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Water Fixed Fire fighting systems

Capacity of fire pumps


The capacity of the fire pumps is calculated as a product of the breadth, depth
and length of the vessel but need not exceed 25m3 per hour

Fire pumps
For cargo ships of 150 gross tons or more, a minimum of one fixed power pump
and
one
portable
pump
are
to
be
provided.
For cargo ships of less than 150 gross tons, one portable pump or alternative , is
to
be
provided.
which
meets
the
criteria
listed
later
For fishing vessels, not less than one fixed power pump is to be provided.
Sanitary, ballast, bilge or general service pumps may be accepted as fire pumps,
provided that they are not normally used for pumping oil, and that, if they are
subject to occasional duty for the transfer or pumping of fuel oil, suitable
changeover
arrangements
are
fitted.
In cargo ships and fishing vessels classed for navigation in ice, the fire pump sea
inlet valves are to be provided with ice clearing arrangements .
Relief valves are to be provided in conjunction with any fire pump if the pump is
capable of developing a pressure exceeding the design pressure of the water
service pipes, hydrants and hoses. These valves are to be so placed and adjusted
as to prevent excessive pressure in any part of the fire main system.<BR< main.

Portable Pumps

The pump is to be self-priming.


The suction head in operation is not to exceed 4,5 m.
The portable fire pump, when fitted with its length of discharge hose
and nozzle , is to be capable of maintaining a pressure sufficient to
produce a jet throw of at least 12 m, or that required to enable a jet of
water to be directed on any part of the engine room or the exterior
boundary of the engine room and casing, whichever is the greater. In
the case of ships less than 150t, it is to be ensured that a jet of water
can be directed to any part of the ship.
The pump set is to have its own fuel tank of sufficient capacity to
operate the pump for three hours. (e) Details of the fuel type and
storage location are to be submitted. If the fuel type has a flashpoint
below 60C, further consideration to the fire safety aspects will be
given.
The pump set is to be stored in a secure, safe and enclosed space,
accessible from open deck and clear of the Category 'A' machinery
space. In the case of ships less than 150ton , it is to be ensured that
access to the pump will not be cut off in the event of a hold fire.
The pump set is to be easily moved and operated by two persons and
be readily available for immediate use.
Arrangements are to be provided to secure the pump at its anticipated
operating position(s).
The overboard suction hose is to be non-collapsible and of sufficient
length to cater for the ship's motion under all operational conditions. A
suitable strainer is to be fitted at the inlet end of the hose.

Any diesel-driven power source for the pump is to be capable of being


readily started in its cold condition down to a temperature of 0 C by
hand (manual) cranking.
If it is not possible to comply with the requirements of the above, an
additional fixed fire pump will be required, which is to comply with the
following:
The pump, its source of power and sea connection are to be
located in accessible positions outside the Category 'A'
machinery space; or in a different space to the main fire pump, if
the main fire pump is located outside the Category 'A' machinery
space. In the case of ships less than 150t, the pump may be
situated in the Category 'A' machinery space, if so desired.
) The sea valve is to be capable of being operated from a position
near the pump.
The room where the fire pump prime mover is located is to be
illuminated from the emergency source of electrical power,
except for ships less than 150t, and is to be well ventilated.
If the pump is required to supply water for a fixed fireextinguishing system in the space where the main fire pump is
situated, it is to be capable of simultaneously supplying water to
this system and the fire main at the required rates.
The pump may also be used for other suitable purposes, subject
to approval in each case.
Pressure and quantity of water delivered by the pump being
sufficient to produce a jet of water, at any nozzle, of not less than
12 m.
In the case of ships lisee than 150t, a fire main, hydrants and
hoses are to be installed of suitable construction

Means to illuminate the stowage area of the portable pump and its
necessary areas of operation are to be provided from the emergency source of
electrical power.

Fire main
The diameter of the fire main is to be based on the required capacity of the fixed
main fire pump(s) and the diameter of the water service pipes are to be sufficient
to ensure an adequate supply of water for the operation of at least one fire hose.
The wash deck line may be used as a fire main provided that the requirements of
this
sub-Section
are
satisfied.
All exposed water pipes for fire-extinguishing are to be provided with drain valves
for use in frosty weather. The valves are to be located where they will not be
damaged
by
cargo.
When the fixed main fire pump is delivering the quantity of water required , or
the fire pump described as the alternative the portable pump , through the fire
main, fire hoses and nozzles, the pressure maintained at any hydrant is to be
sufficient to produce a jet throw at any nozzle of not less than 12 m.

Number and position of hydrants


The number and position of the hydrants are to be such that at least one jet of
water may reach any part normally accessible to the crew while the cargo ship or
fishing vessel is being navigated and any part of any cargo space when empty.
Furthermore, such hydrants are to be positioned near the accesses to the

protected spaces. At least one hydrant is to be provided in each Category 'A'


machinery space.

Pipes and hydrants


Materials readily rendered ineffective by heat are not to be used for fire mains.
Where steel pipes are used, they are to be galvanized internally and externally.
Cast iron pipes are not acceptable. The pipes and hydrants are to be so placed
that the fire-hoses may be easily coupled to them. The arrangement of pipes and
hydrants are to be such as to avoid the possibility of freezing. In ships where
deck cargo may be carried, the positions of the hydrants are to be such that they
are always readily accessible and the pipes are to be arranged, as far as
practicable, to avoid risk of damage by such cargo. Unless one hose and nozzle is
provided for each hydrant in the ship, there is to be complete interchangeability
of
hose
couplings
and
nozzles.
A valve is to be fitted at each fire hydrant so that any fire-hose may be removed
while the fire pump is at work.
Where an additional fixed fire pump is fitted in as an alternative to the
portable pump:
an isolating valve is to be fitted in the fire main so that all the
hydrants in the ship, except that or those in the Category 'A'
machinery space containing the main fire pump, can be supplied
with water by the additional fixed fire pump. The isolating valve is
to be located in an easily accessible and tenable position outside
the Category 'A' machinery space; and
the fire main is not to re-enter the machinery space downstream
of the isolating valve.

Fire Hoses
Fire-hoses are to be of approved non-perishable material. The hoses are to be
sufficient in length to project a jet of water to any of the spaces in which they
may be required to be used. Their length, in general, is not to exceed 18 m. Each
hose is to be provided with a nozzle and the necessary couplings. Fire-hoses,
together with any necessary fittings and tools, are to be kept ready for use in
conspicuous positions near the water service hydrants or connections.
The number of fire-hoses to be provided, each complete with couplings and
nozzles, is to be one for each 15 m length of the cargo ship or fishing vessel but
in no case is there to be less than three. These numbers do not include any hoses
required in any engine room. If necessary, the number of hoses is to be increased
so as to ensure that hoses in sufficient number are available and accessible at all
times.

Nozzles
For the purpose of this Chapter, standard nozzle sizes are to be 12 mm, 16 mm or
19 mm, or as near thereto as possible, so as to make full use of the maximum
discharge
capacity
of
the
fire
pump(s).
For accommodation and service spaces, the nozzle size need not exceed 12 mm.
The size of nozzles intended for use in conjunction with a portable fire pump need
not
exceed
12
mm.
All nozzles are to be of an approved dual purpose type (i.e. spray/jet type)
incorporating a shut-off.

Typical system

Shown above is a typical system which may be found on most vessel. Of note are
the large number of fire main isolator valves. The system may be so arranged as
to split the supply between port and stbd sides over all deck levels. Thereby in
the event of damage on one side of the vessel a nearby supply of water is
ensured. In addition to the required main and emergency fire pumps, on this
vessel a standy by pump capable of serving the fire main as well as the ballast
and emergency bilge suction systems is available. ( note that a special
arrangement must be made to ensure that bilge water is not delivered through
the fire main.

One vessel I have served on has Main, Emergency, Fire & ballast, Potable
water cargo & Fire pumps all cabable of supplying the main fire main as well
as a 3600m3/hr main engine driven pump for supplying fire monitors.

Fixed Fire Fighting Installations for


enclosed Spaces rules and regulations
Gas fire-extinguishing systems in machinery spaces
The use of a fire-extinguishing medium which, either by itself or under expected
conditions of use, gives off toxic gases in such quantities as to endanger persons
is not permitted. New installations that use fire-extinguishing media, which have
ozone-depleting properties under the Montreal Protocol, are not permitted.
The necessary pipes for conveying a fire- extinguishing medium into
protected spaces are to be provided with control valves which are to be so placed
that they will be easily accessible and not readily cut off from use by an outbreak
of fire. The control valves are to be so marked as to indicate clearly the spaces to
which the pipes are led. Suitable provision is to be made to prevent inadvertent
admission of the medium to any space. Where pipes pass through
accommodation spaces they are to be seamless and the number of pipe joints are
to be kept to a minimum and made by welding only.

The piping for the distribution of fire-extinguishing medium is to be of


adequate size and so arranged, and discharge nozzles so positioned that a
uniform distribution of medium is obtained. All joints are to be made by suitable
barrel couplings, cone connections or flanges. Screwed and running couplings are
not allowed except that threaded sleeve joints may be allowed where connecting
the nozzles to the distribution piping in the protected spaces. All pipes are to be
arranged to be self-draining and where led through any refrigerated spaces, the
arrangement will be specially considered. A means whereby the individual pipes
to all protected spaces can be tested using compressed air is to be provided.
Distribution pipes are to extend at least 50 mm beyond the last nozzle.
Steel pipes fitted in spaces where corrosion is likely to occur are to be
galvanized, at least internally.
Means are to be provided to close all openings which may admit air
into, or allow gas to escape from, a protected space.
Where the volume of free air contained in air receivers in any space is
such that, if released in such a space in the event of fire, such release of air
within that space would seriously affect the efficiency of the fixed fireextinguishing system, an additional quantity of fire-extinguishing medium is to be
provided.
Means are to be provided for automatically giving audible warning of
the release of fire-extinguishing medium into any space in which personnel
normally work or to which they have access. The alarm is to operate for a suitable
period before the medium is released.
Where pneumatically-operated alarms are fitted which require
periodic testing, carbon dioxide is not to be used as an operating medium. Airoperated alarms may be used provided that the air supply is clean and dry.
Where electrically-operated alarms are used, the arrangements are to
be such that the electric operating mechanism is located outside the pump room,
see also Ch 2,16.8.
The means of control of any fixed gas fire- extinguishing system are
to be readily accessible and simple to operate and are to be grouped together in
as few locations as possible at positions not likely to be cut off by a fire in a
protected space. At each location, there are to be clear instructions relating to the
operation of the system having regard to the safety of personnel.
Automatic release of fire-extinguishing medium is not permitted.
Where the quantity of extinguishing medium is required to protect
more than one space, the quantity of medium available need not be more than
the largest quantity required for any one space so protected.
Means are to be provided for the crew to safely check the quantity of
medium in the containers.
Containers for the storage of fire-extinguishing media and associated
pressure components are to be designed and tested to Codes of Practice
recognized by LR, having regard to their locations and the maximum ambient
temperatures expected in service.

The fire-extinguishing medium is to be stored outside a protected


space, in a room which is situated in a safe and readily accessible position and
effectively ventilated. Any entrance to such a storage room is to preferably be
from the open deck and in any case be independent of the protected space.
Access doors are to open outwards, and bulkheads and decks including doors and
other means of closing any opening therein, which form the boundaries between
such rooms and adjoining enclosed spaces are to be gastight.
In systems where containers discharge into a common manifold, nonreturn valves are to be provided at the connections of the container discharge
pipes to the manifold to allow any container to be disconnected without
preventing the use of other containers in the system and to prevent the discharge
of extinguishing medium into the container storage room in the event of the
system being operated. Manifolds are to be tested by hydraulic pressure to 1,5
times the design pressure. The design pressure is the maximum gauge pressure
to which the system may be subjected and is not to be less than the gauge
pressure corresponding to the maximum ambient temperature expected in
service. After the hydraulic test, manifolds are to be carefully cleaned and dried
before the non-return valves are finally fitted.
For ships on unrestricted service, spare parts for the system are to be
stored on board. As a minimum, these are to consist of:
1 actuator;
1 flexible hose (cylinder to manifold); and
the cylinder bursting discs and sealing washers for all cylinders.

Carbon dioxide systems


Carbon dioxide systems are to comply with 7.1 in addition to the remaining
requirements of this sub-Section.
For the purpose of this Chapter, the volume of free carbon dioxide is
to be calculated at 0,56 m3/kg.
For machinery spaces:
the quantity of carbon dioxide carried is to be sufficient to give a
minimum volume of free gas equal to the larger of:
30 per cent of the gross volume of the largest machinery space
protected, including the casing;
the fixed piping system is to be such that 85 per cent of the gas can
be discharged into the space within two minutes; and
the distribution arrangements are to be such that approximately 15
per cent of the required quantity of carbon dioxide is led to the bilge
areas.
Two separate controls are to be provided for releasing carbon dioxide
into a protected space and each is to ensure the activation of the alarm. One
control is to be used to discharge the gas from its storage cylinder(s). A second
control is to be used for opening the valve of the piping which conveys the gas
into the protected space. The two controls are to be located inside a release box
clearly identified for the particular space. If the box containing the controls is to
be locked, a key to the box is to be in a break-glass type enclosure conspicuously
located adjacent to the box. There is to be a dedicated release box for each
protected space, in which personnel normally work or to which they have access,
see also 7.1.7. The space served is to be identified at the release box.

mm bore.

Distribution pipes for carbon dioxide are not to be smaller than 20

High-expansion foam systems


Any required fixed high-expansion foam system in machinery spaces is to be
capable of rapidly discharging through fixed discharge outlets a quantity of foam
sufficient to fill the greatest space to be protected at a rate of at least 1 m in
depth per minute. The quantity of foam-forming liquid available is to be sufficient
to produce a volume of foam equal to five times the volume of the largest space
to be protected.
The expansion ratio of the foam is not to exceed 1000 to 1.
Alternative arrangements and discharge rates will be permitted
provided that equivalent protection is achieved.
Supply ducts for delivering foam, air intakes to the foam generator
and the number of foam-generating units are to be such as will provide effective
foam production and distribution.
The arrangement of the foam generator delivery ducting is to be such
that a fire in the protected space will not affect the foam-generating equipment.
The foam generator, its sources of power supply, foam-forming liquid
and means of controlling the system are to be readily accessible and simple to
operate and are to be grouped in as few locations as possible at positions not
likely to be cut off by fire in the protected space.
Foam concentrates carried for use in fixed foam fire-extinguishing
systems are to be of an approved type. They are to be tested at least twice
during each five year period to verify that they remain fit for service. Evidence in
the form of a report from the foam manufacturer or an independent laboratory
will be accepted.

Pressure water-spraying systems


Any required fixed pressure water-spraying fire-extinguishing system in
machinery spaces is to be provided with spraying nozzles of an approved type.
The number and arrangement of the nozzles is to be such as to
ensure an effective average distribution of water of at least five litres per square
metre per minute in the spaces to be protected. Where increased application
rates are considered necessary, these will be specially considered. Nozzles are to
be fitted above bilges, tank tops and other areas over which oil fuel is liable to
spread and also above other specific fire hazards in the machinery spaces.
The system may be divided into sections, the distribution valves of
which are to be operated from easily accessible positions outside the spaces to be
protected and which are not to be readily cut off by fire in the protected space.
The system is to be kept charged at the necessary pressure, and the
pump supplying the water for the system is to be put automatically into action by
a pressure drop in the system.

The pump is to be capable of simultaneously supplying, at the


necessary pressure, all sections of the system in any one compartment to be
protected. The pump and its controls are to be installed outside the space(s) to
be protected. It is not to be possible for a fire in the space(s) protected by the
water-spraying system to put the system out of action.
The pump may be driven by independent internal combustion type
machinery, but if it is dependent upon power being supplied from the emergency
generator, that generator is to be arranged to start automatically in case of main
power failure so that power for the pump required by 7.4.5 is immediately
available. When the pump is driven by independent internal combustion
machinery, it is to be so situated that a fire in the protected space will not affect
the air supply to the machinery.
Precautions are to be taken to prevent the nozzles from becoming
clogged by impurities in the water or corrosion of the piping, nozzles, valves and
pump.
As an alternative to 7.4.1 to 7.4.7, the arrangement described in
MSC/Circ.668, and amendments thereto contained in MSC/Circ.728 will be
accepted or equivalent.

halon 1301 Bromotrichlhoromethane


CF3Br
A colorless odourless gas. As a gas it is non-corrosive, when it is dissolved in
water it is highly corrosive .Nitrogen for super-pressurisation is added due to the
low pressure energy of halon, typically to 42bar at 20oC
by a little understood process it disrupts the chain of reaction that is
combustion thus extinguishing fires.

Toxicity
When comparing toxicity to extinguishing concentration halon is the safest agent.
Concentrations upt to 7% can be breathed for 5 minutes without effect, at 10%
this is reduced to 1 minute.
At a temperature above 510oC halon will decompose. Two of the most
important products are Hydrogen Bromide (HBr) and Hydrogen Fluoride (HF). In
small concentrations these gases are an irritant which will forewarn personnel of
increasing concentrations.
It is considered that these gases pose a much lesser threat than the
other products of fire- poisonous smoke, carbon monoxide etc.

Required concentration

A concentration of 4.25 to 5% by volume is required

Advantages

clean with no residue


Easy and safe to store
Electrically non-conductive
Good penetration
Suited to automatic release
Low working concentrations means relatively safe for personnel
Fast

Regulations

Only permitted machinery space, pump rooms or cargo spaces


solely for carriage of vehicles not carrying cargo.
No new installations
System designed so minimum quantity of medium is discharged to
space based on liquid phase within 20s
Means of safely checking pressures
Volume 0.16m3/Kg
Fire resistant release mechanism
Over pressure device fitted
Leakage warning alarm
for locally operated devices the concentration should not go above
7% not halon 1301 and 5.5% for halon 1211 at 20 oC, discharge time
for liquid phase no more than 10s

Montreal convention
Following the Montreal protocol the usage of Halons was agreed to be phased out
by the year 2000 and halved by the year 1995.
In response to this, IMO has planned the following;
No new installations after July 1992
Testing of systems banned by January 1992, integrity test on spaces
required
A requirement that stocks of Halons be recorded
Existing Halon systems phased out by 2000
With regard to the second requirement, guidelines state that Halon should only be
used as a fire fighting medium in a space where there is no other suitable means
of extinguishing the fire to protect personnel and property. This guideline is only
valid until January 2000. Companies are required to replace there fire fighting
Halon with a suitable alternative, it is envisaged that companies will have
difficulty in restocking Halon systems as the production of these gasses is phased
out by industry. It is a requirement that they have a suitable alternative method
fitted should the system be utilised and so it is in the operators best interest to
replace the system at their convenience rather than as necessary. Halon systems
are still in use as of August 2000

Sprinkler systems
Must be fitted to passenger ships carrying less than 36 passengers in the
accommodation spacesand other areas considered necessary be the
administration. For pasenger ships carrying greater than 36 passengers it must
be fitted to accommodation spaces, corridors, stairwells and to control stations
( the latter may be served by an alternative system to prevent damage). The
system must be of an approved type. See below for full requirements.
Generally takes the form of a wet pipe (line continuosly flooded) on to which are
connected a number of sprinkler head. These heads consist of a valve held shut
by a high expansion fluid filled quartzoid bulb.A small air space is incorporated.

When a fire occurs in an adjacent area to this bulb the fluid expands
until the air space is filled, increasing internal pressure causes the bulb to
fracture. The size of the air gap determines the temperature at which this failure
occurs. The valve plug falls out and a jet of water exits , striking the spray
generator where it is then distributed evenly over the surrounding area. In acting
this way only the area of the fire is deluged and damage is minimised.

Water is supplied from an air pressurised water tank ( thus the


system functions without electrical power), this water is fresh water to minimise
damage. The tank is half filled with water and the rest is compressed air at
pressure sufficient to ensure that all the water is delivered to the highest sprinkler
at sprinkler head working pressure. Once this source of water is exhausted, falling
main pressure is detected by a pressure switch. This activates a sea water supply
pump. A valve is fitted on the system to allow proper testing of this function.
After sea water has entered the system proper flushing with fresh water is
required to prevent corrosion
A shore connection may be connected to the system to allow function
during dry-dock

High Pressure Water spray system


A similar but essentially different system exists for the supply of water under
pressure to dry pipes onto which sprinkler heads are fitted. These sprinkler heads
do not have the bulb and valve arrangement. Instead when an area is to be
served a relevant isolation valves is opened. The fundamental difference between
this and the sprinkler system is that human intervention is required, whereas the
sprinkler system is required to be fully automated. Commonly a cross connection
vai a non-return valve exists able to deliver to the water from the high pressure
spray system to the sprinkler system

When an isolation valve is opened pressure in the line falls and the
sea water pump is started. The air vessel is there to prevent cycling of the pump
due to slight water leakage. The fresh water pump is there for flushing and initial
filling of wet pipe only.

Regulations
Taken from SOLAS 1974 Regualtion II/2A
Regulation 12 Automatic sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm systems
1.1 Any required automatic sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm
system shall be capable of immediate operation at all times and no
action by the crew shall be necessary to set it in operation. It shall
be of the wet pipe type but small exposed sections may be of the dry
pipe type where in the opinion of the Administration this is a
necessary precaution. Any parts of the system which may be
subjected to freezing temperatures in service shall be suitably
protected against freezing. It shall be kept charged at the necessary
pressure and shall have provision for a continuous supply of water
as required in this regulation.
1.2 Each section of sprinklers shall include means for giving a visual
and audible alarm signal automatically at one or more indicating
units whenever any sprinkler comes into operation. Such alarm
systems shall be such as to indicate if any fault occurs in the
system. Such units shall indicate in which section served by the
system fire has occurred and shall be centralized on the navigation
bridge and in addition, visible and audible alarms from the unit shall
be located in a position other than on the navigation bridge, so as to
ensure that the indication of fire is immediately received by the crew.
2.1 Sprinklers shall be grouped into separate sections, each of
which shall contain not more than 200 sprinklers. In passenger ships
any section of sprinklers shall not serve more than two decks and
shall not be situated in more than one main vertical zone. However,
the Administration may permit such a section of sprinklers to serve
more than two decks or be situated in more than one main vertical
zone, if it is satisfied that the protection of the ship against fire will
not thereby be reduced.
2.2 Each section of sprinklers shall be capable of being isolated by
one stop valve only. The stop valve in each section shall be readily
accessible and its location shall be clearly and permanently
indicated. Means shall be provided to prevent the operation of the
stop valves by any unauthorized person.
2.3 A gauge indicating the pressure in the system shall be provided
at each section stop valve and at a central station.
2.4 The sprinklers shall be resistant to corrosion by marine
atmosphere. In accommodation and service spaces the sprinklers
shall come into operation within the temperature range from 68C to
79C, except that in locations such as drying rooms, where high
ambient temperatures might be expected, the operating temperature
may be increased by not more than 30C above the maximum
deckhead temperature.
2.5 A list or plan shall be displayed at each indicating unit showing
the spaces covered and the location of the zone in respect of each

section. Suitable instructions for testing and maintenance shall be


available.
3 Sprinklers shall be placed in an overhead position and spaced in a
suitable pattern to maintain an average application rate of not less
than 5 l/m2/min over the nominal area covered by the sprinklers.
However, the Administration may permit the use of sprinklers
providing such an alternative amount of water suitably distributed as
has been shown to the satisfaction of the Administration to be not
less effective.
4.1 A pressure tank having a volume equal to at least twice that of
the charge of water specified in this subparagraph shall be provided.
The tank shall contain a standing charge of fresh water, equivalent
to the amount of water which would be discharged in one minute by
the pump referred to in paragraph 5.2, and the arrangements shall
provide for maintaining an air pressure in the tank such as to ensure
that where the standing charge of fresh water in the tank has been
used the pressure will be not less than the working pressure of the
sprinkler, plus the pressure exerted by a head of water measured
from the bottom of the tank to the highest sprinkler in the system.
Suitable means of replenishing the air under pressure and of
replenishing the fresh water charge in the tank shall be provided. A
glass gauge shall be provided to indicate the correct level of the
water in the tank.
4.2 Means shall be provided to prevent the passage of seawater into
the tank.
5.1 An independent power pump shall be provided solely for the
purpose of continuing automatically the discharge of water from the
sprinklers. The pump shall be brought into action automatically by
the pressure drop in the system before the standing fresh water
charge in the pressure tank is completely exhausted.
5.2 The pump and the piping system shall be capable of maintaining
the necessary pressure at the level of the highest sprinkler to ensure
a continuous output of water sufficient for the simultaneous
coverage of a minimum area of 280 m2 at the application rate
specified in paragraph 3.
5.3 The pump shall have fitted on the delivery side a test valve with a
short open-ended discharge pipe. The effective area through the
valve and pipe shall be adequate to permit the release of the
required pump output while maintaining the pressure in the system
specified in paragraph 4.1.
5.4 The sea inlet to the pump shall wherever possible be in the space
containing the pump and shall be so arranged that when the ship is
afloat it will not be necessary to shut off the supply of seawater to
the pump for any purpose other than the inspection or repair of the
pump.
6 The sprinkler pump and tank shall be situated in a position
reasonably remote from any machinery space of category A and
shall not be situated in any space required to be protected by the
sprinkler system.

7.1 In passenger ships there shall be not less than two sources of
power supply for the seawater pump and automatic alarm and
detection system. Where the sources of power for the pump are
electrical, these shall be a main generator and an emergency source
of power. One supply for the pump shall be taken from the main
switchboard, and one from the emergency switchboard by separate
feeders reserved solely for that purpose. The feeders shall be so
arranged as to avoid galleys, machinery spaces and other enclosed
spaces of high fire risk except in so far as it is necessary to reach
the appropriate switchboards, and shall be run to an automatic
change-over switch situated near the sprinkler pump. This switch
shall permit the supply of power from the main switchboard so long
as a supply is available therefrom, and be so designed that upon
failure of that supply it will automatically change over to the supply
from the emergency switchboard. The switches on the main
switchboard and the emergency switchboard shall be clearly
labelled and normally kept closed. No other switch shall be
permitted in the feeders concerned. One of the sources of power
supply for the alarm and detection system shall be an emergency
source. Where one of the sources of power for the pump is an
internal combustion engine it shall, in addition to complying with the
provisions of paragraph 6, be so situated that a fire in any protected
space will not affect the air supply to the machinery.
7.2 In cargo ships there shall not be less than two sources of power
supply for the seawater pump and automatic alarm and detection
system. If the pump is electrically driven it shall be connected to the
main source of electrical power, which shall be capable of being
supplied by at least two generators. The feeders shall be so
arranged as to avoid galleys, machinery spaces and other enclosed
spaces of high fire risk except in so far as it is necessary to reach
the appropriate switchboards. One of the sources of power supply
for the alarm and detection system shall be an emergency source.
Where one of the sources of power for the pump is an internal
combustion engine it shall, in addition to complying with the
provisions of paragraph 6, be so situated that a fire in any protected
space will not affect the air supply to the machinery.
8 The sprinkler system shall have a connection from the ship's fire
main by way of a lockable screw-down non-return valve at the
connection which will prevent a backflow from the sprinkler system
to the fire main.
9.1 A test valve shall be provided for testing the automatic alarm for
each section of sprinklers by a discharge of water equivalent to the
operation of one sprinkler. The test valve for each section shall be
situated near the stop valve for that section.
9.2 Means shall be provided for testing the automatic operation of
the pump on reduction of pressure in the system.
9.3 Switches shall be provided at one of the indicating positions
referred to in paragraph 1.2 which will enable the alarm and the
indicators for each section of sprinklers to be tested.
10 Spare sprinkler heads shall be provided for each section of
sprinklers to the satisfaction of the Administration.