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The Complete Guide to Healing Your

Hip Flexor Injuries

Introduction
Hi and Thank You for purchasing this book!
I hope this is the start of your road to recovery and that the information in this book will
help it go smoothly and quickly.
A little about meI am a hardcore soccer player and avid runner and have been for over
20 years. Over time I have had my fair share of injuries but one injury in particular to my
Hip Flexor I just couldnt shake! This led me to researching everything I could on the
topic, talking to doctors, and experimenting in order to understand the injury more.
With the greater understanding of the injury I was able to identify the problem and break
down a recovery plan to get me back to full strength so I could train again.
At this time my Hip Flexor has never been stronger, and I hope my injury woes are stuck
in the past.
If you have any questions, my information is at the end of this book so you can contact me;
I will try to answer you as soon as I can.
For now, enjoy the book!

Table of Contents
Anatomy.......................................................................................................................................... 5
Psoas Major/Minor....................................................................................................................... 5
Illiacus Muscle ............................................................................................................................. 5
Rectus Femoris............................................................................................................................ 6
Sartorius ....................................................................................................................................... 6
Tensor Fasciae latae ..................................................................................................................... 6
Diagnosis......................................................................................................................................... 8
Hip Flexor Pain When Lifting Leg ............................................................................................. 8
Constant Hip Flexor Pain ................................................................................................................ 9
Hip Flexor Tendonitis ............................................................................................................. 9
Hip Flexor Pain When Touching Hip Area .................................................................................... 9
Bruised Hip Flexor .................................................................................................................. 9
Hip Flexor Strains ......................................................................................................................... 10
First Degree Hip Flexor Strain ................................................................................................... 10
Second Degree Hip Flexor Strain .............................................................................................. 10
Third Degree Hip Flexor Strain ................................................................................................. 10
Hip Flexor Tendonitis ................................................................................................................... 11
Snapping Hip Syndrome ............................................................................................................... 12
Treatment for Strains and Bruises................................................................................................. 14
Scar Tissue from Your Hip Flexor Injury ................................................................................ 144
Light Massage .......................................................................................................................... 144
Foam Rolling ........................................................................................................................... 144
Treatment For Hip Flexor Tendonitis ........................................................................................... 15
Standard Recovery ................................................................................................................... 165
Iliopsoas Release ...................................................................................................................... 166
Surgery ..................................................................................................................................... 176
Treatment for Snapping Hip Syndrome.17
Hip Flexor Flexibility Test.......................................................................................................... 187
After Healing 18

Legal Stuff - Disclaimer


Although the author and publisher have made every reasonable attempt to achieve complete
accuracy of the content in our book, they assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Also,
you should use the information provided in this book at your own risk.
Your particular situation may not be exactly suited to the examples illustrated in this book; you
should adjust your use of the information and recommendations accordingly.
Nothing in this book is intended to replace common sense, legal, medical or other professional
advice, and is meant to inform and entertain the reader. The author is not responsible for the use
or misuse of the information in this book.
This book is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should
regularly consult a physician in matters relating to his/her health and particularly with respect to
any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Hip Flexor Anatomy


There are 4 main locations of the smaller muscles that make up the overall hip flexor muscles:
the abdomen/hip region, the front of the thigh, the gluteus, and the inside of thigh/groin.

Abdomen/Hip
The Iliopsoas is the large, long muscle shown on the
right, located at the front of the hip. It is composed
of the following smaller muscles:

Psoas Major/Minor
The Psoas Major is a tapered muscle that runs along
the front of your pelvic bone down to your hip joint;
it is probably the most important of the hip flexor
muscles. While it does help lift the leg up, it also
greatly aids in external rotation (moving your leg
away from your center of gravity). The Psoas Minor
is found right beside the Psoas Major and also helps
in this role, but only about 50% of people have this
muscle! This is also one of the highest risk muscles
for a hip flexor injury due to its' central position and
role in most movements.

Illiacus Muscle
The Illiacus Muscle is located right beside the Psoas, but it is a much smaller, triangular
muscle. The Illiacus is actually important for two types of movements, the first: open-chained
(like when you are standing), it helps to raise the leg/knee forward. In closed-chained positions
(think lying down), it can help lift the upper half of the torso up, like in a sit-up. Because of the
heavy loads often placed on the Illiacus it is often a source of hip flexor pain, usually as a result
of a hip flexor strain.

Muscles on Front of Thigh


Rectus Femoris
This is what most people would call their quadriceps
muscle, but it is actually part of the hip flexor
muscles. It obviously is involved in hip flexion, but it
also is the primary muscle when extending the leg (knee
flexion) in a standing position, like kicking a soccer
ball. Note that it is not the primary muscle for this same
movement in a seated position when the hip is already
in a flexed position, it has limited power, so other
muscles are use.

Sartorius
The Sartorius is a long thin muscle that runs from
the hip joint all the way down to the knee over top
of the thigh. It aids in 4 major movements:
Flexion of the knee and hip, rotation of your leg,
and adduction (pushing your legs
together). Because of its' many facets of
movement, it primarily plays a support role to
other hip flexor muscles.

Gluteal Component
While it is not common sense or knowledge, part of the Gluteus is considered to be in the hip
flexor. There is only the one muscle that wraps around the leg enough to be considered in this
region: the Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL).

Tensor Fasciae latae


The Tensor Fasciae latae is primarily an adductor and stabilizing muscle. In many activities,
walking, running, snow activities, and many more, it is heavily used to stabilize the leg and
support the knee.

Inner Thigh Muscles


These 4 hip flexor muscles located on the inner thigh are all have extremely similar functions.
The Pectineus, Adductor longus and brevis, and the Gracilis all are located in what most people
would consider the groin region. They are responsible mainly for moving the leg laterally,
although they support in the flexion of the hip as well. If you have injured one of these muscles
you would probably thing you pulled your groin.
As you can see, there are several hip flexor muscles that all work together to facilitate hip flexion
while fulfilling other functions as well.

Hip Flexor Injury Diagnostic


This chart (With clickable links) will guide you through the simple injury treatment process.

Type of Pain
(Diagnosis)
Muscle
Strain

Overuse
Injury

Classification

Classification

Treatment

Treatment

Trauma

Treatment

Hip Flexor Injury Causes


In day-to-day activity, most actions will never come close to damaging the hip flexors severely,
however, in any athletic activity there is always a risk.
The most common hip flexor injury is not blunt trauma, but rather an excessive stretch of the
muscle, a hip flexor pull in other words. A pull can happen in several ways, running, jumping,
shuffling, and any other explosive sports. Modern sports are extremely fast, which push athletes
to be faster all the time, and when you try to go just that little bit faster, that little extra extension
of the leg can cause a hip flexor injury. Although this is the main source of injury, they can still
occur even when not playing sports. For example, if you are sitting down for an extended period
of time and develop a tight hip flexor it is easy to pull it when standing up and moving around.
The other type of injury that you may develop is an overuse injury from performing too much of
one movement that you do not have a sufficient fitness base for. The most common example is
Hip Flexor Tendonitis that causes the attached tendons to get inflamed and cause pain.

Diagnosis
This section will help you determine what kind of injury you have. There are three main types of
hip flexor pain discussed below, I encourage you to read through them all and see which one
most appropriately fits your discomfort.

Hip Flexor Pain When Lifting Leg


Hip flexor pain is usually associated with pain while lifting the leg, but more specifically, Hip
Flexor pain that is felt only during this movement is usually a pulled (or strained) hip flexor.

Do You Have a Pulled Hip Flexor?


If you have a pulled hip flexor you may know it already based on when it
first started hurting; if it was during some sort of explosive movement, you
probably have a hip flexor strain. In order to test if you have pulled your hip
flexor, try standing on the opposite foot, then lifting your leg as high as
possible(knee to chest, as in the picture), if you feel any hip flexor pain at
any stage stop immediately.
Once you have established that there is significant Hip Flexor pain while
performing the knee to chest movement, it is almost certain that you have a
pulled hip flexor.

Constant Hip Flexor Pain


The second type of pain is when you feel constant pain in your hip flexor. If you have nagging
hip flexor pain throughout the day, and it hurts when you move your leg or stretch your hip
flexor, you likely have some form of overuse injury. The two most common overuse injuries by
far are:

Hip Flexor Tendonitis


Hip flexor tendonitis occurs usually with athletes as an overuse injury. Whenever a repetitive
movement is performed, such as running or cycling, there is a lot of force being placed on the hip
flexors. Often this will lead to inflammation of the tendon attaching the hip flexor muscles to the
bone and will cause a lot of hip flexor pain.

Snapping Hip Syndrome


Snapping hip syndrome is closely related to hip flexor tendonitis, but has a few subtle
differences. The main difference and symptom is hearing or feeling a snap when the hip flexor
is activated (the leg is lifted in some manner). This doesnt always cause pain, but it usually
does, with relief experienced after resting.

Hip Flexor Pain When Touching Hip Area


A bruised hip flexor is an umbrella term describing an injury to one or more of the several
muscles that the hip flexor contains. If your Hip Flexor pain started after a blunt trauma to this
area, you probably have a bruised hip flexor.

Bruised Hip Flexor


It can be hard to tell the difference between a bruised hip flexor and a pulled hip flexor, because
you will often experience Hip Flexor pain when lifting the leg either way. The difference is that
in a stationary position, a bruised hip flexor will be very sensitive if you touch it. So to diagnose
this, stand up and slowly apply pressure to the different parts of the hip flexor discussed earlier;
if the hip flexor pain felt while applying pressure is similar in intensity to the Hip Flexor pain felt
lifting your leg, you probably only have a bruised hip flexor, this is actually great news!!

Hip Flexor Strain


A strain, as mentioned before, is usually caused by intense or sudden activity. What a strain
actually is though is a muscle tear. All muscles, and especially larger ones, are composed of
muscle fibres that join together. Imagine those fibres being stretched apart like an elastic band
during these activities; depending on how much you stretch them they may get damaged,
sometimes just a bit, but sometimes they will snap (or tear). A Hip Flexor strain occurs when
there is any kind of a tear in one of the hip flexor muscles. Since not all strains are equal, they
are classified into the following 3 degrees:

First Degree Hip Flexor Strain


If you can move your leg to your chest without much discomfort, you most likely have a first
degree strain; this is the best kind you could have. A first degree strain means you have a minor
or partial tear to one or more of the muscles in the area and probably don't have a lot of Hip
Flexor pain.

Second Degree Hip Flexor Strain


If you had a lot of trouble moving your leg to your chest and had to stop part way through, you
probably have a second degree pull. A second degree pull is a much more severe partial tear to
one of the muscles; it can cause significant hip flexor pain and needs to be taken care of
extremely cautiously in order not to fully tear the injured area.

Third Degree Hip Flexor Strain


If you can barely move your leg at all why are you reading this book!!! Go see your doctor right
away and try not to move your leg if you can avoid it. A Third degree strain is a full tear of your
muscle causing severe Hip Flexor pain and requires a much longer time to heal, please get your
doctors opinion on this before you do anything else.

Hip Flexor Tendonitis


When we think of tendonitis we think of getting old and aging getting the best of us. This doesnt
mean that we are not vulnerable to tendonitis, more specifically hip flexor tendonitis earlier on in
our lives when we are more or less healthy.
Hip Flexor Tendonitis is pain caused by tendon inflammation, which is typically caused in the
hip flexor region by repetitive movement of major muscles. It is an extremely common Hip
Flexor injury since many activities have a high rate of repetition. Since tendons attach muscles
to bones, they are always tied together, that is why if there is tendon damage, it is usually the
result of muscle damage. Hip flexor tendonitis is also often called Iliopsoas tendonitis due to the
fact that the Iliopsoas is often the affected muscle. To learn exactly what the Iliopsoas is
composed of and where it is, refer back to the hip flexor anatomy page.

How is Hip Flexor Tendonitis Caused?


As alluded to earlier, hip flexor tendonitis is caused through overuse of a particular muscle,
which in turn inflames the associated tendon. If you are young and have hip flexor tendonitis,
chances are good that you are an athlete, as running/cycling and all kinds of activities require
repetitive movements and actions using the hip flexors.
In a nutshell, hip flexor tendonitis is an overuse injury, which is hurt by trying to do too much
too fast. This is why it often affects athletes who try to increase their training volume, but do so
too much or without a sufficient base fitness level.

Snapping Hip Syndrome


Snapping hip syndrome is closely related to hip flexor tendonitis, but has a few subtle
differences. The main difference and symptom is hearing or feeling a snap when the hip flexor
is activated (the leg is lifted in some manner). This doesnt always cause pain, but it usually
does, with relief experienced after resting.
Much like hip flexor tendonitis, anyone who is fairly active is at risk of developing snapping hip
syndrome. Its often referred to as dancers hip as it is fairly common for dancers to develop
this due to the repetitive movements they perform in training. Anytime someone is running or
training physically a lot there is a risk of developing the injury. However, unlike other forms of
tendonitis, this injury is usually only caused as a direct result of the activity being performed, as
opposed to old age.

Two Main Types of Snapping Hip Syndrome


Lateral Extra Articular
This is the most common type of the syndrome which occurs when either the IT band or Gluteus
Medius tendon slides back and forth across a part of the pelvis called the greater trochanter.
Medial Extra Articular
The other way snapping hip syndrome can occur, is if the Illiopsoas tendon gets caught on the
front of the hip, most commonly on the anterior inferior iliac spine. If you have read about hip
flexor tendonitis, you will notice that this is the same tendon that is usually inflamed, which is
why these two injuries often have overlapping issues.

Hip Flexor Bruise (Contusion)


As discussed before, a bruised muscle in the Hip Flexor can often cause pain or discomfort. You
may or may not be able to see discoloration on your skin depending on how deep the bruise is.
A contusion is suffered after a blunt blow to a muscle damages muscle fibres and connective
tissue. On occasion a contusion can be severe enough to cause a pool of blood to accumulate in
the damaged muscle, so much so that you may be able to feel a bump over the area.

Hip Flexor Treatment Procedure For


Strains and Contusions
When you sustain a hip flexor strain or contusion, the bodys natural defenses kick in and you
will usually see some sort of swelling. To transition from this phase to the next phase in
recovery, you should follow the P.R.I.C.E. procedure as soon as possible following the injury.
Protection Stop all physical activity and try to immobilize the injured leg, this will prevent any
further damage. Note that this step is primarily for grade 3 and bad grade 2 strains, there is no
significant difference if you follow this step for grade 1 strains, however if you have the
necessary equipment, you should use it to be on the safe side.
Rest Rest may be the most frustrating step of the hip flexor treatment process, but also the
most important one. An injury cannot heal unless it has time to rebuild, if you continue to train
on an injured muscle you will develop a buildup of scar tissue which will most likely lead to
chronic injuries. In this context, rest is about reducing the movement of the injured leg as much
as possible and try to take as much stress of the injured hip flexor as you can.
Ice Immediately after the injury, alternate icing and not icing the injured hip flexor for 20
minutes every 2 hours in order to reduce inflammation and pain. After this continue icing at a
less frequent rate, judge how often by how much swelling is still present; the more swelling, the
more frequent you should ice. As a precaution, never apply an extremely cold object directly to
your skin, wrap it in some sort of towel to prevent skin damage.
Compression Compression goes hand in hand with icing, which has a purpose of reducing
swelling from inflammation. The compression will temporarily restrict blood flow which
prevents swelling from occurring. This area is hard to wrap, and takes a lot of material, so for
the most part tape is not the best option. You should try to find a compress bandage that you can
wrap around your torso several times and re-use for a long time.
Elevation Try to elevate the injury as much as possible. The hip flexor is hard to elevate
above everything else, but try to stay away from a sitting position where your hips are the lowest
point on your body.
This protocol should be followed until all swelling is eliminated and the majority of Hip Flexor
pain subsides, typically 48-72 hours with most grade 1/grade 2 pulls.
After the P.R.I.C.E. procedure is applied, you need to rest before you can move on to regaining
your strength; the length will depend on the severity of the strain.
A first degree hip flexor strain will take at least 2 weeks to fully heal, while a second degree pull
typically takes up to 6 weeks. Keep in mind that your injury is probably somewhere in between
first and second degree, so your recovery time should be about 2-6 weeks. I know what youre

thinking, but I dont want to sit out that long, and I completely understand. This begs the
question, what can we do to make it heal faster?

Heat
In order for muscle tissue to repair, cells continually need to bring resources to the area that is
damaged, in this case the hip flexor. To help this process we use heat; before we go any further
please take precautions with heat, if something is too hot it will burn your skin, which will
prolong your recovery by making repair resources go towards healing the skin as well.
To heat the area properly, you can use either a heating pad, or soak in a warm bath or hot
tub. Again, I would like to re-iterate taking precautions with the heat, use a towel around a
heating pad if needed, and raise the temperature of a bath/tub slowly. Heat is a very effective
tool that could reduce your hip flexor injury healing time significantly. You should aim for 2030 minutes of heat 1-2 times a day, any more and you risk damaging the skin.

Scar Tissue from Your Hip Flexor Injury


Even if you arent doing any strenuous activity, you still use your hip flexor in minor ways when
you walk or move around in general. Any activity when a muscle is injured will result in a
build-up of scar tissue, even though there will not be much if you arent doing physical
activity. Scar tissue is weak tissue that the body can make quickly to help the function of injured
muscles, but since it is weak it leads to chronic re-occurring Hip Flexor pain in the future. To
prevent scar tissue from accumulating there are two methods available:

Light Massage
Light self-massage can be applied to work the tissue surrounding the hip flexor injury; the
stimulation of the tissue will aid blood flow which as mentioned before is a positive, and it will
also breakdown any minor scar tissue that has formed, which should be minimal if P.R.I.C.E.
was followed.

Foam Rolling
Foam rolling is great for loosening the muscles and breaking down knots of scar tissue. This
isnt just for the hip flexor, but for any muscle group in general. Rolling will not have to be done
very often, but it is beneficial to do 2-3 times a week for a short time period.
There are 3 factors when using a foam roller that must be addressed in order to get the most out
of it.

Speed
Typically you want to move back and forth over a tight area slowly enough to allow the muscle
to overcome the natural reflex and relax. For different people this will vary, just pay attention to
the feelings you are getting in your body.

Technique
The most effective way to use a foam roller is to make the contact point your center of gravity;
this basically means that you should try to balance your weight right on top of the roller. Simply
roll up and down (or side to side) over the muscle area you are focusing on.

Duration
The duration of the entire rolling session will vary based on how extensively you want to use the
foam roller. For a single muscle you can usually complete a high quality session in about 5-10
minutes, obviously if you want to include other muscles it will take longer.

Other Considerations
This article is primarily about using a roller on the hip flexor, but the same guidelines apply to
any muscle in the body. It is a good idea to try to have a complete rolling routine where you
work on the lower quads, hamstrings, and IT bands. However, if you remember the hip flexor
contains many muscles that span more than just the top of the hip area, so its important to focus
on these muscles at the minimum.

Hip Flexor Tendonitis Treatment


There are a few immediate things you should do if you suspect you have hip flexor tendonitis:
1)

Stop all activity IMMEDIATELY; this is an injury that cannot heal without rest.

2)

If you feel pain stretching, stop performing stretching, this will only aggravate the injury

3)

Ice the area; this should help bring down some inflammation

Once the diagnosis has been made, there are a few possible courses of action.

Standard Recovery
The priority of a standard recovery will be to bring down your hip flexor inflammation. The 3
main ways we will do this is by using ice, anti-inflammatory medication, and compression. The
inflammation and damage will heal in time, which will then allow you to SLOWLY begin
activity following a structured strength rehab program.
Ice Icing should be your primary method of inflammation reduction. The sooner you can do
this after any activity the better off you will be. You need to ice your injured area for
approximately 20 minutes every 2 hours for the first 2 days, and then you can reduce the time.
As a precaution, never apply an extremely cold object directly to your skin; wrap it in some sort
of towel to prevent skin damage.
Anti-Inflammatory - This is pretty self-explanatory. Simply get some over the counter antiinflammatory medication and follow the instructions on the packaging.
Compression Compression goes hand in hand with icing, which has a purpose of reducing
swelling from inflammation. The compression will temporarily restrict blood flow which
prevents swelling from occurring. This area is hard to wrap, and takes a lot of material, so for
the most part tape is not the best option. You should try to find a compress bandage that you can
wrap around your torso several times and re-use for a long time.

Iliopsoas Release
As mentioned at the start of this article, the Iliopsoas is often the source of the problem. In many
cases, the injury can be caused by overuse, which leads to a really tight Iliopsoas, which in turns
causes the actual damage. The Iliopsoas is a hard muscle to work with, which is why it is best to
go see a licensed massage therapist who can perform deep tissue massage to release the
muscle. I have known several people personally who have had this injury cured after a few
sessions of massage.

Surgery
In some extremely rare cases, the tendon may be damaged beyond normal repair. However, if
you are able to read this book and are not thriving around in pain; you probably do not need
surgery.

Snapping Hip Syndrome Treatment


Treating snapping hip syndrome is a little tougher than diagnosing it. There are many reasons
that the tendon may not be functioning properly: inflammation, damage, muscular imbalances,
postural issues, and more. If you are not sure what caused your injury I would urge you to see a
doctor, they can perform tests and scans to isolate the issue which will make treatment easier.
To correct any strengthening imbalances you need to test the relative strength of all opposing
muscle groups, most importantly in this case are your hip flexors/Gluteus Maximus and
quad/hamstring combinations. If there is an alarming strength difference in one of the
movements, look to correct it through strengthening exercises.
If the injury only activates when you train for an extended period, most likely you have an
inflamed tendon. This should be treated similarly to hip flexor tendonitis with the PRICE
recovery procedure and rest. If you absolutely must train try taking a low dose antiinflammatory medication beforehand.
If you are an extremely serious athlete there is also the option to get an injection if you have an
inflamed bursa (the fluid sac that tendons rest on). The most common injection is corticosteroids
which are anti-inflammatory that last for weeks and depending on the dosage
months. Unfortunately this also comes with many undesirable side effects.
Once the issue has healed, make sure you strengthen the affected areas slowly before resuming
full activity. This will prevent the issue from becoming a chronic injury that affects you for a
long time.

After Healing
Before we do any strength training, we must first see if the hip flexor is healed. To do so, we
have some basic tests to assess both strength and functionality.

Hip Flexor Flexibility Test


If you have been following the course of action addressed earlier, then you will have minimized
the prevalence of scar tissue that has formed as a result of activity with a hip flexor injury. This
alone will help a lot in maintaining flexibility while the injury heals with quality muscle tissue.
In order to test your flexibility, stand on the opposite foot, and lift your knee on the injured hip
flexor side as high as you can in a slow controlled fashion. If you feel any hip flexor pain then it
is not healed, however, some tightness is to be expected (especially in the case of a hip flexor
strain), which is why it is important to go slowly so you dont over-extend yourself.
If you are unable to get your knee close to your chest, we must first work on hip flexor
flexibility, so that when we resume strengthening you will not risk re-injury. There are several
hip flexor stretches, but here is the most effective/recommended:
1)
As seen in the picture, go into a lunge position -> keep your front knee at a 90 degree
angle, keep your lower back straight, and gently push your hip flexor forwards while you lean
back slightly. You should feel a light stretch in your hip flexor.

Hold the position for 10 seconds, go slightly further into the stretch for 10 seconds more, and go
slightly further once more for 10 seconds. Alternate legs, and repeat twice more for a total of 3
sets of 90 seconds for each leg.

After a week or so of doing this every day, you should have re-developed proper flexibility and
can now move on to hip flexor strengthening. You can perform any exercises you want that
involve the Hip Flexor, just remember to take it slow and dont rush back to activity.

Concluding Remarks
Try to follow the simple flowchart procedure presented earlier. It is designed to help you
breakdown the injury recovery process so you are not overwhelmed by it.
Always proceed cautiously, and if something seems wrong or is hurting do NOT under any
circumstances do not continue aggravating it.
When you finish treatment you will have a weakened Hip Flexor so make sure you SLOWLY
begin a rehabilitation program.
Good Luck With Your Recovery!

Thank You
I hope you got a lot of value from reading this book! Please be careful when working with
injuries, you want to make sure you heal as safely as possible by being cautious. I recommend
you digest the information in this book, review it as needed, and see how it applies to your
situation.
If you have any further questions you can always ask on this page (just leave a comment at the
bottom):
Or send me an email at dalec@hipflexor.org and Ill be glad to help!

Exercise
By Paige Waehner, About.com Guide

Updated August 09, 2011

About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by our Medical Review Board

Hips, Butt and Thighs


This Hips, Butt and Thigh workout is perfect for targeting the major muscles of the lower body. Many of these moves are advanced and may require some
practice to get your form down. Start with no weight or a light weight to perfect each exercise and avoid injury.
Precautions
See your doctor if you have any injuries or medical conditions. Avoid any exercises that cause pain or discomfort.
Equipment
Various weighted dumbbells, a step or platform, resistance band and an exercise ball
How To
Warm up with 5-10 minutes of cardio
Complete the exercises in each series, one after the other, with no rest in between
Rest for 30-60 seconds and either move on to the next series (shorter) or repeat the series 1-3 times for a more intense workout
Squat1

Hold heavy weights over the shoulders (shown) or at the sides and lower into a squat until the thighs are parallel to the floor. Repeat for 12 reps.
Side Step Squats3

Place a resistance band under the feet and hold onto handles with both hands. Take a wide step to the right, and lower into a squat, knees behind toes and
keeping tension on the tube. Step the feet together and continue stepping to the right for 12 steps or the length of the room before switching sides.
Front One-Legged Squat5

Stand on a very short platform and lift left leg out in front of step. Bend the right knee, attempting to bring the left toes to the floor while pressing the hips
back. Straighten and repeat for 12 reps on each side.
Repeat 1-3 times
Step Ups7

Stand behind a 15-inch platform or step, weights in hand. Place the right foot on the step, transfer the weight to the heel and push into the heel to come
onto the step. Step back down and repeat for 12 reps before switching sides.
One-Legged Deadlift10

11

Tip from the hips and lower the weight towards the floor (back straight) while lifting the right leg straight out behind you to hip level. Contract the glutes of
the right leg to pull back up and repeat for 12 reps before switching sides.
Bent Knee Deadlift12

13

13
14

In a wide stance, place heavy weights on the floor between the feet. Squat down (knees behind toes and abs in) and pick up the weights as you stand

up. Squat back down, put the weights down and stand up. Repeat for 12 reps.
Repeat 1-3 times
Lunge on the Ball15

16

Place one foot on top of a ball behind you (prop the ball against a wall if needed), bend knees and lower into a lunge, keeping the knee behind the toe.
Press into the heel to press back up and repeat for 12 reps, then switch sides.17
Sliding Side Lunge 18

19

20

Put a paper plate under the left foot and hold a heavy weight in the left hand. Keep the weight in the right leg and bend the knee as you slide the left foot
out to the side, keeping the left leg straight. Touch the weight to the floor and stand up, sliding the foot back in. Repeat for 12 reps on each side.
Lunge Sweep21

22

Begin with feet wide and hold a weight (or kettlebell) in both hands overhead. Pivot and turn to the right into a lunge, while sweeping the weight down with
the left hand. Pivot back to the front, exchanging the weight to the right hand and pivot to the left, lowering into a lunge while bringing the weight down.
Continue alternating sides while swinging the weight up and over (if you're advanced, you can toss the weight to the other hand at the top of the motion)
for 12 reps.
Repeat 1-3 times
Hip Extensions

23

24

On forearms and knees, place a weight behind the right knee. Squeeze the weight and lift the right leg up to a 90-degree angle and pushing the bottom of
the foot towards the ceiling. Lower and repeat for 12 reps before switching sides.
Ball Butt Lift25

26

27

Lie on the ball with weights on the hips. Squeeze the glutes to raise hips until body is in a straight line like a bridge. Lower and repeat for 12 reps.
Hamstring Rolls28

29

Lie with heels on the ball and lift the hips. Keeping that position, roll the ball in and out for 12 reps.
Repeat 1-3 times
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