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2016

A report card on preventable chronic diseases,


conditions and their risk factors
Tracking progress for a healthier Australia by 2025
Australias Health Tracker is the companion to Australias Adult Health Tracker
and Australias Children and Young People Health Tracker.

Chronic diseases, like


CARDIOVASCULAR
DISEASE
CANCER

and

1 in 2

DIABETES

are the leading cause


of illness, disability and
death in Australia.

Australians
have a chronic
disease.
Despite the
need
Almost

ONE THIRD
could be prevented

by removing exposure
to risk factors such as
smoking, high body
mass, alcohol use,
physical inactivity and
high blood pressure.
2

AUSTRALIAS HEALTH TRACKER 2016

of spending* is
dedicated to
prevention.
*As a proportion of total
health expenditure.

FOREWORD
Chronic disease is the biggest health challenge of the
21st century. Australia lags well behind comparable
countries in tackling the risk factors for preventable
chronic diseases. National action must be focused on
population-level interventions that target risk factors
shared by many population groups and communities.
There is strong evidence about what works to achieve
positive change and there are numerous opportunities
for governments, community and industry to act
collaboratively for the benefit of all Australians.

This report card builds on work undertaken in 2015,


through a national collaboration of public health and
chronic disease organisations and experts that produced
health targets to support, guide and track progress towards
a substantial change in the health of our nation.

Much of Australias chronic disease burden is preventable


or capable of significant amelioration. Risk factors for
chronic diseases that are shared by many in the population
are modifiable. For example, people can be influenced to
move more and to drink less; salt and sugar in food and
beverages can be reduced. Through effective evidencebased changes to relevant public policy, funding, services
and to daily environments such as schools and workplaces;
we can create healthier products, people and places to live.

Australias Health Tracker is the first comprehensive


assessment of how Australias population is faring when
measured against these health targets for 2025. It includes
data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and nonIndigenous people, and children as well as adults.

Australias Health Tracker shows where preventative health


policy efforts have been successful in tackling risk factors
for chronic diseases in Australia. It also shows where
Australia is lagging behind world standards and failing to
prevent chronic diseases.

The collaboration drew on the agenda set by the World


Health Organization in the Global Action Plan for the
Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases
2013-2020 and the Mental Health Action Plan 20132020, to provide a set of Australian chronic disease
prevention and reduction targets and indicators for
achievement by the year 2025 (see p.5).

In 2016, Australia must commit to supporting policies and


interventions that reduce chronic disease risk factors and
underlying determinants, and significantly scale up existing
effective action. More than 50 organisations have joined
together to hold governments, and others, to account
political will, leadership and investment in a national
prevention agenda is vital.
Australians deserve a healthier future. We can, and we
must, do better

TECHNICAL NOTE

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The indicators that are used in this report card are drawn
mainly from Targets and Indicators for Chronic Disease
Prevention in Australia (AHPC, 2015). This report card
shows the latest Australian data about health status and
risks for adults and children/young people and how the
data compares to population health targets for 2025.
The baseline data is the nearest data to 2010, the year
used for baseline data by the World Health Organization
(WHO). Additional targets may be developed subsequently
to address significant risk factors and indicators, including,
where relevant, socio-economic disadvantage, rural and
remote environments, gender, age or Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander-specific targets. On the basis of available
data, comparable Indigenous and non-Indigenous data are
presented. There are limitations in the currently available
data. Australia does not have regular, comprehensive health
surveillance that includes anthropometric, biomedical and
environmental measures. Comparative data in this report
is drawn from data from the most recent reputable source
for the most appropriate age cohort with some of the
data as recent as 2015/16, and some dating from 2011/12.
International, Indigenous, and non-Indigenous comparisons
may be measured on different timescales, for different age
groups, and may involve slightly different concepts.
For full details regarding the source and selection of data,
refer to the technical appendix available at vu.edu.au/ahpc

The Australian Health Policy Collaboration at Victoria


University, in collaboration with expert working group
members from Australian universities and public health
organisations, has developed this report card to inform
and influence health policies and services in Australia.
Australias Health Tracker will be used by collaborating
organisations. It is published for use by all with an interest
in improving the health of Australians. Working group
members and organisations are acknowledged on page 15.
This work was led by Penny Tolhurst of AHPC.

AUSTRALIAS HEALTH TRACKER 2016

Preferred citation: Tolhurst, P., Lindberg, R., Calder, R.,


Dunbar, J., de Courten, M. Australias Health Tracker.
Melbourne: The Australian Health Policy Collaboration;
July 2016.

AUSTRALIAN CHRONIC DISEASE TARGETS


FOR ACHIEVEMENT BY THE YEAR 20251
25% reduction in the overall mortality
from cardiovascular diseases, common
cancers, chronic respiratory diseases
and diabetes

10% reduction in the national


suicide rate

At least 10% relative reduction in


the harmful use of alcohol

10% relative reduction in


prevalence of insufficient physical
activity

30% relative reduction in mean


population intake of salt/sodium

25% relative reduction in the


prevalence of raised blood
pressure

60% reduction in smoking rates of


adults with a mental illness

30% relative reduction in


prevalence of current tobacco use

Halt the rise in obesity

Halt the rise in new diabetes

Improve employment rates of adults


with mental illness, halving the
employment and education gap

Improve participation rates of young


people with mental illness in education
and employment, halving the
employment and education gap

ADDITIONAL RELEVANT AUSTRALIAN TARGETS INCLUDED IN REPORT CARD2

54% of women 50-69 years of age


participate in BreastScreen Australia

41% of people invited to take part in


the National Bowel Cancer Screening
Program participate

1. McNamara, K, Knight, A, Livingston, M, Kypri, K, Malo, J, Roberts, L, Stanley, S, Grimes, C, Bolam, B, Gooey, M, Daube, M, OReilly,
S, Colagiuri, S, Peeters, A, Tolhurst, P, Batterham, P, Dunbar, JA & De Courten, M (2015), Targets and indicators for chronic disease prevention
in Australia, Australian Health Policy Collaboration technical paper No. 2015-08, AHPC, Melbourne.
2. Department of Health (DoH) (2016), 2016-17 Portfolio Budget Statements, http://www.health.gov.au/internet/budget/publishing.nsf/
content/2016-2017_health_pbs

ADULTS
HOW ARE AUSTRALIAN ADULTS
TRACKING?

>> Australia currently ranks 13th highest consumer of


litres per capita alcohol consumption out of 34 OECD
countries

Most Australian adults have access to high-quality health


care for acute conditions and trauma and enjoy long-life
expectancy. Australia is a global leader in tobacco control
and has a strong record in public health measures to
prevent infectious diseases and threats to health safety
such as through food and water security and road safety
measures.

>> Australia is one of the top performing countries for


low rates of smoking ranked 4th out of 34 OECD
countries

However, there is significant room for improvement in


Australias health, particularly in incidence, prevalence
and management of preventable chronic diseases and
associated risk factors for adults. Some of the report cards
key findings include:

>> Reduce raised blood pressure

63.4% of the non-Indigenous adult population and


71.4% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult
population is overweight or obese
Almost a quarter (23%) of the adult population has
high blood pressure and the trend is moving in the
wrong direction to reach the 2025 target
44.5% of the adult population is not meeting physical
activity recommendations
23.5% of adults with mental illness smoke daily
COMPARED TO OTHER NATIONS:

>> Amongst high-income countries Australia has some of


the highest obesity rates. Australia is ranked 30th out of
34 indicating we are in the bottom third performers
amongst OECD countries
>> Australians eat too much salt. Our relative lack of
progress on reducing salt consumption and high blood
pressure shows up markedly, when compared to strong
voluntary and mandatory salt-reduction approaches
in Finland, the United Kingdom, the United States of
America, Argentina and South Africa

AUSTRALIAS HEALTH TRACKER 2016

Overall, the data suggests that Australias adults are not


tracking well to reach the following 2025 targets:
>> Halt the rise in obesity and diabetes
>> Reduce presentations to emergency departments for
alcohol-related injuries
>> Reduce national suicide rate
WE CAN AND WE MUST DO BETTER.

The tables in this report card outline the latest Australian


data about adults and how the data compares to the
2025 targets. As far as possible both Indigenous and
non-Indigenous data is presented. The baseline data is the
nearest data to 2010 available and trends (not necessarily
statistically significant differences) are reported on.
TABLE KEY

Trend in right direction. Good progress towards


target. Maintain efforts.
Trend indicates no/limited progress
towards target.
Trend in wrong direction. Poor progress
against target.

ADULTS

RISK FACTORS

LATEST
AUSTRALIAN
DATA

2025
TARGET

BASELINE DATA
AGAINST LATEST
DATA

TREND

LATEST
INDIGENOUS
DATA

RISK FACTORS

Adults who are


overweight or obese

63.4%

61.1%

80%
80%
60%
60%
40%
40%
20%
20%
0%
0%

71.4%
07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15

30%
30%

Adults who are obese

Adults not meeting


physical activity
recommendations

Adults consuming too


much salt

Proportion of total energy


intake from discretionary or
junk food in adults diets

Adults consuming too


much sugar

27.9%

44.5%

8.1g

34.6

47.8

24.6%

40%

5.7g

Indicator
to be
monitored

Indicator
to be
monitored

20%
20%

41.7%

10%
10%
0%
0%

07/08
07/08

50%
50%
40%
40%
30%
30%
20%No
20%
10%
10%
0%
0%

14/15
14/15

new data since


baseline
11/12
11/12

50%
12L
40%
12L
10L
10L
30%
8L
8L
20%
6L
6L
10%
4L
4L
2L
0%
2L
0L
0L

07/08
2010
2010

Inadequate
data to assess
trend

Not
available

40.7%

Not
available

14/15
2013
2013

11/12
2010
2010

65%

14/15
14/15

80%
25%
25%
20%
60%
20%
15%
15%No new data since
40%
10%
10%
baseline
20%
5%
5%
0%
0%
0%
07/08
14/15
11/12
14/15
11/12
14/15
30%
20%
20%
20%
15%
15%
10%
10%
5%
5%
0%
0%
0%

Inadequate
data to assess
trend

14/15
2014
2014

25%
30%
20%
30%

23

High blood pressure

16.1

15%
20%
20%
10%
5%
10%
10%
0%
0%
0%

20%
6%
6%
15%
4%
4%
10%
2%

20.4%
11/12
2010
2010

14/15
2013
2013

7
MALES
MALES
FEMALES
FEMALES

10%
10%
10%
0%
0%
0%
0%

11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12

14/15
14/15
14/15
14/15

25%
25%
20%
20%
20%
20%
15%
15%
15% BASELINE DATA
15%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%AGAINST LATEST
5%
DATA
5%
5%
0%
0%
0%
0% 11/12
11/12
14/15
14/15
11/12
14/15
11/12
14/15

25%
ADULTS
25%

RISK FACTORS

LATEST
AUSTRALIAN
DATA

2025
TARGET

RISK FACTORS CONTINUED

Adults who drink at


risky levels

Per capita pure alcohol


consumption

Heavy episodic
drinking

18.2%

9.7
litres

26.4%
Males

Emergency Department
presentations (estimated
alcohol injuries) per 1,000

Daily smokers
(aged 14 and over)

High cholesterol

5.7
Females

3.4

12.8%

18%

9.5
litres

26%
Males

4.9

Females

2.7

10.6%

32.8% 24.6%*

20%
20%
20%
20%
15%
15%
15%
15%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
0%
0%
0%
0%

12L
12L
12L
10L
12L
10L
10L
8L
10L
8L
8L
6L
8L
6L
6L
4L
6L
4L
4L
2L
4L
2L
2L
0L
2L
0L
0L
0L

30%
30%
30%
30%
20%
20%
20%
20%
10%
10%
10%
10%
0%
0%
0%
0%
6%
6%
6%
6%
4%
4%
4%
4%
2%
2%
2%
2%
0%
0%
0%
0%

15%
15%
15%
15%
12%
12%
12%
12%
9%
9%
9%
9%
6%
6%
6%
6%
3%
3%
3%
3%
0%
0%
0%
0%

*Target set by expert working group in line with WHO Action Plan
8

AUSTRALIAS HEALTH TRACKER 2016

80%
80%
80%
80%
60%
60%
60%
60%
40%
40%
40%
40%
20%
20%
20%

LATEST
INDIGENOUS
DATA

22.7%
2010
2010
2010
2010

2013
2013
2013
2013

Not
available
2010
2010
2010
2010

2014
2014
2014
2014

37.8%
2010
2010
2010
2010

2013
2013
2013
2013

MALES
MALES
MALES
MALES

Not
available

FEMALES
FEMALES
FEMALES
FEMALES
09/10
09/10
09/10
09/10

11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12

38.9%
2010
2010
2010
2010

2013
2013
2013
2013

40%
40%
40%
40%
30%
30%
30%
30%
20%
20%
20%
20%
10%
10%No new data since
10%
10%
0%
0%
baseline 13/14
0%
0% 12/13
12/13
13/14
12/13
13/14
12/13
13/14

60%
60%
60%
60%
40%
40%
40%
40%
20%
20%
20%
20%
0%
0%
0%
0%

TREND

10/11
10/11
10/11
10/11

13/14
13/14
13/14
13/14

Inadequate
data to assess
trend

25%

0%
15%
0%
0%
12%

LATEST
AUSTRALIAN
DATA

2025
TARGET

36%

41% **

SCREENING

54% **

61.4

70.5

4.7

4.1

SOCIAL INCLUSION

Employment of people
with mental illness

ILLNESS

Prevalence of diabetes in
adults (25-65 years)

Adults with mental illness


who smoke daily

30%

23.5%

11%

DEATHS

Death rates from CVD,


stroke, common cancers,
or chronic respiratory
disease (30-70 years)

Suicide rate

40%
60%
60%
20%
60%
40%
60%
40%
0%
60%
40%
20%
40%
20%
40%
20%
0%
20%
0%
20%
0%
0%
0%
80%
60%
40%
80%
80%
20%
60%
80%
60%
80%
0%
40%
80%
60%
40%
60%
20%
60%
40%
20%
40%
0%
40%
20%
0%
20%
20%
0%
0%
0%
5%
4%
3%
5%
2%
5%
4%
1%
5%
4%
5%
3%
0%
4%
3%
5%
4%
2%
3%
2%
4%
3%1%
2%
1%
3%
2%
0%
1%
0%
2%
1%
0%
1%
0%
0%

207

166

deaths per
100,000

deaths per
100,000

12.0

9.8 ***

deaths per
100,000

**2019/20 target, *** 2020 target

deaths per
100,000

10/11

13/14

10/11
10/11
10/11
10/11
10/11

13/14
13/14
13/14
13/14
13/14

11/12

14/15

11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12

14/15
14/15
14/15
14/15
14/15

07/08

11/12

07/08
07/08
07/08
07/08
07/08

11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12

20%
30%
30%
10%
30%
20%
30%
20%
0%
30%
20%
10% 11/12
20%
10%
20%
10%
0%
10%
0%
10%
11/12
0% 11/12
0%
0% 11/12
11/12
11/12
250
200
150
250
100
250
200
50
250
200
250
150
0
200
150
250
200
100
150
2010
100
200
15050
100
50
150
100
0
50
0
100
50
2010
0 2010
50
0
0 2010
2010
2010
15
12
9
15
156
12
15
123
15
09
12
9
15
12 6
9 2013
6
12
93
6
3
9
6
0
0
3
6
3
2013
0
3 2013
0
0 2013
2013
30% 2013

Deaths
Deaths
Deaths
Deaths
perper
100,000
per100,000
per
100,000
100,000
Deaths
per 100,000
Deaths per 100,000

Breast cancer screening


in women (50-69 years)

53.7 %

11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12
11/12

9%
15%
15%
6%
12%
15%
12%
15%
3%
15%
9%
12%
ADULTS
9%
12%
0%
6%
12%
9%
6%
9%
2013
3% 2010
9%
6%
3%BASELINE DATA
6%
6%
0%
3%
0%
3%
AGAINST LATEST
2010
2013
3%
0%
2013
DATA
0% 2010
40%
0% 2010
2013
2013
30% 2010
2010
2013
20%
40%
40%
10%
30%
40%
30%
40%
0%
20%
40%
30%
20%
30%
13/14
10% 12/13
30%
20%
10%
20%
0%
20%
10%
0%
10%
12/13
13/14
10%
0% 12/13
13/14
0%
13/14
0% 12/13
12/13
13/14
60% 12/13
13/14

Deaths
Deaths
Deaths
Deaths
perper
100,000
per100,000
per
100,000
100,000
Deaths
per 100,000
Deaths per 100,000

Bowel cancer screening


(50-74 years)

09/10
09/10
09/10
09/10
09/10

20%
30%
30%
30%
10%
30%
20%
20%
30%

14/15

TREND

LATEST
INDIGENOUS
DATA

Not
available

35.5%

Not
available

Not
available

50%

14/15
14/15
14/15
14/15
14/15

2013

Not
available

2013
2013
2013
2013
2013

20.3

2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014

deaths per
100,000

CHILDREN AND
YOUNG PEOPLE

HOW ARE AUSTRALIAN


CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE
TRACKING?
Most Australian children and young people have access
to high-quality health care for their early years and
throughout their life for acute conditions. In Australia,
a male born in 20112013 can expect to live to the age
of 80.1 years and a female would be expected to live to
84.3 years.
However, there is significant room for health improvement
in the early and teen years, particularly in the risk factors
for chronic disease that can impact short and long-term
health. Some of the report cards key findings include:

Overall, the data suggests that children and young people


are not tracking well to reach the obesity and overweight
2025 targets. Furthermore, efforts must be maintained
to sustain progress in smoking cessation and reduction
in alcohol emergency department presentations.
In some areas such as breastfeeding and physical activity,
new guidelines have been adopted and with the next report
card, relevant data will be available to allow trends to be
reported on. Targets may also be developed to help better
track consumption of discretionary foods, sugar intake and
gender, age and/or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanderspecific indicators.

70.8% of children (5-11 years) and 91.5% of young


people (12-17 years) are not meeting physical activity
recommendations

The tables in this report card outline the latest Australian


data about children and young people and how the data
compares to the 2025 targets. As far as possible both
Indigenous and non-Indigenous data is presented. The
baseline data is the nearest data to 2010 available and
trends (not necessarily statistically significant differences)
are reported on.

More than one quarter of Australias children (25.6%)


and young people (29.5%) are overweight or obese

TABLE KEY

40.7% of total energy intake is from discretionary or


junk food in young non-Indigenous peoples (14-18
years) diets
42.9% of total energy intake is from discretionary
or junk food in young Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander peoples (14-18 years) diets

10

AUSTRALIAS HEALTH TRACKER 2016

Trend in right direction. Good progress towards


target. Maintain efforts.
Trend indicates no/limited progress
towards target.
Trend in wrong direction. Poor progress
against target.

CHILDREN AND
2025
TARGET

CHILDREN

Proportion of infants
exclusively breastfed to
six months of age

Children (5-11 years) not


meeting physical activity
recommendations

Indicator
to be
monitored

2.1

70.8

63.7

DATA

Deaths
Deaths
Deaths
per
per
per
100,000
100,000
100,000

LATEST
AUSTRALIAN
DATA

250
250
250
200
200
200
150
150
150
100
100
100
50
50
50
0
0
0

Deaths
Deaths
Deaths
per
per
per
100,000
100,000
100,000

RISK FACTORS

30%
30%
30%
20%
20%
20%
YOUNG
PEOPLE
10%
10%
10%
0%
0%
0%BASELINE DATA
11/12
14/15
11/12
14/15
11/12
14/15
AGAINST
LATEST

2010
2010
2010

15
15
15
12
12
12
9
9
9
6
6No
6
3
3
3
0
0
0

2013
2013
2013

new data since


baseline

2013
2013
2013

2014
2014
2014

TREND

LATEST
INDIGENOUS
DATA

Not
available

Inadequate
data to assess
trend

40.5%

30%
30%
30%

Children
(5-11 years) who are
overweight or obese

25.6

21.6

20%
20%
20%

32.8%^

10%
10%
10%
0%
0%
0%

07/08
07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15
14/15

20%
20%
20%

Children
(5-11 years) who are
overweight

18.1%

15%

15%
15%
15%

10%
10%
10%

21.2%^

5%
5%
5%

0%
0%
0%

07/08
07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15
14/15

8%
8%
8%

Children
(5-11 years)
who are obese

Proportion of total energy


intake from discretionary
or junk food in childrens
(9-13 years) diets

^ Aged 5-14 years

7.8%

6.6%

6%
6%
6%
4%
4%
4%
0%
0%
0%

39.4%

Indicator
to be
monitored

11.8%^

2%
2%
2%
07/08
07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15
14/15

2%
2%
2%

1%
1%
1%
0%
0%
0%

15%
15%
15%
12%
12%
12%
9%
9%
9%
6%
6%
6%
3%
3%
3%
0%
0%
0%

30%
30%
30%
25%
25%
25%
20%

2011
2011
2011

41%

2014
2014
2014

MALES
MALES
MALES
FEMALES
FEMALES
FEMALES
09/10
09/10
09/10

11/12
11/12
11/12

11

10%

2010

2013

07/08

14/15

0%

RISK FACTORS

LATEST
AUSTRALIAN
DATA

2025
TARGET

Deaths per 100,000

CHILDREN AND YOUNG


PEOPLE
20%
15

12
15%
9
6 BASELINE DATA
10%
3AGAINST LATEST
5%
0
DATA
2014
0% 2013
07/08

CHILDREN CONTINUED

Children
(9-13 years) consuming
too much sugar

70.3

Indicator
to be
monitored

TREND

LATEST
INDIGENOUS
DATA

Not
available

14/15

8%
30%
6%
20%
4%

10%
2%
0%
0%

07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15

YOUNG PEOPLE
20%
2%
15%

1.2

Young people (12-17


years) who smoke daily

Young people (12-17


years) who binge drink

Emergency Department
presentations (estimated
alcohol injuries)
per 1,000 young people
(15-19 years)

Young people (12-17 years)


not meeting physical
activity recommendations

6.4%

10%
1%
5%
0%
0%

Indicator
to be
monitored

Young people (15-17


years) who smoke daily

1.3

5.8

Not
available
07/08
2011

8%
15%
6%
12%
4%
9%

MALES

6%
2%
3%
0%
0%

FEMALES

07/08
09/10

2%
30%
25%
20%
1%No
15%
10%
5%
0%
0%

12.9
Females

7.5

91.5

Males

15%
25%
12%
20%
9%
15%

13

Females

09/10
07/08

82.6

30%
8%
25%
6%
20%
No
15%
4%
10%
2%
5%
0%
0%

11/12
14/15

new data since


baseline

07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15

07/08

14/15

11/12

14/15

25%
20%
80%
15%
60%
10%
40%
5%

12

AUSTRALIAS HEALTH TRACKER 2016

0%
20%
0%

8%

Inadequate
data to assess
trend

Not
available

Males

FEMALES

0%

18%

2014
14/15

MALES

6%
10%
3%
5%

14/15
11/12

new data since


baseline

2011
07/08

Males

14/15
2014

Not
available

Females

Inadequate
data to assess
trend

65.2%

0%
0%
0%
8%

CHILDREN AND

RISK FACTORS

LATEST
AUSTRALIAN
DATA

2025
TARGET

YOUNG PEOPLE CONTINUED

Young people
(12-17 years) who are
overweight or obese

Young people
(12-17 years) who
are obese

TREND

LATEST
INDIGENOUS
DATA

2%

29.5% 28.3%

30%
30%
30%
25%
25%
1%
25%
20%
20%
20%
15%
15%
15%
10%
10%
0%
10%
5%
5%
5%
0%
0%
0%

22.4

7.4%

19.8

7.5%

12%
25%
25%
25%
9%
20%
20%
20%
6%
15%
15%
15%
3%
10%
10%
10%
0%
5%
5%
5%
0%
0%
0%

30%
25%
8%
8%
20%
8%
6%
15%
6%
6%
10%
4%
4%
5%
4%
2%
0%
2%
2%
0%
0%
0%
25%
20%

Proportion of total energy


intake from discretionary
or junk food in young
peoples (14-18 years) diets

2014
2014
2014

6%
15%
15%
15%
YOUNG
PEOPLE
4%
12%
12%
12%
MALES
MALES
9%
2%
MALES
9%
9%
6%
BASELINE
DATA
6%
0%
6%
FEMALES
FEMALES
3%AGAINST
LATEST
07/08 FEMALES
14/15
3%
3%
DATA
0%
0%
0%
09/10
11/12
09/10
11/12
09/10
11/12

15%

Young people
(12-17 years) who are
overweight

2011
2011
2011

40.7

Indicator
to be
monitored

15%
80%
80%
10%
80%
60%
60%
5%
60%
40%
0%
40%
40%
20%
20%
20%
0%
0%
0%
8%

2011

2014

07/08
07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15
14/15

36.3%^^

MALES
FEMALES
09/10

11/12

07/08
07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15
14/15

20.6%^^

15.8%^^
07/08

14/15

07/08
07/08
07/08

14/15
14/15
14/15

07/08

14/15

11/12
11/12
11/12

14/15
14/15
14/15

42.9%

Not
available

6%

Young people
(14-18) consuming too
much sugar

73.1

Indicator
to be
monitored

4%

2%
0%
07/08

14/15

80%
60%

Young people (16-30


years) with mental illness in
education or employment

78.4% 84.5%

Not
available

40%
20%
0%
11/12

14/15

^^ Aged 15-17 years


13

Chronic diseases prevention for Australia:


Statement of commitment
We call for, and are active contributors towards, a systemic
and sustained approach to the prevention and management
of chronic diseases in Australia.

Core principles
Action is required urgently to reduce the incidence
and impact of chronic diseases, and must address the
underlying risk factors and determinants. There is a critical
need for a national prevention agenda.
We support a set of core principles that provide a common
platform for interventions to prevent chronic diseases:
1.

A systemic approachfocussing on common risk


factors and determinants.

2.

 vidence-based actionacting now, using best


E
available evidence, and continuing to build evidence.

3.

Tackling health inequity and health disparity


working to improve and redress inequities and
disparities in access to programs, services and
inequities in outcomes.

4.

 national agenda with local actionbuilding


A
commitment and innovation with local and
community-level actions.

5.

 life course approachintervening early and


A
exploiting prevention opportunities at all ages and
across generations.

6.

 hared responsibilityencouraging complementary


S
actions by all groups.

7.

Responsible partnershipsavoiding ceding policy


influence to vested interests.

The benefits of reducing the incidence and impact of


chronic diseases are nationally significant. They extend
beyond the impact on the health of individuals to our
childrens future, the wellbeing of the communities in which
we live, and the economic prosperity of our society.
Australians deserve a healthier future. We can, and we
must, do better.

For further details, please see the accompanying report


cards and technical appendix available on the AHPC
website.

vu.edu.au/ahpc

14

AUSTRALIAS HEALTH TRACKER 2016

Signatoriesand supporters for chronic diseases


prevention for Australia
Arthritis and Osteoporosis Victoria
Australia and New Zealand Obesity Society
Australian Centre for Health Research
Australian Dental Association
Australian Disease Management Association
Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations
Australian Health Care Reform Alliance
Australian Health Promotion Association
Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association
Australian Psychological Society
Australian Womens Health Network
Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute
Better Health Plan for the West
Brimbank City Council
Cabrini Institute
Cancer Council Australia
Catholic Health Australia
Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney
Chronic Illness Alliance
CLAN
Cohealth
CRANAplus
Deakin University
Diabetes Australia
Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education
George Institute for Global Health
Health West Partnership
Inner North West Primary Care Partnership
Kidney Health Australia
Lowitja Institute
Mental Health Australia
National Alliance for Action on Alcohol
National Heart Foundation
National Rural Health Alliance
National Stroke Foundation
NCD FREE
Network of Alcohol and other Drugs Agencies
Networking Health Victoria
Obesity Australia
Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis
Peoples Health Movement OZ
Public Health Association of Australia
Royal Flying Doctor Service
School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame
School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe
University
Services for Australian Rural and Remote Allied Health
Social Determinants of Health Alliance
South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute
The Telethon Kids Institute
Victoria University
Victorian Health Promotion Foundation
YMCA

Acknowledgment of working group members


Expert Advisory Group Chair Prof. Maximilian de Courten,
Director of the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and
Management, Victoria University; Prof. Alex Brown, Deputy
Director, SAHMRI, Adelaide; Prof. Brian Oldenburg, Melbourne
School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne;
Colin Sindall, Chief Preventative Health Officer, Population Health
and Prevention Strategy, DHHS Victoria; Dr Erin Lalor, Policy
Advisor, Australian Health Policy Collaboration; Prof James Dunbar,
Director at Professor James A Dunbar Consulting, Research Advisor,
Australian Health Policy Collaboration; Leonie Scott, General
Manager, Health Outcomes, National Heart Foundation; Martin
Laverty, CEO, Royal Flying Doctors Service; Michael Moore, CEO
Public Health Association of Australia; Prof. Ian Olver, Director,
Sansom Institute, University of South Australia; Prof. Rob Carter,
Alfred Deakin Professor And Chair In Health And Human Services
Economics, Deakin University; Prof. Rob Moodie, Melbourne
School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne;
Sharon McGowan, CEO of National Stroke Foundation. Working
Group 1 Mortality, morbidity and high-risk populations Chair Dr
Andrew Knight, Fairfield General Practice Unit, UNSW and Clinical
Adviser, Improvement Foundation Rapporteur Dr Kevin McNamara,
Senior Research Fellow, School of Medicine, Deakin University,
Adjunct Senior Lecturer, School of Pharmacy, Monash University.
Prof. Alex Brown, Deputy Director, SAHMRI, Adelaide Mr Bill
Stavreski, National Director, Data and Evaluation, National Heart
Foundation Dr Christine Connors, General Manager Primary Health
Care, NT Dept. of Health Dr Dale Ford, Improvement Foundation,
Adelaide Dr Erin Lalor, CEO, National Stroke Foundation. Prof.
Ian Olver, Director, Sansom Institute, University of South Australia
Ms Jan Chaffey, Camp Hill Healthcare, Brisbane and Life Member
of Australian Association of Practice Management A/Prof. John
Rasa, CEO, Networking Health Victoria Prof. Jon Emery, Professor
of Primary Care Cancer Research, University of Melbourne Ms
Karen Booth, Australian Primary HealthCare Nurses Association
Prof. Mark Harris, Director, Centre for Primary Care and Equity,
UNSW Dr Mark Morgan, Hills Medical Practice, Adelaide Prof.
Nigel Stocks, Head of Discipline of General Practice, University
of Adelaide Dr Rob Grenfell, National Medical Director, BUPA A/
Prof. Ron Tomlins, President International Primary Care Respiratory
Group and University of Sydney Prof. Sabina Knight, Director, Mt Isa
Centre for Rural and Remote Health, JCU Dr Steve Bunker, Clinical
Research Adviser, Medibank Private. Working Group 2 Alcohol
Chair Prof. Kypros Kypri, Senior Brawn Fellow, School of Medicine
and Public Health, Newcastle University Rapporteur Dr Michael
Livingston, NHMRC Early Career Research Fellow, Centre for
Alcohol Policy Research, La Trobe University. A/Prof. Kerry OBrien,
School of Social Sciences, Monash University Prof. Maree Teesson,
Director, NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Mental
Health and Substance Use (CREMS National Drug & Alcohol
Research Centre, UNSW Mr Michael Thorn, CEO, Foundation for
Alcohol Research and Education, Canberra A/Prof. Peter Miller,
Principal Research Fellow, School of Psychology, Deakin University
Prof. Robin Room, Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, La Trobe
University Prof. Steve Allsop, Director, National Drug Research
Institute, Curtin University Prof. Tanya Chikritzhs, National Drug
Research Institute, Curtin University. Working Group 3 - Physical
Inactivity Chair Dr Lyn Roberts AO, Principal Adviser, VicHealth
Rapporteur Dr Jonathan Malo, Public Health Medicine Advanced
Trainee, VicHealth Prof. Adrian Bauman, Sesquicentenary Professor
of Public Health, Boden Institute, University of Sydney Prof. Fiona
Bull MBE, Director, Centre for the Built Environment and Health,

UWA Prof. Jo Salmon, Director, Centre for Physical Activity and


Nutrition Research, Deakin University Prof. Phil Morgan, Deputy
Director, PRC for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of
Newcastle Prof. Stuart Biddle, Program Leader, Active Living and
Public Health ISEAL, Victoria University Prof. Timothy Olds, Alliance
for Research in Exercise Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), University
of South Australia Adjunct Prof. Trevor Shilton, National Active
Living Lead, National Heart Foundation of Australia Prof. Wendy
Brown, Director, Centre for Research on Exercise, Physical Activity
and Health, University of Queensland. Working Group 4 Salt
Chair Dr Bruce Bolam, Executive Manager, WHO Collaborating
Centre for Excellence in Health Promotion, VicHealth. Rapporteur
Dr Carley Grimes, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Deakin University
Rapporteur Ms Sonya Stanley, Principal Program Officer, VicHealth
Prof. Bruce Neal, Senior Director, The George Institute, University of
Sydney Prof. Caryl Nowson, Chair of Nutrition and Ageing, Centre
for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research Deakin University. Dr
Jacqui Webster, Centre Director, WHO CC Salt Reduction, The
George Institute for Global Health. Ms Kellie-Ann Jolly, Director of
Cardiovascular Programs, Victoria National Heart Federation, VIC.
Mr Scott Stirling, Advocacy Manager National Stroke Foundation.
Alexandra Jones, The George Institute for Global Health. Working
Group 5 Tobacco Chair Prof Mike Daube AO, Professor of
Health Policy, Curtin University. Rapporteur Dr Michelle Gooey,
Principal Program Officer VicHealth. Mr Todd Harper, CEO, Cancer
Council Victoria. Dr Sarah White Director, QUIT Victoria, Cancer
Council Victoria. Ms Kate Purcell, Director, Purcell Consulting
NSW. Working group 6 Obesity and diabetes Chair Prof. Stephen
Colagiuri, Boden Institute, University of Sydney. Co-chair Prof. Anna
Peeters, School of Health & Social Development, Deakin University.
Rapporteur Dr Sharleen OReilly, NHMRC TRIP Fellow, Institute
of Physical Activity and Nutrition, Deakin University. Prof. Boyd
Swinburn, Alfred Deakin Professor, Deakin University and School
of Population Health, University of Auckland. Prof. David Crawford,
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, Deakin University. Prof.
Helena Teede, Monash Partners Academic Health Sciences Centre,
Monash University. Ms Jane Martin, Executive Manager, Obesity
Policy Coalition, Cancer Council Victoria. Dr Julie Brimblecombe,
Nutrition Program Lead Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin.
Prof. Louise Baur AM, Professor of Paediatrics & Child Health,
Associate Dean and Head, The Childrens Hospital at Westmead
Clinical School, University of Sydney and The Childrens Hospital,
Westmead Prof. Stephen Simpson AC, Director, Charles Perkins
Institute, University of Sydney and Obesity Australia Prof. Steve
Allender, Co-Director WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity
Prevention, Deakin University Prof. Timothy Gill, Research Programs
Director, Boden Institute, University of Sydney. Working group
7 Mental Health Chair Dr Philip Batterham, Fellow in Mental
Health Research, National Institute for Mental Health Research,
Australian National University. Rapporteur Ms Penny Tolhurst,
Manager, Chronic Disease Program, Australian Health Policy
Collaboration. Prof. Carol Harvey, University of Melbourne, Director,
Psychosocial Research Centre/Northwestern Mental Health. Prof.
Helen Herrman, Director Research, Orygen and Director, WHO
Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. Prof. Jane Pirkis Director,
Centre for Mental Health, School of Population and Global Health,
University of Melbourne. Prof. Philip Burgess, Professor of Mental
Health Services Research, School of Public Health, University of
Queensland. Dr Tim Coombs, Director of Nursing, Mental Health,
Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District.

15

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#aushealthtracker, @AHPC_VU
2016 Australian Health Policy Collaboration