Anda di halaman 1dari 11

P.H.A.T.

(Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 1 of 11

MARCH 21, 2013

P.H.A.T. (POWER
HYPERTROPHY
ADAPTIVE TRAINING)

When it comes to a persons physique, everyone has a unique set of goals


and their own interpretation of what is aesthetically pleasing. Take a look
around the gym and youll no doubt see a variety of training methods and
physiques to match. For instance, you may observe the stereotypical
muscle-head, who loves nothing more than entering a room and having
everyones jaws drop at the sight of their imposing and masculine
physique, blasting out some heavy deadlifts. Then, at the other end of the
room, you see a slim and well toned person on the treadmill, running
for what seems to be a long time.

NO MATTER WHAT YOUR END GOAL IS, THE


MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO GET THERE WILL
BE, MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, THROUGH THE
USE OF A WELL STRUCTURED
TRAINING/SPORT-SPECIFIC PROGRAM

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 2 of 11

THAT IS BUILT UPON EXPERIENCE AND


SCIENTIFIC RATIONALE.
In this Issue of Gym Magazine we will explore one training program in
particular that is designed to increase strength, pile on muscle and, most
likely, leave you feeling physically exhausted at the end of every workout
P.H.A.T.

What is P.H.A.T.?
Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training, otherwise known as P.H.A.T., is a
training program developed by natural bodybuilder and powerlifter Dr.
Layne Norton that encompasses elements of both bodybuilding and
powerlifting training protocols. With P.H.A.T. the idea is that, instead of
focusing on specific training adaptations (hypertrophy, maximal
strength, power etc.) individually for weeks at a time like with linear
forms of periodization, you will perform exercises in both the lower rep
ranges (3-5 reps) and higher rep rages (12-20 reps) within the same
given week. This is achieved by splitting the workouts into Power days
and Hypertrophy days which, subsequently, means you will be training
each muscle group twice a week.
Now to many this way of training may seem somewhat counter intuitive
as it appears to go against their long held beliefs of overtraining and how
training a body part any more than once a week will supposedly cause
you to crash and burn out. It is, after all, in contrast to the more
traditional bodybuilding split style programs that have become so
popular within the fitness community over the past five or so decades.

BUT FEAR NOT WITHIN A FEW SHORT


WEEKS YOUR BODY WILL ADAPT TO THIS
ADDED TRAINING FREQUENCY AND YOU WILL
SOON BEGIN TO MAKE GAINS IN BOTH
STRENGTH AND MUSCLE MASS AT A MUCH
FASTER RATE THAN YOU EVER EXPERIENCED
PREVIOUSLY.

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 3 of 11

What does a typical P.H.A.T. routine


look like?
As you will be performing exercises in both the lower and higher rep
ranges, it has been designed so that the workouts are separated into
power days and hypertrophy days respectively. The rationale behind
this is that you will get more bang for your buck so to speak if you focus
on lifting for either maximal strength or to induce muscular hypertrophy
within a given training session. Listed below is the basic format of the
P.H.A.T. program:
Day 1: Upper Body Power
Day 2: Lower Body Power
Day 3: Rest
Day 4: Back and Shoulders Hypertrophy
Day 5: Lower Body Hypertrophy
Day 6: Chest and Arms
Day 7: Rest

Power Days

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 4 of 11

Day one and day two are your power days. During these workouts you
will be doing heavy compound movements in the 3-5 rep range for 3-5
working sets in order to elicit more strength orientated gains this
would include exercises like the deadlift, squat, bench press, bent-over
rows, overhead press or any variation of the above.
Since you are lifting predominantly for an increase in strength, your rest
intervals between sets will be much longer than that of the hypertrophy
days. Here you can rest anywhere from 3-6 minutes between sets; the
goal here is to lift as heavy a weight as possible for these 3-5 reps, so
make sure you are getting enough rest before attacking that barbell
again for your next set!
Following each of your main lifts with assistance exercises is a great
idea and should be included where possible; these are essentially
supplementary exercises used as a means to improve or benefit your
main compound lifts. For example, following your heavy sets of bent-over
rows you could do weighted pull-ups for 2 sets of 6-10 reps, and after
your back squats you could do 2 sets on the leg press for 6-10 reps.
Auxiliary exercises may also be included at the end of the workout to
target the smaller muscles (calves and arms for instance) although the
assistance exercises on the upper body power day will often be enough
to stimulate bicep and tricep growth just fine.

Hypertrophy Days
Youve just had a days rest and its now time to get back in the gym and
crank that intensity up a notch you are now training like a traditional
bodybuilder. Your reps will be higher, rests will be shorter and you will
most likely be feeling more of a pump at the end of your workout.
Before you jump straight into your hypertrophy portion of the routine,
you should begin the workout by doing 6-8 sets of speed work for 3 quick
reps with the main compound exercise you lifted at the start of the week.
So if you did bent-over rows on Monday for your back power exercise,
you will do bent-over rows at the beginning of your back and shoulders
workout on the hypertrophy day. Since the goal here is to improve rate of
force production, you will use a weight 65-70% of that of your 3-5 rep
max.
Once you have finished your speed work you will go ahead and focus on
inducing muscle hypertrophy.

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 5 of 11

The rest of the workout typically looks like that of a bodybuilder: 3-4 sets
of 12-20 repetitions per exercise with a rest time of 1-2 minutes between
sets.

Is P.H.A.T. for everybody?


The P.H.A.T. program will be a tough routine for anyone. In its totality, its
a hardcore 5 day a week program with a tremendous amount of volume
in every workout.
It is best suited for the advanced trainee; someone who has built up an
impressive and solid foundation of strength. The undulating rep scheme
involved will help this type of athlete to continue making gains in both
muscle mass and strength, whereas a linear form of periodization, or
typical 5 day split, will often not be the most efficient, let alone optimal,
way of making progress for the advanced lifter.
This program may also benefit the intermediate lifter provided they too
have built up a good foundation of strength. However for an intermediate
to get the most out of this routine it is advisable to cut back the volume of
each workout to avoid burning themselves out, and also to perhaps cut
back on training frequency to 4 days a week as opposed to the full 5 day
training week.
If you are a beginner that is just getting into lifting weights then there are

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 6 of 11

other full-body routines out there that will be much more optimal for
increasing strength and muscle mass than P.H.A.T.

P.H.A.T. Template
Day 1: Upper Body Power Day
Pulling Power Movement: Bent over or Pendlay rows 3 sets of 3-5 reps
Assistance Pulling movement: Weighted Pull ups 2 sets of 6-10 reps
Auxiliary Pulling movement: Rack chins 2 sets of 6-10 reps
Pressing Power Movement: Flat dumbbell presses 3 sets of 3-5 reps
Assistance pressing movement: Weighted dips 2 sets of 6-10 reps
Assistance pressing movement: Seated dumbbell shoulder presses 3
sets of 6-10 reps
Auxiliary curling movement: Cambered bar curls 3 sets of 6-10 reps
Auxiliary extension movement: Skull crushers 3 sets of 6-10 reps

Day 2: Lower Body Power Day


Pressing Power Movement: Squats 3 sets of 3-5 reps
Assistance pressing movement: Hack Squats 2 sets of 6-10 reps
Assistance extension movement: Leg extensions 2 sets of 6-10 reps
Assistance pulling movement: Stiff legged deadlifts 3 sets of 5-8 reps
Assistance pulling/curling movement: Glute ham raises or lying leg
curls 2 sets of 6-10 reps
Auxiliary calf movement: Standing calf raise 3 sets of 6-10 reps
Auxiliary calf movement: Seated calf raise 2 sets of 6-10 reps

Day 3: Rest
Day 4: Back and Shoulders Hypertrophy
Day
Pulling Power Exercise speed work: Bent over or Pendlay rows 6 sets
of 3 reps with 65-70% of normal 3-5 rep max
Hypertrophy pulling movement: Rack chins 3 sets of 8-12 reps

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 7 of 11

Hypertrophy pulling movement: Seated cable row 3 sets of 8-12 reps


Hypertrophy pulling movement: Dumbbell rows or shrugs bracing
upper body against an incline bench 2 sets of 12-15 reps
Hypertrophy pulling movement: Close grip pulldowns 2 sets of 15-20
reps
Hypertrophy shoulder movement: Seated dumbbell presses 3 sets of
8-12 reps
Hypertrophy shoulder movement: Upright rows 2 sets of 12-15 reps
Hypertrophy shoulder movement: Side lateral raises with dumbbells or
cables 3 sets of 12-20 reps

Day 5: Lower Body Hypertrophy Day


Lower Body Power Exercise speed work: Squats 6 sets of 3 reps with
65-70% of normal 3-5 rep max
Hypertrophy pressing movement: Hack squats 3 sets of 8-12 reps
Hypertrophy pressing movement: Leg presses 2 sets of 12-15 reps
Hypertrophy extension movement: Leg extensions 3 sets of 15-20 reps
Hypertrophy pulling movement: Romanian deadlifts 3 sets of 8-12 reps
Hypertrophy curling movement: Lying leg curls 2 sets of 12-15 reps
Hypertrophy curling movement: Seated leg curls 2 sets of 15-20 reps
Hypertrophy calf movement: Donkey calf raises 4 sets of 10-15 reps
Hypertrophy calf movement: Seated calf raises 3 sets of 15-20 reps

Day 6: Chest and Arms Hypertrophy Day


Pressing Power Exercise speed work: Flat dumbbell presses 6 sets of 3
reps with 65-70% of normal 3-5 rep max
Hypertrophy pressing movement: Incline dumbbell presses 3 sets of
8-12 reps
Hypertrophy pressing movement: Hammer strength chest press 3 sets
of 12-15 reps
Hypertrophy fly movement: Incline cable flyes 2 sets of 15-20 reps
Hypertrophy curling exercise: Cambered bar preacher curls 3 sets of
8-12 reps
Hypertrophy curling exercise: Dumbbell concentration curls 2 sets of
12-15 reps
Hypertrophy curling exercise: Spider curls bracing upper body against

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 8 of 11

an incline bench 2 sets of 15-20 reps


Hypertrophy extension exercise: Seated tricep extension with
cambered bar 3 sets of 8-12 reps
Hypertrophy extension exercise: Cable pressdowns with rope
attachment 2 sets of 12-15 reps
Hypertrophy extension exercise: Cable kickbacks 2 sets of 15-20 reps

Day 7: Rest
Facebook

Google+

Pinterest

E-mail

(http://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?
(https://plus.google.com/share?
Twitter(#)
(javascript:essb_pinterenst
(javascript:void
u=http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat- url=http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat();)
(0);)
training/)
training/)

SPONSORS

(http://www.illpumpyouup.com/top-selling-products/)

(http://www.fitoverfat.com/advertising/)

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

Page 9 of 11

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

Page 10 of 11

10/15/2014

P.H.A.T. (Power Hypertrophy Adaptive Training)

Page 11 of 11

Never miss a thing! Sign up to our newsletter and get email


updates on new articles, giveaways, exclusive content
and more straight to your inbox!
Enter Your Email Address

http://www.fitoverfat.com/phat-training/

Subscribe

10/15/2014