districts three tuition revolving accounts.
Budget planning for the next fiscal year often begins with conversations over the summer, just as the
current fiscal year is underway. The executive team, which includes the Director of Special Education,
the Director of Technology, the Director of Human Resources, the Superintendent and Cabinet, began
discussions on the FY17 budget in September. In early November, the administrative council met to
discuss the FY17 budget process. Budget request packets were sent to administrative council
members in October and returned in mid-December. A budget workshop was held in January with the
principals presenting their school budgets directly to the school committee. The executive team also
held individual budget meetings with principals, directors and the curriculum department to review
budget requests. Follow up meetings with administrative council are held in March and April as the
budget process continues into the spring.
The new Pittsfield charter has made significant changes to the budget timeline. Previously, the school
committee approved a budget in early June. In accordance with the new charter, school committee
approval of the budget must take place before May 1. In order to meet this deadline, approval of the
68

budget is scheduled to take place prior to the May 1 deadline in late April, approximately two months
before the budget was approved in previous fiscal years. Information regarding the budget and budget
hearings will similarly take place much earlier than in years past. More information on the budget
timeline, including meeting dates for the current year budget process, is included in the budget calendar
section of this book.

Net School Spending


In addition to the operating budget, the city supports education in Pittsfield by providing services to
schools. The city maintenance department is responsible for maintenance on all school buildings.
Emergency services are provided through the city police and fire departments. Health insurance for
school employees and retirees are funded with other city employees in the city budget. Costs are
allocated for all of these services in accordance with the net school spending agreement approved in
2005 between the city and school district. Charges are determined on an annual basis by the city
finance department and reported to the state as part of total education spending in the school districts
annual financial end of year report. In preparation for FY17 the district is working with the Mayor and
new city finance director to update the net school spending agreement.

Revolving accounts
The Pittsfield Public Schools has a number of revolving accounts that were set up to fund specific
programs and services. These accounts fall into a few different categories: tuition accounts; special
education circuit breaker account; donation accounts; accounts that fund specific programs such as
athletic programs, career and technical education programs, and school food service programs; and
accounts for restitution of instructional equipment and textbooks such as the lost book account and
insurance reimbursement accounts.
Tuition Revolving Accounts
As stated previously in the revenue section of this book, Pittsfield Public Schools has three main tuition
accounts:
1. Richmond tuition account for students enrolled in Pittsfield Public Schools from the Town of
Richmond;
2. Vocational tuition account for revenue generated through the city agreement to allocate the
revenue generated from twelve vocational tuitions if a minimum threshold of twenty vocational
out-of-district students enroll in district programs;
3. School choice account for revenue generated from students enrolling in the district through the
school choice program.
Revenue from these sources was fairly stable several years ago, with some fluctuation year to year as
student enrollment from school choice, for example, increased or decreased due to the number of
incoming choice students in a given year. More recently, Richmond tuition revenue has declined and
Vocational tuition revenue to the district has been reduced to zero. In the case of vocational tuition, if
enrollment does not meet the threshold of twenty out of district students, no revenue will be allocated to
the vocational tuition revolving account from the City of Pittsfield. In this scenario, the city retains the
full amount of the vocational tuition revenue.

69

Tuition Revenue

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

Richmond Tuition

152,303

153,303

165,225

121,628

FY15

Vocational Tuition

154,140

88,810

97,690

107,460

0**

School Choice

337,595

382,332

458,286

430,338

534,879

509,481 455,000

Total

644,038

624,445

721,201

659,426

592,137

601,425 504,640

57,258

FY16*

FY17*

91,944
0**

49,640
0**

*FY16 and FY17 revenues are projected, preceding years are actual revenues.
**Vocational out of district student enrollment below City reimbursement level.

Budget Assumptions
Richmond tuition revenue decreased from FY14 to FY15 as seven seniors out of 14 students attending
Pittsfield schools from Richmond graduated in the prior year, FY14. A total of seven students, including
one senior, were enrolled in FY15, and six students including two seniors in FY16. The revenue
assumptions project a total of five students enrolling from Richmond in FY17. The tuition rate will
increase by two percent based on the Richmond tuition agreement, which is tied to the Consumer Price
Index. According to Richmond officials, most students enroll in the Berkshire Hills School District for
high school.
Vocational tuition revenue dropped to zero in FY14, FY15 and FY16 due to enrollment figures just
below the threshold of allocating funds to the school district. Twenty students were enrolled in
vocational programs from out of the district in FY14; however, two students left the program in the
spring and did not complete the year. As a result, vocational tuition funds were not allocated to the
district in FY14. Eighteen out of district students were enrolled in the program in FY15 and twelve
students are enrolled in FY16, thus vocational tuition revenue is not anticipated in FY16 or FY17.
Per pupil vocational tuition rates increased in FY16. The vocational tuition rate set by the state has
been increasing at a rate of ten percent per year for the past several years. A number of years ago the
state changed the way it calculated the vocational tuition rate for districts. As a result, Pittsfield altered
the cost allocation method on the annual financial report submitted to the state to more accurately
reflect total vocational spending in the district. The tuition rate increase is anticipated to continue in the
next fiscal year.
The Pittsfield Public Schools has utilized an increasingly larger amount of funding as part of the district
operating budget from the three tuition accounts over the past five years. The funding from each
individual account has varied during this time period, based on the funds available. In FY16 the
amount of funds projected to be available at the end of the year will decrease, thus reducing the
funding for FY17.

Tuition Expenditures
Richmond Tuition
Vocational Tuition
School Choice
Total

FY11

FY12

FY13

150,000
50,000
342,320
542,320

230,000
80,000
333,742
643,742

230,000
50,000
436,762
716,762

FY14

FY15

FY16*

200,000 209,795 119,538


100,000
13,068
0
410,000 487,137 590,462
710,000 710,000 710,000

FY17*
82,401
0
537,599
620,000

*FY16 and FY17 expenditures are projected, preceding years are actual expenditures.

The year-end balance is the account balance in a given account as of June 30, the end of the fiscal
year. For revolving accounts, this year-end balance is also the starting balance for the next fiscal year
as the accounts continue from year to year. The year end balances in the tuition revolving accounts are
70

projected to decrease in FY16 and FY17 from previous years based on the revenue and expenditure
projections outlined above. The year end balances for FY17 in the tuition revolving accounts are
projected to be lower than the balances for the previous five years.

Year End Balance

FY11

Richmond Tuition
Vocational Tuition
School Choice
Total

301,753
56,568
470,548
828,870

FY12

FY13

305,623
65,378
508,539
879,540

240,848
113,068
530,062
883,979

FY14
262,532
13,068
567,706
843,306

FY15

FY16*

FY17*

109,996
0
615,448
725,444

82,401
0
534,467
616,868

49,640
0
451,868
498,808

*FY16 and FY17 balances are projected, preceding years are actual balances.

Program Specific Revolving Accounts


Adult Learning Center
Pittsfield Public Schools operates several programs at the Adult Learning Center, including classes for
students interested in pursuing an adult diploma or GED and programs for English Language Learners.
The Center also operates a program in connection with a grant through Berkshire County Regional
Employment Board. Revenue from the BCREB grant funds Adult Learning Center program instruction
and expenses. The account had increased over the past several years so funds were used to offset
the cost of the directors salary in FY14 and partially offset the directors salary along with other
program expenses in FY15, FY16 and FY17. All available funds are projected to be spent in this
account in FY16 and FY17.

Adult Learning Center


Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

FY13

25,592
22,707
133,229

31,391
53,537
111,083

38,450
18,962
130,571

FY14
47,280
96,106
81,442

FY15
(15,884)
63,171
2,387

FY16*
37,000
34,387
0

FY17*
37,000
37,000
0

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Athletic Revolving Account


The student athletics program in Pittsfield generates revenue primarily through student participation
fees. Students are charged $125 for each sport in which they participate, up to $375 per student if
participating in fall, winter and spring sports. Fee waivers are available upon request for families based
on financial need. The program also generates revenue through gate fees at athletic games and
events. The athletic department has historically maintained a balance of approximately $50K in the
revolving account. More recently, this balance has hovered around $35K, due to the increasing
number of participants qualifying for fee waivers. In FY12 and FY13 the Athletic account paid for
custodial overtime for athletic events. The additional expense is not sustainable given the declining
revenues and these costs were returned to a district operating expense in FY14.

Athletics

FY11

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

132,426
112,846
53,367

FY12

FY13

139,126
149,735
42,758

126,711
133,796
35,673

FY14

FY16*

132,159 126,355 125,000


149,128 132,421 105,000
18,704
12,638
32,638

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

71

FY15

FY17*
120,000
120,000
32,638

Career and Technical Education Revolving Accounts


The Career and Technical Education programs provide services to local residents through several
district programs. Community members and staff purchase lunch created and served by students
through the culinary programs at Pittsfield and Taconic High Schools. The automotive repair program
at Taconic trains students through work on community members vehicles. Similarly, the cosmetology
program provides hands on training and course hours required for licensure through cosmetology
services offered to the public. The programs accept donations from community members to fund the
cost of supplies and parts needed to further the educational training of students.
The career and technical education revolving accounts consist of a total of six accounts. The two
culinary accounts strive to maintain a beginning and ending balance of $10K for cash flow purposes
throughout the school year. The two vocational program accounts typically have much lower balances
within individual sub accounts by program, but the main accounts total between $7K and $14K. Both
accounts are projected to be lower in FY17 as programs are encouraged to direct all available funds to
the classroom. There are two cosmetology revolving accounts. One revolving account is used for the
cosmetology retail store that is operated by cosmetology students. The second account is for adult
post-graduate education in cosmetology. Program revenue is generated through fees and offsets
cosmetology program costs. Post-graduate student participation has declined in recent years so the
revenue projections and year-end balance projections for this program are correspondingly lower than
in previous years. Information on specific accounts is below.

Career and Technical


Education Accounts
Year End Balances

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16*

Cosmetology
PHS Vocational Tech
THS Vocational Tech
PHS Culinary Arts
THS Culinary Arts
Total Year End Balances

34,179
7,477
14,233
5,739
9,876
71,503

20,986
8,978
14,822
11,252
8,814
64,851

23,948
7,847
14,516
12,320
8,306
66,936

2,249
8,680
9,137
9,182
9,283
38,531

29,085
8,690
7,361
7,875
4,532
30,293

16,000
7,000
7,000
10,000
10,000
35,000

FY17*
1,000
5,000
5,000
10,000
10,000
31,000

*FY16 and FY17 balances are projected, preceding years are actual balances.

Circuit Breaker Revolving Account


Revenue for the circuit breaker revolving account is generated by state reimbursement for students
who are mandated to receive particularly high cost special education services based upon their
individual education plan. More detail on this reimbursement mechanism is available on the preceding
state revenue section.
State revenue for circuit breaker is specific to the cost of services provided to individual students within
the previous fiscal year. Reporting is completed annually at the end of each school year in July and
certified by the state in November for receipts for that year. In the aftermath of the 2008 recession, the
state has cut this revenue source mid-year to balance the budget. In FY15 the Governor cut this line
item through 9C cuts twice, once in November in the amount of $3.86M and again in February by
$250K. For this reason, and because receipts are not certified by the state until halfway through a given
year, revenue received in one fiscal year is used to offset local budget expenses in the next fiscal year.

72

Circuit Breaker

FY11

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

445,069
362,102
364,905

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16*

FY17*

728,872
485,846
607,931

601,266
607,931
601,266

1,261,319
847,189
1,015,396

1,299,352
1,230,582
1,084,166

1,336,051
1,084,166
1,336,051

1,000,000
1,336,051
1,000,000

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Community Correction Vocational Revolving Account


Pittsfield previously operated a program to provide vocational training to inmates returning to the
community. Training was provided during non-school hours in the evenings and on weekends.
Funding for this program was from the revenue for two vocational students out of district tuitions as
part of the city agreement to provide twelve tuitions to the school department. This program is no
longer operating and the account was closed in FY15. The remaining balance was used to fund
replacement equipment and supplies for vocational programs.

Community Correction
Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

36,078
11,784
42,906

FY13

17,762
2,860
57,808

FY14

19,538
77,346

12,790
64,556

FY15
64,556
0

Account closed in FY15.

Continuing Education Account


The Adult Learning Center operated continuing education programs for the community for a number of
years. In FY15 enrollment and course offerings declined, in part due to the proliferation of course
offerings through OLLI at Berkshire Community College, online courses and other programming in the
community. The Adult Learning Center offered electrical theory which is one of the courses of required
hours for electricians apprentices. The Center is exploring options for offerings in fall of 2016.

Continuing Education

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16*

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

34,276
35,095
56,776

21,525
30,460
47,841

12,325
17,402
42,765

4,905
8,954
38,716

6,655
6,541
38,830

6,000
6,000
38,830

FY17*
12,000
12,000
38,830

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Custodial Revolving Account


The district permits school-related organizations such as parent teacher organizations or athletic
booster clubs to hold school events on school property without building use fees. These organizations
are responsible for paying for custodial overtime fees. The custodial revolving account was set up in
FY13 to better account for payment of custodial overtime fees. Charges for overtime fees are
transferred to this account, thus relieving local budget from these costs. Year-end balances in this
account are due to the timing of payments; balances are not anticipated to accrue in this account.

Custodial Revolving
Account
Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

N/A
N/A
N/A

N/A
N/A
N/A

FY13
4,935
2,154
2,782

FY14

FY15*

FY16*

23,244
24,388
1,638

18,952
17,669
2,920

18,500
20,420
1,000

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

73

FY17*
18,500
18,500
1,000

Donation Account
Donations for individual schools and school programs are deposited into a single donation revolving
account and earmarked for use by the school or program. Gifts are made by businesses as well as
individuals and fund everything from technology and furniture for a school language lab to school field
trips. In total, these accounts summed to $65K a couple of years ago, but most individual accounts
were in the $5K to $10K range.
In recent years, the school donation revolving account has appeared to increase significantly due to the
increase in private grants. In the past, private grants had been accounted for in a state grant fund
number, but were moved to the donation account at the citys direction a couple of years ago. Recent
private grants include $88K from the Mass Life Sciences Center, $25K for technology purchases for
Morningside Community School from Best Buy, and $30K from the United Way for summer school
programming at Conte, Crosby and Morningside. The totals from these private grants, as well as
others, artificially inflate the donation revolving account balance. Private grants are more restrictive
than gifts to schools and the district requested a separate fund number from the city to better reflect the
private grant activity. Beginning in FY15 the district moved new private grants to separate accounts
with an account number that begins with 158XX. It is anticipated that the donation account will
decrease as existing private grants in this account are fully expended.

Donations
Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16*

77,155
80,289 133,292 206,157 126,986 120,000
51,294 124,744 219,648 129,131 139,157 140,000
195,990 151,534
65,178 142,204 130,032 110,032

FY17*
120,000
150,000
80,032

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Drivers Education Revolving Account


The drivers education program provides both classroom hours and on the road instruction to students
pursuing a drivers license. Classroom instruction fees are offered at a reduced rate to students as a
way to encourage drivers education and safe driving. Fees for on the road instruction are competitive
with area drivers education programs and fund expenses associated with instruction, including
payments to instructors, insurance costs, and vehicle maintenance and replacement costs. The
balance in this account is projected to increase over the next several years to fund the replacement of
the current vehicle.

Driver's Education
Account

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16*

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

13,910
11,671
10,418

10,993
10,352
11,060

11,800
10,352
12,508

9,450
6,169
15,789

11,340
6,849
20,279

11,500
7,200
24,579

FY17*
11,500
7,200
28,879

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Enrichment Revolving Account


Pittsfield organizes enrichment programs for students seeking additional preparation for SAT testing. In
the past, this program has been fully funded by student fees. In spring 2014 the district was able to
provide free SAT preparation for interested students. A total of six instructors provided evening classes
in Math and English. Eighty students were enrolled in the program. The total cost to the district in
FY14 was $12,000 which reduced the balance that had accrued in this account. In FY15 the district
returned to a fee based program.
74

Enrichment Account
Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

9,176
5,603
10,399

6,300
5,151
11,548

7,000
4,151
14,397

400
12,071
2,726

FY15
6,000
4,599
4,127

FY16*
3,000
4,500
2,627

FY17*
3,000
4,500
1,127

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Insurance Revolving Accounts


The district maintains two insurance restitution revolving accounts, one for technology and a second for
other items. The district receives reimbursement for damaged items through the city insurance carrier.
Checks for the value of the item, less any deductible, are deposited into the revolving accounts.
Replacement items are then purchased, and the insurance reimbursement amount is used to offset the
cost to the local budget. Per state finance law, replacement funds are to be used within the same fiscal
year. Any funds not utilized are returned to the citys general fund.

Insurance Account

FY11

FY12

FY13

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

7,261
3,746
27,108

976
7,261
20,823

10,589
31,412
0

Insurance - Technology
Account

FY11

FY12

FY13

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

19,505
18,792
18,608

839
0

19,447

1,539
20,986
0

FY14

FY15*

FY16*

260
213
47

120,816
117,703
3,161

11,000
11,000
0

FY14

FY15

11,454
11,454

1,667
1,667

FY16*
14,000
14,000
0

FY17*
4,000
4,000
0

FY17*
5,000
5,000
0

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Lost Book Revolving Account


Schools receive restitution fees from students for lost or damaged instructional materials. Deposits are
made throughout the year, but collections typically peak at the end of the school year. Schools order
replacement books and materials on an ongoing basis, with larger orders coinciding with the end of
both the school and fiscal year as balances increase and in time for books to be received by the
following school year. As with the donation account, revenues are deposited into a single revolving
account with individual sub accounts earmarked for the individual schools. The total revolving account
balance at the start of FY16 was $2,037 with individual school accounts ranging from $3 dollars to
$300. Account balances that had accrued in prior years were spent down in FY14. Year-end balances
in this account are due to the timing of payments; balances are not anticipated to accrue in this
account.

Lost Books

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

2,177
4,040
17,288

1,489
271
18,506

3,410
9,609
12,307

4,486
15,348
1,445

FY15
1,263
671
2,037

FY16*
1,000
2,000
1,037

FY17*
1,000
1,000
1,037

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Professional Development Revolving Account


As the largest district in Berkshire County, other school districts will occasionally participate in adult and
continuing education professional development programs provided by the Pittsfield Public Schools.
75

Revenue is generated through fees and is used to offset professional development program costs.
This account is showing augmented utilization as cooperative programming increases. Higher
expenditures are projected in FY17 in anticipation of additional professional development programming
targeted to the many state initiatives, particularly in the area of technology education.

Professional
Development
Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

243
1,125

1,125

8,561
300
9,386

18,277
24,683
2,980

5,783
2,689
6,074

FY16*
6,000
6,500
5,574

FY17*
6,000
6,500
5,074

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

School Nutrition Service Program Account


Often referred to as a revolving account, the school nutrition service program account is primarily
funded through the federal school lunch grant and the universal breakfast program. As allowed under
federal regulations, other food service programs are also included in the school food service account,
including the fresh fruit and vegetable program and the summer breakfast and lunch programs.
The school food service program is required by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education to maintain a minimum balance of six weeks operating costs in the program
account, and a maximum of three months operating costs. For Pittsfield, this range is a minimum of
$361K and maximum of $784K. The balance in the Pittsfield food service account fluctuates based on
the timing of receipts and overall profit or loss for that year. City financial statements show a much
lower balance of $307K in FY13 due to state and federal revenue that was received just after the close
of the fiscal year.
Along with many other districts across the state, the school food service program experienced its first
operating loss in FY13. The $40K operating loss was tied to decreased revenue, particularly from a la
carte sales of snack foods and other items that are no longer able to be offered under the federal
Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act enacted in 2010 and fully implemented in FY13. Snack companies have
modified many of their recipes in compliance with the new law and a la carte sales are increasing from
FY13 but are not expected to reach previous levels.
The operating balance in the school food service program account is anticipated to be within state
mandates in FY16 and FY17, and potentially higher than FY15 due to shifting trends in revenues and
expenses. The program replaced several large walk in freezers in FY15 with newer, more energy
efficient models. These higher equipment replacement costs yielded a lower ending balance for fiscal
year 2015. Additional equipment is planned for replacement in FY16. The district is monitoring
revenues and expenses carefully in FY16, the first year of the Community Eligibility Program, which
provides breakfast and lunch to all elementary school students in the district at no cost to their families.
It is anticipated that the additional meals served to elementary students will enable the program to
update equipment while still maintaining a positive balance for the fiscal year. Trends will become more
clear as the district moves into future years of program implementation.

76

School Nutrition
Service
Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16*

FY17*

2,498,116 2,595,999 2,234,736 2,885,625 2,770,290 2,850,000


2,378,207 2,506,909 2,594,604 2,600,866 2,855,869 2,850,000
578,653
667,743
307,875
592,634
507,054
507,054

2,875,000
2,875,000
507,054

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Special Education Parent Advisory Council Revolving Account


Massachusetts General Law sets forth the establishment of a parent advisory council made up of
special education staff and administrators, parents of special education students, and other community
stakeholders. The council discusses educational issues and organizes parent and student engagement
activities. As the group is created under state law, funds for the parent advisory council are held in trust
by the district for use by the council. The balance in this account at the beginning of FY16 was $438.
Summer School Program Revolving Accounts
The Pittsfield Public Schools operates many summer school programs for students. While many are
grant funded, other programs are funded through program fees. There are two accounts in which
revenues are generated by participation fees. The accounts have seen less activity in recent years as
grant funds have largely replaced fees for Pittsfield students. Students participating in credit recovery
programs for middle school students and high school students continue to pay fees as grants have not
covered out of district students. The district is anticipating using $15K in FY17 to maintain
programming as federal grant funding for the five year Mass Grad program ends in FY16.

Summer School

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

Remedial Summer School


Transition Summer School
Total Year End Balance

13,649
3,197
16,846

15,196
2,399
17,596

17,875
2,399
20,274

15,244
1,901
17,145

15,749
1,549
17,298

FY16*
16,198
1,097
17,295

FY17*
1,198
450
1,648

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

Testing Revolving Accounts


Students who participate in SAT testing and Advanced Placement (AP) exams pay a fee to cover the
cost of the exam. A balance accrued in this account a number of years ago. In FY14 and FY15 the
district will be using this balance to cover the costs of AP exams for students who qualify for free or
reduced lunch and to help defray the costs of exams for students who are enrolled in multiple AP
courses. The amount to be used in FY16 is a ballpark estimate and the actual expenditures may be
different as it is unknown at this time how many students will require assistance. Any funding
remaining at the end of FY16 will be used towards this same end the following year.

Testing

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

29,238
29,966
18,883

38,010
34,900
21,993

34,817
31,963
24,847

35,427
42,983
17,291

47,407
45,711
18,987

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

77

FY16*
34,000
37,500
15,487

FY17*
34,000
40,000
9,487

Transportation Revolving Account


The district has collected fees for a number of years for ticket transportation services. Students who
live within the mileage limits set by school committee policy for free transportation may pay a fee to ride
the bus on a space available basis. Previously the district collected approximately $40K per year in
fees. The law changed in 2005 and under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 71, Section 68
transportation fees may no longer be assessed to students who qualify for free or reduced lunch.
Currently the district collects approximately $20K in transportation fees. In FY15 the district utilized
$370K from the balance that had accumulated in this account to fund the first year payment for the new
bus fleet.
In FY13, to better track transportation offsets from external organizations that provide transportation
funding for programs, e.g. PTOs and grant funded school programs, the district began depositing
transportation reimbursement into the transportation revolving account. The revenue in this account
increased in FY13 and is projected to increase in FY14 and FY15 as a result of this accounting change.
The district anticipates using all available funds in this account in FY15 and future years to offset the
costs of bus maintenance and bus driver pay for PTO and grant funded trips and programs.

Transportation
Account
Revenue
Expenditures
Year End Balance

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY16*

27,889
23,010
46,945 100,424
96,333 113,415
225
180
4,135
58,560 444,707 119,000
265,336 288,166 330,976 372,840
24,466 18,881

*FY16 and FY17 figures are projected, preceding years are actual amounts.

78

FY15

FY17*
104,000
109,000
13,881

Informational Section

79

State Aid
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
FY17 Chapter 70 Summary
236 Pittsfield
Comparison to FY16

Aid Calculation FY17

6,192

6,115

-77

Pct
Chg
-1.24%

68,905,112

68,494,174

-410,937

-0.60%

29,086,218

28,579,116

-507,102

-1.74%

39,818,894

39,941,194

122,300

0.31%

68,905,112

68,520,310

-384,802

-0.56%

58.69%

58.67%

57.79%

58.31%

100.00%

100.04%

FY16
Prior Year Aid
1

Chapter 70 FY16

Enrollment
39,818,894

Foundation Aid
2

Foundation budget FY17


Required district
contribution FY17
Foundation aid (2 -3)
Increase over FY16
(4 - 1)

3
4
5

68,494,174

Minimum $20 per pupil


increase

Change

28,579,116
39,915,058
96,164

Target aid share


C70 % of
foundation
Required NSS % of
foundation

Minimum Aid
6

Foundation budget
Required district
contribution
Chapter 70 aid
Required net school
spending (NSS)

FY17

26,136

Non-Operating District
Reduction to Foundation
7

Reduction to foundation

FY17 Chapter 70 Aid


8

sum of line 1, 5 minus 7

39,941,194

FY17 Chapter 70 and Net School Spending Requirements. Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary
Education. 27 Jan. 2016. http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/chapter70/chapter-17p.html

80

FY2017 Local Aid Estimated Receipts for Pittsfield

FY2017 Local Aid Estimates


Pittsfield
FY2017
Governor's
Budget Proposal

FY2016 Cherry
Sheet Estimate
Education:
Chapter 70

39,818,894

39,941,194

477,448

264,201

534,879

515,935

40,831,221

40,721,330

7,959,318

8,301,569

Local Sh of Racing Taxes

Regional Public Libraries

School Transportation
Charter Tuition Reimbursement
Smart Growth School Reimbursement
Offset Receipts:
School Choice Receiving Tuition

Sub-total, All Education Items:


General Government:
Unrestricted Gen Gov't Aid

Urban Revitalization

118,000

Veterans Benefits

746,709

746,709

State Owned Land

90,804

90,251

171,238

164,773

64,994

64,853

9,151,063

9,368,155

49,982,284

50,089,485

Exemp: VBS and Elderly


Offset Receipts:
Public Libraries

Sub-Total, All General Government

Total Estimated Receipts

Cherry Sheet: Preliminary Municipal Est. Based on Budget Process, FY17. Massachusetts Department of
Revenue. 8 March 2016.
<https://dlsgateway.dor.state.ma.us/DLSReports/DLSReportViewer.aspx?ReportName=CherrySheetBudgets&
ReportTitle=Cherry+Sheet+Budgets>

81

FY2017 Local Aid Assessments for Pittsfield

FY2017 Local Aid Assessments


Pittsfield
FY2017
Governor's
Budget Proposal

FY2016 Cherry
Sheet Estimate
County Assessments:
County Tax

Suffolk County Retirement

Essex County Reg Comm Center

Sub-Total, County Assessments:

Retired Employees Health Insurance

Retired Teachers Health Insurance

133,061

128,480

10,793

11,063

Metropolitan Area Planning Council

Old Colony Planning Council

87,780

87,780

231,634

227,323

MBTA

Boston Metro. Transit District

393,894

412,249

393,894

412,249

25,463

25,463

25,463

25,463

School Choice Sending Tuition

2,452,955

2,654,601

Charter School Sending Tuition

2,579,200

2,378,012

5,032,155

5,032,613

5,683,146

5,697,648

State Assessments and Charges:

Mosquito Control Projects


Air Pollution Districts

RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge

Sub-Total, State Assessments:


Transportation Authorities:

Regional Transit

Sub-Total, Transp Authorities:


Annual Charges Against Receipts:
Multi-Year Repayment Program
Special Education
STRAP Repayments

Sub-Total, Annual Charges:


Tution Assessments:

Sub-Total, Tution Assessments:

Total Estimated Charges:

Cherry Sheet: Preliminary Municipal Est. Based on Budget Process, FY17. Massachusetts Department of
Revenue. 8 March 2016.
<https://dlsgateway.dor.state.ma.us/DLSReports/DLSReportViewer.aspx?ReportName=CherrySheetBu
dgets&ReportTitle=Cherry+Sheet+Budgets>

82

City and Town Contribution Required Contribution

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education


FY17 Determination of City and Town Total Required Contribution
236 Pittsfield
Effort Goal
1)

2014 equalized valuation

2)

Property percentage

3)

Local effort from property wealth

4)

2013 income

5)

Income percentage

6)

Local effort from income

7)

Combined effort yield (row 3+ row 6)

FY17 Increments Toward Goal


3,452,075,400

13)

Required local contribution FY16

0.3792%

14)

Municipal revenue growth factor (DOR)

0.45%

13,089,393

15)

FY17 preliminary contribution (13 x 14)

29,217,106

16)

Preliminary contribution pct of foundation (15/8)

1.4701%
15,216,298

28,305,692

If preliminary contribution is above the target share:


17)

Excess local effort (15 - 10)

911,414

18)

637,990

19)

70% reduction toward target (17 x 70%)


FY17 required local contribution (15 - 18), capped at
90% of foundation

20)

Contribution as percentage of foundation (19 / 8)

Foundation budget FY17

68,494,174

9)

Maximum local contribution (82.5% * row 8)

56,507,694

21)

Shortfall from target local share (11 - 16)

10)

Target local contribution (lesser of row 7 or row 9)

28,305,692

22)

11)

Target local share (row 10 as % of row 8)

41.33%

23)

Added increment toward target (13 x 1% or 2%)*


*1% if shortfall is between 2.5% and 7.5%; 2% if shortfall >
7.5%
Shortfall from target after adding increment (10 - 15
- 22)

12)

Target aid share (100% minus row 11)

58.67%

24)

FY17 required local contribution (15 + 22)

25)

Contribution as percentage of foundation (24 / 8)

If preliminary contribution is below the target share:

FY17 Chapter 70 and Net School Spending Requirements. Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. 27 Jan. 2016.

83

42.66%

1,035,070,000

8)

http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/chapter70/chapter-17p.html

29,086,218

28,579,116
41.72

FY2017 Chapter 70
Chapter 70 Foundation Budget
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Office of School Finance

FY17 Chapter 70 Foundation Budget


236 PITTSFIELD
(1)
PreSchool
Foundation Enrollment

-------------------------------------- Base Foundation Components ----------------------------------------------------------(2)


(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
------ Kindergarten -----Jr High/
High
ELL
ELL
ELL
Half-Day
Full-Day
Elementary
Middle
School
PK
K Half
KF - 12

151

391

1 Administration

27,484

2 Instructional Leadership

49,637

227,596

3 Classroom and Specialist Teachers


4 Other Teaching Services
5 Professional Development

2,257

1,357

1,391

142,324

821,548

493,948

506,324

257,051

1,483,797

892,119

914,471

1,178,673

6,803,659

3,599,782

5,426,416

58,372

302,306

1,745,022

755,238

(10)
Vocational

TOTAL*

268

375

230

57

3,012

6,115

97,552

136,500

577,820

143,199

2,946,698

176,189

246,533

4,019,796

1,216,704

2,486,959

1,906,661

9,745,687

32,592,137

644,506

165,683

173,753

1,780,223

2,188

5,627,290

9,001

46,638

269,260

175,487

174,417

43,274

77,741

91,977

214,485

1,102,281

6 Instructional Equipment & Tech

32,942

170,597

984,752

592,073

971,057

116,931

458,123

80,282

3,406,756

7 Guidance and Psychological

16,559

85,770

495,096

396,230

509,134

78,253

137,258

1,718,299

6,587

34,123

295,441

290,140

685,805

35,081

184,886

1,532,063

63,201

327,302

1,889,312

1,231,505

1,223,983

303,706

617,558

645,454

1,505,157

7,807,176

56,969

295,017

1,703,064

973,566

958,775

254,388

419,786

731,221

989,291

6,382,078

1,359,599

1,359,599

548,347

2,839,802

16,490,951

9,400,088

12,014,888

2,487,761

4,939,095

5,813,636

1,504,986

12,454,620

68,494,174

Foundation Budget per Pupil

11,201

8 Pupil Services
9 Operations and Maintenance
10 Employee Benefits/Fixed Charges
11 Special Ed Tuition
12 Total
13 Wage Adjustment Factor
14 Economically Disadvantaged Decile

100.0%
10

* Total foundation enrollment does not include columns 11 through 13, because those columns represent increments above the base. The pupils are already counted in columns 1 to 10.
Total foundation enrollment assigns pupils in pre-kindergarten and half-time kindergarten an enrollment count of .5.
Special education in-district headcount is an assumed percentage, representing 3.75 percent of K to 12 non-vocational enrollment and 4.75 percent of vocational enrollment.
Special education out-of-district headcount is also an assumed percentage, representing 1 percent of non-vocational K-12 enrollment.
Economically disadvantaged headcounts are the number of pupils in columns 1 through 10 who are directly certified as eligble for the Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program (SNAP); the Transitional Assistance for Families with Dependent Children (TAFDC); the Department of Children and Families' (DCF) foster care program; and MassHealth (Medicaid).
Each component of the foundation budget represents the enrollment on line 1 multiplied by the appropriate state-wide foundation allotment.
The wage adjustment factor is applied to underlying rates in all functions except instructional equipment, benefits and special education tuition.
The foundation budget shown on this page may differ from the final number used in the formula, due to rounding error.
FY17 Chapter 70 and Net School Spending Requirements. Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. 27 Jan. 2016.

84

--- Incremental Costs Above The Base -----(11)


(12)
(13)
Special Ed
Special Ed
Economically
In District
Out of Dist Disadvantaged

Chapter 70 Trends
1/29/2016

profile16jan2016.xlsm

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Chapter 70 Trends
236 PITTSFIELD
236

Required

236

Required

Actual

Dollars

Pct

Foundation

Pct

Local Con-

Chapter 70

Pct

Net School

Pct

Net School

Pct

Over/Under

Over/

Enrollment

Chg

Budget

Chg

tribution

Aid

Chg

Spending (NSS)

Chg

Spending

Chg

Requirement

Under

FY07

6,537

0.3

57,082,753

8.3

25,485,280

31,597,473

12.4

57,082,753

8.3

60,552,821

6.0

3,470,068

6.1

FY08

6,445

-1.4

59,041,739

3.4

25,796,426

33,245,313

5.2

59,041,739

3.4

63,439,778

4.8

4,398,039

7.4

FY09

6,372

-1.1

61,752,173

4.6

25,995,833

31,996,051

-3.8

57,991,884

-1.8

61,466,451

-3.1

3,474,567

6.0

FY10

6,298

-1.2

63,207,565

2.4

25,852,192

35,041,213

9.5

60,893,405

5.0

65,170,156

6.0

4,276,751

7.0

FY11

6,285

-0.2

62,148,015

-1.7

25,940,936

35,512,358

1.3

61,453,294

0.9

68,538,958

5.2

7,085,664

11.5

FY12

6,257

-0.4

63,704,269

2.5

26,794,850

36,909,419

3.9

63,704,269

3.7

69,350,974

1.2

5,646,705

8.9

FY13

6,205

-0.8

65,754,170

3.2

27,822,547

38,017,593

3.0

65,840,140

3.4

72,045,158

3.9

6,205,018

9.4

FY14

6,308

1.7

67,796,004

3.1

28,757,787

39,290,438

3.3

68,048,225

3.4

75,689,508

5.1

7,641,283

11.2

FY15

6,269

-0.6

67,481,752

-0.5

29,005,679

39,447,163

0.4

68,452,842

0.6

78,535,444

3.8

10,082,602

14.7

FY16

6,192

-1.2

68,905,112

2.1

29,086,218

39,818,894

0.9

68,905,112

0.7

79,291,843 *

1.0

10,386,731

15.1

Dollars Per Foundation Enrollment


Foundation Ch 70
Actual
Budget
Aid
NSS

Percentage of Foundation
Required
Actual
Ch 70
NSS
NSS

Chapter 70
Percent of
Actual NSS

FY07

8,732

4,834

9,263

55.4

100.0

106.1

52.2

FY08

9,161

5,158

9,843

56.3

100.0

107.4

52.4

FY09

9,691

5,021

9,646

51.8

93.9

99.5

52.1

FY10

10,036

5,564

10,348

55.4

96.3

103.1

53.8

FY11

9,888

5,650

10,905

57.1

98.9

110.3

51.8

FY12

10,181

5,899

11,084

57.9

100.0

108.9

53.2

FY13

10,597

6,127

11,611

57.8

100.1

109.6

52.8

FY14

10,748

6,229

11,999

58.0

100.4

111.6

51.9

FY15

10,764

6,292

12,528

58.5

101.4

116.4

50.2

FY16

11,128

6,431

12,806

57.8

100.0

115.1

50.2

* Budgeted
Foundation enrollment is reported in October of the prior fiscal year (e.g. FY16 enrollment = Oct 1, 2014 headcount).
Foundation budget is the state's estimate of the minimum amount needed in each district to provide an adequate educational program.
Required Net School Spending is the annual minimum that must be spent on schools, including carryovers from prior years.
Net School Spending includes municipal indirect spending for schools but excludes capital expenditures, transportation, grants and revolving funds.
Federal SFSF grants in FY09, FY10, FY11, and FY12 and federal Education Jobs grants in FY11, FY12 and FY13 are not included in these calculations. Net
school spending is limited to Chapter 70 aid and appropriated local contributions. However, the SFSF and Education Jobs calculations were directly based
upon the Chapter 70 formula and helped districts spend at foundation budget levels.
In FY09, this district received an SFSF grant of
In FY10, this district's SFSF grant entitlement was
In FY11, the combined SFSF and Educ Jobs entitlement was

$3,760,289
$2,314,160
$2,000,140

In FY12 the combined SFSF/Ed Jobs amount was


In FY13 the Education Jobs amount was

Chapter 70 Trends. Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. 29 Jan. 2016 <http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/chapter70/>

85

Percent

Foundation

1,334,758
0

Pittsfield Chapter 70 Trends, FY93 to FY16

Chapter 70 Trends, FY93 to FY16


PITTSFIELD
$90,000,000
$80,000,000

Chapter 70 Aid
Foundation Budget
Required Net School Spending
Actual Net School Spending

$70,000,000
$60,000,000
$50,000,000
$40,000,000
$30,000,000
$20,000,000
$10,000,000
$0
93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Fiscal Year

Chapter 70 Trends. Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. 29 Jan. 2016
<http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/chapter70/>

86

Foundation Budget Rates per Pupil Chapter 70

FY17 Foundation Budget Rates


PK/Half Day K

$3,631

Kindergarten-Full

$7,263

Elementary

$7,307

Junior/Middle

$6,927

High School
Limited English PK/Half Day K

$8,638
$4,641

Limited English Full Time

$9,283

Vocational

$13,171

Special Ed-In School

$25,277

Special Ed-Tuitioned Out

$26,403

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 1

$3,775

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 2

$3,815

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 3

$3,855

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 4

$3,895

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 5

$3,935

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 6

$3,975

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 7

$4,015

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 8

$4,055

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 9

$4,095

Economically Disadvantaged Decile 10

$4,135

FY17 Chapter 70 and Net School Spending Requirements. Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. 27 Jan. 2016.
http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/chapter70/chapter-17p.html

87

Per Pupil Expenditures Comparisons


Urban School Comparison

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education


Per Pupil Expenditures - Pittsfield Compared to Small Urban Districts, FY15
------------------------310 of 322 districts with accepted data ---------------------------------------------------------- Expenditures Per Pupil Within The District--------------------------------------------------fte pupils fte pupils
instruc- classroom &
other
profesinstructn'l guidance,
operations insurance,
at the
district

tuitioned
out of dist

total
pupils

administration

tional
leadership

specialist
teachers

teaching
services

sional dev- materials, counseling


elopment equip & tech & testing

pupil
services

and
retirement
maintenance & other

--expenditures per pupil-total


within the
district

outside
the district

total
expenditures

expenditures
per pupil

district

date

CAMBRIDGE

2/25/16

6,428.0

620.6

7,048.6

1,279.50

1,871.76

7,772.98

2,330.81

1,054.99

813.44

797.08

2,115.72

1,831.71

6,315.50 26,183.50

41,918.15

194,321,971

27,568.87

CHELSEA

2/25/16

6,300.4

714.2

7,014.6

465.76

904.26

4,254.19

877.75

505.24

330.67

410.29

1,537.87

984.85

2,457.62 12,728.51

22,907.44

96,555,187

13,764.89

CHICOPEE

2/25/16

7,618.3

332.6

7,950.9

531.61

1,085.53

5,378.25

1,112.54

385.24

248.08

268.96

1,514.86

1,056.86

2,127.95 13,709.87

12,511.00

108,607,099

13,659.72

EVERETT

2/25/16

7,030.5

667.2

7,697.7

343.93

1,114.30

5,380.32

1,035.54

193.07

343.13

308.64

1,066.17

849.30

1,871.36 12,505.76

21,190.71

102,060,185

13,258.53

FITCHBURG

2/25/16

4,937.4

721.7

5,659.1

526.75

883.78

4,919.38

741.57

317.62

445.43

425.36

1,617.03

933.23

2,296.11 13,106.25

18,415.50

78,001,260

13,783.33

HAVERHILL

2/25/16

7,202.0

1,268.6

8,470.6

443.73

644.65

4,608.39

1,059.83

97.12

277.73

478.07

1,419.59

780.05

2,647.89 12,457.04

11,413.96

104,195,348

12,300.82

HOLYOKE

2/25/16

5,459.3

1,233.0

6,692.3

594.50

1,238.71

5,454.01

1,712.15

308.80

568.41

526.36

2,098.42

1,279.86

2,245.44 16,026.68

14,482.97

105,351,980

15,742.27

LEOMINSTER

2/25/16

6,061.3

507.5

6,568.8

403.26

725.19

4,947.65

1,097.12

122.93

497.08

413.06

1,383.66

834.82

2,411.90 12,836.69

18,900.66

87,399,129

13,305.19

MALDEN

2/25/16

6,515.1

982.6

7,497.7

402.48

925.13

5,803.21

1,026.10

14.92

459.99

412.91

914.58

856.46

2,131.09 12,946.88

18,261.23

102,293,674

13,643.34

PITTSFIELD

2/25/16

5,781.5

680.5

6,462.0

328.37

927.62

5,349.00

1,363.60

214.45

535.73

430.98

1,159.98

1,169.44

3,300.86 14,780.04

11,739.15

93,439,283

14,459.81

SALEM

2/25/16

4,134.4

870.2

5,004.6

700.36

1,557.29

7,237.31

1,187.83

267.76

512.11

909.63

1,151.65

880.22

3,171.67 17,575.83

13,566.55

84,471,119

16,878.70

SOMERVILLE

2/25/16

4,846.8

570.1

5,416.9

591.79

1,207.34

6,026.70

1,331.27

532.14

613.18

673.07

1,589.46

2,137.91

2,769.95 17,472.82

24,053.90

98,400,404

18,165.45

TAUNTON

2/25/16

7,941.2

231.5

8,172.7

254.69

642.90

4,816.06

576.05

80.37

292.50

425.38

1,443.09

794.51

2,084.33 11,409.87

41,435.51

100,200,407

12,260.38

891,513.2 67,874.3 959,387.5


917,203.5 65,266.1 982,469.6

530.11
500.15

971.81
935.16

5,607.52
5,441.36

1,168.44
1,137.25

198.11
217.34

430.36
431.64

438.96
420.86

1,435.42
1,375.68

1,144.31
1,103.09

2,490.06 14,415.10
2,434.04 13,996.56

21,549.46 14,313,908,614
21,839.25 14,263,057,360

14,919.84
14,517.56

MASSACHUSETTS TOTAL
FY14 Total, Aug 2015

FY15 Total Expenditures Per Pupil. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 29 February 2016. <http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/statistics/ppx15.html>

88

Berkshire County School Comparison

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education


Per Pupil Expenditures - Pittsfield Compared to other Berkshire County School Districts, FY15
------------------------310 of 322 districts with accepted data ---------------------------------------------------------- Expenditures Per Pupil Within The District--------------------------------------------------fte pupils fte pupils
instruc- classroom &
other
profesinstructn'l guidance,
operations insurance,
at the
district

tuitioned
out of dist

total
pupils

administration

tional
leadership

specialist
teachers

teaching
services

district

date

CLARKSBURG

2/25/16

170.5

42.6

213.1

622.97

1,025.06

5,458.59

1,825.72

FLORIDA

2/25/16

85.1

16.9

102.0

848.85

1,611.90

6,008.03

HANCOCK

2/25/16

41.8

45.9

87.7

581.20

2,758.37

7,612.11

LANESBOROUGH

2/25/16

215.5

22.3

237.8

550.77

802.70

5,866.49

LEE

2/25/16

684.3

103.4

787.7

686.42

1,033.81

6,476.73

LENOX

2/25/16

731.1

56.7

787.8

716.45

1,045.91

NORTH ADAMS

2/25/16

1,469.7

189.7

1,659.4

563.83

PITTSFIELD

2/25/16

5,781.5

680.5

6,462.0

328.37

RICHMOND

2/25/16

158.5

57.8

216.3

SAVOY

2/25/16

38.4

44.4

82.8

WILLIAMSBURG

2/25/16

154.8

48.7

203.5

495.31

ADAMS CHESHIRE

2/25/16

1,392.8

146.0

1,538.8

BERKSHIRE HILLS

2/25/16

1,349.2

118.6

1,467.8

CENTRAL BERKSHIRE 2/25/16

sional dev- materials, counseling


elopment equip & tech & testing

pupil
services

and
retirement
maintenance & other

--expenditures per pupil-total


within the
district

outside
the district

total
expenditures

expenditures
per pupil

124.84

261.13

264.35

1,547.00

906.01

3,043.37

15,079.03

14,250.70

3,178,055

14,913.44

2,127.40

98.24

268.14

155.41

2,140.29

1,367.03

4,138.57

18,763.85

13,086.98

1,817,974

17,823.27

1,661.03

455.36

366.96

371.20

1,484.93

877.85

518.80

16,687.80

9,474.14

1,132,413

12,912.35

2,199.83

70.62

803.87

246.46

1,313.54

1,490.44

4,392.84

17,737.55

5,767.13

3,951,049

16,615.01

1,789.71

240.99

276.00

549.39

1,568.23

1,452.72

3,736.39

17,810.40

7,963.56

13,011,088

16,517.82

7,638.97

1,295.18

208.05

762.96

478.77

1,309.43

1,533.64

3,283.64

18,273.00

7,912.13

13,808,010

17,527.30

1,430.96

5,392.70

1,513.18

103.67

214.28

363.81

1,576.09

1,109.45

3,230.78

15,498.75

16,241.03

25,859,436

15,583.61

927.62

5,349.00

1,363.60

214.45

535.73

430.98

1,159.98

1,169.44

3,300.86

14,780.04

11,739.15

93,439,283

14,459.81

545.83

1,539.66

9,759.86

1,365.38

180.64

406.61

625.03

1,639.42

1,524.03

3,009.79

20,596.26

9,944.08

3,839,275

17,749.77

1,159.19

1,912.53

5,568.70

2,818.13

43.23

402.55

263.36

1,621.69

1,092.55

7,349.24

22,231.17

8,462.34

1,229,405

14,847.89

980.63

6,821.53

948.17

153.86

306.75

243.31

1,283.90

1,270.36

1,924.81

14,428.62

13,190.68

2,875,936

14,132.36

456.15

757.26

4,799.39

1,121.87

120.93

252.94

226.20

1,440.86

943.49

3,124.97

13,244.06

9,685.84

19,860,459

12,906.46

864.43

1,679.01

6,003.57

1,115.69

108.90

199.21

548.10

1,847.42

1,412.69

3,673.99

17,453.01

15,036.73

25,330,963

17,257.78

1,712.2

166.6

1,878.8

504.29

930.19

5,478.85

1,287.16

278.79

366.59

532.48

1,806.62

1,391.84

3,313.55

15,890.36

7,036.76

28,379,801

15,105.28

2/25/16

540.6

37.4

578.0

565.58

887.23

7,122.59

969.26

235.25

414.89

626.08

1,904.36

1,786.61

3,946.38

18,458.22

36,502.38

11,343,703

19,625.78

NORTHERN BERKSHIRE2/25/16

496.6

4.0

500.6

1,017.60

1,000.90

7,826.90

548.30

324.52

1,079.39

622.75

1,870.34

1,939.90

3,560.00

19,790.59

10,000.00

9,868,005

19,712.36

891,513.2 67,874.3 959,387.5


917,203.5 65,266.1 982,469.6

530.11
500.15

971.81
935.16

5,607.52
5,441.36

1,168.44
1,137.25

198.11
217.34

430.36
431.64

438.96
420.86

1,435.42
1,375.68

1,144.31
1,103.09

2,490.06
2,434.04

14,415.10
13,996.56

21,549.46 14,313,908,614
21,839.25 14,263,057,360

14,919.84
14,517.56

MOUNT GREYLOCK

MASSACHUSETTS TOTAL
FY14 Total, Aug 2015

FY15 Total Expenditures Per Pupil. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 29 February 2016. <http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/statistics/ppx15.html>

89

Per Pupil Expenditure Comparison to State

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education


Office of School Finance

236 PITTSFIELD

Trends in Total Membership and Expenditures


expenditures
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY14

68,395,662
72,181,283
76,527,386
79,916,262
80,803,444
82,195,166
83,826,713
84,120,620
85,430,077
89,359,525

expenditures

pupils
6,768.8
6,769.4
6,662.0
6,698.7
6,623.3
6,589.3
6,566.9
6,619.0
6,603.4
6,496.7

8,000.0

90,000,000

7,000.0

80,000,000

10,105
10,663
11,487
11,930
12,200
12,474
12,765
12,709
12,937
13,755

10,600
11,210
11,858
12,448
13,006
13,047
13,354
13,637
14,022
14,518

6,000.0

70,000,000
60,000,000

5,000.0

50,000,000

4,000.0

40,000,000

3,000.0

30,000,000

2,000.0

20,000,000

1,000.0

10,000,000
0

0.0
FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14

Per Pupil Expenditure Trends


District and Massachusetts Average

----per pupil expenditure---district


MA average
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY14

pupils

100,000,000

district

MA average

16,000
14,000
12,000
10,000
8,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
0
FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14

note: all in-district and out-of-district pupils and expenditures are included
FY2014 Total Expenditures Per Pupil. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 7 Dec.2015. http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/statistics/ppx14.html

90

Grants
Grant Information Summary Report

Fund Code
790
701
632
345
625
220-E

PITTSFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS


FY16 GRANT INFORMATION TO DATE
2/9/2016
Title
Amount
STATE GRANTS
Alternative Education
$20,000.00
FY16 Quality Full Day Kindergarten
$288,510.00
FY16 Academic Support Svc
$25,100.00
FY16 Adult Learning Center
$327,892.00
FY15 Academic Support - Summer
$9,000.00
FY16 DSAC
$47,807.00
TOTAL STATE GRANTS
$718,309.00

Org #

Responsible

16601
16615
16691
16694
16698
16699

T. Gage
J. Curtis
T. Gage
P. Gage
T. Gage
K. Latham

Contract
Contract
Contract
391
Contract
Contract
237

STATE OTHER GRANTS


FY16 DMH/ASP
$114,385.00
FY16 DPH Essential School Health
$106,600.00
FY16 WIOA - Workforce Initiative
$8,775.00
FY16 SPED Inclusive Pre-School (IPLE)
$91,425.00
Big Yellow School Bus
$800.00
MCC Stars
$22,800.00
FY16 CFCE
$117,500.00
TOTAL STATE OTHER
$462,285.00

16617
16636
16638
16640
16644
16660
16695

L. Steele
J. Roy
T. Gage
L. Carnevale
Various
Various
J. Curtis

305
140
246
245B
647-B1B
647-A1
647-A1
180
240
647-B2
305
140
274
184
262
647-B2
323-B
298
240
400
647-A1
647

FEDERAL GRANTS
FY15 Title 1 Part 2
$195,808.00
FY15 Title IIA Part 2
$54,530.00
FY16 MTSS Partnership
$31,826.00
FY16 21st CCLC SPED Enhancement
$20,000.00
FY16 21CCLC Herberg - Summer
$51,411.00
FY16 21CCLC Reid - Summer
$46,608.00
FY16 21CCLC HS - Summer
$34,812.00
Title III ELL
$39,948.00
FY16 SPED 94-142
$1,799,815.00
FY16 21CCLC School Year
$331,779.00
FY16 Title I
$1,902,060.00
FY16 Title IIA
$306,421.00
FY16 SPED Prog Improvement
$47,317.00
FY15 Title III English Language Acq
$1,634.00
FY16 SPED Early Childhood
$71,377.00
FY16 21CCLC Reid School Year
$66,992.00
FY16 DSAC - Title I Support
$54,521.00
FY16 SPED Inc-PreSch Prog Improv
$3,500.00
FY16 SPED 94-142 - Part 2
$219,634.00
FY16 Perkins Occ Ed-Vocational
$108,626.00
FY16 21CCLC Reid Carryover
$41,000.00
FY16 21st CCLC Conte - Summer
$47,123.00
TOTAL FEDERAL GRANTS
$5,476,742.00

17522
17524
17601
17602
17604
17605
17606
17608
17610
17618
17622
17624
17641
17645
17646
17652
17654
17658
17693
17697
17698
17699

K. Latham
J. Curtis
A. Carpenter
M. Ireland
M. Ireland
M. Ireland
M. Ireland
V. Guglielmo-Brady
G. West
M. Ireland
K. Latham
J. Curtis
G. West
V. Guglielmo-Brady
L. Carnevale
M. Ireland
K. Latham
G. West/L Carnevale
G. West
R. Brady
M. Ireland
M. Ireland

Contract
Contract
Contract
806

FEDERAL OTHER GRANTS


Connecting Activities - PHS
$2,750.00
Connecting Activities - THS
$2,750.00
FY16 MassGrad
$22,909.00
FY15 RTTT ELG July-Dec 2015
$7,400.00
TOTAL FEDERAL OTHER GRANTS
$35,809.00

16634
16635
17530
17648

T. Gage
T. Gage
T. Gage
J. Curtis

Private
Private
Private
Private
Private
Private
Private
Private
Private
Private
Private
Private

PRIVATE GRANTS
FY16 Adult Career Pathways
$37,494.00
Berkshire Bank Foundation Media
$2,500.00
United Way Multi-Cultural Bridge
$15,000.00
Crane & Co. Comm Block - Allendale
$7,644.00
FY16 MKEA
$6,638.00
EOS Crosby Breakfast
$12,500.00
C.A.S. IT.
$1,600.00
BBF Multi-Cultural Bridge
$5,000.00
FY16 ACP - Summer
$3,640.00
SISEP
$10,000.00
Scholastic-Patterson's Pledge-Conte
$6,000.00
United Way -PPP
$4,000.00
TOTAL PRIVATE GRANTS
$112,016.00

15803
15804
15806
15807
15808
15809
15855
15860
15895
15811
15812

P. Gage
Y. Sirker
Various
B. Kelley
J. Curtis
S. Bryant
Various
A. Dean
P. Gage
A. Carpenter
B. Buckenroth
A. Carpenter

TOTAL FY16 - ALL GRANTS

91

$6,805,161.00

PITTSFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS


GRANT AWARDS FOR FY 2016
State Grants:
DISTRICT AND SCHOOL ASSISSTANCE CENTER UNDERPERFORMING DISTRICTS GRANT (DSAC)
State Funds 220-E
Purpose: To support improvement in schools through participation in regionally-based professional
development and assistance initiatives associated with the District and School Assistance Centers (DSACs).
DSAC regional assistance is designed to enhance district and regional capacity to plan, implement and sustain
research-based practices to improve student performance and is aligned with the Massachusetts District
Accountability and Assistance Framework.
Instructional
Contracted Services
Supplies
Travel
Total

26,800
17,966
2,100
941
47,807

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION


State Funds 345
Purpose: To assist adult students to achieve their educational and career goal as family members, workers,
and community members, and prepare them to successfully take their next steps toward those goals, in college
and further training, at work, and in the community.
Administrator
23,364
(FTE: .27)
Instructional
190,566
(FTE: 3.7)
Non-Instructional
28,662
(FTE: 1.0)
Fringe Benefits
40,000
Contracted Services
14,000
Supplies
5,000
Travel
5,100
Other
21,200
Total
327,892
ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES - SUMMER 2015
State Funds 625
Purpose: To enhance academic support in English language arts (ELA), science, and mathematics for students
in classes of 2014-2016 who are at-risk for not achieving a competency determination required for a high school
diploma.
Instructional
9,000
Total
9,000
ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES (MCAS) SCHOOL YEAR
State Funds 632
Purpose: To enhance academic support services so that all eligible students will meet the state's Competency
Determination required for high school graduation.
Administrator
2,000
Instructional
20,000
Other
3,100
Total
25,100
92

QUALITY FULL DAY KINDERGARTEN


State Funds 701
Purpose: To support high quality educational programs for children in full-day kindergarten classrooms by:
improving the quality of leadership, curriculum, and classroom environment; providing continuity of curriculum
across preschool, kindergarten, and grades one through three; providing professional development
opportunities; supporting children in all domains of development; and developing other programmatic
components of kindergarten.
Instructional
107,316
(FTE: 2.0)
Non-Instructional
136,481
(FTE: 7.0)
Contracted Services
19,800
Supplies
24,563
Travel
350
Total
288,510
ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION
State Funds 790
Purpose: To help school districts pilot or enhance middle school and high school level district and inter-district
alternative education programs/schools that serve students who are most at risk of not graduating from high
school. The target population includes, but is not limited to: students identified as high and moderate risk in the
Early Warning Indicator System (EWIS), students who are suspended or expelled, students who are chronically
truant, students with have mental health concerns, and/or students with course failures. Grant funds may be
used for salaries for staff salary or stipends, curriculum development, consultants, substitutes, community
partnerships, technology, travel, training, and purchase of materials and supplies.
Instructional
Contracted Services
Supplies
Travel
Other
Total

5,000
5,000
4,000
2,500
3,500
20,000

State Grants - OTHER:


COORDINATED FAMILY & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
State Funds 237
Purpose: To provide all families with access to locally available comprehensive services and support that
strengthens families and promotes optimal child development.
Non-Instructional
Contracted Services
Total

1,425
116,075
117,500

INCLUSIVE PRE-K LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS


State Funds 391
Purpose: To serve preschoolers with disabilities in high-quality inclusive settings with their same-aged peers.
Instructional
36,136
(FTE: 0.5)
Non-Instructional
12,000
(FTE: 1.0)
Fringe
900
Other
42,389
Total
91,425

93

DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH/A.S.P.


State Contract
Purpose: To provide programs for students with learning and emotional disabilities.
Instructional
94,843
(FTE: 2.0)
Fringe Benefits
18,770
Supplies
772
Total
114,385
DEPT. OF PUBLIC HEALTH/ESSENTIAL SCHOOL HEALTH-NURSES
State Contract
Purpose: To provide school health services to all students preschool through grade 12.
Instructional
88,392
(FTE: 2.0)
Fringe Benefits
3,000
Supplies
8,348
Travel
4,000
Indirect Cost
2,860
Total
106,600
WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT
State Contract
Purpose: To provide an integrated service delivery system that incorporates a comprehensive work
component, case management and follow up.
Instructional
7,200
Supplies
500
Travel
525
Other
550
Total
8,775
MASS CULTURAL COUNCIL/BIG YELLOW BUS
State Contract Conte, Egremont, Morningside, Williams
Purpose: To fund field trips for students.
Other
Total

800
800

MASS CULTURAL COUNCIL/STARS


State Contract Allendale, Conte, Crosby, Egremont, Reid, Herberg
Purpose: To fund residency programs with the Berkshire Museum.
Contracted Services
22,800
Total
22,800

94

Federal Grants:
TITLE II (A) TEACHER QUALITY
Federal Funds 140
Purpose: To increase student achievement through comprehensive district initiatives that focus on the
preparation, training, recruitment, and retention of effective educators. The goal is to improve the overall
effectiveness of all educators, making those activities that focus on educator effectiveness a high priority.
Instructional
192,278
(FTE: 2.00)
Non-Instructional
7,800
(FTE: 0.25)
Fringe Benefits
37,684
Contracted Services
67,159
Supplies
1,500
Total
306,421
TITLE II (A) TEACHER QUALITY/PART TWO
Federal Funds 140
Purpose: To increase student achievement through comprehensive district initiatives that focus on the
preparation, training, recruitment, and retention of effective educators. The goal is to improve the overall
effectiveness of all educators, making those activities that focus on educator effectiveness a high priority. The
federal Tydings Amendment allows school districts two years to spend federal entitlement funds.
Instructional
29,013
Non-Instructional
413
Fringe Benefits
5,416
Contracted Services
18,766
Supplies
544
Travel
388
Total
54,540
TITLE III: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER
Federal Funds 180
Purpose: To provide supplemental funds to improve the education of English language learners (ELLs),
including immigrant children and youth, by assisting the children and youth to learn English and meet
challenging state academic content and student academic achievement standards.
Instructional
30,330
Supplies
3,618
Other
6,000
Total
39,948
TITLE III: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM FOR
LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS
Federal Funds 184
Purpose: To create supplemental summer programs and activities in districts with a currently approved Title III
grant.
Instructional
1,634
Total
1,634

95

SPED PL 94-142
Federal Funds 240
Purpose: To provide funds to ensure that eligible students with disabilities receive a free and appropriate public
education that includes special education and related services designed to meet their individual needs.
Administrator
40,000
Instructional
561,112
(FTE: 9.0)
Non-Instructional
745,740
(FTE: 34.0)
Fringe Benefits
176,995
Contracted Services
227,968
Supplies
38,000
Travel
10,000
Total
1,799,815
SPED PL 94-142/PART TWO
Federal Funds 240
Purpose: To provide funds to ensure that eligible students with disabilities receive a free and appropriate public
education that includes special education and related services designed to meet their individual needs. PPS
extended FY15 federal special education entitlement grant (fund code 240) spending into FY15. Authority for
this action is received through the federal Tydings Amendment allowing school districts two years to spend
federal entitlement funds.
Instructional
198,854
(FTE: 3.9)
Fringe Benefits
20,780
Total
219,634
21st CCLC SPED ENHANCEMENT
Federal Funds 245B
Purpose: To enhance the capacity of current 21st Century Community Learning Center programs (CCLC) to
include students on an Individual Education Plan (IEP) into an array of activities designed to complement their
school-day programs, advance student achievement, and provide opportunities for socializing and participating
with peers without disabilities. To increase access to evidence-based professional development, including faceto-face and online training and technical assistance, products, services, and activities.
Administrator
2,712
Instructional
11,408
Non-Instructional
5,880
Total
20,000
MULTI-TIERED SYSTEM OF SUPPORTS (MTSS) PARTNERSHIP
Federal Funds 246
Purpose: To increase access to evidence-based professional development, including face-to-face and online
training and technical assistance, products, services, and activities.
Administrator
1,500
Instructional
6,782
Contracted Services
8,400
Supplies
3,182
Travel
11,962
Total
31,826

96

EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION ALLOCATION


Federal Funds 262
Purpose: To provide funds to school districts and charter school districts to build capacity and to ensure that
eligible 3, 4, and 5 year-old children with disabilities are appropriately identified as eligible for special education
and receive developmentally appropriate special education and related services designed to meet their
individual needs in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act - 2004 (IDEA-2004) and
Massachusetts Special Education laws and regulations.
Administrator
29,791
FTE: (0.4)
Instructional
34,772
FTE: (0.62)
Fringe Benefits
6,774
Total
71,337
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT
Federal Funds 274
Purpose: To fund professional development activities that will improve the skills and capacity of educators to
meet the diverse needs of students with disabilities and to promote inclusive practices across all settings.
Instructional
23,344
Non-Instructional
4,000
Fringe Benefits
2,101
Contracted Services
7,500
Supplies
4,059
Travel
6,313
Total
47,317
SPED PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT - EARLY CHILDHOOD ALLOCATION
Federal Funds 298
Purpose: To extend strategic planning begun at the April 24, 2013 Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education (DESE) Secondary Transition Capacity-Building Conference in Marlborough, MA, by supporting the
planning or development of whole-school/whole-district best practices in the areas of Transition Assessment or
Self-Determination for students with disabilities, aged 14-22.
Instructional
1,975
Non-Instructional Stipends
525
Supplies
1,000
Total
3,500
TITLE I
Federal Funds 305
Purpose: To provide supplemental resources to local school districts to help low-achieving students in highpoverty schools meet the State's academic standards.
Administrator
59,500
(FTE: 0.65)
Instructional
1,108,755
(FTE: 18.0)
Non-Instructional
284,874
(FTE: 18.0)
Fringe Benefits
440,160
Contracted Services
7,071
Travel
1,200
Other
500
Total
1,902,060

97

TITLE I /PART TWO


Federal Funds 305
Purpose: To provide supplemental resources to local school districts to help low-achieving students in highpoverty schools meet the State's academic standards. The federal Tydings Amendment allows school districts
two years to spend federal entitlement funds.
Administrator
1,999
Instructional
99,969
Non-Instructional
23,082
Fringe
10,066
Contracted Services
54,812
Supplies
3,845
Travel
435
Other
1,600
Total
195,808
DISTRICT AND SCHOOL ASSISSTANCE CENTER UNDERPERFORMING DISTRICTS GRANT (DSAC)
Federal Funds 323-B
Purpose: To support improvement in schools through participation in regionally-based professional
development and assistance initiatives associated with the District and School Assistance Centers (DSACs).
DSAC regional assistance is designed to enhance district and regional capacity to plan, implement and sustain
research-based practices to improve student performance and is aligned with the Massachusetts District
Accountability and Assistance Framework.
Instructional
21,000
Contracted
33,000
Supplies
521
Total
54,521
PERKINS ACT ALLOCATION FUNDS - SECONDARY P.L. 105-332
Federal Funds 400
Purpose: To raise student achievement of academic, vocational, and technical competencies in career and
technical programs and to update and develop new career and technical programs in high-skill high-wage
occupations leading from secondary to postsecondary education.
Non-Instructional
40,000
(FTE: 2.0)
Fringe Benefits
4,100
Supplies
42,606
Travel
7,000
Other
12,400
Indirect Costs
2,520
Total
108,626

98

MASSACHUSETTS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTERS / CONTE COMMUNITY SCHOOL,


HERBERG MIDDLE SCHOOL, PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL
Federal Funds 647
Purpose: The purpose of the program is to establish or expand community learning centers that operate during
out-of-school hours and provide students with academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities
designed to complement the students' regular academic program.
Description/School
Conte
Herberg
PHS
Total
Administrator
18,615
10,000
16,000
44,615
(FTE: .68)
Instructional Stipends
47,426
64,796
49,916
162,138
Non-Instructional
17,668
12,098
9,126
38,892
Fringe Benefits
1,946
3,300
1,672
6,918
Contracted Services
22,539
13,000
3,670
39,209
Supplies
5,453
2,800
4,084
12,337
Travel
600
500
500
1,600
Other
15,000
11,070
0
26,070
Total
129,247
117,564
84,968
331,779
MASSACHUSETTS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER / REID MIDDLE
SCHOOL/CARRYOVER
Federal Funds 647-A
Purpose: The purpose of the program is to establish or expand community learning centers that operate during
out-of-school hours and provide students with academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities
designed to complement the students' regular academic program.
Administrator
11,500
(FTE: .17)
Instructional
25,783
Non-Instructional
6,329
Fringe Benefits
2,295
Contracted Services
11,600
Supplies
2,000
Travel
465
Other
7,020
Total
66,992
MASSACHUSETTS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER / REID MIDDLE SCHOOL
SCHOOL YEAR
Federal Funds 647-B2
Purpose: The purpose of the program is to establish or expand community learning centers that operate during
out-of-school hours and provide students with academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities
designed to complement the students' regular academic program.
Administrator
10,101
(FTE: .15)
Instructional
19,465
Non-Instructional
3,114
Fringe Benefits
1,057
Contracted Services
5,500
Supplies
1,613
Travel
150
Total
41,000

99

MASSACHUSETTS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTERS / REID MIDDLE SCHOOL SUMMER
Federal Funds 647-A-1
Purpose: To establish or expand community learning centers that operate during out-of-school hours and
provide students with academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities designed to complement the
students' regular academic program.
Administrator
893
Instructional
29,155
Non-Instructional
5,893
Contracted Services
1,467
Supplies
4,000
Other
5,200
Total
46,608
MASSACHUSETTS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTERS /PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER
Federal Funds 647-A-1
Purpose: To establish or expand community learning centers that operate during out-of-school hours and
provide students with academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities designed to complement the
students' regular academic program.
Administrator
4,755
Instructional
18,585
Non-Instructional
6,644
Fringe Benefits
778
Supplies
2,150
Other
1,900
Total
34,812
MASSACHUSETTS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTERS / HERBERG MIDDLE SCHOOL SUMMER
Federal Funds 647-B1B
Purpose: To establish or expand community learning centers that operate during out-of-school hours and
provide students with academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities designed to complement the
students' regular academic program.
Administrator
892
Instructional
30,625
Non-Instructional
9,143
Contracted Services
1,403
Supplies
4,260
Other
5,088
Total
51,411

100

MASSACHUSETTS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTERS / CONTE COMMUNITY SCHOOL


- SUMMER
Federal Funds 647-B1B
Purpose: To establish or expand community learning centers that operate during out-of-school hours and
provide students with academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities designed to complement the
students' regular academic program.
Administrator
2,210
Instructional
21,050
Non-Instructional
8,805
Fringe
270
Contracted Services
8,190
Supplies
903
Other
5,695
Total
47,123
Federal Grants - OTHER:
RTTT- ELCG EVIDENCE BASED LITERACY YEAR 3
Federal Funds 806
Purpose: To enhance the implementation of EEC approved, evidence-based literacy models through
Coordinated Family and Community Engagement (CFCE) grantees. Grant funds awarded biannually.
Contracted Services
5,200
Supplies
1,770
Other
430
Total
7,400
US DEPT. OF ED/DEPT. OF ESE/MASS GRAD IMPLEMENTATION
Federal Funds: 7048-1500
Purpose: To support statewide and local efforts for high school dropout prevention, intervention and recovery.
Administrator
58
Instructional
19
Non-Instructional
3,240
Fringe
3,557
Contracted Services
8,278
Supplies
4,659
Travel
2,122
Other
976
Total
22,909
CONNECTING ACTIVITIES
State Contract: PHS $2,750 and THS $2,750
Purpose: To provide business, education and community partnerships through Berkshire County Regional
Employment Board.
Instructional
5,500
Total
5,500

101

Private Grants:
ADULT CAREER PATHWAYS/BCREB
Purpose: To support the on-going effort to provide increased services
to Berkshire County residents and to strengthen the connection
between the Adult Basic Education/ESOL providers and the workforce
system.

37,494

ADULT CAREER PATHWAYS/BCREB SUMMER


Purpose: To support the on-going effort to provide increased services
to Berkshire County residents and to strengthen the connection
between the Adult Basic Education/ESOL providers and the workforce
system.

3,640

MASSACHUSETTS KINDERGARTEN ENTRY ASSESSMENT


(MKEA)
Purpose: To support Kindergarten educator learning and work

6,638

BERKSHIRE BANK FOUNDATION WRITING & MEDIA


WORKSHOP: Broadcast Journalism, Literacy and Community
Action for Middle School Students
Purpose: To create a sustainable writing and media program by
purchasing equipment and providing training

2,500

C.A.S.IT/PHS, THS, REID, HERBERG


Purpose: To provide funding for text books for the Italian programs

1,600

CRANE & CO., INC., COMMUNITY BLOCK GRANT


Purpose: To purchase 12 ELMO interactive document cameras for
Allendale Elementary School

7,644

BERKSHIRE UNITED WAY MULTI-CULTURAL BRIDGE


MENTORING AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAM at Allendale, Stearns,
Conte and Crosby
Purpose: To provide a residency and after-school program that
promotes understanding and acceptance of others through the arts and
cultural education by partnering with Multicultural Bridge.
BERKSHIRE BANK FOUNDATION MULTICULTURAL BRIDGE
MENTORING AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAM at Reid Middle School
Purpose: To provide a residency and after-school program that
promotes understanding and acceptance of others through the arts and
cultural education by partnering with Multicultural Bridge.
Eos FOUNDATION
Purpose: To support universal free, after the bell, breakfast in the
classroom program for all students in all grades for school year 20152016 at Crosby Elementary School
102

15,000

5,000

12,500

SISEP (State Implementation & Scaling-up of Evidence-Based


Practices)
Purpose: To support education systems in creating implementation
capacity for evidence-based practices benefitting all students,
especially students with disabilities.
PITTSFIELD PREVENTION PARTNERSHIP (UNITED WAY)
Purpose: To support the SADD program in place at Reid, Herberg,
Taconic and Pittsfield High Schools.
SCHOLASTIC PATTERSONS PLEDGE
Purpose: To improve the library at Conte Community School

10,000

4,000

6,000

TOTAL GRANT AWARD AMOUNTS: $6,805,161

103

Summary of Grant Awards


FTEs Funded
FY 2016
Grant Funded FTEs Total = 109.29

89.82 FTE's
Federal Funds
$5.476M

$6.00

$5.00

Millions

$4.00

$3.00

$2.00

$1.00

13.97 FTE's
State
Funds
$718.3 K

0 FTE's
Federal Other
Funds
$35.8 K

5.5 FTE's
State Other
Funds
$462.2 K

0 FTE's
Private
Funds
$112 K

$0.00
STATE STATE OTHER

104

FEDERAL

FEDERAL
OTHER

PRIVATE

Pittsfield Students to School Choice


Students Exiting Pittsfield to School Choice
2014-2015
(final as of
6/24/15)
Districts Students Are Attending
Hancock
Lanesborough
Lee
Lenox
North Adams
Richmond
Williamstown
Adams Cheshire
Berkshire Hills
Central Berkshire
Mount Greylock
Mohawk Trail
Southern Berkshire
MA Virtual Academy at Greenfield
TECCA Commonwealth Virtual School
Totals:

2015-2016
(preliminary as
of 12/16/15)

Net
Change

1.00
14.00
42.62
171.20
1.00
52.00
0.00
3.91
26.50
95.32
22.38
0.17
2.13
7.42
3.69

1.00
12.00
46.00
175.00
1.00
54.00
1.00
2.00
31.50
108.00
20.00
0.00
1.00
6.00
8.00

0.0
-2.0
3.4
3.8
0.0
2.0
1.0
-1.9
5.0
12.7
-2.4
-0.2
-1.1
-1.4
4.3

443.34

466.50

23.2

Pittsfield Students to Charter Schools

Students Exiting Pittsfield to Charter Schools


2014-2015
(final as of
6/24/15)

2015-2016
(preliminary as
of 12/24/15)

Net Change

BART (Berkshire Arts & Technology)


Adams, MA

176.00

179.00

3.0

Totals:

176.00

179.00

3.0

Preliminary FY16 School Choice Pupils and Tuition. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education.
23 Dec. 2015. <http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/schoolchoice/choice16.html>
Numbers listed here differ slightly from those shown on Preliminary FY16 School Choice Rosters.
Preliminary FY16 Rates by Charter School and Sending District. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education. 28 Dec. 2015. http://www.doe.mass.edu/charter/finance/tuition/fy16/Q2-preliminary.html
Charter numbers differ from those on the Preliminary FY15 Charter School Pre-Enrollment Report. Numbers
shown here are more current and accurate, but not broken down by grade level.

105

Pittsfield Students Gained by School Choice & Tuition


Students Attending Pittsfield through School Choice & Tuition

Home Districts of Students:

2014-2015
(final as of
6/24/15)

2015-2016
(preliminary as
of 12/16/15)

Net Change

Hancock
Lanesborough
Lenox
North Adams
Richmond
Williamstown
Adams Cheshire
Berkshire Hills
Central Berkshire
Hawlemont

3.00
15.12
6.37
1.05
1.00
1.00
13.58
2.00
40.64
1.00

2.00
12.00
7.00
0.00
1.00
1.00
13.00
2.00
38.00
0.00

-1.0
-3.1
0.6
-1.1
0.0
0.0
-0.6
0.0
-2.6
-1.0

Mount Greylock

10.33

14.00

3.7

4.00

1.00

-3.0

95.09

91.00

-5.1

Northern Berkshire
Totals:

Preliminary FY16 School Choice Pupils and Tuition. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education. 23 Dec. 2015. <http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/schoolchoice/choice16.html>
Numbers listed here differ slightly from those shown on Preliminary FY16 School Choice Rosters.
Preliminary FY16 Rates by Charter School and Sending District. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education. 28 Dec. 2015. http://www.doe.mass.edu/charter/finance/tuition/fy16/Q2-preliminary.html
Charter numbers differ from those on the Preliminary FY15 Charter School Pre-Enrollment Report. Numbers
shown here are more current and accurate, but not broken down by grade level.

106

School Choice & Charter Statistics by Grade

Preliminary FY16 School Choice and Charter School "Out" by Grade (as of 12/16/15)
Charter school figures from FY16 Pre-Enrollment report 4/1/15
Receiving District:
Adams/Cheshire
Berkshire Hills
Central Berkshire
Hancock
Lanesborough
Lee
Lenox
MAVA (MA Virtual Academy
at Greenfield)
Mt. Greylock
North Adams
Richmond
Southern Berkshire
TECCA Commonwealth
Virtual School
Williamstown
CHARTER SCHOOL:
BART (Berkshire Arts &
Technology)
GRAND TOTALS

K
1
3
4

8
1

1
7

1
14

4
9

3
1
1
8

10

11

12

2
9

4
7

10

3
7

3
7

6
10

12

3
10

7
12

3
4
19

5
4
11

2
20

4
6
10

5
19

3
24

5
14

1
12

3
10

8
6

1
2
1

1
5

Total
2
32
108
1
12
47
175
6
20
1
54
1

1
1

25

30

30

42

40

36

30
70

48
86

40
85

31
72

32
63

8
1
TOTAL 468

10
41

9
48

200
668

Total
13
2
38
2
12
7
14
1
1
1
91

Preliminary FY16 School Choice "In" by Grade (as of 12/16/15)


Sending District:
Adams/Cheshire
Berkshire Hills
Central Berkshire
Hancock
Lanesborough
Lenox
Mt. Greylock
Northern Berkshire
Richmond
Williamstown
GRAND TOTALS

K
1
1
4

1
2
1
5

2
1

3
2

4
1

7
1

8
2

10

11
2

12
1

4
1

3
1

4
1
3

2
1

1
3

1
2
1

1
4

10

10

1
7

11

1
4

Preliminary FY16 School Choice Rosters. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 28 December 2015. Available to
school administrators via secure web portal.
Numbers listed here differ slightly from those listed on Preliminary FY16 School Choice Pupils and Tuition
Preliminary FY16 Charter School Pre-Enrollment Report. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 1 April 2015.
<http://www.doe.mass.edu/charter/enrollment/> (available to public with individual student names omitted)
Charter pre-enrollment numbers are from Spring 2015 and differ from those listed on Preliminary FY16 Rates b y Charter School and Sending District,
which includes Fall 2015 enrollment figures but is not broken down by grade level as the spring report is.

107

School Choice Comparisons to Urban Districts


Comparison of Pittsfield to other Small Urban Districts, December 2015

District
CAMBRIDGE
CHELSEA

FY16
Receiving
FTE
0.0

FY16
Receiving
Tuition

FY16
Sending
FTE

FY16
Sending
Tuition

5.0

33,500

0.0

8.0

51,900

195.0

1,009,093

136.0

777,720

0.0

16.0

100,274

FITCHBURG

170.0

973,989

426.0

2,504,850

HAVERHILL

36.0

191,343

189.0

1,095,599

HOLYOKE

56.0

316,976

339.0

2,020,196

246.0

1,367,932

322.5

1,886,475

CHICOPEE
EVERETT

LEOMINSTER
MALDEN

0.0

8.0

50,800

91.0

515,935

466.5

2,654,601

SALEM

0.0

77.5

445,533

SOMERVILLE

0.0

2.0

13,400

81.0

422,939

110.0

660,353

PITTSFIELD

TAUNTON

Comparison of Pittsfield to other Berkshire County Districts, December 2015

District
CLARKSBURG

FY16
Receiving
FTE
33.0

FY16
Receiving
Tuition

FY16
Sending
FTE

FY16
Sending
Tuition

203,974

16.0

107,823

FLORIDA

1.0

5,000

7.0

47,000

HANCOCK

4.0

24,000

5.0

25,000

LANESBOROUGH

19.0

115,999

22.0

111,635

LEE

128.0

729,588

100.0

561,288

LENOX

255.0

1,329,856

50.0

286,394

NORTH ADAMS

40.0

283,731

109.5

668,937

PITTSFIELD

91.0

515,935

466.5

2,654,601

RICHMOND

80.5

418,500

15.0

83,198

SAVOY

9.0

47,846

21.0

114,631

WILLIAMSTOWN

32.0

169,190

2.0

10,000

ADAMS CHESHIRE

50.0

297,454

70.5

451,780

BERKSHIRE HILLS

226.0

1,270,730

96.5

558,660

CENTRAL BERKSHIRE

161.0

1,022,486

158.0

882,971

64.0

356,522

25.0

140,152

SOUTHERN BERKSHIRE

118.0

673,764

111.0

592,028

NORTHERN BERKSHIRE

0.0

1.0

5,000

MOUNT GREYLOCK

Preliminary FY16 School Choice Pupils and Tuition. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education. 23 Dec. 2015. <http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/schoolchoice/choice16.html>

108

Past Year School Choice Comparisons of Pittsfield and Other Berkshire County Districts

School Choice Students FY10 - FY15: Outgoing, December 2014


District

FY12
Sending
FTE's

FY13
Sending
FTE's

FY14
Sending
FTE's

FY15
Sending
FTE's

FY16
Sending
FTE's

FY12 to FY15
% Change

CLARKSBURG

7.2

13.3

8.5

13.0

16.0

123%

FLORIDA

1.0

0.0

3.5

4.0

7.0

600%

HANCOCK

9.0

14.6

9.7

11.0

5.0

-44%

LANESBOROUGH

18.3

22.9

21.2

21.3

22.0

20%

LEE

76.8

81.1

90.4

89.7

100.0

30%

LENOX

41.7

44.4

53.8

51.7

50.0

20%

NORTH ADAMS

112.8

119.7

121.4

117.9

109.5

-3%

PITTSFIELD

385.4

398.9

373.2

443.3

466.5

21%

RICHMOND

20.6

18.2

19.5

16.2

15.0

-27%

SAVOY

19.0

16.4

25.0

25.5

21.0

11%

WILLIAMSTOWN

4.0

4.3

4.8

4.5

2.0

-50%

ADAMS CHESHIRE

58.6

56.9

69.1

79.4

70.5

20%

BERKSHIRE HILLS

110.5

99.1

100.0

102.9

96.5

-13%

CENTRAL BERKSHIRE

140.8

134.6

133.2

147.8

158.0

12%

MOUNT GREYLOCK
SOUTHERN BERKSHIRE

17.1

16.3

20.5

18.8

25.0

46%

140.3

145.1

152.0

133.2

111.0

-21%

School Choice Students FY12 - FY15: Incoming, December 2015


District

FY12 to
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY15
FY16
FY15
Receiving Receiving Receiving Receiving Receiving % Change
FTE's
FTE's
FTE's
FTE's
FTE's

CLARKSBURG

19.0

20.7

22.0

27.0

33.0

74%

FLORIDA

4.0

4.0

7.0

2.0

1.0

-75%

HANCOCK

7.0

3.0

4.0

3.0

4.0

-43%

LANESBOROUGH

15.0

12.9

15.0

20.0

19.0

27%

LEE

95.4

103.0

112.7

128.0

128.0

34%

216.3

221.4

222.0

246.8

255.0

18%

NORTH ADAMS

38.3

42.0

40.3

44.2

40.0

4%

PITTSFIELD

71.4

85.4

87.4

99.1

91.0

27%

RICHMOND

69.2

56.9

59.5

76.0

80.5

16%

SAVOY

6.0

5.0

7.8

14.0

9.0

50%

WILLIAMSTOWN

33.6

41.0

38.9

42.1

32.0

-5%

ADAMS CHESHIRE

58.3

59.7

66.5

58.2

50.0

-14%

BERKSHIRE HILLS

275.5

287.6

288.2

242.2

226.0

-18%

CENTRAL BERKSHIRE

123.8

129.1

130.2

152.8

161.0

30%

LENOX

MOUNT GREYLOCK
SOUTHERN BERKSHIRE

64.0

65.4

58.5

61.4

64.0

0%

124.4

121.7

122.5

123.6

118.0

-5%

Preliminary FY16 School Choice Pupils and Tuition. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 23 Dec. 2015.
http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/schoolchoice/choice16.html>

109

Per Pupil Expenditures in Berkshire County School Districts

110

Charter School Summary


Pittsfield Public Schools
Summary of Charter School FTE, Tuition, and Reimbursements, FY10 to Present*

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

53.97

70.72

87.01

113.42

157.83

176.02

179.00

Tuition

606,749

785,734

968,758

1,319,901

1,783,054

2,195,773

2,273,658

Facilities Aid
Chapter 46 Aid
Total Aid

48,193
212,554
260,747

60,646
256,523
317,169

75,375
209,928
285,303

101,242
391,419
492,661

138,267
575,541
713,808

155,894
380,112
536,006

159,847
70,780
230,627

Net Cost to District

346,002

468,565

683,455

827,240

1,069,246

1,659,767

2,043,031

236
FTE

Summary of Historical Commonwealth Charter School FTE, Tuition and Reimbursements. Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary
Education. 13 January 2016. http://www.doe.mass.edu/charter/finance/tuition/

111

Homeschooling
Students may be approved for Home Schooling from grade 1 (6 years old by December 1) until age
16. The Deputy Superintendent reviews the familys curriculum materials and plans before giving
initial approval for Home Schooling and does so again at the beginning of transition years: entering
grades 6 and 9. Students either take standardized tests at the end of the school year and submit
the results to the Deputy Superintendent or give portfolios of their years work to the Deputy
Superintendent to review. These basic requirements must be met before approval for Home
Schooling will be granted for the succeeding year.
The Pittsfield Public Schools approved Home Schooling plans for students in the following grade
levels from 2004-05 to 2015-16.

45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

School Year
Elementary

112

Middle

High

Total

Total Number of Students

Number of Students by Grade

Homeschooled Students by Grade and Year

Tuition Rates
PITTSFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
FY2016 TUITION RATES

Approved by School Committee


September 2, 2015

REGULAR EDUCATION RATES:

Elementary

Middle

High

2014-2015 Annual Rate


2015-2016 Annual Rate

$11,831
$12,186

$11,841
$12,196

$11,929
$12,287

Rate of increase

3%

3%

3%

SPECIAL EDUCATION RATES:

DOE
034-40

Preschool

Hearing
Impaired

2014-2015 Annual Rate


2015-2016 Annual Rate

$32,563
$33,540

$25,222
$25,979

$45,032
$46,383

Rate of increase

3%

3%

3%

OTHER PROGRAMS RATES:

EOS

Positive
Options

ELL

2014-2015 Annual Rate


2015-2016 Annual Rate

$20,259
$20,867

$20,259
$20,867

$20,259
$20,867

Rate of increase

3%

3%

3%

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
RATE *

High

2014-2015 Annual Rate


2015-2016 Annual Rate

$11,821
$17,556

Rate of increase
48.5%
* All vocational rates are set annually by DESE

RICHMOND TUITION RATE **

High

2014 - 2015 Annual Rate


2015 - 2016 Annual Rate

$9,543
$9,734

Rate of increase

2%

** In June 2014, the Pittsfield School Committee approved Richmond Tuition Rates for a five year period indexed to
the 12-month percent change in Consumer Price Index for the Northeast Urban Area as of December of the previous
year with a floor of 2% and a cap of 3%. These FY16 rates represent the second year of the current tuition
agreement with Richmond.

113

Career and Technical Education Enrollment by Program

Pittsfield High School


Career Technical Enrollment by School Year
September 2007 June 2016
As of December 30, 2015
Program
07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15
Building Maintenance / Facilities Management
Grade 10
4
8
10
10
11
11
13
6
Grade 11
6
3
13
4
5
9
8
12
Grade 12
4
4
6
1
3
9
7
Total
10
15
27
20
17
23
30
25

6
6
13
25

Cosmetology
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Post-Graduate
Total

12
9
3
8
32

11
7
5
10
33

15
13
6
6
40

10
9
12
2
33

18
13
13
6
50

14
13
14
5
46

7
12
9
5
33

12
7
8
7
34

12
9
7
3
31

Culinary Arts
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

9
10
13
32

13
8
9
30

11
10
9
30

15
12
9
36

13
11
10
34

11
12
8
31

11
9
10
30

13
9
4
26

11
10
7
28

Office Technology
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total
Electronics
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Post-Graduate
Total

114

15/16

NEW
3
0
0
3
7
9
8
0
24

8
7
7
0
22

2
7
6
0
15

4
2
4
0
10

5
5
0

4
3
3

2
2
3

10

10

Closed

Closed

Program
Health Assisting*
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

07/08

08/09

12
4
4
20

8
12
2
22

13
6
13
32

11
8
5
24

11
10
4
25

9
5
6
20

13
5
6
24

0
9
4
13

0
0
9
9

Horticulture
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

3
5
1
9

2
2
5
9

4
3
7

10
1
1
12

5
4
4
13

4
2
5
11

6
5
1
12

2
7
4
13

7
1
5
13

Small Engine
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

5
3
7
15

8
4
3
15

5
6
3
14

13
5
6
24

10
13
3
26

14
6
8
28

11
12
3
26

8
7
10
25

11
4
6
21

88

108

96

105

61

58

54

146

165

159

169

155

136

184

Career Exploratory
Total Enrollment

142

09/10 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15

175

15/16

*Health Assisting is no longer accepting new students at Pittsfield High School. The program is
re-locating to Taconic High School. Current Students will complete their studies at PHS.

115

Taconic High School


Technical - Vocational Enrollment Comparison
September 2007 June 2016
As of December 30, 2015
Program

116

07/08 08/09

09/10

10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14

14/15

15/16

Auto Body
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

7
12
9
28

5
7
19
31

9
4
7
20

7
9
4
20

12
6
6
24

10
8
4
22

3
8
6
17

7
2
8
17

5
6
9
20

Auto Mechanics
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

8
9
12
29

7
6
9
22

10
4
7
21

11
9
2
22

7
9
7
23

11
5
8
24

7
7
7
21

8
6
7
21

10
8
5
23

Allied Health
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

6
21
12
39

9
13
20
42

17
9
11
37

13
21
8
42

16
12
10
38

13
12
7
32

10
11
8
29

13
12
10
35

6
12
11
29

Carpentry
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

11
14
11
36

10
8
12
30

4
6
6
16

8
4
6
18

10
8
1
19

8
17
12
37

12
5
8
25

7
9
4
20

9
2
10
21

Culinary Arts
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

17
9
11
37

13
12
10
35

19
10
12
41

13
13
9
35

9
14
10
33

11
10
14
35

11
11
9
31

14
10
11
35

9
15
11
35

Graphic Arts
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total

5
9
2
16

7
4
12
23

5
6
2
13

6
3
6
15

0
2
5
7

0
0
1
1

7
0
0
7

5
3
0
8

closed

Program
Machine Technology
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Total
Metal Fabrication
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Post Graduate
Total

117

07/08 08/09

09/10

10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14

14/15

15/16

5
13
5
23

8
3
9
20

8
6
2
16

4
4
5
13

9
2
6
17

8
8
3
19

6
7
6
19

5
7
6
18

3
9
8
20

10
8
7

6
9
8

10
3
8

7
9
6

8
5
8

7
10
5

6
6
5

11
5
6

11
9
6

25

23

21

22

17

22

26

Not applicable

21

22

Pittsfield Public Schools - Custodial Staffing Full Time Equivalents (FTEs)


Building and Address

Year of
Contstruction

Size in
Square
Feet

FY'01

FY'02

FY'09

FY'10

FY'11

FY'12

FY'13

FY'14

FY'15

FY'16

FY'17
Projected

Allendale Elementary

1951

34,774

180 Connecticut Avenue

1999 (add.)

13,359
48,133

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

Conte Community Elementary

1974

69,518

4.00

3.50

3.50

3.50

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

Crosby Elementary
517 West Street

1962

69,826

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

Egremont Elementary
84 Egremont Avenue

1951
1999 (add.)

31,854
32,025
63,879

4.00

4.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

Capeless Elementary
86 Brooks Avenue

1951
2001 (add.)

20,704
17,950

1.50
1.50

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

Morningside Community
Elementary
100 Burbank Street

1975

69,654

4.00

3.50

3.50

3.50

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

Stearns Elementary
75 Lebanon Avenue

1961
2001 (add.)

21,214
19,129

1.50
1.50

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

Williams Elementary
50 Bushey Road

1957
1960
1962
1971
2001

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

4.50

4.50

4.50

4.50

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

115,036

4.50

4.50

4.50

4.50

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

31,519

1.00

1.00

1.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

200 West Union Street

38,654

40,343
(add.)
(add.)
(add.)
(add.)

18,085
1,120
6,384
666
22,082

2.00

48,337
Herberg Middle
501 Pomeroy Avenue

1953
2000 (add.)

90,189
17,451

Reid Middle
950 North Street

1953
2000 (add.)

Hibbard Alternative
280 Newell Street

1924

Pittsfield High
300 East Street

1931
1975 (add.)

203,051

9.00

8.00

8.00

8.00

8.00

8.00

7.00

7.00

7.00

7.00

7.00

Taconic High
96 Valentine Road

1969

189,686

8.00

7.00

7.00

7.00

7.00

7.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

Mercer
269 First Street

1905

17,653

2.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

54.00

49.00

49.00

48.00

46.00

46.00

43.00

43.00

43.00

43.00

43.00

107,640

Minor Maintenance/
Electrician

118

94,229
20,807

163,635
39,416

Custodial Staffing (contd)

Total Square Footage of


Buildings
FY01=
FY16 =

1,053,768
1,112,929

Total Custodial
FY01=
19,514 Staff:
FY16=
25,882
FY01=
54.00
FY16=
43.00
Increase in Sq.Ft/Custodian
from FY01 to FY16=
Difference FY01 to
6,368
FY16=
(11.00)
Sq. Ft./Custodian

119

Average Daily Meals


Food Service Program FY16 - Daily Avg. Number of Meals Served Compared to Student Enrollment

By School - FY16 Total Daily Average Number of Lunches Served

120

Athletics
Participation 2015 - 2016

Sport
Football
Boys Soccer
Girls Soccer
Boys Cross Country
Girls Cross Country
Volleyball
Golf
Total Fall Participation
Boys Basketball
Girls Basketball
Hockey (Co-Op Team)
Cross Country Ski
Wrestling
Alpine Ski
Swimming
Total Winter Participation
Baseball
Softball
Boys Track
Girls Track
Boys Tennis (Co-Op Team)
Girls Tennis (Co-Op Team)
Boys Lacrosse
Girls Lacrosse (Co-Op Team)
Estimated Spring Participation
Total Estimated Annual
Participation
Approx. Multi-Sport Athletes

121

PHS

THS

Number of Athletes
47
38
34
35
37
27
12
230
30
23
7
4
3
21
29
117
29
25
47
44
7
9
34
14
212

Number of Athletes
37
34
30
23
16
25
10
175
29
19
8
7
12
14
22
111
28
25
23
30
1
3
32
20
159

559
178 / 559

445
185 / 445

Athletic Budget
2014-2015 ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT - Final
TRANSPORTATION

ASSIGNOR
GAME
FEES
SALARIES OFFICIALS MEDICAL

EVENT
STAFF

EQUIPMENT PRINTING

PORT -O/
STORAGE

COACH
ED/
LEADER

FACILITY
ELECTRIC MAINT CUSTODIAL

MISC

POLICE

TOTAL
PROGRAM
EXP

USER FEE
REV

TICKET
REV

TRANS
BUDGET

COACH
SAL.
BUDGET

THS GOLF
THS BOYS SOCCER
THS GIRLS SOCCER
THS FALL XC
THS FOOTBALL
THS VOLLEYBALL

$
$
$
$
$
$

780
1,155
1,065
1,265
1,325
720

$
$
$
$
$
$

180
180
165
165

$
$
$
$
$
$

2,905
7,062
7,250
6,572
12,700
5,374

$
$
$
$
$
$

1,855
1,883
435
3,151
2,605

$
$
$
$
$
$

325
300
150
710
75

$
$
$
$
$
$

317
125
725
175

$
$
$
$
$
$

300
4,224
60

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
90 $
90 $
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

115
-

$
$
$
$
$
$

150
-

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

213
85
812
-

$ 3,985
$ 11,197
$ 10,978
$ 8,422
$ 24,077
$ 9,174

$
$
$
$
$
$

1,250
1,475
1,750
3,450
1,875
1,375

$
$
$
$
$
$

707
577
3,840
-

THS GOLF
THS BOYS SOCCER
THS GIRLS SOCCER
THS FALL XC
THS FOOTBALL
THS VOLLEYBALL

PHS GOLF
PHS BOYS SOCCER
PHS GIRLS SOCCER
PHS FALL XC
PHS FOOTBALL
PHS VOLLEYBALL

$
$
$
$
$
$

775
1,165
1,245
1,775
2,160
745

$
$
$
$
$
$

180
180
165
165

$
$
$
$
$
$

2,905
7,062
7,062
7,105
13,308
5,374

$
$
$
$
$
$

2,405
2,248
497
3,233
2,225

$
$
$
$
$
$

300
350
75
620
-

$
$
$
$
$
$

270
75
200
1,380
500

$
$
$
$
$
$

315
5,578
-

$
$
$
$
$
$

400
-

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
213
$
85
$
$ 1,185
$
-

$ 3,995
$ 11,595
$ 11,245
$ 9,652
$ 28,029
$ 9,009

$
$
$
$
$
$

1,375
3,900
3,750
7,250
2,050
2,625

$
$
$
$
$
$

391
8,453
-

PHS GOLF
PHS BOYS SOCCER
PHS GIRLS SOCCER
PHS FALL XC
PHS FOOTBALL
PHS VOLLEYBALL

THS TRAINER
PHS TRAINER

$
$

$
$

$
$

5,758 $
5,758 $

$
$

$
$

$
$

824 $
681 $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

6,582
6,439

$
$

$
$

THS BOYS BASKETBALL


THS GIRLS BASKETBALL
THS ALPINE SKI
THS XC SKI
THS SWIMMING
THS HOCKEY
THS WRESTLING

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

1,210
1,175
60
875
725
1,550
2,117

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

180
180
842
400
135
150
150

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

8,634
7,250
2,905
2,905
6,575
4,593
5,726

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

2,731
2,560
1,302
530
240

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

645
670
450
200

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

2,125
1,840
995
150

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

225
225
68
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

1,601
1,601
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

75 $
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
200
$
$
$
492
$
$
$ 1,450

$ 1,375
$
561
$
$
$
$
694
$
-

$ 19,001
$ 16,062
$ 3,875
$ 4,672
$ 8,737
$ 8,962
$ 10,033

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

1,575
1,375
1,500
1,375
1,950
1,825
625

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

5,505
3,950
1,240
-

THS BOYS BASKETBALL


THS GIRLS BASKETBALL
THS ALPINE SKI
THS XC SKI
THS SWIMMING
THS HOCKEY
THS WRESTLING

PHS BOYS BASKETBALL


PHS GIRLS BASKETBALL
PHS ALPINE SKI
PHS SWIMMING

$
$
$
$

1,200
1,250
60
650

$
$
$
$

180
180
842
135

$
$
$
$

8,634
7,498
2,905
7,734

$
$
$
$

2,525
2,970
1,195

$
$
$
$

600
600
-

$
$
$
$

3,460
2,960
-

$
$
$
$

513
123
68
-

$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$

132
132
-

$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$

200
251
-

$ 1,246
$
214
$
$
-

$ 18,690
$ 16,178
$ 3,875
$ 9,714

$
$
$
$

1,625
1,750
2,375
3,250

$
$
$
$

8,619
5,215
-

PHS BOYS BASKETBALL


PHS GIRLS BASKETBALL
PHS ALPINE SKI
PHS SWIMMING

PHS BASEBALL
PHS GIRLS TENNIS
PHS BOYS TENNIS
PHS SOFTBALL
PHS BOYS TRACK
PHS GIRLS TRACK
PHS BOYS LACROSSE
PHS GIRLS LACROSSE

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

1,350
365
365
1,120
1,275
1,275
1,215
1,275

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

145
145
200
200
145
145

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

7,498
2,692
2,372
7,498
6,428
6,428
7,298
7,298

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

2,886
2,495
1,070
1,070
2,360
2,310

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

75 $
$
$
75 $
$
$
545 $
620 $

$
$
$
50 $
$
$
275 $
275 $

645
153
310
302
244
244
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
90 $
$
$
353 $
353 $
643 $
521 $

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

111
111
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

125
25
25
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

850
70
70
102
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

13,574
3,300
3,047
11,685
9,776
9,776
12,583
12,444

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

2,875
1,155
875
2,125
4,690
4,375
2,875
2,500

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

PHS BASEBALL
PHS GIRLS TENNIS
PHS BOYS TENNIS
PHS SOFTBALL
PHS BOYS TRACK
PHS GIRLS TRACK
PHS BOYS LACROSSE
PHS GIRLS LACROSSE

THS BASEBALL
THS GIRLS TENNIS
THS BOYS TENNIS
THS SOFTBALL
THS BOYS TRACK
THS GIRLS TRACK
THS BOYS LACROSSE

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

1,050
1,375
730
730
1,300

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

145
145
200
200
145

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

7,498
7,250
5,964
6,428
7,298

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

2,905
2,200
850
850
2,712

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

75
750

$
$
$
50 $
$
$
325 $

400
359
308
309
22

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

105
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

250
200
353
353
200

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

111
111
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

218
25
25
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

850
70
70
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$ 13,496
$
$
$ 11,579
$ 8,611
$ 9,076
$ 12,752

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

2,500
2,000
1,500
2,950
1,650

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

THS BASEBALL
THS GIRLS TENNIS
THS BOYS TENNIS
THS SOFTBALL
THS BOYS TRACK
THS GIRLS TRACK
THS BOYS LACROSE

MIAA EVENTS\EDUCATION
ADMIN

$
$

1,010 $
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
850 $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
367 $

$
600 $
75 $ 1,000 $

$
$

2,800
3,372

$
$

$
$

450
-

MIAA EVENTS\EDUCATION
ADMIN

THS FACULTY MANAGER


PHS FACULTY MANAGER

$
$

$
$

4,593 $
4,593 $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

4,593
4,593

$
$

$
$

2014 - 2015
2015 - 2016
2016 - 2017

3,707

2,270

559

75

$ 6,275

39,482

$ 6,569

$ 252,690

$ 56,298

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$

$ 9,060

$ 16,272

$ 16,500

$ 3,496

1,190 $
1,080 $

$ 1,299

$
$

$ 6,683

$ 421,235

$ 83,420

$ 38,947

POLICE

TOTAL
PROGRAM
EXP

USER FEE
REV

TICKET
REV

Assuming same budget expenses for FY2016 and FY 2017


TRANSPORTATION

122

$
$

ASSIGNOR
GAME
FEES
SALARIES OFFICIALS MEDICAL

EVENT
STAFF

EQUIPMENT PRINTING

PORT -O/
STORAGE

COACH
ED\
LEADER

FACILITY
ELECTRIC MAINT CUSTODIAL

MISC

THS TRAINER
PHS TRAINER

$47,300 $ 255,731
$47,850 $ 260,842
$ 50,300 $ 270,566
COACH
TRANS
SAL.
BUDGET
BUDGET

District Facilities
District FacilitiesVehicle Inventory
Division: Bus Operations
Buses:
43 School Buses

Thirty-six (36) 2015 seventy-seven (77) passenger, type C


school buses
Three (3) 2015 279 wheelbase buses with air conditioning, each
with wheelchair lift and each with tie downs for three (3)
wheelchairs
Two (2) 2015 270 wheelbase buses with air conditioning, each
with wheelchair lift and each with tie downs for two (2)
wheelchairs
Two (2) 2015 193 wheelbase buses with air conditioning, each
with wheelchair lift and each with tie downs for four (4)
wheelchairs

Other:

Four (4) 2006 GMC Yukons


One (1) 2011 Ford F350 Pickup
One (1) 2010 Ford Escape

Division: Special Education

One (1) 2010 Ford Explorer

Division: Vocational

One (1) 2004 GMC Sierra Pickup Truck (Carpentry/general


vocational use)
Two (2) 2003 Savanna Vans (PHS Health and Carpentry)
One (1) 2014 Ford E350 Mini Bus/Cargo Van (THS Health)
Two (2) EZ Hauler Trailers (Horticulture and Carpentry)

Division: Custodial

One (1) 2005 Toyota Matrix


One (1) 2008 Chevrolet Colorado

Division: Food Service

One (1) 2011 International Truck


One (1) 2015 Ford Cargo Van

Division: Technology

One (1) 2006 GMC Savana Cargo Van


One (1) 2014 Ford E150 Cargo Van

Division: Driver Education

One (1) 2004 Pontiac Grand AM F69


2016 Inventory Total - 63 Vehicles

123

Glossary
CCR College and Career Ready. A term used to encompass the knowledge and skills that
students must master by the end of high school in order to be prepared for post-secondary
education or the workforce.
Capital Budget An annual appropriation or spending plan for capital expenditures. Capital
expenditures are usually associated with acquiring tangible assets or completing projects that
have a useful life of at least five years.
Cherry Sheet Detailed report on Local Aid for each city and town, plus regional school
districts. Named for the cherry colored paper on which they were originally printed, the Cherry
Sheets are the official means by which the Department of Revenue (DOR) notifies a
municipality or regional school district of the next fiscal years state aid (receipts) and
assessments.
Chapter 70 Aid The primary category of state aid for education. The aid amount is
calculated each year and voted on by the Legislature.
Charter School Charter schools are a type of public school which operate independently of
the conventional school district structure. A charter school is a separate, legally autonomous
public entity with all the powers necessary to carry out its school program. A charter is a
contract, between the state and a charters schools board of trustees, which holds the school
accountable to parents, the state, and the public at large. Charters are granted for a period of 5
years and are subject to renewal, contingent upon the schools ability to deliver quality
educational results and successfully meet the goals of its charter. Charter schools may not
charge tuition to their students. Funding for charter schools comes from the district in which the
student resides in the form of per-pupil tuition that follows the student to the charter school.
Circuit Breaker Law A law designed to reimburse school districts for high cost special
education students. The Circuit Breaker Law reimburses instructional and tuition costs for
Special Education In District and Out of District students.
Collective Bargaining The negotiations between an employer and union representative
regarding wages, hours, and working conditions.
Common Core State Standards (CCSS) The Common Core State Standards Initiative was a
state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices
and the Council of Chief State School Officer. The standards for Literacy and Mathematics
were developed in collaboration with teachers, school administrators, and experts, to provide a
clear and consistent framework to prepare our children for college and the workforce. The
standards are informed by the highest, most effective models from states across the country
and countries around the world, and provide teachers and parents with a common
understanding of what students are expected to learn. Consistent standards will provide
appropriate benchmarks for all students. The Board of Education for the Commonwealth of

124

Massachusetts adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) as the Curriculum
Frameworks with a few additional standards in English Language Arts and Mathematics in
2010.
Commonwealth Virtual Schools A Commonwealth of Massachusetts Virtual School (CMVS)
is a public school operated by a board of trustees where teachers primarily teach from a
remote location using the Internet or other computer-based methods and students are not
required to be located at the physical premises of the school. Each CMVS determines what
grade levels it will serve and what particular programs it will offer. Massachusetts Virtual
Schools are: Massachusetts Virtual Academy at Greenfield Commonwealth Virtual School (K12) and TEC Connections Academy (TECCA) Commonwealth Virtual School (K-12). Any
student in the state can apply for admission to a virtual school. If more students apply to a
CMVS than there is space available, the school will hold a lottery to determine which students
will be admitted. Once a student is admitted to a CMVS, he or she is entitled to attend in
subsequent years without reapplying.
CEP - Community Eligibility Provision - provides an alternative approach for offering school
meals to local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools in low income areas, instead of
collecting individual applications for free and reduced price meals. The CEP allows schools
that predominantly serve low-income children to offer free, nutritious school meals to all
students through the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. The CEP uses
information from other direct-certify programs, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
Program (SNAP) and the Temporary Assistance Program for Needy Families (TANF) instead
of traditional paper applications.
CPI Consumer Price Index. This index is often called the cost-of-living index.
CPI - Composite Performance Index. The Composite Performance Index (CPI) is a measure of
the extent to which students are progressing toward proficiency in English language arts (ELA)
and mathematics, respectively. The CPI is a 100-point index that combines the scores of
students who take standard MCAS tests (the Proficiency Index) with the scores of those who
take the MCAS-Alternate Assessment (MCAS-Alt) (the MCAS-Alt Index).
CPI Change - Composite Performance Index (CPI) Change. This figure represents the
difference between a group's baseline CPI and its Performance CPI for the current cycle. The
CPI Change figure is compared to a group's Gain Target to establish whether the group met its
Improvement Target.
CTE Career and Technical Education
DESE The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, formerly
the Department of Education
DIBELS Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills. They are a set of standardized,
individually administered measures of early literacy development. They are designed to be
125

short (one minute) fluency measures used to regularly monitor the development of pre-reading
and early reading skills.
District or School District A municipal school department or regional school district, acting
through its school committee or superintendent of schools, a county agricultural school, acting
through its board of trustees or superintendent/director, any other public school established by
statute or charter, acting through its governing board or director.
DSAC District and School Assistance Centers. Regional centers of the assistance arm of
the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
ELL English language learner. A national-origin or linguistic minority student who is limitedEnglish proficient.
Encumbrance Obligation in the form of purchase order, contract, or salary commitment that
is chargeable to an appropriation and for which a part of the appropriation is reserved.
End of Year Report Each city, town and regional school district shall submit an End-of-Year
Pupil and Financial Report to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education after the close of each fiscal year. At the discretion of the Commissioner of
Education, the Department may withhold release of all or some part of a district or
municipalitys quarterly state school aid if the school district has not filed the reports as
required under 603 CMR 10.03 in an acceptable form by the required filing deadlines or any
extensions of those deadlines granted by the Commissioner.
EPIMS Education Personnel Information Management System. Statewide data collection
system mandated by DESE beginning in 2007. EPIMS collects demographic data and work
assignment information on individual public school educators in Massachusetts in compliance
with NCLB reporting on highly qualified teachers.
E-Rate - In the 1996 Telecommunications Deregulations Act, Congress instructed the Federal
Communications Commission (FCC) to create regulations and procedures for the E-Rate
program. The E-Rate (for Education Rate) program gives schools and libraries discounts of
20% to 90% on purchases of telecommunications services, Internet access, internal building
connections, data networks, and more. Almost all K-12 public and private, not for-profit
schools are eligible.
Every Student Succeeds - The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is a US law passed in
December 2015 that governs the country's K12 public education policy and replaced the No
Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). ESSA modified but did not eliminate provisions relating to the
periodic standardized tests given to students and generally gives more control of education to
the States, rather than the Federal Government.
Extraordinary Maintenance - The periodic servicing, repair or reconditioning of school
buildings, grounds, or equipment to extend the useful life of an existing asset, provided that the
126

total cost per project per school of an extraordinary maintenance project shall not exceed
$100,000.
Fiscal Year Since 1974, the Commonwealth and municipalities have operated on a budget
cycle that begins July 1 and ends June 30. The designation of the fiscal year is that of the
calendar year in which the fiscal year ends. For example, the 2016 fiscal year is July 1, 2015 to
June 30, 2016 and is usually written as FY2016.
Fixed Cost Municipal costs that are legally or contractually mandated such as retirement,
FICA/Social Security, Insurance, debt service or interest costs.
Foundation Budget A budget for each school district established by the Education Reform
Act. This budget represents the minimum level of spending needed to provide an adequate
education for the districts students. The foundation budget is made up of 19 separate
categories, such as teaching salaries, books and equipment, extracurricular activities, utilities
and maintenance, etc. Significant variations between local spending and the foundation
budget or between local spending and the state-wide averages occur.
Foundation Enrollment The total number of students who reside in the district and who
attend public school in that district or in another district for which the district or town of
residence pays tuition. On or before October 15 of every year, every school district within the
Commonwealth shall report the total number of students for whom the district is fiscally
responsible as of October 1.
FTE Full Time Equivalent. Used by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
to calculate the number of staff positions. Example: A full time position is 1 FTE; two half-time
positions equal 1 FTE.
General Fund Receipts Funds received by a school district or municipality that are not
granted or contributed to the district or municipality for a designated purpose and are not, by
statute, set aside in a special account for expenditure at the discretion of the school
committee.
IDEA Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
IEP Individualized Education Program. The IEP is a written document that serves multiple
purposes: it is a teacher planning aid, an administrative form, and a parent involvement tool.
Primarily, it delineates a childs special needs and the educational services designed to meet
those needs.
Improvement Rating - A school or district's Improvement Rating is determined by comparing
baseline performance to end-of-cycle performance. The amount of Composite Performance
Index increase a school or district is expected to achieve during a particular rating cycle, called
the Gain Target, is based on the gap between that school or district's baseline Composite
Performance Index and a Composite Performance Index of 100 (the year 2014 performance
127

target for all Massachusetts schools and districts). Improvement Ratings are only issued in
even-numbered years, at the end of each 2-year cycle. Once the amount of improvement is
calculated for each content area and the appropriate error band have been applied, the
resulting score is matched to one of five improvement rating categories: Above Target; On
Target; Improved Below Target; No Change; Declined.
Integrated Per Pupil Costs The amount of money a city or town spends on a per pupil basis
for all students who reside in that particular city or town. This spending includes funds
appropriated to the school committee budget; assessments to member regional school
districts; municipal indirect costs to support education; tuition payments to other public or
private schools and federal impact aid funds.
LEA Local Educational Agency
LEP Limited English Proficient; a term used to identify those students who have insufficient
English to succeed in English-only classrooms.
Levy The property tax levy is the revenue a community can raise through real and personal
property taxes. In Massachusetts, municipal revenues to support local spending for schools,
public safety and other public services are raised through the property tax levy, state aid, local
receipts and other sources. The property tax levy is the largest source of revenue for most
cities and towns.
Levy Ceiling A community cannot levy more than 2.5% of the total full and fair cash value of
all taxable real and personal property in the community. The full and fair cash value limit is the
levy ceiling.
Levy Limit Proposition 2 places constraints on the amount of the levy raised by a city or
town and on how much the levy can be increased from year to year. A levy limit is a restriction
on the amount of property taxes a community can levy. A communitys levy is also constrained
in that it can only increase by a certain amount from year to year. The maximum amount a
community can levy in a given year is the levy limit. The levy limit will always be below, or at
most, equal to the levy ceiling. The levy limit may not exceed the levy ceiling.
Line-item Budget A budget based on expenditure types such as supplies, equipment,
maintenance, or salaries, as opposed to a program budget that groups all expenditures for
each program.
Maintenance of Effort (MOE) MOE requires that each year school districts expend combined
local and state funds or just local funds for special education services at least at the same level
(computed on either a per capita basis or an aggregate basis) that the district spent during the
previous year, unless the district has an allowable reason for reducing its expenditures. The
purpose of the MOE requirement is to ensure that federal special education funds are used to
supplement and not supplant local or state funds

128

MassCore The recommended Massachusetts High School Program of Studies intended to


help high school graduates arrive at college or the workplace well prepared, as well as reduce
the number of students taking remedial courses in college. MassCore recommends a
comprehensive set of subject area courses and units as well as other learning opportunities to
complete before graduating from high school. The recommended program of studies includes:
four years of English, four years of math, three years of a lab-based science, three years of
history, two years of the same foreign language, one year of an arts program and five
additional "core" courses such as business education, health, and/or technology. MassCore
includes additional learning opportunities such as AP classes, dual enrollment, a senior
project, online courses for high school or college credit, and service or work-based learning.
MCAS Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System. MCAS was implemented in
response to the Education Reform Law of 1993, which required that MCAS be designed to:
Test all public school students across the Commonwealth, including students with
disabilities and students with limited English proficiency
Be administered annually in selected grades
Measure performance based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework learning
standards
Report on the performance of individual students, schools, and districts
Serve as one basis of accountability for students, schools, and districts.
MCAS 2.0 - The Board of Elementary and Secondary Education voted on November 17, 2015
to transition to a next-generation MCAS that will be given for the first time in spring 2017 and
will use both PARCC and MCAS items, along with items developed specifically for the
Massachusetts tests. For spring 2016, districts that administered PARCC in spring 2015 will do
so again in grades 3-8, and the remainder of districts will continue with MCAS unless they
choose to administer PARCC. The MCAS tests in spring 2016 will be augmented with a limited
number of PARCC items in order to help make statewide comparisons easier and to offer
students and staff the opportunity to experience PARCC items while the new assessment is
being developed.
Medicaid Reimbursement Program Following Congress passage of the Medicare
Catastrophic Coverage Act of 1988, which clarified Medicaids responsibility to pay for healthrelated services provided to handicapped children pursuant to an Individualized Education
Plan, the John W. McCormack Institute, University of Massachusetts at Boston, at the request
of the Department of Public Welfares Medicaid Division and the State Department of
Education began an exhaustive study to identify health-related services eligible for Medicaid
reimbursement in Massachusetts. Programs providing health-related services to Medicaid
students are eligible for federal reimbursement of a portion of the cost of qualified program
expenses, known as Federal Financial Participation (FFP). The rate of FFP for each state is
dependent upon its per capita income as compared to the federal per capita average. The cost
of health-related services can be attributed to several factors, among which are the expanding
scope of health-related services that schools are required to provide (ranging from speech,
physical and occupational therapy to gastro-tube feedings), students requiring 24 hour special
129

education in Chapter 766 approved private Residential Schools due to social and behavioral
needs, and the high cost of specialized programs that serve children with low-incidence
disabilities. Medicaid Reimbursement Program for the school based health services is divided
into two categories: direct services and administrative services. Massachusetts General Law
requires that all revenues received as a result of the Medicaid Reimbursement Program must
be directly deposited in the municipalitys General Fund.
Minimum Local Contribution The minimum dollar amount that a municipality must
appropriate from property taxes and other local revenues for the support of schools as
determined by the Education Reform Act of 1993.
MRGF Municipal Revenue Growth Factor. Each municipality is expected to increase its
required local spending from the previous year based on its municipal revenue growth factor
(MRGF). The MRGF is calculated annually by the Department of Revenue and represents the
percentage increase in total unrestricted revenues available to the city or town. This factor is
applied against the prior years preliminary contribution.
MSBA The Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA) is a quasi-independent
government authority created to reform the process of funding capital improvement projects in
the Commonwealths public schools. The MSBA strives to work with local communities to
create affordable, sustainable, and energy efficient schools across Massachusetts.
Municipal Expenditures Commonly referred to as the Schedule 19 numbers, these
represent the amount spent on specific school expenditures that are appropriated to the city
departments. Examples include employee insurance costs, maintenance, and financial/date
processing costs.
NCLB No Child Left Behind - On January 8, 2002 President Bush signed into law the No
Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). This new law contained the most sweeping changes to
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) since it was enacted in 1965. It
changed the federal governments role in kindergarten-through-grade-12 education by asking
Americas schools to describe their success in terms of what each student accomplishes. The
act contained the Presidents four basic education reform principles: stronger accountability for
results, increased flexibility and local control, expanded options for parents, and an emphasis
on teaching methods that have been proven to work. Under the act, families of students who
attend Title I-supported schools that had not made adequate yearly progress in increasing
student academic achievement over a period of at least two years had other options to pursue
a quality education for their child. On December 10, 2015 President Barack Obama signed
legislation replacing NCLB with the Every Student Succeeds Act.
Net School Spending The larger portion of the school budget, which contains costs directly
related to the education of students. The amount of communitys required net school
spending (i.e. minimum net spending) is set each year by the Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education.
130

New Growth Proposition 2 allows a community to increase its levy limit annually by an
amount based on the increased value of new development and other growth in the tax base
that is not the result of revaluation. New growth includes:
Properties that have increased in assessed valuation since the prior year because of
development or other changes.
Exempt real property returned to the tax roll and new personal property.
New subdivision parcels and condominium conversions.
Non Net School Spending The smaller portion of the school budget. The primary
components are busing, the costs of community usage of school buildings, and capital
improvements. Although the state does not establish a minimum appropriation amount, there
are laws and regulations that impact some of the amounts required, such as minimum busing
mileage requirements.
October 1 Enrollment The total number of students enrolled in the school district. On or
before October 15 of every year, every school district within the Commonwealth shall report its
student enrollment as of October 1. The data required for this report is used for fund allocation,
statistical analysis and monitoring educational equity.
Operating Budget A plan of proposed expenditures for personnel, supplies, and other
expenses for the coming fiscal year.
PARCC - The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is
a consortium of states working together to develop a common set of K-12 assessments in
English and math anchored in what it takes to be ready for college and careers. These new K12 assessments will build a pathway to college and career readiness by the end of high
school, mark students progress toward this goal from 3rd grade up, and provide teachers with
timely information to inform instruction and provide student support. PARCC assessments
were administered in several schools during the 2014-15 school year.
PDP Professional Development Point: a unit of measurement of professional development
activities. One clock hour is equivalent to one professional development point. One semester
hour is equivalent to 15 PDPs.
Performance Rating - A school or district's Performance Rating is a descriptive representation
of that school or district's aggregate student performance on Massachusetts Comprehensive
Assessment System (MCAS) tests for a given cycle. The Composite Performance Index (CPI)
is a measure of the extent to which students are progressing toward proficiency in English
language arts (ELA) and mathematics, respectively. A CPI of 100 in a given content area
means that all students have reached proficiency. Performance Ratings are only issued in
even numbered years, at the end of each 2-year cycle.
Progress and Performance Index (PPI) - A new performance measure that replaced AYP in
Massachusetts in 2012. The cumulative PPI is a four-year measure of progress toward
narrowing proficiency gaps. The PPI incorporates MCAS scores in English language arts,
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math, and science and technology/engineering; growth in ELA and math; graduation rates; and
dropout rates. The cumulative PPI represents a groups performance over multiple years,
weighted to give more credit to more recent years: the most recent year is weighted by a factor
of four, the year before by three, the year before that by two, and the first year by one. Federal
rules require the use of the equivalent of AYP in Title III AMAO determinations. Although AYP
and the cumulative PPI are not the same measure, the PPI is a more fair measure of
performance than AYP for a number of reasons: the targets are more attainable; it gives
schools and districts credit for student growth; it incorporates data over four years across a
variety of indicators thus providing a better sense of a schools trajectory; it does not require
year-to-year linear improvement; and it does not require schools and groups to hit all targets in
all subject areas to be considered to be making progress.
Required Local Contribution The amount set by the Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education as the minimum amount a community must contribute for educational
expenses. This amount plus state aid equals the minimum net spending requirement.
Restructuring The accountability status of a school that has failed to make AYP in English
language arts, mathematics, or both subjects in the aggregate or for student subgroups for five
or more consecutive years or for one or more additional years after being identified for
Corrective Action.
RETELL - Strengthening teaching and learning for English language learners is central to
closing the proficiency gap. Rethinking Equity and Teaching for English Language Learners
(RETELL) is a Department initiative to improve and support the academic achievement of
English language learners in our Commonwealth. RETELL brings a systemic approach that
combines professional development for Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) teachers designed
to enable them to make rigorous content accessible to their English learners. Moreover, new
curriculum standards and assessment for ELLs will undergird RETELL. RETELL will require
that Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) teachers and the administrators who supervise them to
complete updated SEI professional development or its equivalent, with high priority placed on
teachers with ELL students currently in their classes.
Revolving Fund Fund within a municipal accounting system used for revenues from a
specific service. Revenues in a revolving fund can be used to support the associated service
without appropriation.
RTTT Race to the Top, a federal grant initiative from the US Department of Education funded
through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
Rubrics Specific sets of criteria that clearly define for both student and teacher what a range
of acceptable and unacceptable performance looks like. Criteria define descriptors of ability at
each level of performance and assign values to each level. Levels referred to are proficiency
levels which describe a continuum from excellent to unacceptable product.
SASID State Assigned Student Identifier.
The SASID number is issued by the
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and remains with the
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student throughout his/her educational life in grades pre-K through 12, even as the student
transfers from one district or school to another. If the student leaves the state and returns, the
student will receive his/her original SASID.
School Choice The school choice program allows parents to send their children to schools in
communities other than the city or town in which they reside. Tuition is paid by the sending
district to the receiving district. Districts may elect not to enroll school choice students if no
space is available.

Receiving district:
any city, town or regional school district within the
Commonwealth in which a child does not reside, but in which that child attends
public school under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, C. 72,
S.12B.

Sending district:
any city, town or regional school district within the
Commonwealth in which a child resides, but in which that child does not attend
public school under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, C. 72,
S.12B.

SIFEu - Students with Interrupted Formal Education. These are students who come to U.S.
schools without a history of stable schooling in their own language. SIFE differ from ELLs as
they have low or no literacy in their native language, little acquaintance with school culture, few
or no academic literacy skills and little academic knowledge.
SIMS Student Information Management System. Statewide data collection system that
includes a unique student identifier for all students receiving a publicly funded education in
Massachusetts.
DESE utilizes the information to meet federal and state reporting
requirements and to inform policy and programmatic decisions.
Vocational Technical Programs Specific educational programs approved by the
Commissioner of Education which lead to employment of continuing preparation for
employment associated with agriculture, allied health, automotive, construction, marketing,
service occupations, industrial-manufacturing programs and technical programs.
Warrant An authorization for an action by municipal personnel or voters. For example, a
town meeting warrant establishes the matters that may be acted on by voters at town meeting.
A treasury warrant authorizes the treasurer to pay specific bills.
WIDA - World-class Instructional Design and Assessment advances academic language
development and academic achievement for linguistically diverse students through high quality
standards, assessments, research, and professional development for educators. Twentyseven U.S. states now belong to the WIDA Consortium, and many other schools nationally and
internationally have adopted WIDA resources for use in their English language development
programs.

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504 Plan A 504 plan is a legal document falling under the provisions of the Rehabilitation Act
of 1973. It is designed to plan a program of instructional services to assist students with
special needs who are in a regular education setting. A 504 plan is not an Individualized
Education Plan (IEP) as is required for special education students.
21st CCLC - Twenty First Century Community Learning Centers. The Massachusetts
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has distributed 21st CCLC grants under
Title IVB of the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). The purpose of the program is to offer
students academic enrichment opportunities along with other activities designed to
complement the students regular academic program.

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