Anda di halaman 1dari 8

ART HISTORY II

(Spring 2016)
Professor: Dr. Konstantinos Giakoumis
Time/Place: Wednesday, 17:00-20:00, Room 3B
Turn-it-in Class ID and Enrollment Password: 12238580 / Art2
E-mail/Cell: kgiakoumis@unyt.edu.al / 069 20 70 592
Office Hours: Thursday, 15.00-17.00 or by appointment (Room 1C)
Teaching Philosophy:
I maintain a constructivist approach in teaching and learning. Put simply, I believe
that students build knowledge and skills by associating new materials with prior
knowledge, experiences and perceptive frames. This requires active learning that can
be achieved only when the student engages in the teaching and learning process as
active and responsible actor of learning. Class discussion, critical introspection, focus
on hands-on guided exercises with sources to build skills and outreach activities to
link what is on paper with our world are therefore an integral part of this course.
Course Purpose:
As an art historical course delivered to non-art-historians, the purpose of this course is
triple. First and foremost, to enable students build skills that an art historian applies
when approaching artworks and writing about the past; these skills (e.g. observation
and contextualization) are also utilized in our daily lives and are therefore integral to
the critical thinking process. Second, to empower student understanding that our
world today was not created of nothing and that our past shapes our present a great
deal, whether we deal with politics, economics, business, institutional, social,
technological or cultural matters; in short, there is history behind everything and the
process of unveiling it through artworks makes us more conscious decision-makers.
Last, the course aims at enhancing student understanding and appreciation of the
worlds artistic heritage around us.
Course Description:
This course is designed to provide an understanding, knowledge and appreciation of
major art historical phenomena and works of high aesthetic quality in architecture,
sculpture, painting, and other visual art forms within diverse historical and cultural
contexts. In the course, major forms of artistic expression from the early Renaissance
(14th Century), to the emergence of post-Modernism (late 20th Century) from a variety
of cultures are explored. Students learn to look at works of art critically, with
intelligence and sensitivity, and to analyze what they see. It is, therefore, anticipated
that students will develop insights beyond a mere repetition of dates, places, and
artists, and shall come to a greater understanding of the trends and movements that
have shaped civilisations and cultures throughout the ages.
Learning Objectives:
1. Knowledge Base: By the end of the course students are expected to:
Have gained an incisive view of major artistic works and developments
from Renaissance to modern times.

Be able to discuss, analyse and evaluate their importance in a critical


fashion and beyond a mere quotation of dates, places, and artists using
appropriate terminology.
Demonstrate intelligence and sensitivity in analysing an artwork.
Demonstrate awareness of ethical issues encountered in an art
historians laboratory.

2. Cognitive / Intellectual Skills: By the end of the course students are expected
to be able to:
Analyse key art historical artworks and developments using a variety
of primary and secondary sources.
Synthesize relevant information from different primary and secondary
sources.
Evaluate the reliability of their sources.
Apply basic art historical methodological tools to new, unknown
artworks.
3. Key / Transferrable Skills: By the end of the course students are expected to
have demonstrated:
The ability to work effectively with others as a member of a group
within the given time constraints.
An ability to work within an appropriate ethos and to access and use a
range of learning resources.
An ability to evaluate own strengths and weaknesses within criteria set
by others.
An ability to collect and manage information from a range of sources
undertaking simple and guided research tasks.
An ability to take responsibility of own learning with appropriate
support.
The appropriate skills of communicating effectively on art historical
matters.
An ability to apply with limited autonomy, under direction or
supervision, learned tools and methods carefully and accurately to a
well-defined new problem, within defined guidelines.
Course Outline:
I

02/24

Introduction to the subjects and vocabulary of Art History. Course requirements; art
historical methods of inquiry. FROM GOTHIC TO RENAISSANCE: Precursors of
Renaissance. Art Historical Thinking Skills: Periodization in art history. Readings:
1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 19. 2) Adams, Chapter 12.

II

03/02

FROM GOTHIC TO RENAISSANCE. Art Historical Thinking Skills: Primary and


Secondary Sources in Art History. Readings: 1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 19. 2) Adams,
Chapter 12.

III

03/09

THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY. Art Historical Thinking Skills:


Relationships between facts, opinions, sources and interpretations; Understanding,
evaluating and producing descriptions of art objects. Readings: 1) Kleiner et al.,
Chapter 21. 2) Adams, Chapter 13. Titles of Papers and brief outlines due.

IV

03/16

THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY. Art Historical Thinking Skills: Analyzing


art objects from different methodological perspectives often tells us more than their
authors had in mind. Readings: 1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 22. 2) Adams, Chapter 14.

03/23

MANNERISM / THE RENAISSANCE IN NORTHERN EUROPE. Art Historical


Thinking Skills: Comparing and contrasting a variety of artworks unveils important
evidence on social structures, economies, politics and cultures. Readings: 1) Kleiner
et al., Chapter 20 and pp. 673-687. 2) Adams, Chapters 15. Detailed outlines and
annotated bibliographies due.

VI

03/30

16TH CENTURY ART IN NORTHERN EUROPE. Art Historical Thinking Skills:


Relating social groups and the individuals in art historical understanding. Readings:
1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 23. 2) Adams, Chapter 16.

VII

04/06

Mid-Term Exam

VIII

04/13

BAROQUE AND ROCOCO ART. Art Historical Thinking Skills: Comparing and
contrasting artworks offers valuable information on social structures, economies,
politics and cultures. Readings: 1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 24. 2) Adams, Chapters 1718.

IX

04/20

THE LATER ART IN CHINA, SOUTH AND SOUTH EASTERN ASIA. Art
Historical Thinking Skills: Understanding and evaluating historical change;
distinguishing causes of change. Readings: Kleiner et al., Chapters 25-27.

05/04

NEO-CLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM. Art Historical Thinking Skills:


Diversities in judging the past. Readings: 1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 28. 2) Adams,
Chapters 19-20.

XI

05/11

REALISM, IMPRESSIONISM, POST-IMPRESSIONISM AND SYMBOLISM. Art


Historical Thinking Skills: Evaluating alternate theses; understanding how and why
art historical developments and events are interpreted and re-interpreted. Readings:
1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 29. 2) Adams, Chapters 19-22. First Draft of Research
Papers.

XII

05/18

EXPRESSIONISM AND MODERN ART. Art Historical Thinking Skills: Sifting art
historical evidence (before and after): social, economic, political and cultural.
Readings: 1) Kleiner et al., Chapter 33. 2) Adams, Chapter 24.

XIII

05/25

CUBISM AND ABSTRACT. Art Historical Thinking Skills: Close-reading and


interpreting a variety of art historical sources. Readings: 1) Kleiner et al., Chapters
33-34. 2) Adams, Chapters 25-27Presentation of papers.

XIV

06/01

LATER ART THE AMERICAS, AFRICA AND OCEANIA. Art Historical


Thinking Skills: Using Literature in History; Understanding Processes. Readings:
Kleiner et al., Chapters 30-32. Presentation of papers. Research papers due.

XV

06/08

FINAL EXAM.

Textbooks:
Kleiner F. S. (2010), Gardners Art Through The Ages, 13th edition, Fort Worth
Philadelphia San Diego New York Orlando Austin San Antonio
Toronto Montreal London Sydney Tokyo: Harcourt College Publishers.
Adams L. (2003), Art Across Time, New York: McGraw-Hill Publ.
Additional Readings and Other Materials:
Additional readings shall be assigned from other books, articles, or in-class handouts
on a case-by-case basis. Various audio-visual materials shall be included in class
presentations.

Supplemental Web-based Research:


Students are expected to supplement their textbook readings with Web-based
research, and specific reading assignments may be made from these websites:

http://www.harcourtcollege.com/arts/gardner
http://www.wadsworth.com/cgiwadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&product_isbn_issn=053464200
4&discipline_number=37
http://witcombe.sbc.edu/ARTHLinks.htm
http://www.arthistory.net
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/splash.htm
http://www.loggia.com/art/arthistory.html

Course Website:
In the courses cyberspace [http://www.unyt.edu.al/art2] students can find primarily practice
tests related to their study of the main course-book. Inasmuch as the course-books leave too
little space for art history in a local setting, the courses website also provides students with
additional materials to enhance their knowledge and understanding of local art history within
wider geographical limits, historical periods and developments.

Term Paper:
Students will be required to write a term paper on a subject either of their own choice, or
chosen from a list after consulting with the instructor. Topics suggested by the students are
subject to approval and may involve an oral in-class presentation. (See notes on plagiarism).
Students are required submit both an electronic (at www.turnitin.com) and a hard copy of
their paper. The 20% grade of the term paper is to be divided under the following
components: 1) A well-thought research paper topic and brief outline: 2% [due March 09,
2016]. 2) A detailed outline accompanied with an annotated bibliography: 3% [due March
23, 2016]. 3) Quality of papers first draft: 5% [due May 11, 2016]. 4) Evaluation of the final
draft: 10% [due June 01, 2016].

Basis for Student Evaluation:


1. Participation:
10 %
2. Presentations
10 %
3. Mid-Term exam:
30 %
4. Term Paper:
20 %
5. Final Exam:
30 %
Basis for Student Evaluation:
#

1.

2.

Criterion

Attendance, participation and preparation: I expect students be in


class and also actively engage into class discussion and other activities,
individual or in larger and smaller groups. One of the exciting things
about art history is that there is rarely a right or wrong view, but more
often than not a convincing or non-convincing viewpoint. Considering
the value of advance preparation for class discussions, orally investigated
review questions will normally precede the start of a new section.
Mid-Term Exam: Both the mid-term, as well as the final exam are
structured in two sections, each of which contains two parts. The first
sections first part contains multiple-choice, most of which are available
online at the courses website. The second part of the first section
contains multiple-choice questions on artworks illustrated in class; these
artworks will have been extensively discussed in class and the questions
about them are developed for the purpose of assessing student learning of

% of final
grade

10%

30%

skills cultivated in class. The second section of the test contains two
essays. The first part involves description, analysis and interpretation of
an unknown (i.e. not discussed in class) artwork in the form of short
essays in response to questions upon them aimed at assessing student
learning of the art historical thinking skills developed throughout the
course. The second part of the second section contains a selection of
change-of-time or comparative, larger-scale essays (approx. 500 words)
aimed at assessing students ability to identify patterns and factors of
change over time and to compare social, economic, political and other
structures reflected in arts.
Term Paper: Students will be required to write a term paper on a subject

3.

4.

5.

either of their own choice, or chosen from a list after consulting with the
instructor. Topics suggested by the students are subject to approval and may
involve an oral in-class presentation. (See notes on plagiarism). Students are
required submit both an electronic (at www.turnitin.com) and a hard copy of
their paper. The 20% grade of the term paper is to be divided under the
following components: 1) A well-thought research paper topic and brief outline:
2% [due March 09, 2016]. 2) A detailed outline accompanied with an annotated
bibliography: 3% [due March 23, 2016]. 3) Quality of papers first draft: 5%
[due May 11, 2016]. 4) Evaluation of the final draft: 10% [due June 01, 2016].

Please see the appendix on the assessment criteria for papers applied in
this course.
Presentation(s): Students are required to present their papers to peers
and also engage into a number of group projects assigned in class leading
to presentations. Good presentation skills (contact with audience, time
management, voice-pitch, clear driving point with principal evidence and
findings, as well as a powerful Power Point presentation, where
appropriate, are desired qualities constituting a good presentation).
Final Exam: This is a cumulative exam. Please see notes on mid-term
exam.

Grading Scale:
Letter
Percent
Grade
(%)
A
96-100
A90-95
B+
87-89
B
83-86
B80-82
C+
77-79
C
73-76
C70-72
D+
67-69
D
63-66
D60-62
F
0-59

20%

10%

30%

Generally Accepted Meaning


Outstanding work
Good work, distinctly above average

Acceptable work

Work that is significantly below average


Work that does not meet minimum standards for passing
the course

Individual Tutorials:
Students are welcome to arrange a tutorial session with the instructor on an individual
basis.
General Policies:
1. Regular attendance is expected. If there is an urgent reason to be absent,
please email the instructor in advance.

2. Assignments will be collected at the beginning of the class session. There will
be a 10% daily deduction for late assignments (up to 2 days only, thereafter no
grade will be given) unless you make special arrangements with the instructor
in advance via email communications.
3. Any form of unethical activity, e.g. cheating, will result in an automatic F on
the course in accordance to UNYTs Honour Code.
4. Make-up exams will be given in the case of a confirmed medical excuse. If
possible, please advise the instructor in advance by email.
Please Note: STUDENTS: If you feel that you have special learning difficulties,
please, make an appointment with the universitys Counselling Centre.

EVALUATION GRID AND FEEDBACK FORM FOR PAPERS


STUDENTS NAME & SURNAME: ______________________

(10%)

THESIS

CRITERIONCOMPONENT

N/A

COURSE: _____________________

%
DESCRIPTION
POINTS
9-10 (A) Precise, original, substantiated and plausible, insightful and sophisticated.
8-8.9 (B) Slightly obscure and/or lacking insightfulness or originality.
7-7.9 (C) Slightly vague or uninteresting, lacking originality.
6-6.9 (D) Vague or upholding a self-evident point.
0-5.9 (F) No thesis.
9-10 (A) Sets of ideas constitute logical arguments; possible counter-arguments are identified and defused. The author makes crossdisciplinary connections not necessarily retrieved from course materials, thereby creating novel avenues of supporting a thesis.

8-8.9 (B) Logical ideas form solid arguments. Some counter-arguments are identified but not defused; insights are primarily limited to the sources

STRUCTURE
(30%)

CONTENT
(30%)

used.
Logic &
Argumentation 7-7.9 (C) The logic of some ideas may fail, thereby creating implausible arguments. Few counter-arguments are identified. Most insights are
limited to the primary materials without cross-disciplinary connections.
(10%)
6-6.9 (D) Loose ideas, not advancing to an argument. Mere repetition or summary of points raised in the used sources. No attempt to identify

counter-arguments and dilute them. Simplistic view of topic; no effort to apperceive alternate theses.
0-5.9 (F) Arguments sequenced arbitrarily.
9-10 (A) Full, semantically and grammatically correct integration of primary sources into historical or art historic argument; use of
examples to illustrate points of view.
8-8.9 (B) Use of primary source materials to uphold most statements; some unnecessary or inappropriate use of primary materials. Primary
sources are not very well incorporated into sentence structures.
Use of Evidence 7-7.9 (C) Many statements remain unsubstantiated, without thorough or suitable evidencing; limited use of examples from primary sources
to support the authors viewpoints or unclear points in the choice of evidence. Primary sources are loosely integrated into the (art)
(10%)
historical argument.
6-6.9 (D) Scarce, poor or irrelevant use of examples. Statements are not supported by evidence or evidence does not lead to statements.
Primary source quotations are thrown improperly or unnecessarily without any effort for integration.
0-5.9 (F) No attempt to relate statements with examples.
9-10 (A) Statements and evidence are correlated with each other to form mini-theses, which logically advance to the papers thesis. The
analysis is vertical (meaning thorough and insightful) rather than horizontal (meaning superficial).
Many statements and evidence are correlated to each other. The analysis is somewhere vertical and elsewhere horizontal.
8-8.9
(B)
Analysis
7-7.9 (C) A number of statements or quotes provide little or no insight.
(10%)
6-6.9 (D) Loose or no insight on the correlation between statements and evidence, thereby not formulating comprehensible arguments.
0-5.9 (F) No effort in providing any insights. Lack of arguments.
27-30 Justified and identifiable, naturally flowing towards buttressing the thesis. Smooth and sound macro-structural transitions from
(A) unit to unit. The micro-thesis of a unit progresses through logically classified, coherent and interconnected paragraphs.

N/A

24-26.9
(B)
21-23.9
(C)

Overall rather justified and identifiable, even though occasionally lapsing towards extraneousness. Some macro-structural
transitions are obscure, or some paragraphs lack coherence, interrelation or clarity of sequencing.
Overall lacking a logical, driving point and proper justification; leaning towards extraneousness or redundancy. Macro-structural
units are often unabridged, while many paragraphs lack coherence, correlation with each other and do not serve a clear driving
point.

ASSESSMENT

PRESENTATION
(30%)

18-20.9
(D)
0-17.9
(F)
27-30
(A)

N/A

24-26.9
(B)
21-23.9
(C)
18-20.9
(D)
0-17.9
(F)

Indistinct, not-rarely due to a lack of driving point. Haphazard structuring of units, many paragraphs without topic sentences.
Lack of driving point, illogical structuring of units or no paragraphing at all.
Excellence in grammar and syntax, use of sophisticated vocabulary, use and understanding of related terminology. The paper is
properly typed, paragraph margins are justified, and illustrations are accompanied by full identifications and proper in-text
citations. The author cites all ideas, statements, arguments, or evidence other than his own.
Correct grammar and syntax with sporadic mistakes. The papers format is not very user-friendly. Some illustrations are not cited
in the text or are incompletely identified. The author cites all ideas, statements, arguments, or evidence other than his own.
Some failures in correct use of grammar, syntax and diction, but no grave mistakes. The papers format is unattractive and not
user-friendly. Few illustrative materials, unidentified, placed casually without in-text citation. Some mistakes in citations.
Major errors in syntax, grammar, and diction. Frequent mistakes in citation style, too little illustrative materials without structural
link with the text. Paper format difficult to read.
Major problems in writing academic English. Instances of plagiarism. Paper highly illegible due to sloppy formatting.

Final Papers Grade


ADDITIONAL FEEDBACK
1. Thesis: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2. Content:
a. Logic and Argumentation: ___________________________________________________________________________________
b. Use of Evidence: ___________________________________________________________________________________________
c. Analysis: _________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Structure: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________
4. Presentation: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dr. Konstantinos Giakoumis