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Manlius Pebble Hill School

Library Project Final Report

Prepared by Ruth V. Small


Amanda S. Avery
Cathleen T. Hendrick
Melissa McElroy-Elve
Leslie C. Savage
Jennifer L. Sullivan
Heather A. Turner
Manlius Pebble Hill School
Library Project Final Report
Presented 12/13/07

Contents:

Introduction

Section 1: Teacher Response

A. Lower School Teacher Focus Group

B. Middle/Upper School Teacher Focus Group

C. Librarian Interviews

Section 2: Student Response

A. Lower School Student Focus Group

B. Middle School Student Focus Group

C. Upper School Student Focus Group

Section 3: Parent On-line Survey Results

Section 4: Administrator/Staff Response

A. Lower School Administrator Input

B. Middle School Administrator Input

C. Upper School Administrator Input

Appendices
Teacher Survey (All Levels) Result Table
Lower School Student Survey Result Table
Parent Input Section
MPH Administrators Focus Group Report
MPH Teachers’ Focus Group Questions
MPH Parent Survey
MPH Teachers’ Survey
MPH Students’ Survey
Introduction:

“The intellectual hub...An academic playground...A show-case for the school...”

Surveys and focus groups were conducted with groups of teachers, students, parents, and

administrators from Manlius Pebble Hill School, to obtain their ideas on the construction,

planning, and utilization of the future library. This document contains the results of the focus

groups and surveys and is organized by group, with responses broken down into two main areas

of discussion: 1. Physical Space and 2. Technology and Resources.

In summary, most participants felt that the library space must be a dynamic balance of

openness and flow, as well as provide clearly designated areas for each level without losing a

sense of warmth. Small rooms that serve as silent, private spaces for individuals or groups of

students and teachers were popular requests. Separate rooms for multimedia, teacher planning

silent reading, and storytelling were suggested.

The library building must continue the school’s trend of “green” construction, with

environmentally friendly materials throughout. It should be bright and airy with plenty of

windows and natural lighting where possible. There should be comfortable furniture and a

fireplace situated in a lounge area for student use, recreational reading, and relaxing.

More computer terminals and multimedia were desired, as well as updated and sufficient

materials geared to the specific needs of each school. Innovative features to enhance efficiency

and access points and superb flexible arrangements of furniture and multipurpose areas are a

necessity. The space must be mobile and accommodating. Technology must suit the growing

interests and needs of students in the areas of video production and broadcast journalism.
MPH Project p. 4

The new library should be an exciting place for MPH students and encourage use by the

larger community, serving as the school’s “hub” by providing ample resources for studying,

research, reflection, creativity, collaboration and discussion. As one of the librarians described,

“A reflection of what MPH is, sort of lively, encourage and reflect a sort of curiosity, a

combination of both a place for contemplation and reflection and a place where it is exciting to

be . . . I want it to be a place where every kid finds something that matters to them”.

Section 1: Teacher Response


(Please refer to the Appendices for a comprehensive table of survey responses).

A. Lower School Teacher Focus Group

(Large Group at LS Faculty Meeting)

Physical Space

One teacher described his vision for a future library, which was supported by many

others in the room: the library opens to a large central area that can be used for

community space; branching out from the central space are separate areas for the lower

school, the middle school and the upper school; and the corners of the library would

contain conference rooms.

Room with a View: The teachers were emphatic that any separate rooms should contain

glass windows so that they can have an unfettered view of the whole library at any time. Some

even mentioned having glass doors to provide this type of visual access. They also requested

having many windows in the space and using non fluorescent lighting. Some suggested that

MPH employ local artists to design special light fixtures, mosaics, and glass for the new library.

Soundproof Multimedia Rooms: The teachers requested a series of soundproof studios

able to hold about 10 students, for multimedia projects such as video production and audio
MPH Project p. 5

recording, complete with black out shades. One teacher requested to use these soundproof

rooms for a “listening library” in which students could listen to classic (jazz) recordings on their

own or in small groups. The soundproof rooms could be used as practice spaces for students

that play instruments. Teachers would like to send students to work in the studios during class.

One teacher suggested using a close circuit camera in these rooms to occasionally monitor

student conduct.

Flexible Furniture: The teachers requested flexible furniture or space configurations

that would allow the library floor plan to be changed for particular purposes. One mentioned

flexible table configurations. Some teachers wanted to see an abundance of fabrics on the

furniture to make it appear “cozy” and hospitable. Others suggested a combination of modern,

yet comfortable furnishings with more traditional styled furniture that would strike an

interesting contrast.

Storytelling Amphitheatre: The teachers requested a separate amphitheatre with

tiered, stadium seating to be used for storytelling or other small performances. They also

thought that this room should be soundproof so that it would not interfere with other

activities happening in the library. The amphitheatre should be equipped with a projection

screen to accommodate larger audiences or events.

Planning Space for Teachers: A space for collaboration and planning was desired. This

space should also contain teacher reference materials. These materials are currently housed in

the faculty lounge because there is no space for them in the library.

Art Gallery: Teachers requested a gallery to display student art work in the library,

as well as work from local artists. These display areas could also contain special first
MPH Project p. 6

editions of historical books that are relevant to the MPH community, current book titles,

and upcoming events in CNY.

Workstation/Mini-Studio: They liked the idea of creating a work space equipped

with a sink, paper cutters, ample counter space, bookmaking and bookbinding materials, as

bookmaking is an important and popular activity at the school. However, the teachers

mainly wanted a separate workspace to support other types of group projects.

Student Study Areas: The teachers sought study carrels or kiosks for independent student

work, as well as tables to support groups of 5-6 students, and larger groups of about 16-18

students. These should be separate spaces where students will not disrupt other activities in the

library.

Community Space: The teachers wanted the library to contain a café that would be

open during the evenings. They felt that students would return to the school at night to

study if there was a café available. One of the teachers offered to monitor the library

during that time just to have the space available during the evenings. A student run café

could be tied into a part of their course work. The teachers also liked the idea of evening

hours so that community gatherings could take place there. Of course, this means that a

large community space must be available. Many teachers also wanted to have a section of

the library devoted to parent resources. They sometimes receive requests for these

materials and wanted to have them available in the same space where parent meetings

would take place. As a bonus, some teachers requested a fireplace in this space for casual

reading.
MPH Project p. 7

Conferencing: If possible, they would like the library to contain two conference

rooms that could each hold at least one class of students.

Technology and Resources:

The teachers requested a separate computer room that would house a sufficient

number of computers for the student population. They believed that desktop computers

would become obsolete and thought that laptops would be a better long term fit, with

attachable mice for very young students that have trouble manipulating the touch pad. The

laptops could be stored on a cart with a device to contain all the cords, or on a shelving unit

in a wall. They also strongly desired color printers for student projects, scanners, digital

cameras, Smart Boards, ELMO projection devices, and a writing tablet, as well as sufficient

technology for the multimedia production studios.

Conclusion:

The teachers were concerned that at the conclusion of the facilities project they will have

built “just another library.” They very much wanted a library that would offer an experience to

the students and community that would keep them coming back.

B. Middle/Upper School Teacher Focus Group

(One Middle School Teacher, Two Upper School Teachers, and One Combined Middle and
Upper School Teacher)
MPH Project p. 8

Physical Space:

A Show Piece: These teachers felt the new library should be a show piece to attract

prospective students. The library at Hamilton College was referenced as an example. The

library should be comfortable like Barnes & Noble, contain quiet, tucked away spaces for

individual work, communal open space, conference rooms, and a large seminar room to hold 30

people. The seminar room could host mock trial teams, college representatives during visits,

student clubs and organizations, etc. They felt it would be beneficial to have a “hang out” space

for kids, but that there should also an isolated space such as a room with a glass partition for

quiet study.

Screening/Multimedia Room: One teacher suggested creating a room that students,

individually or in small groups, could use to view films. It was agreed that there should be some

type of multimedia room because many students are interested in film production. This should be

a secure facility so that students could safely store their supplies. The literary magazine currently

has very cramped corners, as does the graphics lab.

Multicultural Space: They felt the library should have different portions of it designated

to represent the different cultures present in the school. For example, one area for French

speakers where everything from the furnishings to the décor was French. The same would be

true for the Spanish, Latin, Chinese, and possibly other areas. The ability to interact with other

schools and to carry on a dialog with people of other cultures and regions will be important to

prevent isolation of the school. One person mentioned the need for a teacher space for correcting

papers, planning lessons, collaborating with other teachers, and as an office space. It should be

bright and have comfortable chairs, tables, and computer access.

Technology and Resources:


MPH Project p. 9

One teacher felt that overall, there should be a balance between print and computer based

resources. They recommended having a cable feed installed so that students could view debates,

or other items of interest on television. Videoconferencing capabilities for use in the language

and science departments and electronic projectors were also requested. They thought it would be

helpful to have several computer terminals available for students for quick use and printing.

There needs to be adequate desk space at the computers on which students can set their books

and materials.

C. Librarian Interviews

Physical Space:

Dream Library Question: When asked what they imagined a dream library would be

like, the librarians have many similar ideas with others in the MPH community. They would like

to see a “flexible space” with room to “do things with kids I want to do.” One of the librarians

said, “It needs to be aesthetically pleasing.” It “should be ideally one of the nicest places in the

school, and for a pre-K-12 school that means a nice place for 4 year olds and a nice place for 18

year olds. . . . For it to be a complete success it would draw faculty or staff or both . . . [If]

faculty used it for lesson planning, I could easily insert the resources I have into their lessons.”

Flexible and open space: One very important aspect is that the “entire space be very

flexible, potentially walls that can move, desks that can move, bookcases that potentially can

move. . . . Another really crucial [point, is that] there be a line of sight, wherever librarians are,

they be able to see the whole building.” The new library needs better seating for the younger

students in an area more conducive to the noise level of story-sharing activities, possibly an

amphitheater. When children are working on collaborative activities, there are also noise

concerns at all levels, Lower, Middle, Upper Schools. As one librarian put it, we are “creating
MPH Project p. 10

space that is perfect for little, little kids and perfect for teenagers; that isn’t completely separate.

One concern was so significant it was mentioned again, the “floor plan has to include line of

sight from every staff workstation.”

One librarian mentioned wanting space for author/illustrator visits and students sharing

work from creative writing, plays, and other performance opportunities. For the pre-K through

4th grade students, the spaces still need to be “very book centered, I would love to have recent

editions and more than one copy, and be able to introduce the ones that are not typically in the

collection”.

A wonderful environment: The new library will probably be a free-standing building

among other buildings. The Upper School librarian said she had thought a lot about “the way

you enter and exit this building. . . sort of a seamless indoor/outdoor transitions”. It will

“overlook this beautiful Jamesville valley [so] window areas. . . that bring the outside in” have

been a component mentioned repeatedly.

A focal point, not necessarily a place: One librarian thought that the “library . . .not be

necessarily for reference. . . but the role for the library [is] to make resources available, from

other locations.” She saw the “teachers easily accessing the library website from wherever they

are on campus” and “teaching with a projector and all kids on the website.” She expanded on

this by describing “common sites for every class” that were “more interactive” and “instead of

review sheets and packets, have class sites with all the information accessible online.” She

continued to describe the “world is smaller, [access to] literature from different places, and sites

where “you can go and hear Jon Scieszka say his name, how other people say it, keeps kids

engaged.”
MPH Project p. 11

Clubs and Other Groups Access: There are several existing groups and other future

needs for space and media production access to clubs, independent study, and other activities.

There are broadcast journalism, comic book clubs, and publications groups that need space.

They also have considerable technological needs as well. One of the librarians in discussing the

inclusion of a media production space discussed the “back and forth” of her thinking as a “text

person” in regards to the inclusion of television in the whole library and how to make that work.

Technology and Resources:

How do you see learning changing? [The technology] “ it opens up so much, it’s so

creative, different styles of learning. . . . Some of the kids who were dropping out when I was in

eighth grade would have had access to different learning experiences, they could be validated. . .

. reading on the computer, being read to through a technology thing.” She also asked the

question, “How do you use this stuff, all the electronics, the ethics, the practicality of teaching a

class when kids are IMing, texting?”

Hardware access: Both librarians feel there are not enough computers to do class

instruction and have students working independently. There also needs to be the capacity for

projection when teaching online resources also. A media production area is a concept that was

raised by the librarians, as well as, listening centers to support music and dance classes, and

other media capabilities such as video, movies, and book making.

A Vision for Technology: This is best presented in the librarian’s own words. “I really

tried not to spend too much time anticipating what we are going to need because if it’s built in

2009, I may have different ideas in 2009. It may come right down to, as we are building the

building, changing what the technology is that’s in there because technology continues to

change.” She continued that it must be “a wireless space, a space where we can do distance
MPH Project p. 12

learning on a more regular basis.” It must be “a space that reflects the real lives of our best

students, a balance between text and imagery in their lives and multitasking.”

Section 2: Student Response

A. Lower School Student Focus Group

(7 students from grades 3 to 5)

Physical Space:

“Hogwarts”style: When asked about how they’d like the library to look the words

“cozy”, “old-fashioned”, and “like Hogwarts” (from the Harry Potter movies) were offered.

They wanted comfortable furniture like bean bag chairs. They expressed a distinct interest in

having separate areas designated for each of the school levels, but also recognized the need for a

“common area” or lounge for talking/discussion that would be shared.

Artwork: They want a space that will reflect their identity and wish to incorporate both

student artwork from class, but also artwork done by “famous artists” displayed on a wall

devoted to art. A student explained the students of each level could paint murals in each of their

respective areas.

Organic Design: The physical layout should be maze-like with curvy shapes and swirled

aisles. There should also be a soundproof silent room that is a separate space. In terms of

aesthetics, the colors yellow, red and orange were favorites, but they should be in hues that are

light, bright and pastel. Windows should be floor-to-ceiling with stained glass and sky-lighting to

have plenty of natural light. Shelves should be tall with ladders or round and shorter for the

younger students. Lastly, they suggested that the library be two stories.

Technology and Resources:


MPH Project p. 13

Need Computing and Multimedia: Students unanimously wished for more computers,

preferably “higher tech” Macs, both desktop and laptop. There should be a separate computer

room containing computers and other multimedia--specifically movies, music, and

videogames/computer games that could be both previewed there and checked out. The preview

aspect would require listening and playing stations or booths. There was a suggestion for more

books on tape, as well.

Efficiency: Students had ideas on how to improve the function and service of the library.

One student came up with an Amazon “wish-list” type feature, which would allow students,

through the use of individual accounts, to electronically create a list of requests for books that

were checked out or totally absent from the library, to be held for them or ordered. They all

agreed that they would like a self-checkout system and to have library cards that they could

swipe, as opposed to having to remember their number.

More Complete Collection: Many students expressed concern that there was a shortage

of materials in several aspects. They would like more copies of books in general. Full and

complete sets of titles that are part of a series were also desired, as one student expressed

frustration with the library only having a few non-consecutive titles in a favorite series. It was

suggested that a system for inter-library loan with other schools, and public libraries be created

to obtain more titles.

The Lower School students all agreed that there are generally inadequate materials for

their age/school level, although there seems to be much more for the younger and the much older

students. The complaint was that many were just “too young” or “too old” for their purposes.

In terms of genres, they requested more non-fiction titles, those on uncommon topics, and

more in the way of current events, pop-culture, and progressive issues. One student said she
MPH Project p. 14

wanted to do a project on a popular coffee franchise and could find nothing to help her. (These

students seemed most interested in using print resources). Also, books and dictionaries in other

languages were desired.

Conclusion:

Lower School students were very specific in their needs and wishes for the new library.

They seemed concerned with making the library easier to use and having a space that was clearly

geared towards their specific age group, in terms of space and materials.

B. Middle School Student Focus Group

(5 students from grades 7-8)

Physical Space:

Library as Lounge: The Middle School students lament the lack of a hangout space for

themselves but recognize the time limitations their schedule imposes on these activities.

Nonetheless, there seems to be a need for some sort of area that they can call their own. All of

the students liked the idea of a “sitting room” type section or corner with a fireplace (real or fake,

it should be childproof) with couches and comfortable chairs. They suggested having a separate

space on the periphery or outside of the library with furniture and snacks that all levels could

access. One student mentioned that this could be an “after-school” space.

Separate Spaces: Sharing the library with all the levels is seen as disruptive and loud.

They feel there needs to be a way to keep activities from interfering with other student use.

While there should be some sort of clear separation for each level, it should not be totally broken

up. One student would like the different sections of materials such as non-fiction, biography,

fiction clearly “signed” or delineated to make it easier to locate everything.


MPH Project p. 15

Design: Besides the fireplace, other architectural/design requests included skylights,

study group rooms with wireless access, a soundproof room for reading where there would be

couches and no computers allowed, and a fish tank. They recognized the need for a theatrical

space and would like student art to be displayed in the library. The only color preference

mentioned was red.

Technology and Resources:

Ease of Use: Because of their time constraints, students made several suggestions that

would lead to more convenient library use and experience. They would like to have a library card

they could swipe and an automated self-checkout to speed things up. They are sometimes

frustrated by not being able to personally access the library’s card catalog system. They feel that

from the middle school levels on up, they should be able to access the card catalog, to see what

books there are on a topic at-a-glance and also to know if they are available or checked out.

Having to manually search the shelves for something is sometimes frustrating to them.

Need Computing: They requested more MAC computers with wireless mouse and

keyboards, which should be situated in a separate section, if not separate room. One student

would like dividers between computers for more privacy. Other types of technology mentioned

included a Smart Board, a television, and a space devoted to web casting, design, and movie

production—which even if they themselves aren’t involved with yet, might be in the future or

know students who are currently. They would like some type of music feature, whether it is

music in a lounge/talking area or a listening type booth with headphones to preview selections

for check-out. Finally, they thought several copiers and printers available for student use would

be very helpful.

Conclusion:
MPH Project p. 16

Although they said they do not have much free time to access the library on their own,

the Middle School students had ideas on how to make the time they do spend in the library more

comfortable, interactive and efficient.

C. Upper School Student Focus Group

(8 students from grades 9-12)

Physical Space:

History: Some students would like to see the design of the old Manlius school

incorporated into the new library and to bring that history back to life in some way.

Space-saving: There was much concern about the need for general floor space. A

suggestion was to utilize wall space with built-in bookshelves instead of free-standing ones. One

student suggested taking advantage of vertical space by having “tree-house” study kiosks.

Separate Spaces: These students feel it would be better suited to have the Lower School

area secluded from the Middle and Upper School but not closed off completely and still located

within the main space. However, they thought a separate room for Lower School story times

would help make using the library simultaneously less distracting. This room should be themed

specifically for story time and not be used for any Upper School work. The room should be

equipped with comfortable beanbag chairs, floor mats, large pillows and kid-friendly posters and

artwork. They would also like a separate quiet room for their own purposes with tables and

chairs that would be conducive to studying, group-work, or club meetings.

Design: Students emphasized their dislike of “dungeon” feeling rooms and all agree

there needs to be plenty of windows and natural light. They would like to take advantage of any

possible views and have this space be an area just for them where they could relax in front of a
MPH Project p. 17

huge window overlooking the hill. There should be plenty of cozy chairs and footrests in this

area for casual reading. One student would like to have interesting egg-shaped chairs called

“womb chairs” which would be both compact and secluded.

Art Features: The Upper School students would like more “sophisticated” art work in the

new library. They would like to see the main area of the library have prints of famous artists

throughout the centuries (Picasso, Van Gough, Renoir, O’Keefe, etc).

The students liked the idea of a fireplace, but were concerned with the safety of having

one. An aquarium was mentioned as a possible alternative.

Lastly, regardless of the design, it was agreed that the new library needed to be “green”

(environmentally friendly).

Technology and Resources:

Access and Hardware: These students were concerned with the layout of the technology

and the logistics of its use. For example, they said more outlets were imperative for use with

their laptops. They would like to see individual cubicles installed with easy access to power

outlets where they can plug in their laptops. The students would also like more computers in

general and Macs in particular. One student suggested scattering several computers along the

periphery of the library, as opposed to having all of them in one large clump.

They would also like more hardware for their systems including speakers and headphones

available for check-out as well as practical things like more copy machines.

Self-serve: The students felt frustrated in having to rely on the librarian for everything,

and would like more self-directed options. For example, there should be conspicuously placed
MPH Project p. 18

posters of clear directions on how to gain access to the different databases near the computers. A

drawer or other area for materials such as scrap paper, index cards, pencils, highlighters and

other implements would also facilitate efficiency. They also like the idea of having a traditional

sliding ladder for accessing books on high shelves.

On a practical note, students mentioned the need for several clocks in plain sight, or at

least a large, centrally-located one that they could see easily from all areas. They would also like

a television area for viewing events, in a separate location that would not be distracting.

Relevant Reading: The Upper School students mentioned that they don’t regularly use the

library for recreational materials as the selection is out-dated and unappealing. They would like a

re-vamped section of popular teen titles. Although they expressed a preference for online

databases for doing research, they would like more encyclopedias and topic-specific reference

books, as there is a lack of print resources for many of their more in-depth reports.

Conclusion:

The Upper School Students would like to see a library that offers them plenty of

independence, that takes into consideration all levels, as well as current materials that are

sufficient for their upper level assignments.

Section 3: Parent Survey Response Summary

(Please refer to the Appendices for a comprehensive table of responses).

Parents of Manlius Pebble Hill School students were invited to participate in an online

survey to gather their input for the new library.

Parent Use and Student Use from Parents Perspective:


MPH Project p. 19

Forty-one parents decided to participate in the online survey with most surveyors coming

from the Upper (48%) and Lower (36%) schools. The majority of parents believe their children

use the library (87.5%). These parents feel their children use the library frequently with 68.8%

estimating the library is used at least once per week and 25% finding that their children use the

library at least twice a month. Parents also felt their children were researching (24%) and

looking for books (22%) most often. Of those parents that believed their child does not use the

library, the reasons included lack of resources and lack of space.

Only 4 out of 41 parents answered that they use the library for their own purposes.

However many wrote that they were not aware they could use the library and are interested in

having access to parent resources including child development materials and afternoon study

hours.

Physical Space: One of the survey questions asked parents to describe their “dream

library.” Many responses include up-to-date technology and room for students to work as well

as additional computers such as laptops available for sign-out). Parents want the library to be a

place for students to congregate and for it to have a warm and cozy atmosphere much like coffee

shops and college libraries. However, the need for quiet space is also very important. A

separation between designated loud and quiet areas is essential. The library should have an open

floor plan that gives students room to research, read, and perform group work. In addition, a

central location is needed because the current library is out of the way and often forgotten.

Different areas are needed for the different needs of students such as special collections: books,

posters, film/videos, and a space for guest speakers. Lastly, teleconferences and the ability for

the space to be adaptable for different needs and varying times such as extended hours after

school is extremely important to parents.


MPH Project p. 20

Technology and Resources: Parents envision equipping the library with a solid

technological infrastructure. The following are some of the suggestions made in terms of

technology:

Dragon Naturally Speaking DVD/VHS Players


eBooks
E-Reader
Film Projectors
Good Task Lighting
iMacs
LCD projectors
More online databases
MP3 Workstation Capabilities
Music
Off campus database access
Online Catalog
Online magazines/newspapers
Online search tools
Photo/Video editing software
Powerpoint/Publisher
Wireless Access
Printers
Scanners
Smart boards
Technology that does not crash
Teleconferencing
Turntables
University Library-like technology
MPH Project p. 21

Conclusion:

Parents desire their children to be able to complete assignments with access to a variety

of sources from databases and the internet as well as teleconferencing and researching in

hardcopy books. Students must be able to access software and the internet quickly and

efficiently with technology that does not crash and can effectively handle the workload of

students.

Section 4: Administrator/Staff Focus Group:

(With administrators from all levels)

A. Lower School Administrator Input

The Lower School needs a theatrical space for storytelling and presentations like a tiered

stage with pillows or outdoor ampitheater (use the outside space as well). Cozy nooks and

crannies are enjoyed by younger children and Ithaca Public Library was suggested as an example

of these “whimsical” type details. Windows in the younger section should reflect their smaller

size, be lower to the floor (Alice in Wonderland style) and offer little details such as sills to grow

seeds on. There should be a space for display of student work. The separation of levels should

walk a fine line between being distinct but also have a flow which would encourage use of all

areas of the library by all age groups—that is to say a lower school student should be able to

access and feel comfortable in the “older” areas and vice versa, as certain levels of books often

have cross-uses in a curriculum and to keep a sense of community. There should be enough

technology/computers available for use at class capacity (15-20 students) plus a few extra.

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MPH Project p. 22

B. Middle School Administrator Input

The Middle School age group tends to under-utilize the library, which the administrators

suggest, may be due to the remoteness of the library location as well as decreased interest. They

believe at this age, the library must be an inviting and enticing space in order to draw them in.

They are lacking a distinct space for their age group “to go and be” and the new library could be

this space. Other student lounge areas are insufficient for fulfilling the social and space needs of

the middle group.

Students at this level are comfortable using the library for research and there is a high

level of independence in this respect. There is a need for a variety of resources available both

print, electronic and otherwise—the maximization of technological tools. Aesthetically it is

important for the library to have a cozy atmosphere which is conducive to study and reflection.

Ideas for achieving a non-confining yet cozy space include using natural light for combating

winter dreariness, windows that make the most of the view, and the use of wood, leather,

upholstery, and organic-type materials, as well as rugs and soothing colors. There must be space

for classes to meet more easily, in a less cramped fashion and retain an open, airy feeling.

C. Upper School Administrator Input

The Upper School seems to generally like going to the library. Many students of this age

use the library for personal reading of magazines and newspapers, as they are not yet mobile

enough to go to outside spaces such as Barnes and Noble. The library seems to function as a

surrogate for these types of academic hang-out spots. The importance of the library as a hang-out

space cannot be underestimated.

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MPH Project p. 23

There was also mention of MPH’s international students using the library to keep in

touch with their families via the computers and chat. Group work is also usually done in the

library and this absolutely needs to be taken into account in terms of design and space regulation.

The most pressing concern for Upper School is the need for collaborative and lounging

space that will not necessary be severed from, but remain undisturbed by the lower school space.

There must be an option or choice for students to be separate or a part of, in this respect.

D. Additional Comments

“Green” Space: The issue of the building of a green space was unanimous. MPH must

continue on the sustainable route in their development. Windows should be utilized to take

advantage of light, while being smartly placed taking into account computer screen glare and

energy efficiency. Artificial lighting should be on working timers to conserve energy and should

be able to be turned on and off individually. Placement of lights is also important. Flooring and

textiles should be green, sustainable and non-toxic.

Flexibility: The library should be able to accommodate everyone’s needs. However,

future development of the school should be considered in that the library will not necessarily

have to include solutions for all of these issues itself. Many of the same spaces should be able to

satisfy multiple needs and could be combined for various functions.

There were multiple comments expressing the need for a space devoted to student

broadcasting and journalism. Because of advances in technology, this space can be small, to suit

about 15 kids, but it must be isolated.

There is a need for office space for the librarians and a place for teachers to be away from

students. A suggestion was made to look into Penn Library where they have “diner-like” booths

23
MPH Project p. 24

with high benches facing inwards across a large table designated for small group work as

opposed to totally separate rooms.

Conclusion:

The administrators emphasized the need for a library that is technological sufficient,

spatial open, inviting, comfortable, and creative with distinct but flexible spaces that will

accommodate all levels, often simultaneously, and be structurally environmentally friendly and

sustainable.

APPENDICES:

Teacher Survey (All Levels) Result Table MPH Teachers’ Focus Group Questions

Lower School Student Survey Result MPH Parent Survey

Table MPH Teachers’ Survey

Parent Input Section MPH Students’ Survey

MPH Administrators Focus Group

Report

24
MPH Parent Library Survey
1. Default Section

1. Your child's or children's grade(s):

2. Does your child currently use the library

j Yes
k
l
m
n j No
k
l
m
n j I don't know
k
l
m
n

3. If your child does not use the library, why not (check all that apply)?

c lack of resources
d
e
f
g
c lack of space
d
e
f
g
c lack of interest
d
e
f
g
c Other (please specify)
d
e
f
g

4. If your child does use the library, which responses below best describe how often your child
uses the library?

j once per week


k
l
m
n
j once biweekly
k
l
m
n
j once monthly
k
l
m
n
j once every few months or less
k
l
m
n

Page 1
MPH Parent Library Survey

2.

5. If your child does use the library, for what purpose(s) does your child currently use the
library?

c recreational reading
d
e
f
g
c using the Internet
d
e
f
g
c read aloud to by librarian
d
e
f
g
c research for class
d
e
f
g
c student groups/clubs/activities
d
e
f
g
c meeting/working with friends
d
e
f
g
c looking for books
d
e
f
g
c Other (please specify)
d
e
f
g

6. Do you use the library for any of the following activities (check all the apply)?

c book clubs
d
e
f
g
c borrow from the parent collection
d
e
f
g
c helping your child
d
e
f
g
c Other (please specify)
d
e
f
g

7. If you use the library, how frequently?

j once per week


k
l
m
n
j once biweekly
k
l
m
n
j once monthly
k
l
m
n
j once every few months
k
l
m
n

Page 2
MPH Parent Library Survey

3.

8. Is there an activity or service for parents that you would like to see at the library that
currently does not exist?

j No
k
l
m
n
j Yes (please specify any such activities/services)
k
l
m
n

9. If you could use three words or phrases to describe your current school library, what would
they be?

1.

2.
3.

10. If you could design the school library of your dreams for the 21st century (for you and your
child), what would it look like? What resources would it have? What programs and services would
it offer?

11. Based on your answer to Question 10, what types of technology would be available in your
dream library?

Page 3
MPH Parent Library Survey

Page 4
MPH Student Library Survey

1. Default Section

1. I am a (please check one):

j
k
l
m
n male j
k
l
m
n female

2. What grade are you in?

3. I use the library (please check one answer):


j
k
l
m
n daily

j
k
l
m
n weekly

j
k
l
m
n 1-3 times a month

j
k
l
m
n once a month or less

j
k
l
m
n never

4. I use the library for (you may check more than one answer):
c
d
e
f
g reading

c
d
e
f
g borrowing books to read at home

c
d
e
f
g finding information for homework

c
d
e
f
g doing homework/studying

c
d
e
f
g finding information for hobbies or interests

c
d
e
f
g using the Internet

c
d
e
f
g working with my friends

c
d
e
f
g reading newspapers/magazines

c
d
e
f
g when it is part of a lesson

c
d
e
f
g attending events/activities e.g. bookclubs, book fairs

c
d
e
f
g Other (please give details)

Page 1
MPH Student Library Survey

2.

5. The library resources I most regularly use are (you may check more than one
answer):
c
d
e
f
g fiction books

c
d
e
f
g non-fiction books

c
d
e
f
g reference books (such as, encyclopedias)

c
d
e
f
g CD-ROMs

c
d
e
f
g the Internet

c
d
e
f
g computer databases

c
d
e
f
g newspaper/magazines

c
d
e
f
g videos/DVDs

c
d
e
f
g Other (please say what)

6. The age of books in the library is mostly (please check one answer):

j
k
l
m
n very new
j
k
l
m
n new
j
k
l
m
n old
j
k
l
m
n very old

7. I wish my library had:

j
k
l
m
n more books j
k
l
m
n less books j
k
l
m
n it's just right

8. When I use the library to help me with schoolwork, I find what I need (please
check one answer):

j
k
l
m
n always
j
k
l
m
n most of the time
j
k
l
m
n rarely
j
k
l
m
n never

9. When I cannot find the information or books i need, it is most often because
(please check one answer):
j
k
l
m
n I don't know where to look

j
k
l
m
n the library has nothing on my topic

j
k
l
m
n the materials are already checked out

j
k
l
m
n Other (please explain)

Page 2
MPH Student Library Survey

3.

10. When I need help using the library (you may check more than one answer):
c
d
e
f
g I ask the librarian

c
d
e
f
g I ask a teacher

c
d
e
f
g I ask student helpers or other students

c
d
e
f
g I use the guides/leaflets

c
d
e
f
g I give up

c
d
e
f
g I never need help using the library.

11. When I need information for schoolwork, I most often use resources from
(please check one answer):
j
k
l
m
n the Internet

j
k
l
m
n the school library

j
k
l
m
n the public library

j
k
l
m
n Other (please explain)

12. If you could use three words to desribe your current library, what would
they be?
1.

2.

3.

13. What do you like the most about your school library?

Page 3
MPH Student Library Survey

4.

14. If you could create a library of the future, what would it look like what would
be in it, and what could you do there? (You may use the back of this page if you
need more space).

Page 4
Library Survey

1. Teacher Survey

Please help us to improve your school library by completing the following survey.

1. I am a:
j
k
l
m
n male

j
k
l
m
n female

2. What grade level(s) and/or subject(s) do you teach?

3. Check the answer that best describes how often you use the library:
j
k
l
m
n daily

j
k
l
m
n weekly

j
k
l
m
n 1-3 times a month

j
k
l
m
n once a month or less

j
k
l
m
n never

4. Check the answer that best describes how often your students use the
library:
j
k
l
m
n daily

j
k
l
m
n weekly

j
k
l
m
n 1-3 times a month

j
k
l
m
n once a month or less

j
k
l
m
n never

5. I use the library for (please check all that apply):


c
d
e
f
g lesson planning

c
d
e
f
g finding information for class

c
d
e
f
g collaborating with my colleagues reading/borrowing from the professional collection borrowing books to read at home using the Int
newspapers/magazines

c
d
e
f
g I don't use the library

c
d
e
f
g attending events/activities e.g. bookclubs, bookfairs

c
d
e
f
g other (please give details)

Page 1
Library Survey

6. My students use the library for (please check all that apply):
c
d
e
f
g research projects

c
d
e
f
g book exchanges

c
d
e
f
g using the Internet

c
d
e
f
g free reading assignments

c
d
e
f
g None of the above

c
d
e
f
g other (please give details)

7. The library resources that my students most regularly use are (please check
all that apply):
c
d
e
f
g fiction books

c
d
e
f
g non-fiction books

c
d
e
f
g reference books e.g. encyclopedias

c
d
e
f
g CD ROMs

c
d
e
f
g internet

c
d
e
f
g computer databases

c
d
e
f
g newspapers/magazines

c
d
e
f
g videos/DVDs

c
d
e
f
g audio/MP3

c
d
e
f
g other (please give details)

8. The library sources I most regularly use are (please check all that apply):
c
d
e
f
g fiction books

c
d
e
f
g non-fiction books

c
d
e
f
g reference books e.g. encyclopedias

c
d
e
f
g CD ROMs

c
d
e
f
g internet

c
d
e
f
g computer databases

c
d
e
f
g newspapers/magazines

c
d
e
f
g videos/DVDs

c
d
e
f
g audio/MP3

Page 2
Library Survey
c
d
e
f
g other (please give details)

9. The age of books in the library are mostly (please check one answer):

j
k
l
m
n very new
j
k
l
m
n new
j
k
l
m
n old
j
k
l
m
n very old

10. The number of books in the library are (please check one answer):

j
k
l
m
n too many j
k
l
m
n just enough j
k
l
m
n too few

11. When I use the library to help me locate resources, I find what I need
(please check one answer):

j
k
l
m
n always j
k
l
m
n most of the time j
k
l
m
n sometimes j
k
l
m
n rarely j
k
l
m
n never

12. When I cannot find the information or books i need, it is most often because
(please check one answer):
j
k
l
m
n I don't know where to look

j
k
l
m
n the library has nothing on my topic

j
k
l
m
n the materials are already on loan/unavailable

j
k
l
m
n Other (please explain)

13. When I need help locating library resources (please check all that apply):
c
d
e
f
g I ask the library

c
d
e
f
g I ask a fellow teacher

c
d
e
f
g I use print guides

c
d
e
f
g I go elsewhere for information

c
d
e
f
g I never need help using the library or locating resources

c
d
e
f
g Other (please explain)

14. Would you like more training in how to use the library?

Page 3
Library Survey
j
k
l
m
n No

j
k
l
m
n Yes (please specify)

15. When I need information for teaching/lesson planing, I most often go to:
j
k
l
m
n internet

j
k
l
m
n the school library

j
k
l
m
n the public library

j
k
l
m
n Other (please specify)

16. The school library has helped my students to (please check all that apply):
c
d
e
f
g imporove their reading skills

c
d
e
f
g become more interested in literature

c
d
e
f
g become more motivated learners

c
d
e
f
g seek information related to personal interests

c
d
e
f
g locate and evaluate information

c
d
e
f
g use information accurately and appropriately

c
d
e
f
g value the importance of information in society

c
d
e
f
g use information ethically

c
d
e
f
g work in groups to seek and generate information

17. What are three words/descripters that best describe the school library?
1.

2.

3.

18. In what way(s) does the current MPH library provide support for your
teaching?

Page 4
Library Survey

19. In what way(s) would you like the future new MPH library to support your
teaching?

20. Please describe your dream library…What would it look like? What
resources would it have in it? How would you use it? What services would it
offer?

Page 5