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Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BRIGHAM YOUNG
UNIVERSITYIDAHO
Catalog 2014-2015
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho
Rexburg, Idaho 83460
(208) 496-1141
www.byui.edu

Brigham Young University-Idaho Catalog


The University makes every effort to ensure the accuracy
of the contents of this catalog but reserves the right to
make changes at any time without prior notice.
Volume 78, Number 1
May 2014
Printed by
BYUIdaho University Press

Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015


Welcome to Brigham Young University-Idaho. My wife, Sue, and I
love this school and the wonderful young people who come here. As
you begin your studies, let me share with you two points of counsel
regarding your time at BYU-Idaho.
First, take advantage of opportunities to develop as a disciple of Jesus
Christ. You can enhance your discipleship by obeying the Honor
Code, attending weekly devotionals, and being active in your campus
ward. These experiences will enrich your life, provide you with
valuable knowledge, and prepare you to serve, love, and lift others.
Second, become immersed in learning. You will soon become familiar
with the BYU-Idaho Learning Model. It emphasizes individual
preparation, collaborative and reective learning opportunities, and
reliance on the guidance of the Holy Ghost by both instructors and
learners. As you engage in active teaching and experiential learning,
you will become further prepared to be a capable leader in your
family, the Church, the workplace, and the community where you
live.
I invite you to embrace all that BYU-Idaho has to offer. You will be
rewarded now and far into the future. May the Lord bless you with
happiness and success in your endeavors.
Again, welcome to campus.
Warm regards,

Kim B. Clark
President, Brigham Young University-Idaho

Table of Contents
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Accreditation .......................................................................20
Lifelong Learning ..................................................................7
Maps ...................................................................................12
Majors .................................................................................20
Minors.................................................................................26
Mission Statement .................................................................6
University Outcomes ...........................................................19
GENERAL INFORMATION
Academic Freedom ................................................................5
Administration .......................................................................8
Board of Trustees .............................................................451
Academic Calendar ..............................................................13
Certicates ..........................................................................29
Colleges and Departments ...................................................11
Concentrations ....................................................................25
Correspondence Directory ...................................................10
Clusters ...............................................................................27
Emeriti ..............................................................................468
Faculty...............................................................................452
Foundations Requirements ..................................................31
Graduation ..........................................................................18
Index .................................................................................476
Nondiscrimination Statement.................................................5
Religion Requirements.........................................................38
Terminology ........................................................................17
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Condentiality of Student Records (FERPA)........................42
Credits and Grades ..............................................................45
Policies ................................................................................40
Standards .............................................................................43
Transfers ..............................................................................49
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS
Dress and Grooming Standards ............................................57
Off-Campus Apartment Approval/Facilities .........................69
Personal Honor ...................................................................54
Student Wards and Stakes ....................................................57
ADMISSIONS and FINANCIAL POLICIES
Application Procedures/Deadlines .......................................59
Financial Policies and Information .......................................62
General Admission Policies ..................................................59
International Students .........................................................59
Tuition, Fees, and Expenses .................................................61
SUPPORT SERVICES
Academic Discovery Center .................................................74
Academic Support Center ....................................................72
Activities ..............................................................................75
Counseling Center ...............................................................70
Disability Services ................................................................69
Housing ..............................................................................68
Library ................................................................................69
Scholarships and Awards ......................................................67
Student Employment ...........................................................68
Student Financial Aid ...........................................................66
Student Health Care Services ...............................................70
Testing Center .....................................................................71
University Store ...................................................................69

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Academic Support Center ....................................................77
Accounting ..........................................................................80
Animal and Food Science .....................................................84
Applied Plant Science ...........................................................92
Art ....................................................................................104
Automotive .......................................................................123
Biology ..............................................................................129
Business Management ........................................................145
Chemistry ..........................................................................159
Civil Engineering ...............................................................165
Communication .................................................................168
Computer Information Technology ...................................180
Computer Science and Engineering ...................................186
Dance ................................................................................198
Design and Construction Management ..............................207
Economics .........................................................................215
English ..............................................................................223
Family History Research ....................................................231
Geography .........................................................................235
Geology.............................................................................238
Health, Recreation and Human Performance .....................246
History ..............................................................................272
Home and Family ..............................................................279
Humanities and Philosophy ...............................................291
Interdisciplinary Studies .....................................................296
Languages and International Studies ..................................318
Library ..............................................................................333
Mathematics ......................................................................334
Mechanical Engineering .....................................................342
Military Science .................................................................349
Music ................................................................................352
Nursing .............................................................................380
Philosophy and Humanities ...............................................291
Physics ...............................................................................387
Political Science .................................................................401
Psychology ........................................................................406
Religious Education ...........................................................412
Sociology and Social Work .................................................415
Teacher Education .............................................................421
Theatre ..............................................................................434
Web Design and Development ...........................................443
Welding .............................................................................448

Nondiscrimination/Academic Freedom
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Statement of Nondiscrimination
BYU-Idaho considers non-discrimination to be fundamental to its mission, goals, and objectives. BYU-Idaho recognizes that its future success is,
in part, dependent upon its ability to successfully accommodate the increasingly diverse nature of the student body and employees, which diversity is promoted by the worldwide growth of its sponsoring Church. The University is committed not to unlawfully discriminate in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment and other school-administered programs on
the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, age, sex, veteran status, genetic information, or disability for all individuals who meet university
and department academic requirements and agree to abide by the universitys standards of conduct and behavior. The university does exercise
the religious exemption in admissions as granted in Title IX of the Education Amendments, 20 U.S.C. 1681 (a)(3) and in hiring employees as
granted in 41 CFR 60-1.5(a)(5).
Any person who believes he or she has encountered discrimination should contact the following:
Students: .................................................................................................. Dean of Students Ofce, located in 290 Kimball, or call 496-9200
Faculty:................................................................................................................. Academic Ofce, located in 210 Kimball, or call 496-1135
Staff:........................................................................................................ Human Resources Ofce, located in 226 Kimball, or call 496-1700

Academic Freedom
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho (BYU-Idaho) is sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. BYU-Idaho invites faculty and
students to pursue secular knowledge in a climate of religious belief. This model consciously embraces all truth, regardless of its source.
Individual freedom lies at the core of both religious and academic life and is based not only on a belief in the value of free inquiry, but also on the
gospel principle that humans are moral agents. Individuals should seek knowledge in the sacred as well as in the secular, by the heart and spirit as
well as by the mind, and through continuing revelation as well as in the written word of God.
The faculty and students are entrusted with individual academic freedom and are encouraged to pursue truth according to the theories,
methodologies, and practices that characterize scholarship in the various disciplines. This trust encompasses the freedom to explore a variety of
ideas.
The Board of Trustees and the academic leadership of BYU-Idaho expect faculty members to protect the fundamental interests and the doctrines
of the Church, the individual faith of Church members, and the mission of the University at all times. Faculty members are free to discuss and
analyze Church doctrine and policy. However, faculty members should not engage in expression privately or in public that knowingly contradicts
or opposes Church doctrine and policy. Faculty members should not deliberately attack or deride the Church, the University, their leaders, or the
principles of the Honor Code.

Mission Statement
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Mission Statement
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho is
afliated with The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Its mission is to:
1. Build testimonies of the restored
gospel of Jesus Christ and encourage living its principles.
2. Provide a quality education for
students of diverse interests and
abilities.
3. Prepare students for lifelong
learning, for employment, and for
their roles as citizens and parents.
4. Maintain a wholesome academic,
cultural, social and spiritual
environment.

Lifelong Learning
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

LIFELONG LEARNING

Foundations offers a focused and complete approach to learning

Brigham Young University-Idaho prepares students for lifelong


learning, for employment, and for their roles as citizens and parents.
Innovative educational concepts help prepare graduates to contribute
signicantly to the Church, the community, and the workplace.

BYU-Idaho is home to the Foundations program. This unique approach to general education courses is aimed at raising the quality of
every students experience at BYU-Idaho.
In the previous general education program, students had a longer
and more diverse list of classes to choose from, creating a signicantly
different experience for each student. Foundations has purposefully
limited the number of class options, ensuring that all students will
have similar experiences and receive a more focused educational
experience.

At BYU-Idaho:

A year-round track system allows more students to attend.

Internships enhance marketability.

The Student Activities Program provides students with


opportunities to lead and serve.

The Learning Model fosters faith-building learning.

The Foundations Program offers a focused and complete


approach to learning.

Students are trained to be leaders.

Students develop a life of honor.

The Spirit of Ricks is preserved and enhanced.

Students are trained to be leaders


While most universities are research-focused and faculty-centered,
BYU-Idaho is teaching-focused and student-centered. Through
hands-on student employment and leadership opportunities, thousands of students every year are given practical opportunities to build
skills that will help them become disciples of Christ and leaders in the
workforce.

A year-round track system allows more students to attend

President Kim B. Clark said, We engage our students in active leadership with meaningful responsibility across the university. They are
required to lead, direct, and move things forward in managing many
of our programs and activities.

BYU-Idaho operates on an expanded year-round basis to allow more


students the opportunity to attend. This creative academic calendar
revolves around a three-track system: Spring/Fall, Fall/Winter, and
Winter/Spring. Qualied students are admitted to one of the three
tracks and they stay on the same track through graduation. Yearround options are available as students enter their upper coursework.

Students develop a life of honor


The heart of BYU-Idaho is Personal Honor. This means all students live by the BYU-Idaho Code of Honor, dress and grooming
standards, and specic housing guidelines. Obedience and faith are
the core of Personal Honor as each student strives to raise his or her
personal bar of righteousness.

Internships enhance marketability


BYU-Idaho is one of the largest intern-producing universities in the
nation. An academic internship is a cooperative program between the
student, the university, and approved experience providers (employers). Internships enable students to obtain practical and valuable
work experience, to apply skills and knowledge learned in school,
and to gain exposure to various job opportunities. In most cases,
an internship is a required element for both associate and bachelor
degree-seeking students.

BYU-Idaho holds a weekly devotional and students attend weekly


worship services and other church activitiesall bringing students
together to be taught by the Spirit. Through unity, sacrice, and love,
students become better leaders in their homes, in the Church, and in
the world around them.

The Student Activities Program allows students to lead and serve


The Spirit of Ricks is preserved and enhanced

BYU-Idaho Student Activities Program meets the needs and interests


of a broad and diverse student body. An array of year-round activities
is offered in the areas of Outdoor, Social, Service, Talent, Fitness,
and Sports. Each area is structured to give students numerous
opportunities for active involvement at various levels of interest
and commitment. Our innovative programs help students develop
character and enhance leadership skills. Within Activities, students are
participants not just spectators.

While looking to the future, we work to preserve and enhance the


Spirit of Ricks. Simply stated, this entails upholding a tradition of
service, hard work, friendliness, and compassionthe same convention that bonded the students, faculty, and administration for more
than 100 years as Ricks College.
President Kim B. Clark said, Our mission, our very purpose, is to
educate, develop, and prepare disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ.
This purpose is deeply rooted in this university. The Lord watches
over this university in a very powerful way. Our purpose is to help
[students] become His true followers, His true disciples, a light to
the world.

The Learning Model fosters faith-building learning


At BYU-Idaho, everyone is a learner and a teacher. Designed to
deepen the learning experience of students, the Learning Model
helps create a greater responsibility for students to learn and teach
one another. It is an inspired learning process and builds on the
understanding that all learners and teachers are at different levels
in their individual progress. It encourages learners and teachers to
prepare, teach one another, and then ponder and prove.

For more information, contact BYU-Idaho at (208) 496-1411, or


visit www.byui.edu.

The Learning Model teaches learners and teachers to 1) exercise


faith in the Lord Jesus Christ as a principle of action and power; 2)
understand that true teaching is done by and with the Holy Ghost;
3) lay hold upon the word of Godas found in the holy scriptures
and in the words of the prophetsin all disciplines; 4) act for themselves and accept responsibility for learning and teaching; and 5) love,
serve, and teach one another.

Administration
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Administration
Kim B. Clark
Fenton L. Broadhead
Henry J. Eyring
Charles N. Andersen
Kevin T. Miyasaki

President
Academic Vice President
Advancement Vice President
University Resources Vice President
Student Services and Activities Vice President

Betty A. Oldham

Special Assistant to the President for Strategy and Planning

Academics
Fenton L. Broadhead
Kelly Burgener
Ralph Kern
Ric Page
Edwin Sexton
Scott Bergstrom
Van Christman
Kirk Gifford
Steven Dennis
Scott Galer
Kevin Brower
Eric Karl
Jon Linford

Academic Vice President


Associate Academic Vice President - Instruction
Associate Academic Vice President - Student Connections
Associate Academic Vice President - Support Services
Associate Academic Vice President - Curriculum and Online
Institutional Research and Assessment Director
Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Dean, College of Business and Communication
Dean, College of Education and Human Development
Dean, College of Language and Letters
Dean, College of Performing and Visual Arts
Dean, College of Physical Sciences and Engineering
Dean, College of Foundations and Interdisciplinary Studies

Sid Palmer

Dean, College of Faculty Development and Mentored Research

Advancement
Henry J. Eyring
Merv Brown
Steve Davis
Christopher Moore

Advancement Vice President


University Relations Managing Director
Alumni Director
LDS Philanthropies Director

J.D. Grifth

Pathway Managing Director

Student Services and Activities


Kevin T. Miyasaki
Kip Harris
Allen Jones
Rob Garrett
Kyle Martin
Aaron Sanns
Tyler Williams
Wynn Hill
Troy Dougherty
Kristie Lords
Shaun Orr
Reed Stoddard
Red Taylor
Derek Fay
Justin Garner
Layne Kinghorn

Student Services and Activities Vice President


Dean of Students
Student Support Director
Enrollment Services Managing Director
Registrar
Student Financial Aid and Scholarship Director
Admissions Director
Student Well-Being Managing Director
Student Living and Housing Director
Student Honor Ofce Director
Student Health Services Director
Student Counseling Center Director
Disability Services
Student Activities Managing Director
Activities Director
Activities Director

University Resources
Charles N. Andersen
Kevin Price
Kevin Allred
Larry Rigby
Joe Taylor
Wayne Clark
Garth Gunderson
Rulon Nielsen
Eric Conrad
Doug Mason
Judy Steiner
Todd Huchendorf
Shane Webster
Darin Lee

University Resources Vice President


Human Resources Director
Internal Audit Director
Budget Ofcer
Chief Information Ofcer
University Operations Managing Director
University Security and Safety Director
Facilities Planning and Construction Director
University Services Managing Director
University Store Director
Event Management Director
Food Services Director
Financial Services Managing Director
Purchasing and Travel Director

College Deans, Associate Deans, and Department Chairs


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES

Humanities and Philosophy


Christopher Williams, Chair

VAN CHRISTMAN, Dean


Kathleen Barnhill, Associate Dean
Steven Christenson, Associate Dean

Languages and International Studies


Kirk Widdison, Chair

Animal and Food Science

COLLEGE OF PERFORMING AND VISUAL ARTS

Jim Lamb, Chair

Applied Plant Science

KEVIN BROWER, Dean


Brian Memmott, Associate Dean
Richard Clifford, Associate Dean

Ben Romney, Chair

Biology
Art

John Zenger, Chair

Health, Recreation, and Human Performance

Darren Clark, Chair

Steve Kimpel, Chair

Music

Sara Hawkins, Chair

Theatre and Dance

Nursing

Diane Soelberg, Chair


Gary Larsen, Chair

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND COMMUNICATION


COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING

KIRK GIFFORD, Dean


Keith Patterson, Associate Dean
Rick Hirschi, Associate Dean

ERIC KARL, Dean


Mark Lovell, Associate Dean
Larry Chilton, Associate Dean

Accounting
Chemistry

Darryl Foutz, Chair

Business Management

Les Manner, Chair

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering

Kimball Galbraith, Chair

Communication

Richard Grimmett, Chair

Design and Construction Management

Mike Cannon, Chair

Computer Information Technology

Reed Nielsen, Chair

Steve Rigby, Chair

Geology

Allan Walburger, Chair

Mathematics

Economics

Julie Willis, Chair


Jackie Nygaard, Chair

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Mechanical Engineering
Greg Roach, Chair

STEVE DENNIS, Dean


Richard Cluff, Associate Dean
Michael Abel, Associate Dean

Physics
Stephen McNeil, Chair

Home and Family

COLLEGE OF FOUNDATIONS AND INTERDISCIPLINARY


STUDIES

Scott Gardner, Chair

Psychology
Eric Gee, Chair

JON LINFORD, Dean


Craig Johnson, Associate Dean
Marc Skinner, Associate Dean

Religious Education
Dale Sturm, Chair

Sociology and Social Work


Nathan Meeker, Chair

COLLEGE OF FACULTY DEVELOPMENT AND MENTORED


RESEARCH

Teacher Education
Kevin Stanger, Chair

SID PALMER, Dean


Dan Moore, Associate Dean

COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LETTERS


SCOTT GALER, Dean
Dan Pearce, Associate Dean
Duane Adamson, Associate Dean

English
Darin Merrill, Chair

History, Geography, and Political Science


Shawn Johansen, Chair

Directory
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Information Technology
Insurance (Student)
International Services
Internship Services
Interpreting & Captioning Serv.
KBYI\KBYR
Kimball Information Desk
LDS Philanthropies
Library Information Desk
Livestock Center
Locker Rooms
Mens
Womens
Lost & Found
Mail Services
Manwaring Center Info Desk
Math Study Center
Online Student Support Center
Outdoor Resource Center
Parking Service
Payroll
Performance Tours
Pharmacy
Philanthropies
Photo Services
Preschool
Print & Copy Services
Purchasing & Travel
Reading Center
Recycling
Registrars
Risk Management
ROTC
Scheduling
Class Rooms
Academic Courses
Facilities
Scholarships
Scroll (University Newspaper)
Security and Safety
Service Center Facilities
Soap Box
Sprint Kiosk (Bookstore)
Stores and Receiving
Student Accounts
Student Activities
Student Employment
Student Honor Ofce
Student Records & Registration
Student Representative Council
Student Support
Student Well-Being
Study Skills Center
Swimming Pool
Surplus Sales
Telecommunication
Testing Center
Ticket Ofce

DIRECTORY/INFORMATION (208) 496-1411


BYUIDAHO
525 SOUTH CENTER STREET
REXBURG, ID 83460
OFFICE
Academic Administration
Academic Discovery Center
Academic Support
Academic Technology Services
Activities
Administrative Services
Admissions
Alumni Relations
ASK BYUI
Audio Visual
Badger Creek Ranch
Beehive Credit Union
Bookstore (University Store)
Bowling Center
Bursars Ofce
Campus Security
Career Services
Cashiers Ofce
Catering
Classroom Technology
Competetive Sports Issue
Computer Help Desk
Continuing Education
Counseling Center
Dean of Students
Disability Services for Students
Employment (Admin/Staff)
Employment (Student)
Enrollment Services
Event Management
Event Services
Executive Ofces
Express Print & Copy
Facilities Management
Facilities Planning & Const.
Family History Center
Farm Shop
Field Service Ofce
Financial Aid and Scholarships
Financial Services
Fitness Center
Food Services
Graphic Service
Hart Building
Hart Equipment Room
Health Center
Help Desk (Technology)
Housing & Student Living
Human Resources
I-Card Ofce
ICOMM Student Media
Information Desk

PHONE
496-1141
496-9800
496-4270
496-7200
496-7300
496-1901
496-1300
496-3300
496-1411
496-2356
496-2531
656-1000
496-3400
496-2221
496-1900
496-3000
496-9800
496-1950
496-2840
496-7070
496-7480
496-9000
496-1250
496-9370
496-9200
496-2910
496-1700
496-1700
4964278
496-3122
496-3150
496-1113
496-2880
496-2601
496-2651
496-9536
496-4540
496-4140
496-1600
496-1901
496-7490
496-2800
496-2070
496-7480
496-7480
496-9330
496-9000
496-9220
496-1700
496-1931
496-3737
496-1411

ROOM
KIM 210
MC 129
MCK 272
MCK 321
MC 101
KIM 290
KIM 120
MC 175
KIM
MCK 320
BDGR CRK
65 S. CTR
MC BKST
MC 140
KIM 130
KIM 150
MC 129
KIM 130
MC 291
UO 120
HRT 187
MCK 322
ASB 103
SHC 200
KIM 290
MCK 158
KIM 226
KIM 226
MCK 290
BCTR 213
MC 230
KIM 200
MC 140A
PPLT 249
PPLT 283
MCK 220
AGM 104
HIN 325
KIM 100
KIM 290
HRT 141
MC 276A
BID 303
HRT 202
HRT 202
SHC 100
MC 310
KIM 220
KIM 226
KIM 130
SPO 114
MC 269

4+ZIP
1690
0760
0421
0415
0710
1695
1615
0705
0405
0540
0040
0715
0740
1620
1630
0760
1625
0725
8205
0900
0415
8011
2020
1688
0421
1670
1670
0421
2200
0720
1650
0400
8205
8205
0405
1300
1945
1610
1695
0900
0725
1701
0905
0905
2010
0415
1645
1670
1625
0115
4500

10

496-7000
496-9331
496-1320
496-9800
496-4292
496-2050
496-1411
496-3510
496-9500
496-4520

KIM 170
SHC 174
MC 276
MC 129
RIG 158
RGS 102
KIM
Stocks Ave
MCK 1 FL
HRLC 112

1635
2010
1689
0760
4525
1700
1660
1655
0405
1110

496-7485
496-7486
496-1401
496-2630
496-1400
496-4289
496-1800
496-7337
496-3030
496-1992
496-3100
496-9342
496-3510
496-7232
496-4067
496-2850
496-2310
496-4290
496-2514
496-1000
496-1972
496-4702
496-3120
496-3120
496-1022
496-3120
496-1600
496-3737
496-3002
496-2500
496-3737
496-3469
496-2645
496-1900
496-7300
496-1700
496-9300
496-1000
496-1420
496-1420
496-9200
496-4291
496-7401
496-2615
496-7000
496-1750
496-3170

HRT 207
HRT 261
MC 269
ASB 140
MC 269
MCK 272
BID 236
STADIUM
KIM 150H
KIM 130
BID 323
SHC 100
Stocks Ave
BID 323
CLK 217
MC 167A
ASB 111
MCK 230
PPLT 249
KIM 190
KIM 290
RIG 205
MC 191
MC 207
KIM 190
MC 191
KIM 100
SPO 114
KIM 150
UO 229
SPO 114
MC BKST
ASB 146
KIM 130
MC 101
KIM 240
KIM 270
KIM 190
RIG 272
RIG 272
KIM 290
MCK 266
HRT 215
ASB 133
KIM 170
MC 5
KIM 130

0905
0905
0770
8000
0750
0421
4660
0905
1630
1620
1660
2010
1655
0415
0655
8005
8010
0421
8205
1640
1695
0545
0705
0750
1640
0750
1610
0115
1630
8205
0115
0715
8015
1625
0710
1670
1686
1640
4500
4500
1688
0421
0905
8020
1635
0780
1625

Directory
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Transcripts
Travel
Tutoring Center
University Relations
University Services
University Store
Wellness Center
Writing Center

496-1000
496-2340
496-4270
496-2051
496-2700
496-3400
496-7491
496-4288

KIM 190
ASB 122
MCK 272
KIM 323
MC 276
MC BKST
HRT 152
MCK 288

1640
8009
0421
1661
0725
0715
0905
0421

COLLEGES
Agriculture & Life Sciences
Business & Communication
Education & Human Dvlpmnt
Language & Letters
Performing & Visual Arts
Physical Sciences & Engineering
Foundations & Interdsciplinary
Studies
DEPARTMENTS
Academic Support Centers
Accounting
Animal & Food Science
Applied Plant Science
Art
Automotive Technology
Biology
Business Management
Chemistry
Communication
Computer Information Tech.
Computer Science & Engr
Design & Construction Mgmt
Dance
Economics
English
Geography
Geology
Health, Recreation, &
Human Performance
History
Home & Family
Human Relations
Humanities & Philosophy
Languages & Intl Studies
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Music
Nursing
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Education
Sociology & Social Work
Teacher Education
Theatre

11

496-4500
496-3600
496-3900
496-4200
496-4800
496-7501

BEN 211
SMI 229
RIG 143
SMI 296
SPO 253
ROM 60

1100
0810
4525
0865
0125
0505

496-3350

SMI 294

0860

496-4270
496-3840
496-4521
496-4580
496-4900
496-7660
496-4600
496-3621
496-7700
496-3691
496-3621
496-7600
496-7570
496-4851
496-3840
496-4360
496-4220
496-7670

MCK 272
SMI 214
LC 123
BEN 144
SPO 316
AUS 106
BEN 201
SMI 231
ROM 230
SPO 229
SMI 231
AUS 216
AUS 106
MC 214
SMI 214
RIG 180
RKS 262
ROM 150

0421
0841
1305
1120
0130
1000
1100
0800
0500
0120
0800
1015
1030
0700
0815
4540
2160
0510

496-4671
496-4220
496-4000
496-2000
496-4340
496-4300
496-7521
496-7630
496-4950
496-4550
496-7730
496-4220
496-4070
496-3920
496-4150
496-4100
496-4820

CLK 145
RKS 262
CLK 223
BID 323
TAY 240
SMI 450
RKS 232
AUS 159
SNO 246
CLK 102
ROM 118
RKS 262
RKS 110
TAY 202
RKS 132
HIN 353
SNO 126

0695
2160
0665
4660
1525
0825
2155
1020
1210
0620
0520
2160
2140
1511
2130
1930
1215

Campus Map
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

I = Information Desk
V = Visitor Parking

12

Fall Semester Schedule 2014


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Fall 2014 Academic Deadlines


FULL SEMESTER CLASS DEADLINES
Sept 12 Move-in Day
Sept 12-13 Get Connected
Sept 15 Classes begin
Sept 15 PAYMENT DEADLINES - Full Semester
Tui on, Fees and Health Plan
Sept 21 Last day to Add to a Full Semester & First Block Wai ng List
Sept 22 Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - Full Semester
Sept 22 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Full Semester
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tui on refund
Sept 22 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Full Semester
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Sept 24 Last day to return books with receipt to University Store for full
credit
Oct 7 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Full Semester classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript
Oct 7 Last day to change from credit to audit for Full Semester classes
Oct 7 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE
Nov 8 Last day to withdraw completely from Full Semester Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund

Nov 10 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual Full


Semester classes and receive a W grade and not the grade
earned
Nov 17 December 2014 gradua on applica on deadline. Students must
apply by this date for their name to be printed in the ocial
program and to be eligible for honors considera on.
Nov 26 Non-Teaching Day - No Classes
Nov 27-28 Thanksgiving Holiday - No Classes
Dec 2 Discon nuance Deadline - Student Enrolled in only FullSemester classes, last day to withdraw completely from all
classes and receive W grades and not the grades earned
Dec 2 Deferment deadline for Fall Semester
Dec 17 Last day of classes
Dec 18-19 Tes ng Days
Dec 19 Gradua on Commencement & Convoca ons
Dec 19 Fall Semester ocially ends
Dec 24 Fall Semester grades due by 12:00 noon by the Faculty
Dec 25 Fall Semester grades available to students online at my.byui.edu

FIRST BLOCK CLASS DEADLINES


Sept 30 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop First Block classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript
Sept 30 Last day to change from credit to audit for First Block classes
Sept 30 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE
Oct 11 Last day to withdraw completely from First Block Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund
Oct 13 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual First
Block classes and receive a W grade and not the grade earned
Oct 21 Discon nuance Deadline - Students enrolled only in First Block
classes, last day to withdraw from all classes and receive W
grades and not the grades earned
Oct 29 Last day of First Block classes
Nov 5 First Block grades due by 12:00 noon by the faculty
Nov 6 First Block grades available to students online at my.byui.edu

Sept 12 Move-in Day


Sept 12-13 Get Connected
Sept 15 Classes begin
Sept 15 PAYMENT DEADLINES - First Block
Tui on, Fees and Health Plan
Sept 21 Last day to Add to a First Block Wai ng List
Sept 22 Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - First Block
Sept 22 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - First Block
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tui on refund
Sept 22 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - First Block
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Sept 24 First Block students last day to return books with receipt to
University Store for full credit

SECOND BLOCK CLASS DEADLINES


Oct 29 Move-in Day
Oct 30 Second Block Classes Begin
Oct 30 PAYMENT DEADLINES - Second Block
Tui on, Fees and Health Plan
Nov 5 Last day to Add to a Second Block Wai ng List
Nov 6 Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - Second Block
Nov 6 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Second Block
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tui on refund
Nov 6 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Second Block
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Nov 7 Second Block students last day to return books with receipt to
University Store for full credit
Nov 14 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Second Block classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript
Nov 14 Last day to change from credit to audit for Second Block classes
Nov 14 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE Second Block

September 2014
S M T W
1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30

T
4
11
18
25

F
5
12
19
26

S
6
13
20
27

October 2014
S M T W
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29

T
2
9
16
23
30

F
3
10
17
24
31

Nov 17 December 2014 gradua on applica on deadline. Students must


apply by this date for their name to be printed in the ocial
program and to be eligible for honors considera on.
Nov 25 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual
Second Block classes and receive a W grade and not the grade
earned
Nov 25 Last day to withdraw completely from Second Block Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund
Nov 26 Non-Teaching Day - No Classes
Nov 27-28 Thanksgiving Holiday - No Classes
Dec 5 Discon nuance Deadline - For students enrolled only in Second
Block classes, last day to withdraw from all classes and receive
W grades and not the grades earned
Dec 17 Last day of classes
Dec 18-19 Tes ng Days
Dec 19 Gradua on Commencement & Convoca ons
Dec 19 Fall Semester ocially ends
Dec 24 Fall Semester grades due by 12:00 noon by the Faculty
Dec 25 Fall Semester grades available to students online at my.byui.edu

November 2014
S M T W T

S
4
11
18
25

S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30

13

December 2014
S M T W
1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30 31

T
4
11
18
25

F
5
12
19
26

S
6
13
20
27

Winter Semester Schedule 2015


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Winter 2015 Academic Deadlines


FULL SEMESTER CLASS DEADLINES
Jan 2
Jan 2-3
Jan 5
Jan 5
Jan 11
Jan 12
Jan 12
Jan 12
Jan 14
Jan 19
Jan 27
Jan 27
Jan 27

Move-in Day
Get Connected
Classes begin
PAYMENT DEADLINES - Full Semester
Tuion, Fees and Health Plan
Last day to Add to a Full Semester & First Block Wai ng List
Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - Full Semester
REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Full Semester
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion refund
STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Full Semester
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Last day to return books with receipt to University Store for full
credit
Civil Rights Day - No Classes
Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Full Semester classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript
Last day to change from credit to audit for Full Semester classes
FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE

Feb 16 Presidents Day - No Classes


Mar 2 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual Full
Semester classes and receive a W grade and not the grade
earned
Mar 2 Last day to withdraw completely from Full Semester Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund
Mar 9 April 2015 gradua on applica on deadline. Students must apply
by this date for their name to be printed in the ocial program
and to be eligible for honors considera on.
Mar 24 Discon nuance (withdraw completely) deadline for all FullSemester classes and receive W grades and not the grades
earned
Mar 24 Deferment deadline for Winter Semester
Apr 8 Last day of classes
Apr 9-10 Tes ng Days
Apr 10 Gradua on Commencement & Convoca ons
Apr 10 Winter Semester ocially ends
Apr 15 Winter Semester grades due by 12:00 noon by the Faculty
Apr 16 Winter Semester grades available to students online at
my.byui.edu

FIRST BLOCK CLASS DEADLINES


Jan 2
Jan 2-3
Jan 5
Jan 5
Jan 11
Jan 12
Jan 12
Jan 12
Jan 14
Jan 19

Jan 20 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop First Block classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript
Jan 20 Last day to change from credit to audit for First Block classes
Jan 20 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE
Feb 1 Last day to withdraw completely from First Block Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund
Feb 2 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual
First Block classes and receive a W grade and not the grade
earned
Feb 10 Discon nuance (withdraw completely) deadline for students
enrolled only in First Block classes to withdraw from all First
Block classes and receive W grades and not the grades earned
Feb 16 Presidents Day - No Classes
Feb 20 Last day of First Block classes
Feb 25 First Block grades due by 12:00 noon by the faculty
Feb 26 First Block grades available to students online at my.byui.edu

Move-in Day
Get Connected
Classes begin
PAYMENT DEADLINES- First Block
Tuion, Fees and Health Plan
Last day to Add to a First Block Wai ng List
Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - First Block
REGISTRATION DEADLINES - First Block
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion refund
STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - First Block
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
First Block students last day to return books with receipt to
University Store for full credit
Civil Rights Day - No Classes

SECOND BLOCK CLASS DEADLINES


Feb 21 Move-In Day
Feb 23 Second Block Classes Begin
Feb 23 PAYMENT DEADLINES - Second Block
Tuion, Fees and Health Plan
Mar 1 Last day to Add to a Second Block Wai ng List
Mar 2 Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - Second Block
Mar 2 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Second Block
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion refund
Mar 2 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Second Block
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Mar 2 Second Block students last day to return books with receipt to
University Store for full credit
Mar 9 April 2015 gradua on applica on deadline Students must apply
by this date for their name to be printed in the ocial program
and to be eligible for honors considera on
Mar 11 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Second Block classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript

January 2015
S M T W T
1
4 5 6 7 8
11 12 13 14 15
18 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28 29

F
2
9
16
23
30

S
3
10
17
24
31

February 2015
S M T W
1 2 3 4
8 9 10 11
15 16 17 18
22 23 24 25

T
5
12
19
26

F
6
13
20
27

Mar 10 Last day to change from credit to audit for Second Block classes
Mar 10 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE Second Block
Mar 22 Last day to withdraw completely from Second Block Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund
Mar 23 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual
Second Block classes and receive a W grade and not the grade
earned
Mar 31 Discon nuance (withdraw completely) deadline for students
enrolled only in Second Block classes to withdraw from all
Second Block classes and receive W grades and not the grades
earned
Apr 8 Last day of classes
Apr 9-10 Tes ng Days
Apr 10 Gradua on Commencement & Convoca ons
Apr 10 Winter Semester ocially ends
Apr 15 Winter Semester grades due by 12:00 noon by the Faculty
Apr 16 Winter Semester grades available to students online at
my.byui.edu

March 2015
S M T W
1 2 3 4
8 9 10 11
15 16 17 18
22 23 24 25
29 30 31

S
7
14
21
28

14

T
5
12
19
26

F
6
13
20
27

S
7
14
21
28

April 2015
S M T W
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29

T
2
9
16
23
30

F
3
10
17
24

S
4
11
18
25

Spring Semester Schedule 2015


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Spring 2015 Academic Deadlines


FULL SEMESTER CLASS DEADLINES
Apr 17 Move-in Day
Apr 17-18 Get Connected
Apr 20 Classes begin
Apr 20 PAYMENT DEADLINES - Full Semester
Tuion, Fees and Health Plan
Apr 26 Last day to Add to a Full Semester & First Block Wai ng List
Apr 27 Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - Full Semester
Apr 27 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Full Semester
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion refund
Apr 27 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Full Semester
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Apr 29 Last day to return books with receipt to University Store for
full credit
May 12 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Full Semester classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript
May 12 Last day to change from credit to audit for Full Semester
classes
May 12 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE
May 25 Memorial Day - No Classes

Jun 15 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual


Full Semester classes and receive a W grade and not the
grade earned
Jun 16 Last day to withdraw completely from Full Semester Classes
and receive a pro-rated tui on refund
Jun 22 July 2015 gradua on applica on deadline. Students must
apply by this date for their name to be printed in the ocial
program and to be eligible for honors considera on.
Jul 4
Independence Day Holiday - No Classes
Jul 7
Discon nuance (withdraw completely) deadline for all FullSemester classes and receive W grades and not the grades
earned
Jul 7
Deferment deadline for Spring Semester
Jul 21 Last day of classes
Jul 22-23 Tes ng Days
Jul 23 Gradua on Commencement & Convoca ons
Jul 23 Spring Semester ocially ends
Jul 29 Spring Semester grades due by 12:00 noon by the Faculty
Jul 30 Spring Semester grades available to students online at
my.byui.edu

FIRST BLOCK CLASS DEADLINES


Apr 17 Move-in Day
Apr 17-18 Get Connected
Apr 20 Classes begin
Apr 20 PAYMENT DEADLINES - First Block
Tuion, Fees and Health Plan
Apr 26 Last day to Add to a First Block Wai ng List
Apr 27 Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - First Block
Apr 27 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - First Block
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion refund
Apr 27 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - First Block
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Apr 29 Last day to return books with receipt to University Store for
full credit
May 5 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop First Block classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript

May 5 Last day to change from credit to audit for First Block classes
May 5 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE
May 16 Last day to withdraw completely from First Block Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund
May 18 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual
First Block classes and receive a W grade and not the grade
earned
May 25 Memorial Day - No Classes
May 26 Discon nuance (withdraw completely) deadline for students
enrolled only in First Block classes to withdraw from all First
Block classes and receive W grades and not the grades
earned
Jun 4 Last day of First Block classes
Jun 10 First Block grades due by 12:00 noon by the faculty
Jun 11 First Block grades available to students online at my.byui.edu

SECOND BLOCK CLASS DEADLINES


Jun 4
Jun 5
Jun 5
Jun 11
Jun 15
Jun 12
Jun 12
Jun 16
Jun 22
Jun 24

Move-in Day
Second Block Classes Begin
PAYMENT DEADLINES - Second Block
Tuion, Fees and Health Plan
Last day to Add to a Second Block Wai ng List
Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - Second Block
REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Second Block
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion refund
STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Second Block
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Second Block students last day to return books with receipt to
University Store for full credit
July 2015 gradua on applica on deadline. Students must apply
by this date for their name to be printed in the ocial program
and to be eligible for honors considera on
Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Second Block classes without
receiving a W grade on the transcript

April 2015
M T

W
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29

T
2
9
16
23
30

F
3
10
17
24

S
4
11
18
25

May 2015
M T

F
1
3 4 5 6 7 8
10 11 12 13 14 15
17 18 19 20 21 22
24 25 26 27 28 29
31

S
2
9
16
23
30

Jun 22 Last day to change from credit to audit for Second Block
classes
Jun 22 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE Second Block
Jul 1
Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from individual
Second Block classes and receive a W grade and not the grade
earned
Jul 3
Last day to withdraw completely from Second Block Classes and
receive a pro-rated tui on refund
Jul 4
Independence Day Holiday - No Classes
Jul 13 Discon nuance (withdraw completely) deadline for students
enrolled only in Second Block classes to withdraw from all
Second Block classes and receive W grades and not the grades
earned
Jul 21 Last day of classes
Jul 22-23 Tes ng Days
Jul 23 Gradua on Commencement & Convoca ons
Jul 23 Spring Semester ocially ends
Jul 29 Spring Semester grades due by 12:00 noon by the Faculty
Jul 30 Spring Semester grades available to students online at
my.byui.edu
June 2015
M T
1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
28 29 30
S

15

W
3
10
17
24

T
4
11
18
25

F
5
12
19
26

S
6
13
20
27

July 2015
M T

W
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29

T
2
9
16
23
30

F
3
10
17
24
31

S
4
11
18
25

Christmas/Summer Session Schedule 2014


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Christmas Session 2014 Academic Deadlines


FULL SESSION CLASS DEADLINES
Dec 20 Last day to Add to a Christmas Session Waing List
Dec 20 Christmas Session Classes Begin
Dec 20 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Christmas Session
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion
refund
Dec 20 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Christmas
Session
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Dec 20 PAYMENT DEADLINES
Tuion, Fees, and Health Plan - Late charge of 5% on
unpaid balance
Dec 20 Last day to withdraw from Christmas Session Classes
and receive a pro-rated tuion refund
Dec 22 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Christmas Session
classes without receiving a W grade on the
transcript.
Dec 22 Last day to change from credit to audit for Christmas
Session classes
Dec 22 FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE Christmas
Session
Dec 23 Christmas Session students last day to return books
with receipt to University Store for full credit

December 2014
S M T W
1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30 31

T
4
11
18
25

F
5
12
19
26

Dec 24 Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from


individual Christmas Session classes and receive a W
grade and not the grade earned
Dec 24 Christmas EveClasses will be in session on this day
due to the limited number of days available during the
Christmas Holiday
Dec 25 Christmas Day - No Classes
Dec 26 No Classes
Dec 27 Disconnuance (withdraw completely) deadline for all
Christmas Session classes and receive W grades and
not the grades earned
Dec 31 New Years Eve- Classes will be in session on this day
due to the limited number of days available during the
Christmas Holiday
Jan 1 New Years Day - No Classes
Jan 2 No Classes
Jan 3 Classes will be in session on this day due to the limited
number of days available during the Christmas Holiday
Jan 3 Last day of classes
Jan 3 Christmas Session Ocially ends
Jan 7 Christmas Session grades due by 12:00 noon by the
faculty
Jan 8 Christmas Session grades available to students online
at my.byui.edu

January 2015
S M T W T
1
4 5 6 7 8
11 12 13 14 15
18 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28 29

S
6
13
20
27

F
2
9
16
23
30

S
3
10
17
24
31

Summer Session 2015 Academic Deadlines


FULL SESSION CLASS DEADLINES
Jul 25 Move-in Day
Jul 27 Summer Session Classes Begin
Jul 27 PAYMENT DEADLINES - Summer Session
Tuion, Fees and Health Plan
Aug 2 Last day to Add to a Summer Session Waing List
Aug 3 Late charge of 5% on unpaid balance - Summer
Session
Aug 3 REGISTRATION DEADLINES - Summer Session
Last day to register or add classes
Last day to drop classes and get a 100% tuion
refund
Aug 3 STUDENT HEALTH PLAN DEADLINES - Summer Session
Enrollment of dependents for new students
Waiver of Health Plan for students
Aug 5 Summer Session students last day to return books
with receipt to University Store for full credit
Aug 11 Drop Deadline - Last day to drop Summer Session
classes without receiving a W grade on the
transcript

July 2015
S M T

W
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29

T
2
9
16
23
30

F
3
10
17
24
31

S
4
11
18
25

Aug 11
Aug 11
Aug 23
Aug 24
Sept 1
Sept 7
Sept 11
Sept 11
Sept 16
Sept 17

August 2015
S M T W T

Last day to change from credit to audit for Summer


Session classes
FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE Summer
Session
Last day to withdraw from classes and receive a
pro-rated tuion refund.
Withdrawal Deadline - Last day to withdraw from
individual Summer Session classes and receive a
W grade and not the grade earned.
Disconnuance (withdraw completely) Deadline for
all Summer Session classes and receive W grades
and not the grades earned
Labor Day - No Classes
Last day of classes
Summer Session Ocially ends
Summer Session grades due by 12:00 noon by the
faculty
Summer Session grades available to students online
at my.byui.edu.

S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31

16

September 2015
S M T W
1 2
6 7 8 9
13 14 15 16
20 21 22 23
27 28 29 30

T
3
10
17
24

F
4
11
18
25

S
5
12
19
26

Terminology & Types of Degrees


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

DEGREE CATEGORIES
All degrees are catagorized according to the number of credit hours within the program requirements as follows:
Standard Degree: 40-55 credit hours of coursework selected from core and emphasis courses within the declared program.
Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: 50-60 credit hours of coursework selected from core and emphasis courses within the declared minors,
concentrations, and clusters.
Integrated Standard Degree: 56-67 credit hours of coursework selected from core and emphasis courses within the declared program;
1 cluster or 2 clusters or 1 minor must be included in the degree requirements.
Specialized Degree: 68-80 credit hours of coursework selected from core and emphasis courses within the declared program.
The following denitions describe the options available to students in Education:
Education Specialized Major: 80 credit hours. No minor required.
Education Composite Major: 55 credit hours plus education core. No minor required.
Education Major: 30 credit hours plus education core. Requires an Education minor.
Education Minor: 20 credit hours. Requires an Education major in a selected eld of study.
Endorsement: 6-20 credit hours, dened and granted by the State of Idaho.

TYPES OF DEGREES AVAILABLE


Associate of Applied Science (AAS): 60-70 credit hours including Foundations & University requirements (will not transfer to other schools).
Associate of Art (AA): 60 credit hours including Foundations.
Associate of Science (AS): 60 credit hours including Foundations.
Associate in Nursing (ASN): 78 credit hours including Foundations.
Bachelor of Art (BA): 120 credit hours including major, minor or clusters, and Foundations.
Bachelor of Science (BS): 120 credit hours including major, minor or clusters, and Foundations.
Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS): 120 credit hours including 2 concentrations or 1 concentration and 1 minor or 1 concentration
and 2 clusters, and Foundations.
Bachelor of Fine Art (BFA): 120 credit hours including major, and Foundations.
Bachelor of Musical Arts (BMA): 120 credit hours including specialized major, minor or clusters, and Foundations.
Bachelor of Music in Music Education (BM): 120 credit hours including specialized major, minor or clusters, and Foundations requirements.

CLUSTERS
When clusters are required, they must be selected from the pre-approved cluster options dened by the academic department. Clusters should
be declared early in the students academic career and planned for just as a student would plan for a major, minor, or emphasis. Clusters are not
printed on University diplomas or transcripts. Cluster courses cannot be waived. If a student cannot complete a cluster course, the student must
declare a different pre-approved cluster.

17

Graduation
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT

In addition to specic degree requirements, students must also meet


the graduation requirements listed below:
Grade Point Average: To graduate, a student must have a
minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
Graduation Catalog: A student is responsible for the
Foundations and Major requirements listed in any one BYU
Idaho Catalog (chosen by the student) from the year of rst
enrollment to the year of graduation, provided the BYUIdaho
Catalog chosen is not more than seven years old. However,
students are subject to all other policies, requirements, and
procedures as outlined in the University catalog for the current
academic year.
Resident Credit: To graduate with a bachelors degree a student
must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of BYUIdaho
credit. To graduate with an associate degree a student must
complete a minimum of 24 credit hours of BYUIdaho credit.
On-Campus Credit: To graduate with any degree, a student
must earn a minimum of 15 credits on campus (not online) at
BYUIdaho or successfully complete one of the options within
BYUIdahos Pathway Program (Academic Start or Accelerated
Start). Students who transfer 15 or more credits earned on
campus at another CES school (BYU, BYUHawaii, or LDSBC)
will be considered as having met this graduation requirement.
Upper Division Credit: To graduate with a bachelors degree,
a student must complete a minimum of 15 hours of BYUIdaho
upper-division credit (300 or 400-level courses). Associate
degrees do not require a minimum number of upper-division
credits.
Minor: At least 6 credits must be taken in residence.
Concentration: At least 6 credits must be upper-division credit
(300 or 400-level courses).
Cluster: At least 1 course per cluster must be taken in residence.
Academic Standing: Students who are academically suspended or
academically dismissed may not graduate from BYUIdaho
Good Honor Code Standing: Students must be in Good Honor
Code Standing in order to graduate from BYUIdaho. Former
students wishing to graduate from BYUIdaho, but whose
ecclesiastical endorsement has expired, will need to submit a
current endorsement before their application for graduation will
be processed.

Commencement and Convocation exercises are held in April, July,


and December. Students who do not attend Convocation must claim
a diploma cover from the Student Records and Registration Ofce
before leaving campus. Diplomas will be mailed to graduates only
after all requirements have been completed and veried, usually 6-8
weeks after nal grades are posted.
Graduation exercises at BYU-Idaho differ than most others in that
we invite the ministry of the Spirit by our conduct and proceedings.
To assist in this process and to show respect for everyone present,
graduates are asked to adhere to BYU-Idahos Dress and Grooming
Standard of Sunday dress.
Additionally, so as not to draw attention to any one individual;
owers, leis, honor cords and other embellishments that might be
considered academic regalia should not be attached to or worn
with the cap and gown during the convocation or commencement
ceremonies. However, outside of these ceremonies, the wearing of
honor cords and other regalia are permitted for society and other
graduation pictures.

GRADUATION HONORS

Cum Laude: Students ranked in the top 10% of their graduating


class.
Magna Cum Laude: Students ranked in the top 5% of their
graduating class.
Summa Cum Laude: Students ranked in the top 1% of their
graduating class.

All honors are based on the cumulative GPA completed at the end
of the semester prior to the graduation ceremony. No adjustments
will be made for grades posted or changed following the graduation
ceremony. To be eligible, the application must be submitted before
the application deadline.

FINANCIAL HOLDS
Candidates with outstanding debts to any department or ofce will
not receive diplomas or ofcial transcripts until all amounts are paid.

EXIT SURVEY

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION

In the interest of documenting post-graduation rates of employment


for accreditation purposes, all students must complete a brief exit
survey, available online, approximately one month before their
anticipated graduation.

Current students apply for graduation online via my.byui.edu.


Former students may request assistance in applying for graduation at
graduation@byui.edu.
For specic deadlines, refer to the Academic Deadline Calendar
found in this catalog. Students who apply after the Graduation
Application deadline will not be included in the Commencement
Program and will not be considered for academic honors. Graduates
names will be included in the program for the Commencement for
which they apply to graduate, not the Commencement in which they
march, if different.

Various means will be used to remind students of this graduation


requirement, including emails sent to the students BYUIdaho email
account with a link to the survey, a notation on the students Grad
Report, and notication through the respective college Career and
Academic Advising ofces.
Completion of the exit survey is a graduation requirement, and
candidates for graduation who do not complete the survey will not
receive their diploma until they have done so.

Ofcial graduation is subject to a degree audit following the last


semester of enrollment. The Student Records and Registration ofce
will notify students of any graduation deciencies. The Graduation
Application of those who do not complete the requirements will
be reevaluated at the end of the next semester. However, students
who do not complete graduation requirements within one year after
application must reapply for graduation.

18

University Outcomes
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

University Outcomes
University-level outcomes (which are listed below) were developed by synthesizing common
outcomes from academic programs across the university. The outcomes emphasize the
importance of becoming, and highlight the fact that each outcome has increasing levels of
development, from knowledge to skill to character.
The purpose of a BYU-Idaho education is to help
students to become
1. Disciple leaders
2. Lifelong learners
3. Creative and critical thinkers
4. Effective communicators
5. Skilled professionals
6. Engaged citizens
The intent of each outcome is clarified below:
Students become disciple leaders as they
x Understand and commit to live the principles of the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ
x Demonstrate leadership skills and the ability to cooperate with others
Students become lifelong learners as they
x Locate, evaluate, and appropriately use needed information
x Master strategies to continually gain and apply knowledge and skills in new
situations
Students become creative and critical thinkers as they
x Apply reflective reasoning, logic and quantitative analysis to new ideas, opinions,
and situations
x Analyze problems and challenges from fresh perspectives that offer innovative
solutions.
Students become effective communicators as they
x Present ideas and arguments clearly through oral, written, and visual form
x Listen, understand, and effectively engage others in varied settings
Students become skilled professionals as they
x Develop deep learning in a discipline and broad skills leading to self-reliance
x Develop professional and ethical values and practices
Students become engaged citizens as they
x Fulfill family, religious, and civic responsibilities
x Develop empathy for their fellowmen and understanding of world religion, culture,
history, literature, science, and the arts

19

Accreditation / Majors
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Accreditation
Brigham Young University - Idaho is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.
Accreditation of an institution of higher education by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities indicates that it meets or exceeds
criteria for the assessment of institutional quality evaluated through a peer review process. An accredited college or university is one which has
available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives
reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation.
Accreditation by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not
a guarantee of every course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance about the
quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution.
Inquiries regarding an institutions accredited status by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities should be directed to the administrative staff of the institution. Individuals may also contact:
Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
8060 165th Avenue N.E., Suite 100
Redmond, WA 98052 (425) 558-4224 www.nwccu.org

Code

Major

MAJORS
Code Emphasis

S/F

F/W

W/S

ACCOUNTING
600
Bachelor of Science in Accounting

ANIMAL AND FOOD SCIENCE


347
Associate of Applied Science in Beef Production Management
645
Bachelor of Science in Animal Science
648
Bachelor of Science in Food Science

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Design/Build/Maintain
Production
Floral Design
N

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Two-Dimensional Studies
Three-Dimensional Studies
Graphic Design
Illustration
Photography
Y
Art History
Drawing
Graphic Desgin
Illustration
Painting
Photography
Printmaking
Three-Dimensional

APPLIED PLANT SCIENCE


365
Associate of Applied Science in Plant Science and Technology
372
Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture
373
Associate of Applied Science in Floral Design
642
Bachelor of Science in Agronomy, Crop and Soil Sciences
644
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Technology
695
Bachelor of Science in Horticulture
14
15
16
825
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Education Composite
ART
560

Bachelor of Arts FINE ARTS


76
77
78
79
80

660

Bachelor of Arts in Art


9
186
187
188
189
190
191
192

20

Majors
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
860
862

Major
Bachelor of Arts in Art Education
Bachelor of Art in Art Education Composite

Code Emphasis

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
346
Associate of Applied Science in Automotive Technology
412
Bachelor of Science in Automotive Technology
143
144

S/F
Y
Y

F/W
Y
Y

W/S
Y
Y

N
N
Business Management
General Automotive

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

BIOLOGY
488
Bachelor of Science in Plant and Wildlife Ecology
176
177
178
179
180
700

Wildlife
Fisheries
Plant Biology
Range
Ecology

Bachelor of Science in Biology

Y
Microbiology
Neuroscience
Environmental Biology
Human Biology
Biotechnology
Zoology
Y
Y

55
62
68
69
70
170
800
805

Bachelor of Science in Biology Education


Bachelor of Science in Biology Education Composite

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
370
Associate of Applied Science in Administrative Assistant/Ofce Manager
371
Associate of Applied Science in Business Management
405
Bachelor of Science in Applied Management
415
Bachelor of Science in Business Management
95
96
97
171
CHEMISTRY
705
Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry*
710
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry *
810
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry Education*

Y
Y
Y
Y
Marketing
Finance
Supply Chain Management
Entrepreneurial Management

Y
Y
Y

*An adjustment to your graduation plan may be necessary to enroll


in certain upper division chemistry courses. See your faculty advisor.

COMMUNICATION
675
Bachelor of Science in Communication

Y
Advertising
Public Relations
News/Journalism
Video Production
Visual Communication

160
161
162
163
164

21

Majors
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
Major
Code Emphasis
COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
681
Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Technology
686
Bachelor of Science in Business Analytics
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
384
Associate of Applied Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering
385
Associate of Applied Science in Computer Programming
440
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
443
Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering
445
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering
450
Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering
DANCE
655
Bachelor of Arts in Dance
168
169
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
345
Associate of Applied Science in Architectural Technology
605
Bachelor of Science in Construction Management

F/W

W/S

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Choreography and Performance
Pedagogy

Y
Y

ECONOMICS
643
Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Agribusiness Management
Global Food and Agribusiness Management
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

148
149
715
720
724

S/F

Bachelor of Science in Financial Economics


Bachelor of Science in Economics
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics

ENGLISH
630
Bachelor of Arts in English
830
Bachelor of Arts in English Education Only Field
836
Bachelor of Arts in English Education First Field

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH


376
Associate of Applied Science in Family History

GEOLOGY
740
Bachelor of Science in Geology
840
Bachelor of Science in Earth Science Education

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
N
Y
Y

Y
Y
N
Y
Y

HEALTH, RECREATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE


356
Associate of Applied Science in Paramedicine
361
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting
366
Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapy Assistant
477
Bachelor of Science in Paramedicine
481
Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology
109
136
611
Bachelor of Science in Recreation Management
106
108
150
750
Bachelor of Science in Health Science
39
102
151
752
Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration

Exercise Physiology
Program Design and Prescription
Y
Y
Therapeutic Recreation
Recreation Management
Community
Y
Y
Public Health
Occupational Safety and Health
Health Promotion
Y
Y

22

Majors
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
Major
HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, POLITICAL SCIENCE
623
Bachelor of Arts in Political Science

Code Emphasis

F/W

Y
Y
Foreign Affairs
American Government
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
History Endorsement
American Government Endorsement

64
65
625
815
880

S/F

Bachelor of Arts in History


Bachelor of Arts in History Education
Bachelor of Science in Social Studies Education Composite
129
130

HOME AND FAMILY


359
Associate of Applied Science in Professional Preschool Education
Y
730
Bachelor of Science in Child Development
Y
736
BS in Marriage and Family Studies
Y
145
Professional General
146
Professional Clinical
147
Home and Family Living
940
Bachelor of Science in Family & Consumer Science Education Composite
Y

W/S
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY


671
Bachelor of Arts in Humanities

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
399
Associate of Science in General Studies
795
Bachelor in Interdisciplinary Studies
799
Bachelor of Science in University Studies

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

LANGUAGES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES


775
Bachelor of Arts in International Studies
910
Bachelor of Arts in Spanish Education

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

MATHEMATICS
650
Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics
850
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics Education

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
374
Associate of Applied Science in Welding and Fabrication Technology
380
Associate of Applied Science in Engineering Technology
465
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
470
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
474
Bachelor of Science in Welding and Fabrication Technology Management

N
Y
N
Y
N

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
N
Y
Y

MUSIC
687
Bachelor of Arts in Music
690
Bachelor of Musical Arts

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

693

116
117
152

General Music
String
Piano

118
119
120
137
138
139

Y
Y
Y
Piano Performance
Organ Performance
Woodwind, Brass or Percussion Performance
Vocal Performance
Jazz Studies
String Performance

Bachelor of Music

23

Majors
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
890

Major
Bachelor of Music in Music Education Composite

Code Emphasis
31
32
33

PHYSICS
770
Bachelor of Science in Physics
154
155
156
157
158
159
165
166
167

W/S
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Astronomy
Biophysics
Chemistry
Computational
Engineering
Geophysics
Mathematical
Medical Physics
Pre-Medical

Bachelor of Science in Physics Education

PSYCHOLOGY
760
Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Y
Y
General Psychology
Industrial/Organizational Psychology

134
135
SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK
500
Bachelor of Science in Social Work
780
Bachelor of Science in Sociology
TEACHER EDUCATION
980
Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood/Special Education
985
Bachelor of Science in Special Education K-12
990
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
182
183
184
185

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y

Language Arts
Math
Science
Social Studies

THEATRE
363
Associate of Arts in Theatre Studies
636
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Studies
172
173
174
175
930

F/W
Y

Band
Orchestra
Choral

NURSING
355
Associate of Science in Nursing
400
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ASN to BSN)

870

S/F
Y

Performance
Childrens Theatre
Theatre Studies
Design/Technical

Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Speech Education

WEB DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT


390
Associate of Applied Science in Web Design and Development
113
114
590
Bachelor of Science in Web Design and Development
110
111

24

Web Design
Web Development
Web Design
Web Development

Concentrations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Concentrations
Code
Concentration
ACCOUNTING
D 138
Accounting
ANIMAL AND FOOD SCIENCE
D 111
Animal Science
ART
D 140
Photography
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
D 123
Automotive Engine Performance
D 124
Automotive Technology Design and Manufacturing
D 125
Automotive Powertrains
D 145
Automotive Technology
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
D 128
Business Management
D 137
Supply Chain and Operations Management
D 144
Administrative Assistant/Ofce Manager
CHEMISTRY
D 112
Biochemistry
COMMUNICATION
D 126
Media and Professional Writing
D 127
Writing Creatively for Fiction and Film
D 136
Visual Communication/Business
COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
D 122
Computer Information Technology
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
D 106
Software Engineering
D 107
Computer Science - Internet
D 108
Computer Science - Hardware
D 109
Computer Science - Theory
D 143
Electrical and Computer Engineering
DANCE
D 131
Dance
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
D 134
Construction Management
D 139
Architecture

Code
Concentration
ENGLISH
D 103
Creative Writing
D 104
Literary Studies
D 105
Professional Writing
GEOLOGY
D 100
Earth Studies
HEALTH, RECREATION, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
D 117
Pre-Physician Assistant
D 141
Health Promotion
HISTORY
D 142
History
HOME AND FAMILY
D 110
Apparel Design and Construction
D 115
Child Development
HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY
D 113
Humanities
D 114
Philosophy
LANGUAGES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
D 101
Spanish
D 130
International Studies
MATHEMATICS
D 118
Actuarial Science
D 119
Applied Math
D 133
Statistics
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
D 146
Manufacturing Technology
PHYSICS
D 129
Physics
PSYCHOLOGY
D 116
Psychology
SOCIOLOGY
D 102
Sociology
THEATRE
D 132
Theatre Studies

25

Minors
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
Minors
ACCOUNTING
121
Accounting
ANIMAL AND FOOD SCIENCE
140
Animal Science
242
Nutrition
APPLIED PLANT SCIENCE
204
Horticulture
243
Plant Science and Technology
ART
170
Art Education
205
Photography
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
210
Automotive Technology
BIOLOGY
141
Natural Resources
143
Biology
173
Biology Education
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
189
Minor for Non-Business Related Majors
224
Minor for Business Related Majors (Acctg) - Finance
225
Minor for Business Related Majors (Acctg) - Marketing
226
Minor for Business Related Majors (Acctg) - Supply Chain
Management
227
Minor for Business Related Majors (Econ/CIT) - Finance
228
Minor for Business Related Majors (Econ/CIT) Marketing
229
Minor for Business Related Majors (Econ/CIT) - Supply
Chain Management
CHEMISTRY
146
Chemistry
172
Chemistry Education
COMMUNICATION
221
Communication
COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
202
Computer Information Technology
246
Business Analytics
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
147
Computer Science
245
Electrical and Computer Engineering
DANCE
183
Dance
ECONOMICS
149
Economics
165
Economics Education
ENGLISH
133
English
134
English Education Second Field
FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH
240
Family History Research
GEOLOGY
130
Natural Science Education
154
Geology
181
Earth Science Education
222
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Technology

Code
Minors
HEALTH, RECREATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
110
Exercise and Sport Science
123
Health Science
163
Physical Education Teaching
171
Health Education
196
Sports Management
200
Recreation Management
219
Industrial Health
220
Healthcare Administration
HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, POLITICAL SCIENCE
111
Geography
112
Geography Education
113
History
114
History Education
126
Political Science
128
American Government Education
222
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Technology
231
Public Administration
HOME AND FAMILY
155
Home and Family Living
184
Marriage and Family Studies
192
Clothing Construction
198
Home Design
199
Child Development
HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY
109
Humanities
124
Philosophy
LANGUAGE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
115
International Studies
135
French
136
German
137
Russian
138
Spanish
139
Chinese
158
Chinese Education
185
French Education
186
German Education
187
Russian Education
188
Spanish Education
194
Multi-Lingual
195
TESOL Education
234
Asian Languages
235
European Languages
236
Latin American Languages
237
Slavic and East European Languages
238
World Languages
239
TESOL
MATHEMATICS
119
Mathematics
120
Mathematics Education
232
Statistics for non-Math/Science Majors
233
Statistics for Math/Science Majors
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
206
Engineering
217
Welding Fabrication Technology
244
Manufacturing Technology

26

Minors/Clusters
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
Minors
MILITARY SCIENCE
179
Military Science
MUSIC
159
Music
203
Piano Pedagogy
Code
Minors
PHYSICS
104
Physics
178
Physics Education
182
Physical Science Education
PSYCHOLOGY
176
Psychology
218
Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Code
Minors
SOCIOLOGY
129
Sociology
THEATRE
160
Theatre Arts
162
Technical Theatre
177
Theatre and Speech Education
WEB DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
215
Web Design (for non-Web D&D Students)
216
Web Development (for non-Web D&D Students)
223
Web Design (for Web D&D Students)
230
Web Development (for Web D&D students)

Clusters
Code
Clusters
ACCOUNTING
2000
Financial Accounting (For Non-Business Majors)
2002
Tax Accounting (For Non-Business Majors)
2003
Financial Accounting (For Business Majors)
2004
Tax Accounting (For Business Majors)

Code
Clusters
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
6100
Automotive Technology
BIOLOGY
1100
Pre-Veterinary
1101
Recreation Therapy (Recreation Management Majors)
1102
Natural Resource (Recreation Management Majors)
1103
Neuroscience (Psychology Majors)
1104
Biological Illustrations (Art Majors)
1105
Microbiology
1106
Biotechnology/Forensics
1107
Health Professions Prerequisites
1200
Pre-Profession

ANIMAL AND FOOD SCIENCE


1001
Equine
1002
Animal Health
1003
Animal Reproduction
1004
Natural Resources
1010
Animal Production
1011
Animal Nutrition
1012
Beef Production
1020
Human Nutrition
1021
Food and Nutrition

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
2100
General Business
2101
General Business (For Accounting Majors)
2103
Administrative Assistant
2106
Real Estate
2109
Business Fundamentals
2111
Human Resource Management
2112
Finance (Application Only, see Advising)
2113
Supply Chain Management
(Application Only, see Advising)
2114
Marketing (Application Only, see Advising)
2115
Entrepreneurship

APPLIED PLANT SCIENCE


1500
Event Planning
1501
Horticulture
1502
Natural Resources
1503
Soil Management
1504
Crop Production
1505
Crop Protection
1506
GIS in Agriculture and Natural Resources
1507
Agriculture Technology
6801
GIS
ART
5200
5201
5204
5205
5206
5207

CHEMISTRY
6500
Chemistry
6502
Animal Health Chemistry
6800
Physical Science and Mathematics

Two-Dimensional Studies
Three-Dimensional Studies
Photography
Art History
Graphic Design
Fundamentals

COMMUNICATION
2200
Advertising
2205
Public Relations
2207
Media Sales and Digital Media
2208
Professional Presentations
2210
Visual Communication
2211
Communication Management
2212
Video
2213
News/Journalism

27

Clusters
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
Clusters
COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
2500
Generic CIT
2501
Programming
2502
Networking
2503
Web
2504
Project Lifecycle

Code
Clusters
HEALTH, RECREATION, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
1201
Exercise and Sports Science
1202
Coaching (Non-education)
1203
Professional Health
1204
Professional Training
1205
Aquatic Management
1206
Inclusion
1207
Outdoor Recreation
1300
Health and Wellness
1301
Industrial Health
1302
Sports Medicine
1303
Public Health
1304
Emergency Care
1305
General Recreation Management
1307
Rehabilitative Recreation Therapy
(For Recreation Managment Majors)
1308
Healthcare Administration

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


6600
Computer Science
6603
Electrical and Computer Engineering
DANCE
5100
Dance
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
6001
Heavy Civil Industrial Construction (Majors Only)
6003
Residential/Commercial Construction (Majors Only)
6010
Construction/Business Management (Majors Only)
6012
Construction Document (Majors Only)
6009
Cabinet and Furniture Making (Non Majors Only)
6011
Design Thinking and Innovation (Non Majors Only)
6013
Construction Management (Non Majors Only)
6014
Building Information Modeling (Non Majors Only)
6015
Architecture Cluster (Non Majors Only)

HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, POLITICAL SCIENCE


4000
Geography
4001
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
4002
American History
4004
World History
4006
Political Science - American Politics
4007
Political Science - International Politics
4008
Pre-Law
6801
GIS

ECONOMICS
2300
General Economics
2302
Law and Economics
2303
Public Administration
2304
General Economics (For Business Majors Only)
2305
Law and Economics (For Business Majors Only)
2307
Agribusiness

HOME AND FAMILY


3000
Child Development
3001
Infant/Toddler
3002
Early Childhood
3003
Family Studies
3004
Sewing
3005
The Home
3006
Home and Family Living

ENGLISH
4200
Reading for a Lifetime
4201
Genre Study
4203
Creative Writing
4204
Literature
4205
Professional Writing and Editing
4206
Rhetoric and Composition
4207
Introduction to English Studies

HUMANITIES AND PHILOSOPHY


4300
Humanities
4301
Philosophy
4302
Ancient Languages
4303
English Language and Usage (For Humanities Majors
Only)

FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH


7000
Family History Research

LANGUAGES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES


4005
International Studies
4110
Other Languages
4111
Spanish Fluent Speaker
4112
Spanish Native Speaker
4113
French Fluent Speaker
4114
German Fluent Speaker
4115
Russian Fluent Speaker
4116
Chinese Fluent Speaker

GEOLOGY
6700
Geology
6703
Mathematics (Geology Majors Only)
6704
Physics (Geology Majors Only)
6705
Inorganic Chemistry (Geology Majors Only)
6706
Organic Biochemistry (Geology Majors Only)
6707
Engineering (Geology Majors Only)
6708
Computer (Geology Majors Only)
6711
Geographical Information Systems (Geology Majors Only)
6800
Physical Science and Mathematics
6801
GIS

28

Clusters/Certificates
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Code
4117
4118
4119
4120
4121
4122

Code
Clusters
PSYCHOLOGY
3100
Psychology: Business
3101
Psychology: Health Sciences
3102
Psychology: Parenting
3103
Psychology: Pre-Health Professions
3104
Psychology: Recreation Management
3105
Psychology: Sociology
3106
Psychology: Research Methods
3107
Introduction to Psychology
3108
Industrial Organizational Psychology

Clusters
Chinese Elementary
French Elementary
Russian Elementary
German Elementary
Spanish Elementary
TESOL

MATHEMATICS
6200
General Mathematics
6203
Statistics
6800
Physical Science and Mathematics

SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK


3200
Criminology
3201
Sociology

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
6300
Engineering
6301
Manufacturing
6302
Welding
6303
Fabrication
MUSIC
5400
5401
5402
5403
5405

TEACHER EDUCATION
3300
General Education
3301
Elementary Literacy
3302
Educational/School Psychology
3303
Elementary Methods of Teaching
3305
Education

Instrumental
Organ
Piano
Vocal Music
General Music

THEATRE
5300
Theatre Arts Performance
5301
Theatre Arts Technical Theatre

NURSING
1400
Non-Nursing

WELDING
6302
Welding
6303
Fabrication

PHYSICS
6400
Technical Physics
6401
Physics Exposure
6800
Physical Science and Mathematics

Certificates
Code
C 100
C 101
C 102
C 103
C 104

Certicate
Basic Accounting
Administrative Assistant
Professional Sales
Web Media
Home and Family Studies

Code
C 105
C 106
C 107
C 108
C 109

Certicate
Business Fundamentals
Entrepreneurship
Family History Research
Computer Information Technology
TESOL

Certicates are designed for degree-seeking students who perceive that the certicate will strengthen their associate or bachelors degree. Each
certicate is nested within an associates degree.

29

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
This is an exciting time to be associated with Brigham Young
University-Idaho as it continues on a steady, upward course of
academic innovation. Dedicated administrators and faculty members
are continually working to prepare students to be well-educated
academically as well as spiritually.
One of the universitys academic developments is our general
education program called Foundations. Just as the name suggests,
Foundations is designed to provide a strong base for the rest of your
university experience and throughout your life.
Foundations presents a focused approach to general education,
allowing students to explore specic aspects of diverse subjects,
delving deep into each topic. The courses are interdisciplinary and
have been created through countless hours of faculty collaboration to
provide you with the most effective learning outcomes.
Foundations courses are divided into ve groups: Eternal Truths,
Academic Fundamentals, Science, Cultural Awareness, and
Connections. While some courses are required, others are left to
personal preference. You will be blessed as you enter these inspired
classes with an open mind and willing heart.
I invite you to carefully review the Foundations courses available and
determine which classes will benet you most. I wish you success in
this and every other endeavor here at BYU-Idaho.
Best regards,

Kim B. Clark
President, Brigham Young University-Idaho

30

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Overview of Foundations

Connections: All students take the 2-credit Foundations Capstone


course.
FDCNC 350, Foundations Capstone: Analytical Thinking and
Moral Judgment (2 credits)

A BYU-Idaho education includes both the acquisition of marketable


skills and a broad general education. BYU-Idaho graduates should
not only be employable, but also literate, well rounded, cultured, and
informed. They should be good thinkers and good communicators.
They should be good citizens with strong testimonies. And they
should graduate with the passion and skills to make them lifelong
learners.

Foundations Requirements: Associates Degree (A.A. or A.S.)


For students pursuing an associates degree, a total of 32 credits of
Foundations courses are required. The requirements are the same as
those for a bachelors degree, with two exceptions. Students pursuing
an associates degree only complete 8 credits in the Eternal Truths
area: FDREL 121, FDREL 122, FDREL 200, plus two additional
FDREL credits of their choice. Also, for an associates degree, students do not take the Foundations Capstone course, FDCNC 350
in the Connections area. The course requirements for the Academic
Fundamentals, Science, and Cultural Awareness areas are the same as
those for a bachelors degree.

In BYU-Idahos Foundations program, students acquire lifechanging skills and knowledge. Courses are both broad and deep.
Students develop the ability to think critically, to read and write, to
reason quantitatively and scientically, and to collaborate. They also
encounter big and meaty questions about todays world, and make
connections between the course material and other aspects of their
lives.
In their Foundations courses, students can nd not just a job, but a
vocationa purpose and vision of how they can bring about a better
world and the skills to help them do it. Foundations is an oasis of
learning in a busy and distracted world. We invite students to pause
and drink deeply from its waters.

Foundations Requirements: Applied Associates Degree (A.A.S.)


An applied associates degree does not transfer to other institutions.
It is intended to be a terminal degree, leading to a profession. For
an applied associates degree, students complete a total of 17 credits
in Foundations. Students take 8 credits in the Eternal Truths area:
FDREL 121, FDREL 122, FDREL 200, plus two additional FDREL
credits of their choice. Additionally, students take the FDENG 101,
FDENG 201, and FDMAT 108 courses in the Academic Fundamentals area.

Foundations Requirements: Bachelors Degree


As part of a bachelors degree, students will complete 14 credits
in Eternal Truths, 9 credits in Academic Fundamentals, 7 credits
in Science, 8 credits in Cultural Awareness, and 2 credits in
Connections.
Eternal Truths: Students complete 14 credit hours of Religion at
BYUIdaho.
FDREL 121 and FDREL 122, Book of Mormon (2 credits each)
FDREL 200, Family Foundations (2 credits)
4 scripture-based credits (2-credit options include FDREL 211
or FDREL 212, New Testament; FDREL 301 or FDREL 302,
Old Testament; FDREL 324 or FDREL 325, Doctrine and
Covenants; FDREL 327, Pearl of Great Price; and FDREL 404,
Writings of Isaiah)
4 additional FDREL credits of your choice
Academic Fundamentals: All students take the following courses,
for a total of 9 credits.
FDENG 101, Writing and Reasoning Foundations (3 credits)
FDENG 201, Advanced Writing and Critical Thinking (3 credits)
FDMAT 108, Mathematical Tools for the Real World (3 credits)
Science: Students take 7 credits of Science as part of their Foundations experience.
FDSCI 101, Science Foundations (2 credits)
Students complete 5 credits of the Issues in the Sciences courses
(numbered FDSCI 200 or higher)
Cultural Awareness: Students complete 8 credits in the Cultural
Awareness area: 3 credits of American Foundations and 5 credits of
Cultural Awareness or World Foundations.
FDAMF 101, American Foundations (3 credits)
FDCA 101, Foundations of Humanities (3 credits)
Students complete 2 credits of the 200-level Cultural Awareness
courses (numbered FDCA 200 or higher)
Instead of taking FDCA 101 and a 200-level Cultural Awareness
course, students can take the following two courses:
FDWLD 101 and FDWLD 201, World Foundations

31

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Transfer Students
The number of Religion credits required for a bachelors degree is adjusted for students who bring transfer credits to BYU-Idaho:

Total # of
Transfer
Credits
0-14.9

Religion hours
Required Subject Matter: If the subject matter has been taken at an Institute or other Church school you may complete the
to take from
credit requirement by substituting other courses offered in Religious Education at BYU-Idaho until 14 credit hours are earned.
BYU-Idaho
14

4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; 4 credits scripture-based and 4 additional religion credits
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; 4 credits scripture-based; and 2 additional religion credits

15-29.9

12

30-44.9

10

45-59.9

60-74.9

75-89.9

4-6

90 or more

2-6

If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200, 4 credits of scripture-based courses, and 6 additional religion credits of your choice.
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; and 4 credits scripture-based
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200, 4 credits of scripture-based courses, and 4 additional religion credits of your choice.
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; and 2 credits scripture-based
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200, 4 credits of scripture-based courses, and 2 additional religion credits of your choice.
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200 and 4 credits of scripture-based courses.
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200 and 2 credits of scripture-based courses.
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200.

The number of Religion credits required for an associates degree or an applied associates degree is adjusted for students who bring transfer
credits to BYU-Idaho:

Total # of
Transfer
Credits

Religion hours
Required Subject Matter: If the subject matter has been taken at an Institute or other Church school you may complete the
to take from
credit requirement by substituting other courses offered in Religious Education at BYU-Idaho until 8 credit hours are earned.
BYU-Idaho

0-14.9

15-29.9

30-44.9

4-6

45 or more

2-6

4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; and 2 credits of your choice
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200 and 4 credits of your choice.
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200 and 2 credits of your choice.
4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200
If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL
200.

Transfer of Credit from other Universities and Institutes of Religion: Religion credit earned at Church Education System Institutes of Religion or other LDS Church schools will transfer to BYU-Idaho as an equivalent religion course or elective credit so long as the course is taken for
credit and such credit is noted on an ofcial transcript. While these religion credits from other LDS Church schools or Institutes of Religion may
transfer to fulll required religion content, they do not satisfy the BYU-Idaho resident religion requirement (religion courses taken from BYUIdaho). Coursework in religious studies from any place other than an LDS Church school or Institute of Religion will not be accepted toward
lling the BYU-Idaho religion requirements.
Religion courses taken at the BYU Jerusalem Center (during a students BYUIdaho experience) will transfer to fulll both religion course content and the resident religion requirement. However, such credit does not apply to the completion of the overall BYU-Idaho residency requirement. BYU Jerusalem Center credits earned prior to a students enrollment at BYU-Idaho can be used to fulll religion course content only, but
may not be applied to any BYU-Idaho residency requirement.

32

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Foundations Substitution Modules

Recommended Sequence for Foundations Courses

Some courses at BYU-Idaho have been approved as substitutions for


Foundations courses. Students will typically opt to take the substitution courses if they are required as part of their major.

Students are encouraged to take one religion class each semester,


until they have completed the required number of FDREL classes.
After that, students are invited to enroll in an Institute of Religion
class each semester. Most FDREL courses do not have prerequisites,
so they can be taken in any order. For example, a student may take
FDREL 122 before taking FDREL 121.

Eternal Truths: There are no substitution modules for Religion


courses.

It is recommended that full-time students enroll in two or possibly


three Foundations courses their rst semester. These courses might
include FDENG 101, FDAMF 101, FDSCI 101, FDCA 101, or
FDMAT 108. The remainder of the schedule is used to explore a
eld of study.

Academic Fundamentals: Substitutions can be made for FDENG


201 and FDMAT 108.
FDENG 201 (3 credits)
Take B 220
FDMAT 108 (3 credits)
Take one of the following: FDMAT 110, FDMAT 112, MATH
109, MATH 113, MATH 215, or ECON 215; and
Take FDMAT 108T
FDMAT 108 (3 credits)
Take one course: ECON 215 or any FDMAT or MATH course
numbered 112 or higher; and
Take one course: MATH 221A, MATH 221B, MATH 221C,
MATH 325, MATH 330, ECON 278, AGBUS 430, or B 212;
and
Take one course: B 301, B 433, HS 345, ME 380, CE 470,
ECON 453, ECON 455, or AGBUS 440

Foundations enriches the educational experience at BYU-Idaho. Students should spread out their Foundations courses, rather than trying
to get through them in a few semesters.

Science: Two possible substitutions exist for the 200-level FDSCI


Issues in the Sciences courses.
200-level FDSCI courses (5 credits total)
Take 4 credits: CHEM 101, CHEM 101L, or CHEM 105; and
Take 4 credits: ME 201, PH 105, PH 121, PH 123, PH 127,
PH 150, PH 220, PH 223, or PH 250
200-level FDSCI courses (5 credits total)
Take 8 credits: AS 215, AS 355, AS 495, BIO 180, BIO 181,
BIO 204, BIO 208, BIO 221, BIO 222, BIO 225, BIO 264,
BIO 265, BIO 302, BIO 352, or BIO 386; and
Take 4 credits: CHEM 101, CHEM 101L, CHEM 105,
CHEM 106, CHILD 210, ESS 375, HRHP 359, HS 320,
PSYCH 111, PSYCH 201, PSYCH 342, PH 101, PH 105, RM
342, RM 423, or SOC 111
Cultural Awareness: There are two possible substitutions for FDCA
101 and the 200-level FDCA Cultural Awareness courses.
FDCA 101 and a 200-level FDCA course (5 credits total)
Take HUM 201 and HUM 202; and
Take one of the following courses: FDCA 201, FDCA 202,
FDCA 203, FDCA 204, FDCA 205, FDCA 206, FDCA 299,
or HUM 342
FDCA 101 and a 200-level FDCA course (5 credits total)
Take the following courses: MUSIC 101, MUSIC 301, MUSIC
302, and MUSIC 303
Connections: There are no substitution modules for the Foundations Capstone.

33

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Course Descriptions

Credits*

Additional religion courses


FDREL 100 Introduction to Mormonism

Eternal Truths
Book of Mormon courses
FDREL 121 Book of Mormon

(2:2:0)

Required for graduation. A study of the content and teachings of the Book of Mormon,
from 1st Nephi through Alma 29.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 122 Book of Mormon

FDREL 130 Missionary Preparation

(2:2:0)

FDREL 150 Provident Living

(2:2:0)

Required for graduation. This course centers on The Family: A Proclamation to the World
and develops gospel doctrines and principles pertaining to a successful and happy marriage and family life. Practical skills required to achieve and sustain provident living will
also be explored and practiced.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 190 Special Topics in Scripture

FDREL 215 Scripture Study


(2:2:0)

(2:2:0)

FDREL 234 Preparing for Eternal Marriage

A study of the early church and epistles from Acts through Revelation.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:2:0)

FDREL 235 Building an Eternal Marriage

(2:2:0)

FDREL 261 Introduction to Family History


(2:2:0)

FDREL 333 Teachings of the Living Prophets

(2:2:0)

FDREL 341 Church History

(2:2:0)

A study of the history and doctrine of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
through June 1844, including the martyrdom of the prophet Joseph Smith.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:2:0)

The study of the Pearl of Great Price with an emphasis on the doctrines, history and
content found in this book of scripture.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 404 Writings of Isaiah

(2:2:0)

This course centers its emphasis on the role, function, and teachings of living prophets,
seers, and revelators as building blocks of faith in a world of challenge and confusion.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A study of the history, content, doctrine, and covenants in sections 77 through Official
Declaration 2.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 327 Pearl of Great Price

(2:2:0)

Students will learn the doctrines surrounding family history and temple work. Skills
associated with gathering, preserving, researching, and sharing family records, as well as
doing temple work for ancestors will be introduced.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A study of the history, content, doctrine, and covenants found in sections 1 through 76 of
the Doctrine and Covenants.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 325 Doctrine and Covenants

(2:2:0)

A study of the doctrines, principles, and practices which will establish a successful,
gospel-centered eternal marriage.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A study of the Old Testament from The Kings through Malachi.


(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 324 Doctrine and Covenants

(2:2:0)

This class allows the student to examine the many different issues that lead to ones
being successfully sealed in the temple of the Lord.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A study of the Old Testament from Genesis through 2 Samuel, with an emphasis on
doctrine and principles.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 302 Old Testament

(2:2:0)

A course designed to help students gain confidence in understanding the scriptures. The
focus is on gaining skills for successful personal scripture study.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as recorded in the four gospels.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 301 Old Testament

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


For BYU-Idaho students facing special credit situations and for BYU-Idaho travel study
students--taught in the term of the travel study--with topics selected which will focus on
history, scripture, and culture of those lands visited.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Scripture-based courses

FDREL 212 New Testament

(2:1:2)

A course designed to assist students in applying gospel principles in their personal lives.
It is composed of classroom instruction in doctrinal and temporal matters, coupled with a
lab where principles of provident living are put into practice.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Family Foundations course

FDREL 211 New Testament

(2:2:0)

A course designed to help prepare students for missionary service by utilizing principles
that reflect and supplement the emphasis taught in the Preach My Gospel missionary
approach. This course is highly recommended for all pre-missionaries.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Required for graduation. A study of the content and teachings of the Book of Mormon
from Alma 30 through Moroni.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 200 Family Foundations

(2:2:0)

This course introduces students to the doctrine and principles of The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints as well as the history and organization of the Church. This
course is designed for students belonging to other religious traditions or who have
recently become new members of the Mormon faith.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 342 Church History

(2:2:0)

A study of the history and doctrine of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from
1844 to 1901.
(Winter, Spring, Fall - rotating)

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


An indepth study of the history and writings of the Prophet Isaiah.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 343 Church History

(2:2:0)

A study of the history and doctrine of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from
1901 to the present.
(Winter, Spring, Fall - rotating)

34
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
FDREL 351 World Religions

(2:2:0)

FDMAT 108 Mathematical Tools for the Real World

A study of religions of the world such as Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism and Judaism.
Designed to introduce members of the Church to the beliefs of other world faiths and
their development with an emphasis on their relationship to the doctrines of the restored
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 352 Christian History

(2:2:0)

An introduction of the history and doctrines of Christianity from Apostolic times--through


the Roman period--into the early development of the Catholic and Orthodox churches, the
Middle ages, the Reformation, and up to the Restoration of the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 390R Special Topics in Religion

(1-2:1-2:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 2 credits per 390R course


Prerequisites: FDREL 121, FDREL 122, FDREL 200, FDREL 121P, FDREL 122P
Fulfills Foundations requirement.
Topical studies in religion, based on teacher expertise.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 431 Doctrines of the Gospel

FDMAT 108T Math for the Real World Test

(2:2:0)

(2:2:0)

This course helps students become more effective teachers. It prepares students to teach
the scriptures and provides them with several teaching experiences, both in class and in
a seminary setting. During the course, students are evaluated and screened for Religion
475. Students will observe at least 2-3 classes and teach 5-8 hours in released time
seminary.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 475 Seminary Teaching Seminar

(2:2:0)

Prerequisites: FDREL 471


(by Instructor permission only) This course deals with current teaching issues and needs.
Trainees are also employed part-time and may teach from one to three classes of seminary each day. Trainees are observed to determine whether they should be considered for
a full-time seminary teaching position.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Academic Fundamentals
FDENG 101 Writing and Reasoning Foundations

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisites: Students must have an ACT English score of at least 16 or an SAT English score
of 400 or ENG 106 with a B or ENG 109 with a B
An introduction to academic inquiry and writing, laying the foundation for further
academic and professional development. Students will learn to think and read critically
and practice the writing process, including invention, research, summary, synthesis and
analysis, revision, and editing. Students will work on several major writing assignments,
including a research project in which they will gather information from a range of valid
sources, demonstrating they can analyze and use that information purposefully, following
appropriate documentation.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDENG 201 Advanced Writing and Critical Thinking

(1:0:0)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of one of the following foundations courses: FDMAT 110,
FDMAT 112, Math 109, Math 111, Math 113, Math 114, Math 119, Math 215, or Econ 215
This pass/fail online-based course allows students who have already had a Foundations
mathematics course, to explore the contemporary topics of finance math, linear and
exponential modeling, probability, and statistical reasoning. It will satisfy part of the BYUIdaho Foundations quantitative reasoning requirement and contains the most vital topics
of the traditional 3.0-credit FDMAT 108. Completion of the course includes passing
both a financial mathematics exam and statistical reasoning exam along with a financial
life-planning spreadsheet project. Students may take FDMAT 108T one time only. Failure
of FDMAT 108T would require the students to take the traditional 3.0 credit FDMAT 108
course to complete the Foundations quantitative reasoning requirement.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A study of the basic doctrines of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as taught
in the scriptures and by Latter-day prophets.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDREL 471 Methods of Teaching Seminary

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisites: Students must have an ACT Math score of at least 18 or an SAT math score of
430 or ALEKS test score of 38 or MATH 100B with a B or MATH 101 with a B or MATH 100G
with a B
This class prepares students to understand, analyze, and solve real-life problems that
require quantitative reasoning. Topics include the meaning of probabilities, how to read,
critique, and apply statistical information found in news reports, public policy debates,
consumer reports, and other daily life and professional situations; the use of mathematical models in describing, understanding, and making predictions about real world
phenomena; and the mathematics of loans and investments. Topics will be illustrated by
examples and applications from current events, daily life, business, and natural phenomena. Mathematical Tools for the Real World is to inspire students to act wisely when faced
with quantitative challenges in collegiate coursework, employment, and daily living.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDENG 101 and at least 22 credits
Help students learn how to reason carefully and express ideas clearly. Students develop
these competencies as they learn to recognize strong arguments, uncover assumptions,
evaluate evidence, recognize rhetorical patterns, and infer ideas from data. To apply their
understanding of these skills, students write summaries, essays synthesizing ideas from
diverse sources, critiques of arguments, and research papers that focus on issues relevant
to their majors.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

35
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Science

FDSCI 205 Understanding DNA and Related Health Issues


Technologies

FDSCI 101 Science Foundations

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
The structure of DNA stands as one of the greatest discoveries of the 20th century and has
led to multi-billion dollar advancements in medicine and agriculture. An understanding
of DNA and its applications is necessary to distinguish fact from fiction, make informed
decisions, and take full advantage of emerging DNA technologies. This course presents the
fundamental concepts related to DNA including its history, structure, function, regulation,
and inheritance. The remaining course material explores multiple issues and topics that
are founded in DNA technology. These include the causes and treatments associated with
genetic disorders, the creation of genetically modified foods, identification through DNA
fingerprinting, tracing of family lineages, the applications and ethics of cloning and stem
cell technology, and the underlying mechanism of organic evolution. Course methods
include lecture, discussion, and hands-on exercises related to the subject material.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


An introduction to the nature, practice, power, and limitations of science, as well as
relationships between science and religion, and science and society. These topics are
explored through the study of selected episodes of scientific discovery that demonstrate
methodical and creative aspects of scientific inquiry, and the self-correcting nature of
science.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDSCI 200 Energy in the 21st Century

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
This course provides an introduction to the sciences and the issues related to energy
production and use. It also explores alternatives to current energy technology.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDSCI 201 Natural Disasters: Man and the Dynamic Earth

FDSCI 206 Light & Sound: The Science of Vision & Hearing

(3:3:0)

FDSCI 208 Introduction to Robotics

(2:2:0)

FDSCI 209 How to Build a Habitable Planet

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
We live on the only inhabited planet weve discovered so far. Through modern science, we
have learned much about what makes a planet habitable and how one might be created.
It was not a trivial undertaking! This course explores (a) the origin of the atoms from
which planets and life are made; (b) the origin and structure of the universe, galaxies,
stars, our solar system, and Earth; (c) the origin and function of Earths atmosphere,
oceans, and continents; and (d) how has Earth maintained habitability through time. In
addition, the course will strengthen our ability to form and defend interpretations based
on observations.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
As individuals, it is often difficult to see or understand the consequences our decisions,
actions, or existence may have on our environment and those around us. The purpose of
this class is to show the effects each of us has as a member of a worldwide population
of over seven billion, and the effects our population has on a local, regional, and global
scale. The focus will be on how individually and collectively we impact the quality of our
environment and human living conditions for both good and bad. Case studies will be
used to examine an array of ecological, biological, agricultural, technological, economical,
social, political and other issues associated with a burgeoning human population. Class
members will receive a foundation whereby they can make informed choices about their
life, family, and community, and be better stewards of Earths resources.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDSCI 204 The American Epidemic: Diabetes and Cardiovascular


Disease

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
This course provides a hands-on approach to the fundamentals of robotics, including
how robots sense, move, and make decisions. Students will build and configure robots to
solve basic real-world problems and analyze their performance. The class will also explore
ethical and environmental issues related to robotics.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
This course provides an introduction to the issues involved in global climate change with
an emphasis on understanding the science of global warming and greenhouse gases.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDSCI 203 Environmental Stewardship

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
This course covers the physical characteristics of light and sound, the biological nature
of eyes and ears, and the sensation of vision and hearing through our brains perceptual
abilities. Students will evaluate the influence of music, movies, advertising, and video
games on the human mind and behavior.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Fee: $18.00
Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
Examine the causes and consequences of natural hazards including earthquakes,
volcanoes, landslides, floods, and coastal hazards. Students work in a team environment
and examine case studies of ancient and modern events, emphasizing effects on science,
engineering, history, economics, politics, and the arts. Study lessons learned from past
events and determine what is being done or should be done to mitigate future disasters.
Class includes a field trip.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDSCI 202 Issues in Global Climate Change

and
(3:3:0)

FDSCI 210 Neanderthals and Other Successes

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
Ours is a planet of life. Evidence from fossils and molecules suggests that organisms
have thrived on Earth for billions of years. However, less than one percent of the species
that have ever existed on our planet are still alive today. What caused some species to
succeed while others failed, and how did life on Earth begin in the first place? From the
earliest bacteria to humans and their civilizations, this course addresses the origins, evolution, and extinction of life on earth based on evidence from chemistry, biology, geology,
and related sciences.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement.
Cardiovascular disease and Diabetes are leading causes of death and morbidity in the
U.S. Both of these diseases are highly correlated with lifestyle choices. In this course
students will study the physiologic mechanisms associated with these diseases as well
as how lifestyle choices influence the diseases. Students will be expected to develop and
implement personal programs to facilitate life-long health and wellness.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDSCI 299 Topics in Interdisciplinary Science

(2-3:2-3:0-2)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Special Topics in Science Foundations. Students will study a topic dealing with a scientific
issue. The topic is determined by a faculty team and approved by the Foundations office.
This course counts toward the 200-level Science requirement.

36
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Cultural Awareness

FDCA 206 Great Books of the World

FDAMF 101 American Foundations

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


The history of the United States holds lessons for people everywhere. This course examines the full range of American history with the goal of better understanding the political,
economic, and cultural ideals and institutions that explain the successes and limitations
of the United States. This course also has interdisciplinary elements and draws deeply
from political science, cultural studies, and economics to illuminated the American past.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDCA 101 Foundations of Humanities

FDCA 299 Topics in Cultural Awareness

(3:3:0)

FDWLD 101 World Foundations I

(2:2:0)

World Foundations 101 is the first half of a two-course sequence that examines great
world civilizations through literature, art, music, philosophy, and history.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDWLD 201 World Foundations II

(2:2:0)

Taking both FDWLD 101 and FDWLD 201 can substitute for the requirement to take FDCA
101 and a 200-level FDCA course.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101
The Middle East has played a significant role in world history. Its present-day turmoil and
potential impact on the future make it no less significant today. This course will introduce
students to Middle East history, geography, politics, culture, religion, and current issues
the region is facing.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDCA 204 Art and Propaganda in the 20th Century

Connections
FDCNC 350 Foundations Capstone: Analytical Thinking
and Moral Judgment

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Fee: $5.00
Course Requirements: Student must have completed 60 credit hours.
This course invites students to consider morally challenging personal and public issues
about which decisions must inevitably be made. Students will be asked to reflect upon
their testimony and personal values, recognize the elements of decision-making, and
refine their use of reasoning, faith and empathy in order to make sound moral decisions.
Critical thinking skills, mutual respect, and a spirit of civic engagement lie at the heart of
Foundations Capstone.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement


Prerequisite: FDCA 101, FDENG 101
This course will focus on the use of propaganda, art, and other forms of persuasion
starting with the Modern Era (approximately post-1860) and continuing to the present.
Students will experience this topic through various social issues and cultural influences
from around the world, including the visual, performing, and literary arts. This course
emphasizes the development of aesthetic judgment and critical thinking.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both FDCA 204 and FDHUM 103 (a course which
no longer exists.)
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDCA 205 China

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDWLD 101
World Foundations II is the second half of a two-course sequence that examines great
world civilizations through literature, art, music, philosophy, and history. Two aspects of
this course give it power. First, the integration of disciplines-literature, art, architecture,
history, religion, philosophy, music and politics-in our study of various civilizations should
produce a rich appreciation for the immense potential of the human spirit. Second,
the use of two themes-redemption and moral revelation-throughout the two courses will
provide a point of view that can help you, the student, make connections between the
cultures, civilizations, and periods of time that we study and explore how God strives with
his children to help them reach their potential.

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101
This two-credit interdisciplinary course addresses the challenges of uneven development and modernization faced by developing nations in an increasingly globalized
world. Unlike other courses in the Cultural Foundations Area, which focus on the specific
country, this course provides a more comprehensive treatment of nations and the issues
of development facing the entire world. Multiple countries are examined in comparative
analysis, illuminating similarities and differences in response to common forces such as
globalization.
(Winter, Spring, Fall))

FDCA 203 The Middle East

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101
This course is part of a two-course sequence. Taking BOTH World Foundations 101 and
World Foundations 201 completely satisfies the Cultural Foundations requirement.

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101
Few countries in the world are more strategically critical yet less understood than
Pakistan. This young country in an ancient land lies at the crossroads of history, religion,
language, and culture. On the front-line in the war against terror, this nuclear power is in
the midst of political turmoil whose outcome will have great implications for the rest of
the world.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDCA 202 The Developing World

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101
Special Topics in Cultural Awareness. Students will study a topic dealing with some aspect
of international studies or the humanities. The topic is determined by a faculty team and
approved by the Foundations office. This course fills the 200-level Foundations of Cultural
Awareness requirement.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Introduction to the Humanities. Students will examine key works in the arts from Renaissance through the early 20th Century, their historical and cultural context, and the artistic
principles that contribute to heir significance. Students will then apply these principles in
their own creative work, and in making value assessments about the arts.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

FDCA 201 Global Hotspot: Pakistan at the Crossroads of Conflict

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDCA 101, FDENG 101
A study of great books from ancient times to the early 20th Century. A deep reading of
literary masterpieces in a variety of cultural, aesthetic, and historical contexts.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement.


Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101
The rise of China as a major player on the international stage over the past few decades
has been breathtaking. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to some of the
key challenges which face China today through the study and analysis of topics such as
population, politics, geography, economics, culture and the environment.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

37
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Foundations Requirements - Bachelors Degree


Eternal Truths
14 Credits
Family Foundations

AND

Take this course:

Academic Fundamentals
9 Credits

Science
7 Credits

Reading & Writing

Scientific Foundations

American Foundations

Take this course:

Take this course:

Take this course:

FDREL 200

(Other Religion Courses)

FDENG 101

Cultural Awareness
8 Credits

FDSCI 101

FDAMF 101

Take 4 Credits
Book of Mormon

Take these courses:


FDREL 121
FDREL 122

2
2
AND

(Scripture Based Courses)

Take 4 Credits
FDREL 211
FDREL 212
FDREL 301
FDREL 302
FDREL 324
FDREL 325
FDREL 327
FDREL 404

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

FDREL 100
FDREL 130
FDREL 190
FDREL 215
FDREL 234
FDREL 235
FDREL 261
FDREL 333
FDREL 341
FDREL 342
FDREL 343
FDREL 351
FDREL 352
FDREL 390R
FDREL 431
FDREL 471
FDREL 475

2
2
1-3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Choose 1 option:
Option 2:

Issues in the Sciences

Advanced Writing

Take this course:

Take five credits:

FDENG 201

Quantitative Reasoning

Take this course:


FDMAT 108

OR
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 110
FDMAT 112
MATH 109
MATH 113
MATH 215
ECON 215

Option 1:

FDSCI 200
FDSCI 201
FDSCI 202
FDSCI 203
FDSCI 204
FDSCI 205
FDSCI 206
FDSCI 208
FDSCI 209
FDSCI 210
FDSCI 299

3
4
5
3
4
4

3
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
3

Cultural Awareness

World Foundations

Take this course:


FDCA 101

Take these courses:


3

FDWLD 101
FDWLD 201

2
3

AND

Take one course:


FDCA 201
FDCA 202
FDCA 203
FDCA 204
FDCA 205
FDCA 206
FDCA 299

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

AND
FDMAT 108T

1
Connections
2 Credits
Analytical Thinking and
Moral Judgment
FDCNC 350
2

40 credits

Foundations Requirements - Associate's Degree


Eternal Truths
8 Credits
AND

Family Foundations

Take this course:


FDREL 200

(Other Religion Courses)

Academic Fundamentals
9 Credits

Science
7 Credits

Reading & Writing

Scientific Foundations

American Foundations

Take this course:

Take this course:

Take this course:

FDENG 101

FDSCI 101

Cultural Awareness
8 Credits

FDAMF 101

Take 2 Credits:
Book of Mormon

Take these courses:


FDREL 121
FDREL 122

2
2

FDREL 100
FDREL 130
FDREL 190
FDREL 211
FDREL 212
FDREL 215
FDREL 234
FDREL 235
FDREL 261
FDREL 301
FDREL 302
FDREL 324
FDREL 325
FDREL 327
FDREL 333
FDREL 341
FDREL 342
FDREL 343
FDREL 351
FDREL 352
FDREL 390R
FDREL 404
FDREL 431
FDREL 471
FDREL 475

2
2
1-3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Advanced Writing

Issues in the Sciences

Take this course:

Take five credits:

FDENG 201

Quantitative Reasoning

Take this course:


FDMAT 108

OR
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 110
FDMAT 112
MATH 109
MATH 113
MATH 215
ECON 215

3
4
5
3
4
4

FDSCI 200
FDSCI 201
FDSCI 202
FDSCI 203
FDSCI 204
FDSCI 205
FDSCI 206
FDSCI 208
FDSCI 209
FDSCI 210
FDSCI 299

3
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
3

Choose 1 option:
Option 2:

Cultural Awareness

Take this course:


FDCA 101

World Foundations

Take these courses:


AND

FDWLD 101
FDWLD 201

Take one course:


FDCA 201
FDCA 202
FDCA 203
FDCA 204
FDCA 205
FDCA 206
FDCA 299

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

AND
FDMAT 108T

32 credits

38

2
3

Foundations
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Foundations Requirements - AAS Requirements


Eternal Truths

Academic Fundamentals
9 Credits

8 Credits
AND
Family Foundations

Take this course:


FDREL 200

Book of Mormon

Take these courses:


FDREL 121
FDREL 122

2
2

Take one course:


FDREL 100
FDREL 130
FDRE: 190
FDREL 211
FDREL 212
FDREL 215
FDREL 234
FDREL 235
FDREL 261
FDREL 301
FDREL 302
FDREL 324
FDREL 325
FDREL 327
FDREL 333
FDREL 341
FDREL 342
FDREL 343
FDREL 351
FDREL 352
FDREL 390R
FDREL 404
FDREL 431
FDREL 471
FDREL 475

Reading & Writing


2
2
1-3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Take this course:


FDENG 101

Quantitative Reasoning

Take this course:


FDMAT 108

OR
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 110
FDMAT 112
MATH 109
MATH 113
MATH 215
ECON 215

3
4
5
3
4
4

AND
FDMAT 108T

Advanced Writing

Take this course:


FDENG 201

17 credits

39

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Academic Policies
Education is the power to think
clearly, to act well in the worlds
work and the power to appreciate
life.
-Brigham Young

40

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

ACADEMIC POLICIES

GPA Requirements for Extracurricular Activities

Student Records and Registration Office

Students must be making satisfactory academic progress (2.0 GPA) to


represent the school in extracurricular activities.

The Student Records and Registration Ofce processes all student records after the Admissions Ofce has admitted the student. Registration, graduation, transcript requests, and the processing of all forms
that affect student academic records are handled by the Student
Records and Registration Ofce.

Electronic Devices in the Classroom


The BYU-Idaho Learning Model envisions students who have come
to class prepared to share ideas-rather than merely receive them.
Learning occurs through discussion in which each student listens
carefully to the comments of others and seeks the opportunity to add,
as inspired, to what is being said. Participating in such a discussion
requires careful attentionas though one were with a friend, one-onone.

Email as an Official Method of Communication


Ofcial university messages to all employees and students may be sent
through BYU-Idaho email. Employees and students are expected
to regularly check their email accounts for ofcial information. This
policy is to ensure that important BYU-Idaho communication is received in a timely and consistent manner. All students and employees
are responsible to check their BYU-Idaho email accounts frequently.

In order to promote such a learning environment, the University


requires, as general policy, that electronic devices be turned off
during class time. These devices include laptop computers, cell
phones and all other electronic devices.

Full-Time Student Status


Students must be registered for 12 credit hours per semester to be
eligible for certain full-time status benets. However, some benets
may require more than 12 credits. The full-time equivalency for
Block registration is 6 credit hours.

Instructors may, for the sake of achieving special learning objectives


or to meet individual student needs, authorize the use of specic
electronic devices in their classrooms. However, it is recommended
that the use of laptops for note-taking not be allowed except
for occasional lectures. In the Learning Model environment,
thinking about what is being said in the classroom and seeking the
opportunity to add a comment is more important than transcribing
the discussion. Impressions that come in class can be noted by hand.
When class is over, students will nd that their handwritten notes,
along with ideas brought to remembrance by the Spirit, will allow
them to write detailed reections. Those reections will be richer
because of the students active participation in the class discussion.

Credit Requirements for Benefits


To be eligible for various benets, students must be enrolled in the
hours indicated.

14 semester credits (and a 3.7 GPA): BYU-Idaho scholarships

12 semester credits: full Veterans benets, full Pell Grants, selected loans and grants, campus employment, athletic competition, Social Security benets, running for student government
ofces or fullling major appointive ofces in student government, health insurance coverage, international students, Stafford
Student Loans, and PLUS loans

Username and Password Protection


Students and employees should never share their BYU-Idaho username and password with any other person or business. Providing this
information to others could potentially compromise the universitys
systems as well as student and employee personal information (e.g.
social security number, nances, grades). Because providing this
information to other people or businesses puts BYU-Idaho at risk,
individuals who do so could face dismissal from the university.

GPA Requirements for Extracurricular Activities


Students must be making satisfactory acedemic progress (2.0 GPA)
to represent the school in extracurricular activities.

Attendance and Absence from Class

Sexual Harassment

Students are responsible for class attendance. No absences, whether


approved by the University for participation in University-sponsored
activities or necessitated by sickness or other personal emergencies,
are excused in the sense that the student is relieved from class work
assigned during the absence. To ensure continuity, students must
make up missed work. In most cases, repeated absences will result in
a lower grade or failure.

Sexual harassment is dened as any unwelcome conduct of a sexual


nature. Sexual harassment may include unwelcome sexual advances,
requests for sexual favors and other verbal, non-verbal, or physical
conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment of a student may deny
or limit, on the basis of gender, the students ability to participate in
or receive benets, services, or opportunities in University programs.
BYU-Idahos policy against sexual harassment extends not only to
employees of the University but to students as well. If sexual harassment or gender-based discrimination is encountered, or if assistance
or information related to allegations of sexual harassment is needed,
contact the Student Honor Ofce, Kimball 270, or call (208) 4969300.

Exceptions to University Academic Policy


Students wishing to appeal any BYU-Idaho academic policy must
submit a petition to the Academic Exceptions Committee through
the Student Records and Registration Ofce. These situations may
include dropping classes or withdrawing from school after published
deadlines. Petitions must be submitted within one year of the
semester for which the student is requesting exception to academic
policy. The petition process is meant to accommodate students
with extenuating circumstances or emergencies beyond their control
that may impact their academic records. Only BYU-Idaho academic
policies can be appealed; federal guidelines and/or requirements
cannot be appealed through this committee. A student can initiate a
petition by contacting the Student Records and Registration Ofce.

41

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS

Major eld of study


Degrees and awards received
Participation in ofcially recognized activities and
sports, including height and weight
Previous educational institutions attended
Religious afliation to local church or congregation
Current class schedule
Photograph
Number of months/semesters enrolled
Class standing (freshman, sophomore, etc.)
Total hours earned
Enrollment status (full-time, part-time, less than
half time)
Anticipated future enrollments
Course registrations prior to the beginning of a
semester/term
Expected date of graduation
Deferred registration eligibility

Notification of Rights under FERPA


The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords
students certain rights with respect to their education records. These
rights include:
1. The right to inspect and review the students education records within 45 days after the University receives a request
for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean,
head of the academic department, or other appropriate ofcial, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish
to inspect. The University ofcial will make arrangements
for access and notify the student of the time and place
where the records may be inspected. If the records are not
maintained by the University ofcial to whom the request
was submitted, that ofcial shall advise the student of the
correct ofcial to whom the request should be addressed.
2. The right to request amending those education records
that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they
believe is inaccurate or misleading. (This does not apply to
grade changes.) They should write the University ofcial
responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the
record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate
or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the
record as requested by the student, the University will
notify the student of the decision and advise the student
of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for
amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing
procedures will be provided to the student when notied
of the right to a hearing.

Additionally, under an agreement with The Church of Jesus


Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Church), BYU-Idaho releases the names and birthdates of students to the Church
for the purpose of moving the students church membership records to the wards in which they will reside during
a given term. This data is provided to the Church in a
secure, electronic format. Students can block the release
of this information by submitting a completed Request
to Withhold Directory Information form to the Student
Records and Registration Ofce.
6. Students have the right to block the release of their public
directory information by completing a Request to Withhold Directory Information form at the Student Records
and Registration Ofce. For complete condentiality, this
form must be completed within the rst ten days of each
semester or term. Students may also modify the display of
the public directory information.

3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identiable information contained in the students education
records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes
disclosure without consent. One exception that permits
disclosure without consent is disclosure to school ofcials
with legitimate educational interests. A school ofcial is a
person employed by the University in an administrative,
supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position
(including law enforcement unit personnel and health
staff); a person or company with whom the University
has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection
agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an ofcial committee, such as a disciplinary
or grievance committee, or assisting another school ofcial
in performing his or her tasks. A school ofcial has a legitimate educational interest if the ofcial needs to review an
education record in order to fulll his or her professional
responsibility.

7. Parents or guardians of students claimed as dependents


on the most recently submitted Federal Income Tax form
may have grade reports forwarded to them pursuant to
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.
Parents of dependent children under the above-described
denition must submit a Certicate of Dependence Form
in order to receive grade reports. No grade report will
be sent to a parent or guardian without proper submission of this form. The Student Records and Registration
Ofce will record Certicate of Dependence forms and
send grade reports as requested. Parents of students who
have declared themselves as independent are not eligible to
receive grade reports.

4. The right to le a complaint with the U.S. Department


of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. To le a
complaint, write to: Family Policy Compliance Ofce, U.S.
Department of Education, 600 Independence Avenue, SW,
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605

Students may waive their independent status by completing the


Waiver of Independence Form. Completion of this form authorizes
parental access to student grades regardless of the dependency status
of a student.

5. The following information is considered directory information and may be made public:
Student name
Home and local address
Telephone numbers
E-mail addresses
Dates of attendance (current and past)

Forms are available at the Student Records and Registration Ofce or


online at www.byui.edu/srr/forms.

42

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

If students are receiving University or federal nancial aid, they


should contact the Student Financial Aid Ofce to verify their eligibility while on Academic Probation.

Academic Standing
Students academic standing at BYU-Idaho is determined at the end
of each term by three measures of their work:
1.0 or higher semester GPA
2.0 or higher cumulative GPA
75% semester Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Academic Suspension
Academic Suspension is the suspension of a students opportunity
to enroll in any academic course at BYU-Idaho for two consecutive
semesters, including those offered through Continuing Education,
Online Learning and the Internship Ofce. Academic Suspension is
a result of performing below the established BYU-Idaho academic
standards after being placed on Academic Probation.

Students are classied in one of the following academic standing


categories: Good, Warning, Probation, Suspension, or Dismissal.

Students on Academic Suspension will be withdrawn from courses


and issued a tuition refund if they have pre-registered and/or paid
any tuition for a subsequent term. Additionally, students on Academic Suspension are (1) ineligible to live in BYU-Idaho approved
student housing and must contact the Housing and Student Living
Ofce; and (2) are ineligible for student employment and must contact their campus employer.

Good Academic Standing


Students are making satisfactory progress when their cumulative
GPA is 2.0 or above, each semester GPA is 1.0 or above, and they
earn progress grades for 75 percent of their credits in each semester
of enrollment. Please note, however, that too many semester GPAs
below a 2.0 will result in a student not meeting the 2.0 cumulative
GPA standard.

Students on Academic Suspension are expected to return to the


University after sitting out the two consecutive semesters immediately
following the semester they were suspended. Students who do not
enroll in their next on-track semester following their Academic Suspension will be withdrawn from the University and will be required
to apply for re-admission. Students choosing to serve an LDS mission
immediately following their Academic Suspension will not need to
reapply to the University if they have deferred their enrollment in the
Admissions Ofce using the LDS Missionary Admission Deferment
Application.

Progress and Non-Progress Grades


Grades are considered to be either progress or non-progress.
Progress grades range from A to D- and P. Non-progress grades
are F, W, UW and may include NR, T and I. Some progress grades
do not meet graduation requirements.

Academic Warning
Academic Warning is an ofcial notice to students that they are
performing below the established BYU-Idaho academic standards.
Students on Academic Warning are permitted to continue their
enrollment at BYU-Idaho. However, they will need to participate in
the Achieving Academic Success Workshop (AASW). (See Academic
Standing Chart.)

Students who have their Academic Suspension lifted will be placed


on Academic Probation until they meet the conditions for Good
Academic Standing.

Academic Dismissal

Students will remain on Academic Warning if they earn a semester


GPA of 2.0 or higher but fail to raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0 if
they earn less than six credits in their next semester of enrollment,
or if they do not complete AASW Also, students who are lifted from
Academic Warning but subsequently fail to meet established academic
standards in any future semester will be placed on Academic Probation.

Academic Dismissal permanently restricts a students opportunity to


attend BYU-Idaho. Academic Dismissal is a result of performing below the established BYU-Idaho academic standards after being placed
on Academic Suspension. Students who wish to continue a formal
education will need to seek opportunities elsewhere.

Petitioning Academic Standing

If students are receiving University or federal nancial aid, they


should contact the Student Financial Aid Ofce to verify their eligibility while on Academic Warning.

Students may not petition Academic Warning or Academic Probation


(including the 12-credit enrollment limit) because these standings
do not prevent their ability to enroll in courses or access University
resources.

Academic Probation
Academic Probation is an ofcial notice to students that they have
performed below the established BYU-Idaho academic standards for
a second time (after having been on Academic Warning). Students
on Academic Probation are permitted to continue their enrollment at
BYU-Idaho. However, they will need to participate in the AASW and
will be restricted to 12 credits while on Academic Probation. (See
Academic Standing Chart.)

Students who feel they have extenuating circumstances that justify an


exception to the Academic Standards Policy may petition their Academic Suspension or Academic Dismissal to the Academic Standards
Committee. The Academic Standards Committee may choose to
allow an exception, stipulating certain requirements the student must
meet, after which the student may be considered for re-enrollment to
BYU-Idaho. For example, the student may be required to earn credits
at another university to demonstrate academic ability. Exceptions are
entirely at the discretion of the Academic Standards Committee.

Students will remain on Academica Probation if they earn a semester


GPA of 2.0 or higher but fail to raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0, if
they earn less than six credits in their next semester of enrollment, or
if they do not complete AASW. Students who returen to Good Academic Standing but subsequently fail to meet established academic
standards in any future semester will be placed on Academic Suspension while on Academic Probation.

Calculating GPA and SAP


GPA: quality points divided by quality credits
SAP: semester earned credits divided by semester attempted credits
NOTE: Student nancial aid eligibility may be determined by a
different SAP percentage

43

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

ACADEMIC STANDING CHART


ACADEMIC
STANDING

GOOD

UNDER THESE CONDITIONS

HOW TO HAVE IT LIFTED

Students are making satisfactory progress when their


cumulative GPA is 2.0 or above, each semester GPA is 1.0 or
above and they earn progress grades for 75 percent of their
credits in each semester of enrollment. Please note, however,
that too many semester GPAs below a 2.0 will result in a
student not meeting the 2.0 cumulative GPA standard.

N/A

WARNING

PROBATION

< 2.0 cumulative GPA


OR
< 1.0 semester GPA
OR
< 75% semester Satisfactory Academic Progress

< 2.0 cumulative GPA and have previously been on Academic


Warning at any time
OR
< 1.0 semester GPA and have previously been on Academic
Warning at any time
OR
< 2.0 semester GPA while on Academic Warning
OR
< 75% semester Satisfactory Academic Progress and have
previously been on Academic Warning at any time

SUSPENSION

< 2.0 cumulative GPA and having previously been on


Academic Probation at any time
OR
< 1.0 semester GPA and have previously been on Academic
Probation at any time
OR
< 2.0 semester GPA while on Academic Probation
OR
< 75% semester Satisfactory Academic Progress in
conjunction with less than 2.0 Semester GPA and have
previously been on Academic Probation at any time

DISMISSAL

When a student has previously been academically suspended


and subsequently fails to meet the established Academic
Standards a second time.

44

Achieving Academic Success


Workshop (AASW)
> 2.0 Cumulative GPA
> 2.0 Semester GPA
> 75% Semester Satisfactory
Academic Progress
> 6 semester credits in a single
semester

Achieving Academic Success


Workshop (AASW)
> 2.0 Cumulative GPA
> 2.0 Semester GPA
> 75% Semester Satisfactory
Academic Progress
> 6 semester credits in a single
semester and no more than 12
credits

Sit out for two consecutive semesters


following the Academic Suspension.
Note: Additional requirements to have
Academic Suspension lifted may be
established by the Academic Standards
Committee. These conditions are
determined on an individual basis and
will be provided to the student in
writing.

Exceptions to Academic Dismissal are


considered by the Academic Standards
Committee.

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

ACADEMIC RECORDS

Resident:Credit awarded for a BYU-Idaho course and recorded


on the ofcial academic transcript as BYUI-Idaho credit, including online and distance courses.
Points: The total number of grade points earned in a term or on a
cumulative basis.

Grading System
Grades are determined by each instructor based upon an evaluation
of all assigned and completed coursework. Classroom/laboratory
participation, mastery of subject matter, and promise of continuing
success in sequential courses in related elds are all criteria used to
evaluate progress.

The following table indicates each grade variant at BYU-Idaho with


its equivalent grade points:

A represents outstanding understanding, application, and


integration of subject material and extensive evidence of original
thinking, skillful use of concepts, and ability to analyze and
solve complex problems. Demonstrates diligent application of
Learning Model principles, including initiative in serving other
students.
B represents considerable/signicant understanding, application, and incorporation of the material that would prepare a
student to be successful in next level courses, graduate school, or
employment. The student participates in the Learning Model as
applied in the course.
C represents sufcient understanding of subject matter. The
student demonstrates minimal initiative to be prepared for class.
Sequenced courses could be attempted, but mastering new
materials might prove challenging. The student participates only
marginally in the Learning Model.
D represents poor performance and initiative to learn, understand, and apply course materials. Retaking a course or remediation may be necessary to prepare for additional instruction in this
subject matter.
F represents failure in the course.
P represents passing the course and is not calculated into the
GPA.
W represents withdrawal from the class and is not calculated
into the GPA. However, if the class is dropped during the rst
22 calendar days of a semester, or the rst 15 calendar days of a
block, no annotation will be made on the permanent academic
record.
UW represents an unofcial withdrawal which is given to a student who meets the following criteria: Did not complete proper
withdrawal procedures; has record of non-attendance that began
before the last date to withdraw from individual courses without
grade earned; and did not complete any work, tests, or class-related assignments after attendance ceased. The UW is calculated
into the GPA as a failing grade value. (0.0)
I is a conditional grade. (See Incomplete Grades.)
NR represents the grade was not reported by the instructor. A
student receiving a NR grade should contact the instructor to
request that a valid grade be submitted to the Student Records
and Registration Ofce.
T represents a temporary grade that is assigned for courses that
do not fall within normal academic deadlines of any given semester. (e.g., internships)
IP indicates that the course is in progress.
AU indicates a course taken for audit.

One Credit of
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
UW
P
I
IP
W
NR
T
AU

Equals Grade Points


4.0
3.7
3.4
3.0
2.7
2.4
2.0
1.7
1.4
1.0
0.7
0.0
0.0
*
*
*
*
*
*
**

* Does not affect the GPA calculation, but may impact Satisfactory
Academic progress
** Does not affect the GPA calculation, does not impact Satisfactory
Academic Progress, and does not appear on the ofcial transcript.

Incomplete Grades
An incomplete grade (I) is a conditional grade only granted under
the following circumstances:
1. Extenuating circumstances (serious illness, personal injury,
death in immediate family, etc.) that hindered class work,
and occurred after the tenth week of a semester or the
fourth week of a block.
2. The student must have a passing grade at the time of
petitioning for the incomplete grade. It is not a substitute
for a failing grade. Therefore, an incomplete grade cannot
be granted if a student is failing a class and wants additional
time to submit make-up work in order to improve a grade.
3. The student must be able to complete the remaining work
on an individual basis with the instructor. Re-enrollment or
attendance in all or part of the same course during a subsequent semester cannot be required as part of the contract.
The general length of time to fulll the requirements of an
incomplete contract is one additional semester.
4. Instructor approval is mandatory. Incomplete contracts are
granted at the instructors discretion.

Credit Definitions
Attempted: The total number of credits in which a student has
registered in a term or on a cumulative basis.
Earned: The total number of credits completed with a progress
grade in a term or on a cumulative basis.
Passed: The total number of credits earned that do not factor into
a term or cumulative GPA.
Quality: The total number of credits earned that factor into a
term or cumulative GPA.

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Repeatable Courses

Academic Renewal

Repeatable courses allow a class to be taken two or more times for


additional credit. Most classes at BYU-Idaho are not repeatable for
credit. Repeatable courses are generally designated with an R at
the end of the course code (ex: BIO 398R). Departments establish
the maximum number of credits or times a course can be repeated.
A repeated course does not replace the former grade or credit of
a previously completed course. Approval to enroll in a repeatable
course for the purpose of replacing a previous credit and grade must
be obtained from the Academic Exceptions Committee prior to
registering for the course.

Under certain circumstances, BYU-Idaho allows students to petition


for Academic Renewal. If approved, this eliminates previous poor
academic work either at BYU-Idaho or elsewhere, from the students
academic record. Before petitioning for Academic Renewal, the following conditions must be met:
1. A minimum of four years must have elapsed since the most
recent coursework to be disregarded was completed.
2. The student must have completed at least one semester at
BYU-Idaho as a full-time student (12 credits or more) with
a grade point average of at least 2.5.
3. The semester(s) to be considered for Academic Renewal
must have a GPA below 2.0.

Retake Courses
Retake courses replace the credit and grade of a previously completed
equivalent course even if the previous grade was higher. The most
recently completed course is calculated into the GPA, earned credits,
and degree requirements. Previous courses remain on the transcript
and are designated as retake courses and will not fulll degree requirements.

If Academic Renewal is approved, the permanent academic record


is annotated to indicate that no work taken during the disregarded
semester(s), even if satisfactory, shall be applied toward graduation
requirements or GPA calculation. However, all work remains on the
record to ensure a true and accurate academic history. Academic
Renewal may impact a students retaken courses.

Students are allowed a maximum of four retakes during their BYUIdaho experience. Retakes occur when retaking BYU-Idaho courses
previously completed at this University. When a University course
is discontinued the opportunity to retake that course is no longer
available. Information regarding discontinued courses and their
replacement courses, where applicable, is available in the respective
academic department sections of the University catalog. Students may
contact the Student Records and Registration Ofce for clarication
on discontinued courses before attempting a retake.

This policy may not be used for individual courses. Students should
also be aware that this is a BYU-Idaho policy and other institutions
are not obligated to honor it. Academic Renewal may be applied
only once during an academic career at BYU-Idaho. Once approved,
Academic Renewal may not be reversed.

Verifications
A verication is proof of enrollment. It shows the students personal
information with name and current dates of attendance. It is used
for insurance purposes, loan deferments, scholarships, employers,
government and legal ofces, etc. Free electronic verications of
enrollment can be obtained by students at any time through the National Student Clearinghouse (www.byui.edu/verication). Parents
and interested third parties can obtain electronic verications for a
nominal fee at www.studentclearinghouse.org.

Exeeding the maximum number of retakes does not prevent students


from registering for course they have previously completed. Retakes
impact the term and cumulative calculations on the transcript but do
not affect a students ability to enroll in a course.
BYU-Idaho courses cannot be replaced by equivalent courses from
other institutions. Exceptions must be approved by the Academic
Exceptions Committee. Students who transfer must recognize
that a transfer institution may not accept the retake course per this
denition.

GPA verication requests must be submitted in writing with the


students signature due to FERPA privacy laws. Such requests can be
submitted to the Student Records and Registration Ofce by letter,
e-mail, fax, and in person. The students name, ID number, and an
address, email, or fax number where the verication is to be sent
are required. Presentation of student identication at the Student
Records and Registration Ofce is required. Social Security numbers
are not listed unless requested by the student.

Pass/Fail Courses
BYU-Idaho offers a limited number of pass/fail courses. Students
in these classes receive no letter grade; instead, they either pass or
fail depending on whether or not they have met the course criteria.
All pass credits are earned but are not included in GPA calculations.
Courses designated as letter grade cannot be changed to pass/fail,
and courses designated as pass/fail cannot be changed to letter grade.

Verication of a students directory information, such as dates of


attendance or degrees earned, can be verbally obtained by contacting
the Student Records and Registration Ofce.

Special Examinations
Transcript Requests

Permission to earn credit by special examination must be obtained


from the applicable Department. Special exams may require a fee.

Ofcial academic transcript requests are made online at my.byui.


edu. Transcripts may not be ordered by phone, e-mail, paper or fax.
Transcripts can be requested by both current and former BYU-Idaho
students by logging into their current or former student account.
When requesting a transcript, students and former students may
choose a certied electronic PDF transcript delivered within minutes
of placing an order. Ofcial electronic PDF transcripts will be
provided at no cost. Students and former students may also choose
a paper copy to be sent by US Postal mail or overnight delivery for
a fee. Transcripts may be sent immediately, at a later date, or after
grades are posted at the end of each term. Ofcial transcripts will
not be released until all BYU-Idaho debts have been paid in full. For
more information, visit www.byui.edu/transcripts.

Vertical Credit
Subject to Department Chair approval, students who have earned a
grade of C or better in a class taken at BYU-Idaho for which there
are prerequisite course(s) they have not taken, may be given credit
and a pass grade for the prerequisite course(s). The Vertical Credit
will be applied to the same semester in which the qualications were
met. To apply, students must consult the appropriate Department
Chair. If approved, an application may be picked up at the Student
Records and Registration Ofce where a credit fee will be assessed.
The fee is $15 for 0.5 to 3.0 credits, with an additional $5 per credit
thereafter. Although vertical credit counts toward total credit requirements for graduation, no grade is given toward GPA computation.

46

Academic Policies
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REGISTRATION

If a student does not add the course by the 24-hour registration


deadline, the student will be dropped from the waitlist, and the seat
will be made available to the next student on the waitlist. Students
who do not register for a waitlisted section by the registration deadline or who accidentally drop themselves from a waitlisted section
will need to re-add themselves to the bottom of the waitlist. Student
Records and Registration cannot re-add students to their original
waitlist position.

Class Registration
Student registration for classes is by priority according to credit level.
Credits earned plus currently enrolled BYU-Idaho credits are calculated into the priority registration credit count. If one misses their
designated registration time, they may still register for classes, but
risk less availability of class selection. Students register for all classes
offered during the semester regardless of the starting date of the class
(e.g., second block classes). Students starting on the second block of
a semester register at the same time as all other students.

Students may waitlist multiple sections of the same course. However,


if a student waitlists a section and then registers for a different section
of the same course, the student will be systematically dropped from
all other waitlisted sections of that course.

Students will be notied of adjustments to the registration schedule


and processes through ofcial BYU-Idaho communications methods.

Amount of Credits per Term

Students should be aware of classes with special requirements such as


proper major selection, credit limit, and prerequisite course completion. Tuition is not refunded if a student drops below a full-time
credit load, unless the student completely withdraws from all classes
by the established deadline.

Sixteen credit hours per semester are recommended for full-time


students. Twenty-one credit hours is the recommended maximum.
Students must obtain permission from the Student Records and
Registration Ofce to take more than 21 credits per semester or 10
credits per block. Students must demonstrate a successful academic
history to qualify.

All individuals participating in BYU-Idaho classes need to be properly


admitted and enrolled to do so. No individual should be allowed to
sit-in on a few classes or for an entire semester without rst registering for the coursewhether for credit or audit. Compliance with
this process is necessary to ensure each students academic experience
is accurately recorded and to ensure that only properly admitted and
eligible students are participating in University courses and utilizing
University resources. All properly registered students, for credit or
for audit, will appear on the courses class roll.

Class Periods
Regular semester class periods last 60 or 90 minutes. Regular semester lab periods run either two or three hours. For every semester
credit hour, two hours of preparation outside of class are required per
class hour per week. For classes with labs, two or three hours of lab
work per week are also required.

Wait Listing

Registration and Payment Deadlines

During course registration, if a section of a desired course has lled,


students can add themselvesin order to an electronic list. A
waitlist allows the rst student on the list to have priority registration
into the course if a seat becomes available. Waitlisting is offered as
a convenience to students during the registration process. Adding
oneself to a waitlist does not guarantee a seat in the course.

The following deadlines are important for students to keep in mind.


Refer to the University Catalog and Class Schedule for specic dates
for each semester. Remember that payments must be made to the
Cashiers Ofce by the deadline date:
1. Final Payment deadline late charge is 5% of unpaid and
related charges.
2. Insurance Payment Deadline.
3. Campus Housing payments. (Refer to housing contract.)
4. Classes dropped after this day will appear on the transcript
with a W grade.
5. Last day to drop full semester classes.
6. Last day to withdraw from school without receiving grades
earned.

The availability of a waitlist is at the discretion of the instructor, who


may choose not to offer a waitlist. Students are limited in the number of credits they may waitlist each term based on their student type:
Student Type (Subprogram)
Waitlist Credit Limit
DAY (on-track or off-track)
12 credits
Online (ONLN)
12 credits
Continuing Education (CTED)
12 credits
Non-matriculating (NONM)
9 credits
Part-time (PART)
9 credits
High School Concurrent Enrollment
6 credits

Adding and Dropping Sections


Changes in registration can be made using the BYU-Idaho online
registration system. If a student wishes to add a class that is full, he
or she may contact the course instructor, and the instructor may, at
the instructors discretion, authorize the student to add. Students are
responsible for adding and dropping courses and maintaining their
own class schedules. See Academic Calendar for specic registration
and academic deadlines.

Students must meet the same conditions to waitlist a course that they
would have to meet to register for the course. Students who have
not met the course prerequisites, requirements, or other conditions,
or who have holds on their account, will not be allowed to waitlist.
The waitlist process will not automatically add students directly into
a waitlisted section. Students are responsible to add themselves
to waitlisted sections if a seat becomes available. Students will be
notied via their BYU-Idaho email account that they have 24 hours
to add themselves to the waitlisted section. These notications may
be sent any time, day or night, including weekends and holidays.
Students are responsible to closely monitor any waitlisted section to
prevent missing their opportunity to add a waitlisted course.

47

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Audit Classes

Degree Progress

Departments have the right to refuse to allow students to audit


individual courses. The Department Chair must report all courses
that students may not audit to the Student Records and Registration
Ofce. Audit restrictions will remain in effect until they are removed
by the Department Chair.

Degree Progress is meant to encourage all degree-seeking students


to make reasonable progress in planning for and completing an
undergraduate degree at BYU-Idaho. New freshmen and transfer
students are encouraged to develop a Graduation Plan with the
Academic Discovery Center or assigned Academic Discovery Satellite
Center upon admission to BYU-Idaho. This plan will serve as a tool
in completing degree requirements and working towards graduation.

Students must rst register for the class for credit and then contact
the Student Records and Registration Ofce to change the course
to audit. Generally, students may not audit a Foundations or online
section.

Students who fail to maintain satisfactory Degree Progress may be


restricted from registration and be required to meet with their satellite advising center. Students who consistently do not make satisfactory Degree Progress may forfeit their opportunity to continue their
academic career at BYU-Idaho.

Tuition for audit classes is assessed on the same basis as for credit
classes. Students may not change from credit to audit after the
deadline to drop a course without earning a W. Students wishing
to change from audit to credit after the deadline to drop a course
without earning a W must receive instructor approval.

Change of Major
Students are encouraged to select a major early in their academic
program to effectively plan towards graduation. Students change
majors by going to the Academic Discovery Center or through
the assigned Academic Discovery Satellite Center. Students should
carefully assess the impact of the major change by utilizing the
Degree Audit report and conferring with their faculty mentor.
Previously approved waivers and substitutions may possibly not
transfer to a newly selected major because of the individuality of the
major requirements.

Students who audit a class are not responsible for attendance, daily
preparations or examinations, and no grade is reported or recorded
on the permanent record. An I grade may not be made up by
repeating the class as an audit.
Registered students who drop all credit section(s) and only have audit
section(s) remaining are considered withdrawn from the University
effective the last drop date of the non-audit section(s). Students
will need to re-apply through the Admissions Ofce for the next
semester. Compliance with deadlines is required, unless a deferment
is obtained.

Students with 60 or more earned credits will not be allowed to


change a major without submitting a petition to the Academic
Standards Committee. The petition must illustrate the ability to
efciently complete the newly selected major. An attached graduation
plan indicating the remaining courses and planned schedule is
required. To petition a change of major with over 60 credits earned,
students should contact the Academic Discovery Satellite Center.

Instructor-Initiated Drops
For students in courses requiring an audition, the instructor will initiate a drop for those students not selected. These administrative drops
will be processed without penalty and must be led by the instructor
with the Student Records and Registration Ofce no later than the
last day to add or drop classes. (See Academic Deadlines.)

Earning Muliple Majors


BYU-Idaho does not allow students to declare or earn multiple majors, even if all coursework is complete.

Students who do not attend the rst two classes (or rst evening
class) or who do not participate in an online course before the end
of lesson one may be dropped from the course and replaced with
another student. Requests for drops should be submitted no later
than the deadline to drop without receiving a W. In some instances,
such action may jeopardize nancial aid or health insurance eligibility.
In such cases, BYU-Idaho assumes no responsibility. Students who
have attended at least one class period are not subject to this policy.
Students who have registered but have no intention of successfully
completing a course should ofcially drop the course rather than risk
receiving an F or UW by assuming the instructor will process an
administrative drop.

Earning an Additional Minor


Requests to declare or earn minors that are not required by a bachelor degree program are typically considered only if the minor can be
completed withing the 120 credit limit.

Withdrawal from School and Deferments


Beginning the rst day of classes, any student who drops all classes to
a zero credit level will be considered withdrawn from the University.
Dropping all classes with only audit classes remaining will also be
considered withdrawn.
Students who drop all classes via the online registration system are
warned of the withdrawal status implications and informed of their
responsibilities. Students may contact the Student Records and
Registration Ofce for assistance.

Students who have not satised the minimum grade requirement for
a pre-requisite of a course may be dropped from the section by the
instructor or department chair.
These administrative drops must be led by the instructor with the
Student Records and Registration Ofce no later than the drop deadline (last day to drop sections without receiving a W grade on the
transcript). (See Academic Deadlines.)

The withdrawal date is the date the student drops to a zero credit
level, unless otherwise approved by the Student Records and
Registration Ofce. Students may not withdraw from BYU-Idaho
after the last day to withdraw from school without receiving grades
earned and will have those grades recorded on their academic
records. (See Academic Calendar.)

Students are academically and nancially responsible for all courses


for which they are registered. Ultimately, it is the students responsibility to drop his or her own class using the online registration
system. Students may contact the Student Records and Registration
Ofce for assistance.

48

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
On-track students who withdraw will be considered as discontinuing
their attendance at BYU-Idaho and will lose their continuing student
status unless they apply for and are granted deferral status by the
Admissions Ofce. Students who withdraw and do not receive a
deferment must apply for re-admission to BYU-Idaho. Students may
not withdraw from a semester in which they have already earned a
grade for a course, including rst block classes.

TRANSFER EVALUATION

The available deferment types are as follows: Continuing Student,


Missionary, and Medical. Following are the conditions to qualify for
each of the deferment types.
1. Continuing Student Deferment. This deferment is for one
semester only. Students must enroll in their next on-track
semester following the deferred semester to maintain their
admission status.
a. Be admitted and remain admissible as a regular day
school student.
b. Attend the most recent on-track semester prior to
requesting the deferment.
c. Submit the Continuing Student Enrollment
Deferment Application before the last day to
withdraw completely from school and receive W
grades and not the grades earned. For the specic
semesters date, please see the Academic Calendar.
2. Missionary Deferment.
a. Be admitted and remain admissible as a regular day
school student.
b. Enter the MTC during the semester immediately
following the last semester of enrollment or prior to
the rst semester of enrollment after being admitted.
c. Submit the LDS Missionary Enrollment
Deferment Application with a copy of the mission
call after receiving the mission call and before entering
the MTC.
d. Complete a full, honorable mission.
3. Medical Deferment.
a. Be admitted and remain admissible as a regular day
school student.
b. Attend the on-track semesters immediately prior to
and following the deferred semester.
c. Have a veriable medical condition that prevents
enrollment.
d. Submit the Medical Enrollment Deferment
Application with a doctors statement to the
Admissions Ofce.

Transfer to BYU-Idaho

Transfer from BYU-Idaho


While BYU-Idaho does make an effort to establish articulation
agreements with other colleges and universities, students who are
considering transferring to another college or university should
review that institutions transfer guidelines.

BYU-Idaho generally accepts college level transfer credits from


regionally-accredited colleges and universities. Courses from institutions that are not regionally-accredited are generally not transferable
to BYU-Idaho. Generally, courses completed 10 or more years ago
will be accepted as elective credit.
Only transfer courses with a grade of C- or higher are eligible for
transfer consideration. Additionally, transfer credit may be used to
satisfy degree requirements but will not be calculated into the BYUIdaho GPA. Transfer courses considered to be out of harmony with
established principles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints will not be accepted by BYU-Idaho for credit consideration.

Full Disclosure of Transfer Schools


Failure to submit ofcial transcripts to BYU-Idaho from all
institutions you have attended or are currently attending, both U.S.
and international, may result in disciplinary action including dismissal
from BYU-Idaho.

Official Transcripts
BYU-Idaho considers evaluation of courses only with an ofcial
college or university transcript. Ofcial transcripts are transcripts
mailed in a sealed envelope from the institution or through a secured
electronic transmission. BYU-Idaho will not evaluate transcripts
submitted via any method deemed unsecure by the University.

Transfer Students with Degrees


Transfer students who have been awarded an Associate Degree (not
including Applied Associate Degrees) from a regionally-accredited
college or university will be viewed as having met most of the
Foundations requirements for a Bachelors Degree. However,
transfer students are still responsible to meet all other graduation and
university requirements, including courses that are deemed essential
to the BYU-Idaho experience. Courses for students who have not
completed a transfer Associate Degree will be evaluated on a courseby-course basis. Transfer Associate Degrees that do not include a
broad liberal arts curriculum may be evaluated on a course-by-course
basis.

Student Military Service


Enrolled BYU-Idaho students called into active service in the armed
forces of the United States during the course of an academic term
receive assistance and exceptions with regard to withdrawing from
courses and receiving tuition refunds. This allowance does not apply
to students ordered to active duty in another countrys armed forces.
Students seeking this allowance should provide a copy of their ofcial
military orders to the Student Records and Registration Ofce for
assistance.

Concurrent/Dual Enrollment Programs


Students may receive credit for courses previously taken through
an early college program if those courses were administered from a
regionally-accredited college or university and are recorded on an
ofcial college or university transcript. Ofcial transcripts must be
sent to BYU-Idaho to be considered for transferability. Concurrent or
dual enrollment courses sent on a high school transcript will not be
considered for transferability.

Online Courses Offered to Indiana Residents


BYU-Idaho is authorized by: The Indiana Board for Proprietary Education; 101 W. Ohio St., Suite 670, Indianapolis, IN 46204-1984

Advanced Placement (AP)


AP scores must be on an ofcial Advanced Placement transcript.
Scores on high school transcripts will not be accepted. Students who
complete an AP exam with a score of 3 or above may receive University credit in that subject area according to the following list:
*See AP Chart immediately following this section.

49

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Technical or Vocational Courses

Religion courses taken at the BYU Jerusalem Center (during a


students BYUIdaho experience) will transfer to fulll both religion
course content and the resident religion requirement. However, such
credit does not apply to the completion of the overall BYU-Idaho
residency requirement. BYU Jerusalem Center credits earned prior
to a students enrollment at BYU-Idaho can be used to fulll religion
course content only, but may not be applied to any BYU-Idaho
residency requirement.

Generally, technical, vocational, or occupational courses are not transferable to BYU-Idaho.

International Baccalaureate (IB)


IB courses must be on an ofcial International Baccalaureate
transcript. Students who complete IB courses with a grade of 5 or
above may receive University credit in that subject area according to
the following approved list:
*See IB Chart immediately following this section.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)


Earned credit hours will be posted as CLEP credit with a P grade.
Such credit may not be converted to a letter grade or correlated with
an existing BYU-Idaho course. Students may receive University credit
for CLEP exams as specied by the following list:
*See CLEP chart immediately following this section.

International Credits
Transcripts from international schools will not be evaluated until the
following conditions are met:
1. The student is an accepted student at BYU-Idaho.
2. The student provides a transcript and course description of
classes completed.
3. All transcripts and course descriptions must be in English.
Translated versions will only be accepted when one of the
following conditions are met:
a. The sending university provides an English translation.
b. The transcripts are translated by a qualied, independent
third-party (not family) translator.
c. A private credential evaluation company is used.
4. The students institution is recognized by its countrys
governing board as an accredited institution, and it is
similar in nature to a college or university in the United
States. Credits from institutions primarily focused on
vocational and technical training are generally not
transferable.
Once conditions are met, the Student Records and Registration
Ofce will evaluate courses for equivalency at BYU-Idaho. Courses
without an equivalent BYU-Idaho course are generally not transferable. All grades are changed to pass or fail grades. English classes
taken outside of a United States university will not be accepted for
meeting English requirements at BYU-Idaho.

Military Credit
BYU-Idaho awards military credit based on the American Council
of Education (ACE) recommendations found in the Guide to the
Evaluation of Education Experiences in the Armed Services. Military
courses without an equivalent BYU-Idaho course will not be transferred to the University for credit consideration.

Transfer of Credit from other Universities and Institutes of Religion


Religion credit earned at Church Education System Institutes of
Religion or other LDS Church schools will transfer to BYU-Idaho as
an equivalent religion course or elective credit so long as the course
is taken for credit and such credit is noted on an ofcial transcript.
While these religion credits from other LDS Church schools or Institutes of Religion may transfer to fulll required religion content, they
do not satisfy the BYU-Idaho resident religion requirement (religion
courses taken from BYU-Idaho). Coursework in religious studies
from any place other than an LDS Church school or Institute of
Religion will not be accepted toward lling the BYU-Idaho religion
requirements.

50

Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Advanced Placement (AP)


AP Test
Art: History of

International Baccalaureatte (IB)


BYU-Idaho
Equivalent
Course

Satisfied
Foundations
Requirement

ART 201

FDCA101

ART 202

Min
Score Credit
3

ART 102

Biology

FDSCI 101

FDSCI*

Chemistry

CHEM 101

FDSCI*

Chemistry

CHEM 105

FDSCI*

Chemistry

4***

CHEM 105***

FDSCI*

Economics: Macro

ECON 151

FDSCI 200

FDAMF101

FDSCI*

FDSCI 203

FDSCI*

Physics (SL)

PH 105

FDSCI*

PH 106

FDSCI*

PH 121

FDSCI*

PH 220

FDSCI*

ECON 150
FDENG 101

FDENG101

English: Lit/Comp

FDENG 101

FDENG101

FDCA101

FDCA101
FDSCI*

FR 101

FR 102

French Literature

FR 201

FR 202

GER 101

GER 102

German Language

Gov. & Politics: US

POLSC 110

Gov. & Politics: Comparitive

POLSC 150

History: US

HIST 260

HIST 262

Visual Arts (SLA, HL)


Experimental Sciences

Physics (HL)

B 101

Economics (SL)

ECON 151

Economics (HL)

ECON 358

GEOG 101

FDSCI*

History (SL, HL)

HIST 222

FDWLD 201

History-Americas (SL, HL)

FDAMF 101

FDAMF 101

History-Europe (SL, HL)

HIST 222

FDWLD 201

PSYCH 111

ANTH 101

CHIN 101

FDAMF101

FDAMF101

HIST 222

FDWLD201

History: World History

HIST 220

FDWLD101

HIST 222

FDWLD201

Languages

GEOG 120

Latin: Vergil

Mathematics: Calculus AB

3
3

LATIN 102
FDMAT110

Chinese (SL, HL)

LATIN 101

FDMAT112

FDMAT110**

MATH 111

FDMAT112

MATH 113

Physics B

PH 105

FDSCI*

PH 106

FDSCI*

Physics C: Elec & Mag

Psychology
Spanish Language

3
3

PH 105

FDSCI*

PH 121

FDSCI*

Statistics

PH 106

PH 220

PSYCH 111

4
4

Spanish Literature

FDMAT112**

CHIN 201

French (SL, HL)

FR 101

FR 102

SPAN 202

FDCA101

FDMAT221

FDMAT221**

*Any combination of seven credits in Physical or Biological Science will meet the
Foundations Science requirement

FR 202

German (SL, HL)

GER 101

GER 102

GER 201

German (HL)

GER 202

Russian (SL, HL)

RUSS 101

RUSS 102

Russian (HL)

RUSS 201

Spanish (SL, HL)

SPAN 101

SPAN 102

SPAN 201

SPAN 202

Spanish (HL)
Math & Computer
Science
Computer Science (SL,
HL)

CS 124

Mathematics (SL, HL)

FDMAT 110

MATH 111

FDMAT 112

Mathematics (HL)

** Students must also complete FDMAT108T to meet the Quantitative Reasoning


Foundations requirement

FR 201

SPAN 102
SPAN 201

4
French (HL)

SPAN 101

CHIN 102

FDSCI*
FDSCI*

4
Chinese (HL)

FDMAT112**

Mathematics: Calculus BC

Physics C: Mechanics

FDAMF 101

Geography (SL, HL)

History: European

Individuals & Societies


Business and Management
(SL, HL)

Psychology (HL)
Soc/Cultural
Anthropology (SL, HL)

Human Geography

TA 123 M/W

Biology (SL, HL)


Environmental Systems
(SL)

FDCA 101

TA 260R

TA 115

ART 102

French Language

BIO 250

English: Lang/Comp

Satisfied
Foundations
Requirement

Economics: Micro

Awarded
College BYUIdaho
Credit Equivalency

Arts
Theatre (SL, HL)

Art: Studio Drawing

Environmental Science

IB Exam

Min
Score

FDMAT 110**

FDMAT 112**

*Any combination of seven credits in Physical or Biological Science will meet the
Foundations Science requirement

***Additional credit may be awarded upon review and approval by the appropriate
academic department.

**Students must also complete FDMAT 108T to meet the Quantitative Reasoning
Foundations requirement

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Academic Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)


Subject

Minimum
Score

Awarded
College
Credit

BYUIdaho
Equivalency

Satisfied
Foundations
Requirement

History and Social Sciences


American Government
Human Growth &
Development
Introduction to
Psychology

50

POLSC 110

50

CHILD 210

50

PSCYCH 111

Introduction to Sociology
Principles of
Macroeconomics
Principles of
Microeconomics

50

SOC 111

50

ECON 151

50

ECON 150

History of the U.S. I

50

HIST 260

FDAMF 101

History of the U.S. II

50

HIST 262

FDAMF 101

FDAMF 101

FDAMF 101

Science and Mathematics


Biology

50

FDSCI 200

FDSCI*

Calculus

50

FDMAT 112

FDMAT 112**

Chemistry

50

105/106

FDSCI*

College Algebra

50

FDMAT 110

FDMAT 110**
FDSCI*
FDMAT 110**

Natural Sciences

50

FDSCI 200/
FDSCI 201

Precalculus

50

FDMAT 110

Precalculus

50

MATH 111

65

ACCTG 201

50

B 275

American Literature
College Composition
(with essay)

50

FDCA 101

61

FDENG 101

FDENG 101

English Literature

50

FDCA 101

FDCA 101

Humanities

50

HUM 201

FDCA 101

HUM 202

50

FR 101/102

62

12

FR 101/102 &
201

50

GER 101/102

63

12

GER 101/102
& 201

50

SPAN 101/102

63

12

SPAN 101/102
& 201

Business
Financial Accounting
Introductory Business
Law

Composition & Literature


FDCA 101

Foreign Language
French Language
(Level 1)
French Language
(Level 2)
German Language
(Level 1)
German Language
(Level 2)
Spanish Language
(Level 1)
Spanish Language
(Level 2)

*Any combination of seven credits in Physical or Biological Science will meet the
Foundations Science requirement
** Students must also complete FDMAT108T to meet the Quantitative Reasoning
Foundations requirement

52

University Standards
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

University Standards
President (Young) looked steadily
forward for a few minutes, as though
in deep thought, then said:
Brother Maeser, I want you to remember that you ought not to teach even the
alphabet or the multiplication tables
without the Spirit of God. That is all.
God bless you. Goodbye.
-Brigham Young

53

University Standards
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Principles of Personal Honor

Furthermore, a student is not in good honor code standing if his or


her ecclesiastical endorsement has either lapsed or been withdrawn,
or if the Student Honor Ofce has placed a hold on the students
records. All students are required to remain in good honor code
standing once admitted to BYU-Idaho, whether they are on or off
campus, on or off track.

True at all Times


Personal honor is integrity in fullling commitments,
responsibilities, and covenants.
Personal honor begins with willing obedience and is fully developed when we consistently govern ourselves by true principles.
Personal honor increases spiritual strength through the ministry
of the Holy Ghost.
Personal honor is central to every aspect of our lives, including
the BYU-Idaho experience.
Personal honor brings us joy and happiness; deepens our desire
to love, serve, and lift others; and ultimately helps us to become
more like the Savior.

Individuals who are on any sex-offender registry are not eligible for
enrollment at BYU-Idaho. Registered sex offenders will not be allowed employment at BYU-Idaho nor other access to the campus.

University Standards and Policies


The University Standards are designed to support and strengthen
the Honor Code. Included are standards and policies on each of
the following: (1) academic honesty, (2) student life, (3) dress and
grooming, (4) continuing ecclesiastical endorsement, and (5) church
attendance. The below standards are not inclusive of all possible
violations of the Honor Code. Violations of university standards
and policies may result in Student Honor action that may include:
counseling and education, warning, steady upward course, probation,
suspension or expulsion from the university, and banning from access
to university properties.

CES Honor Code


Brigham Young University-Idaho and other Church Education
System (CES) institutions (Brigham Young University, Brigham
Young University-Hawaii, and LDS Business College) exist to
educate students in an atmosphere consistent with the ideals and
principles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. These
institutions select employees and students who voluntarily live the
principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Living by those standards
is a condition of employment and admission. Individuals who are
not members of the Church are also expected to maintain the
same standards of honor, integrity, morality, and consideration of
others. By enrolling at BYU-Idaho, or accepting appointment as an
employee, individuals show their commitment to observe the Honor
Code standards approved by the Board of Trustees at all times ...
and in all places (Mosiah 18:9).

1. Academic Honesty
BYU-Idaho students should seek to be completely honest in all their
dealings. They should complete their own work and be evaluated for
that work. They should avoid academic dishonesty and misconduct
in all its forms, including but not limited to plagiarism, fabrication,
falsication, and cheating.
Plagiarism
Intentional plagiarism is the deliberate act of representing the words,
ideas, or data of another as ones own without providing proper
attribution to the original author through quotation, reference, or
footnote.

We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and


in doing good to all men.... If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of
good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things (13th Article
of Faith)
.
As a matter of personal commitment, faculty, staff, and students of
BYU, BYU-Hawaii, BYU-Idaho, and LDS Business College seek to
demonstrate in daily living on and off campus those moral virtues
encompassed in the gospel of Jesus Christ, and will:
Be honest
Live a chaste and virtuous life
Obey the law and all campus policies
Use clean language
Respect others
Abstain from alcoholic beverages, tobacco, tea, coffee and sub
stance abuse
Participate regularly in church services
Observe Dress and Grooming Standards
Encourage others in their commitment to comply with the
Honor Code

Inadvertent plagiarism involves the inappropriate, but non-deliberate,


use of anothers words, ideas, or data without proper attribution.
Although not a violation of the Honor Code, it is a form of academic
misconduct for which an instructor can impose appropriate academic
sanctions. Students who are in doubt as to whether they are providing proper attribution have the responsibility to consult with their
instructor and obtain guidance.
Plagiarism may occur with respect to unpublished as well as published
material. Examples include:
Direct Plagiarism: the verbatim copying of an original source
without acknowledging the source
Paraphrased Plagiarism: the paraphrasing of ideas from another
without attribution, causing a reader to mistake these ideas for the
writers own
Plagiarism Mosaic: the borrowing of words, ideas, or data from an
original source and blending this original material with ones own
writing, without acknowledging the source
Insufcient Acknowledgment: the partial or incomplete attribution of words, ideas, or data from an original source

Good Honor Code Standing


When a student is in good honor code standing, they have the blessings of protection, preparation and peace. It also means a students
conduct is consistent with the Principles of Personal Honor, the CES
Honor Code, The Family: A Proclamation to the World, For the
Strength of Youth, the University Standards and Policies, and the
principles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, both on
and off campus. Students must be in good honor code standing to be
admitted to, continue enrollment at, and graduate from BYU-Idaho.
Students not in good honor code standing may be suspended from
the university. Excommunication, disfellowshipment, or disafliation
from the Church will automatically result in the loss of good honor
code standing.

Fabrication or Falsication
Fabrication or falsication occurs when a student invents or distorts
the origin or content of information used as authority. Examples
include:
Citing a source that does not exist. Citing information from a
source that is not included in the source for which credit is given
Citing a source for a secondary proposition that it doesnt support

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University Standards
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Citing a bibliography source when it was neither consulted nor
cited in the body of the paper
Intentionally distorting the meaning or applicability of data
Inventing data or statistical results to support conclusions

the name, incident, and action taken. If the occurrence is sufciently


egregious, or if a pattern of dishonesty or misconduct is discovered,
the Student Honor Ofce may take additional action, based upon the
nature of the violation.
If a student disagrees with the determination or action and is unable
to resolve the matter to the mutual satisfaction of the student and the
instructor, he or she may have it reviewed through the universitys
grievance process.

Cheating
A student cheats when he or she attempts to give the appearance of
a level of knowledge or skill that has not been obtained. Examples
include:
Copying from another persons work during an examination or
while completing an assignment
Allowing someone to copy work that is not his or her own during
an examination or while completing an assignment
Using unauthorized materials during an examination or while
completing an assignment
Collaborating on an examination or assignment without authorization
Taking an examination or completing an assignment for another,
or permitting another to take an examination or to complete an
assignment that is not his or her own

2. Student Life
Camping and Overnight Activities
Overnight coed activities that are not university sponsored such as
spending the night together at the St. Anthony Sand Dunes, camping, staying in motels or cabins, and similar activities are prohibited.
No overnight guests of the opposite sex are permitted at any time in
single-student housing.
Computer Crime
Any person who knowingly and without permission accesses or attempts to access any campus computer, computer system, computer
program, or network without prior authorization is committing
computer fraud.

Other Academic Misconduct


Other academic misconduct includes other academically dishonest,
deceitful, or inappropriate acts which are intentionally committed.
Examples include:
Inappropriately providing or receiving information or academic
work so as to gain unfair advantage over others
Planning with another to commit any act of academic dishonesty
Attempting to gain an unfair academic advantage for oneself or
another by bribery or by any act of offering, giving, receiving, or
soliciting anything of value to another for such purpose
Changing or altering grades or other ofcial educational records
Obtaining or providing to another a test or answers to a test that
has not been administered
Breaking and entering into a building or ofce for the purpose of
obtaining unauthorized materials
Continuing work on an examination or assignment after the allocated time has elapsed
Submitting the same work for more than one class without disclosure and approval
Getting equal credit on group assignments when equal work was
not done

Copyright
The use of university-owned computers, databases, servers, or the
BYU-Idaho website or intranet for the storage, distribution, sharing,
viewing, or transmission of copyrighted materials without permission
is prohibited.
Curfew and Quiet Hours
Students should be in their own apartments by midnight Saturday
through Thursday nights and 1:00 a.m. on Friday nights. Apartment visitors must leave in time to arrive at their own apartments by
curfew. Quiet hours are from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. daily and all day on
Sunday.
Disruptive Behavior
Brigham Young University Idaho is committed to provide a safe and
secure academic, cultural, social and spiritual environment consistent
with the Church Educational System Honor Code. Disruptive behavior is any behavior that adversely impacts the educational process and
environment of other students, the community or the administrative
functions of the university on or off campus.

Procedures for Handling Academic Dishonesty


Instructors are responsible to establish and communicate to students
their expectations of behavior with respect to academic honesty and
conduct in the course. The instructor will be responsible to investigate any incident of academic dishonesty or misconduct, determine
the circumstances, and take appropriate action. Examples of appropriate action include but are not limited to the following:
Reprimanding the student orally or in writing
Requiring work affected by the academic dishonesty to be redone
Administering a lower or failing grade on the affected assignment,
test, or course

Drugs and Alcohol


The use or possession of substances, drink, drug, chemical or dangerous practice that is used to produce a high or other articial effect
that may harm your body or mind and associated paraphernalia is
prohibited at all times.(For The Strength of Youth pg 26) The university may disclose the violation to the students parent/guardian.
This can be made with or without the students consent if students
are less than 21 years of age at the time of disclosure.
E-mail
Students agree not to share their password, send spam mail or any
inappropriate material (including messages of a harassing or salacious
nature), use their account for commercial purposes or any form of
advertising. Students must not enter the e-mail accounts of others
nor send e-mail messages posing as someone they are not. Students
must not harvest and provide lists of BYU-Idaho e-mail accounts to
anyone.

Refer student to the Student Honor Ofce. The Student Honor Ofce will complete an independent investigation and take appropriate
action. If the incident involves violation of a public law, e.g., breaking
and entering into an ofce or stealing an examination, the act should
be reported to University Security.
Both suspected and proven violations of the Academic Honesty
Policy should be reported to the Student Honor Ofce, detailing

55

University Standards
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Entertainment and the Media
For the Strength of Youth teaches us to, choose wisely when using
media, because whatever you read, listen to, or look at has an effect
on you. Select only media that uplifts you. Do not attend, view, or
participate in anything that is vulgar, immoral, violent, or pornographic in any way. Do not participate in anything that presents
immorality or violence as acceptable. Take care that your use of
media and entertainment does not dull your sensitivity to the Spirit or
interfere with your personal relationships with others. Do not communicate anything over the Internet or through text that would be
inappropriate to share in person. Obey the laws that govern sharing
music, movies, and other copyrighted items (pgs 11-13). See Apartment Living Standards at http://www.byui.edu/housing/aboutapproved-housing/apartment-living-standards

Pets
No pets of any kind are allowed on campus or in approved housing.
See Apartment Living Standards at www.byui.edu/housing/policies/
apartment-living-standards.
Pornography
Pornography in any form is not permitted. Use of pornography is a
serious sin and can lead to other sexual transgression. Pornography in
all forms is especially dangerous and addictive. Avoid pornography at
all costs. (For the Strength of Youth, pg 12)
Right of Access
BYU-Idaho is a private institution. Therefore all grounds, walkways,
roads, parking areas, and buildings owned by the university are
private property. The university retains the right and legal authority
to limit or otherwise restrict access to the campus for any reason it
may deem appropriate. As an educational institution, BYU-Idaho
afrms its right to guard or protect employees, students, and guests
from interferences that would disrupt any class, program, activity,
event, or permitted function. This includes stalking or other conduct
that is threatening or disruptive to students, employees, or guests on
campus properties.

Personal Carry Firearms and Weapons at BYU-Idaho


BYU-Idaho prohibits the possession or use of personal rearms and
weapons on property owned or controlled by the university, including
on or off campus BYU-Idaho approved housing (see Idaho Code 183302C, SB1254), and at programs sponsored by BYU-Idaho, which
occur off of campus property (i.e. Discovery, travel related to academic studies, student activities, etc.). For the purpose of this policy,
rearms or weapons include any device that can expel a projectile,
and/or other dangerous weapons, including knives, explosives, or
other items that, in their intended use, are capable of inicting injury.
Because these items pose a clear risk to the persons and property on
BYU-Idahos campus, violation of this policy will result in appropriate
disciplinary sanctions.

Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Stalking, and Violence


Sexual harassment, sexual assault, including sexual violence, domestic
violence, dating violence, stalking, and any other sex crimes are not
tolerated at BYU-Idaho on or off campus. Sexual harassment and
sexual assault refers to unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual
harassment and sexual assault may include 1) unwelcome sexual advances, 2) requests for sexual favors, and 3) other verbal, non-verbal,
or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment may also include denying or limiting, on the basis of sex, the students ability to
participate in or receive benets, services, or opportunities in university programs. Sexual violence is dened as physical sexual acts perpetrated against a persons will or where a person is incapable of giving
consent. This may include 1) rape, 2) sexual assault, 3) sexual battery,
and 4) sexual coercion. All such acts of sexual violence are forms of
sexual harassment covered under Unlawful Discrimination (Title IX).
BYU-Idahos policy against sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual
violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking extends not
only to employment situations but to academic situations as well. If
a student becomes aware of sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual
violence, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or needs assistance or information related to these allegations they should contact
the Student Honor Ofce at 208-496-9300, Kimball Building Room
270; Dean of Students Ofce at 208-496-9200, Kimball Building
Room 290; or Human Resources Ofce at 208-496-1700, Kimball
Building Room 240. Victims of a sex crime, violence, or stalking
should contact the police where the crime occurred.

Under the laws of the state of Idaho, BYU-Idaho is permitted as a


private institution to place limitations on the carrying of weapons
onto its private property. No one (employees, students, or visitors)
except trained and authorized municipal, county, state, and federal
law enforcement ofcers, or trained and authorized BYU-Idaho
Security ofcers, is permitted to possess or carry rearms or other
weapons, concealed or not concealed, with or without a concealed
weapons permit, while upon the properties owned or controlled by
the university.
Specically approved and sanctioned BYU-Idaho programs, such as
archery courses and Badger Creek programs, may use weapons under
the guidance of trained instructors, within the scope of their approved
mission. Members of the campus ROTC units may possess and/or
carry rearms or weapons with the ring pins or other actuating devices removed as part of ofcial ROTC functions when authorized by
the ROTC administrator. ROTC units on campus are also allowed to
possess and store unloaded paint ball training equipment in a secured
storage area on campus.
BYU-Idaho campus is a weapons-free environment.

Single-Student Approved Housing


All single students under the age of 30 must live in approved housing
unless they live at home with their parents. Only admitted students
are eligible to live in approved housing beginning in their rst assigned semester. Individuals enrolled in Continuing Education who
are not admitted to a track are not eligible to live in approved housing. Students who wish to live with a relative must receive an exception from the Housing & Student Living Ofce to live outside of approved housing. For complete policy see Housing and Student Living
at www.byui.edu/housing/policies/apartment-living-standards.

Harassment, Hazing, Intimidation or Aggressive Behavior


All forms of harassment including but not limited to verbal, physical,
mental, sexual, including sexual violence, hazing, intimidation, exploitation, or aggressive behavior that threaten or endanger the physical
or emotional health and safety of others is in violation of the Honor
Code. To report these types of behavior contact the Student Honor
Ofce at 208-496-9300, Kimball Bldg. Room 270 or the Dean of
Students Ofce at 208-496-9200, Kimball Bldg. Room 290.
Overnight Guests
Because overnight guests often cause interruption and inconvenience
to others, all such guests should be cleared with the apartment
manager and agreed upon by the roommates. No overnight guests
of the opposite sex are permitted at any time. Each tenant shall be
responsible for any damage, beyond reasonable wear and tear, to the
property of the apartment complex caused by the tenant, members of
the tenants family, or guests of the tenant.

Visitation Guidelines (by the Opposite Sex)


Men and women may visit in apartments of the opposite sex beginning at 10 a.m. Visitors of the opposite sex are not allowed in
bedrooms at any time. See Apartment Living Standards at www.byui.
edu/housing/policies/apartment-living-standards.

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University Standards
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

3. Dress and Grooming Standards

Swim Wear
Brigham Young University Idaho invites students to refer to, For the
Strength of Youth when choosing their swimsuit attire. Specically
we are taught, Never lower your dress standards for any occasion.
Doing so sends the message that you are using your body to get
attention and approval and that modesty is important only when it is
convenient.

Campus Attire
Never lower your standards of dress. Do not use a special occasion
as an excuse to be immodest. When you dress immodestly, you send
a message that is contrary to your identity as a son or daughter of
God. You also send the message that you are using your body to get
attention and approval. Immodest clothing is any clothing that is
tight, sheer, or revealing in any manner. (For the Strength of Youth,
pg.6-7).

Swimsuits should be modest in fabric, t and style. Womens suits


should cover the stomach. Mens suits should sit at the waist.

Men and women should be neat and clean in appearance. Avoid


extreme clothing and hairstyles Pants, slacks or jeans should not be in
poor condition, frayed or torn and must be ankle length. Caps or hats
should not be worn in buildings. Shoes should be worn in all public
campus areas. Flip-ops and other casual footwear are inappropriate
on campus. Shorts are not appropriate campus attire. Do not disgure yourself with tattoos. Body piercings are not appropriate.

4. Continuing Ecclesiastical Endorsement


The Board of Trustees of BYU-Idaho requires every student, attending the university to have an annual continuing ecclesiastical endorsement. This will be completed by the bishop of the ward in which the
student and/or membership record reside. The continuing endorsement must be completed prior to registering for classes.

Women
Clothing is immodest when it is sleeveless, does not cover the stomach or is low-cut in the front or back. Dresses and skirts should be
knee-length or longer (even with leggings worn). No capris may be
worn on campus. Women may wear one pair of earrings.

The bishop veries the following:


If LDS, the student is in full fellowship in the Church
The student lives a chaste and virtuous life, including avoidance
of pornography, abstinence from sexual relations outside of marriage, and abstinence from homosexual conduct
The student lives the Word of Wisdom by abstaining from
alcoholic beverages, tobacco, coffee, tea, and other harmful substances
The student demonstrates appropriate and consistent church
activity
The student is honest

Men
Hairstyles should be clean and neat, avoiding extreme styles or
colors,and trimmed above the collar leaving the ear uncovered.
Sideburns should not extend below the earlobe or onto the cheek.
Men are expected to be clean shaven, moustaches, if worn, should be
neatly trimmed and may not extend beyond or below the corners of
the mouth. Beards are not appropriate.

The student veries they are striving to live the Honor Code. Students will renew their endorsement during the rst semester of their
assigned track. Online students without an assigned track will renew
their endorsement annually during the semester of their initial enrollment.

Dress Standards for Men and Women at Campus Events


Activity and Recreational Attire
Dress standards for each event will be specied prior to the event.
If no standard is indicated, the minimum standard is campus attire.
Modest casual attire may be worn at certain activities and events.
Shorts and other pants ending above the ankle are inappropriate for
campus. Shorts are only allowed at playing elds and must be modest
in length. Traveling across campus to activities in shorts is not appropriate.

5. Church Attendance
One of the greatest advantages Brigham Young University-Idaho
offers its students is the opportunity to be a member of a student
ward and stake. Sunday meetings, Monday home evenings and other
activities contribute to the spiritual and social growth of each student.
Progress toward spirituality and righteousness is greatly enhanced
through participation in the sacrament, priesthood, Relief Society and
auxiliary meetings provided each week. BYU-Idahos most important mission is to encourage students to live the principles and build
testimonies of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ.

Event Attire
The minimum standard for men will be shirt and tie. Jeans are not
appropriate. The minimum standard for women will be a dress (or
a skirt and blouse or sweater). Casual dress or clothing will not be
permitted.

Attendance in your assigned ward is a requirement for continued


enrollment. Students who do not attend their church meetings may
have their endorsements withdrawn.

Semiformal Dance Attire


Men: A tuxedo is optional, while church attire such as a sports coat
or dressy sweater is recommended. A dress shirt and tie, formal
half-collar shirt without tie, or turtleneck with a sport coat and dress
slacks are acceptable. Dress shoes are required. Athletic shoes, Tshirts, kilts, jeans, and grubby attire are not appropriate.

Single students living in approved housing are expected to attend


their assigned YSA ward. Students whose home is in the immediate
community are expected to attend their home ward or assigned YSA
ward. Married students generally attend married-student wards but
may elect to attend community ward in which they reside based on
specic family needs.

Women: A formal dress is optional; Sunday dress is recommended


(a modest dress with the hemline or slit at or below the knee). Dress
shoes are required. Athletic shoes, sleeveless dresses, spaghetti straps,
low-cut necklines, unlined see-through materials, and open-back
dresses below the shoulder blades are not appropriate.
Special-Theme Dances
Dress should be consistent with university dress standards at all events.
Appropriate dress will be specied in the publicity prior to the dance.

57

Admissions
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Admissions &
Financial Policies
When I was a child,
I spake as a child,
I understood as a child,
I thought as a child:
But when I became a man,
I put away childish things.
(1 Cor. 13:11)

58

Admissions
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICY

not in English. The minimum score requirements are as


follows: (Subject to Change)
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)
- 66 Internet Test (Sub score of 17 reading, 17 writing, 16
listening, 16 speaking)
-Other TOEFL tests may be accepted in certain situations.
Please contact admissions for more information.
IELTS (International English Language Testing System)
-Overall: 6.0 with sub scores of Reading: 6.0, Writing:
5.0, Listening: 6.0, Speaking: 5.5
PTE (Pearsons Test of English)
-Composite: 46 with sub scores of Reading: 47, Writing:
47, Listening: 45, Speaking: 45

Brigham Young UniversityIdaho exists to provide an education


consistent with the religious and family values taught by The Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. We prefer admission applicants
who are members of the Church in good standing but will not
unlawfully discriminate against applicants based upon gender, race,
creed, religion, national origin, age, or disability who meet the
requirements; who agree to abide by the Honor Code and Dress
and Grooming Standards; and who are otherwise qualied based on
available space.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Prospective students may apply via the Internet at the Church
Education System (CES) home page at www.besmart.com.

4. Transfer Students with more than 24 completed semester hours:


Applicants with fewer than 24 completed semester hours (36
quarter hours) should follow requirements for New Freshmen.
Transfer Students with more than 24 completed semester hours
must submit the following information:
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Part 3: Ecclesiastical Endorsement
-Part 4: Seminary/Institute Recommendation
-Part 7: Student Essays
-$35 Non-refundable fee
-Ofcial Transcripts from each college or university you are
attending or have attended
-Proof of English prociency (where applicable; see International Students and U.S. students living in a foreign
country elsewhere in this section of the catalog)

1. U.S. New Freshmen and Transfer Students applying to BYU


Idaho with fewer than 24 semester hours (or 36 quarter hours):
These students should follow requirements for new freshmen and
must complete and submit the following:
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Part 3: Ecclesiastical Endorsement
-Part 4: Seminary/Institute Recommendation
-Part 5: High School Information including an Ofcial
Transcript and High School Counselor Recommendation
-Part 6: Extracurricular Activities
-Part 7: Student Essays
-$35 Non-refundable fee
-American College Test (ACT) scores or Scholastic Aptitude
Test (SAT) scores
-Ofcial Transcripts from each college or university currently
attending or previously attended

5. Former Full-time BYUIdaho Students: These students must


complete and submit:
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Part 3: Ecclesiastical Endorsement
-Ofcial transcripts from each college or university attended
since last attending BYUIdaho

2. Home Schooled Students: Information on requirements for home


schooled students and students from non-accredited high school
programs can be found at www.byui.edu/admissions.
3. International students and U.S. students living in a foreign
country: In addition to the standard application materials listed
above, International students and U.S. citizens educated abroad
(excepting most international American schools) must provide the
following:
-High School transcripts and, if applicable, college or
university transcripts must be evaluated by an evaluation
agency as part of the application process. BYU-Idaho
accepts evaluations from World Education Services/ WES
(www.wes.org) and International Education Research
Foundation/IERF (www.ierf.org). IERf is preferred.
-Part 8: International Student Information
-Condential Statement of Finances
-Afdavit of Support
-Proof of Finances
-ACT/SAT scores (if educated in a US or Canadian based
educational system, including international schools)
-Proof of English prociency (TOEFL, IELTS or PTE) :
International and US Students not educated in an English
language curriculum are required to demonstrate English
language prociency by meeting minimum scores on one
of the exams listed below. In certain cases these exams may
be required of students educated in an English language
curriculum as well. Ofcial TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE results
are required of applicants from non-English speaking
countries or U.S. citizens whose high school education was

6. Concurrent Enrollment Students: BYU-Idaho makes some courses


available to students wishing to enroll in part-time online classes
while in high school. Online concurrent enrollment students must
be in their junior or senior year of high school. A full description
of the Concurrent Enrollment Program is found at www.byui.
edu/concurrent-enrollment. These applicants must complete and
submit:
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Part 3: Ecclesiastical Endorsement
-Concurrent enrollment voucher (available at www.byui.edu/
concurrent-enrollment)
-$35 Non-refundable application fee
-Current high school or home school transcript

59

Admissions
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

APPLICATION DEADLINES

7. Non-Matriculated: Non degree-seeking students desiring parttime daytime enrollment (up to 9 credits per semester) should
submit:
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Part 3: Ecclesiastical Endorsement
-$35 non-refundable Application fee (if never previously paid
to BYU-Idaho)
-To qualify, an applicant must meet at least one of the following characteristics:
-Has previously earned a Bachelors degree
-25 years of age or older
-Married, divorced, or single parent
-Proof of English prociency (where applicable; see International students and U.S. students living in a foreign
country elsewhere in this section of the catalog)

Applicants for degree-seeking study on campus must have all


application materials submitted or postmarked on or before the
established deadlines listed below. For information on other
application deadlines, please contact admissions@byui.edu.
Fall Semester
Winter Semester
Spring Semester

Priority (freshmen) Dec. 1


Regular
Feb. 1
Oct. 1
Priority (freshmen) Dec. 1
Regular
Feb. 1

How to Apply
Students can apply online at www.besmart.com OR send application
materials to:
CES Admissions Ofce
A-41 ASB
Provo, UT 84602
Telephone (801) 422-2507

8. Online Degree Students: Students seeking completion of an


online degree should submit the following:
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Part 3: Ecclesiastical Endorsement
-$35 non-refundable Application fee (if never previously paid
to BYU-Idaho)
-Some previous residency study within the Church Educational System is required for admission as an online degree
student; see www.byui.edu/od for details.

Notification of Application Status and Admission


Applicants can track their status and view their admission decision
online at www.besmart.com. Admission decisions are usually made no
later than four weeks after the nal application deadline.

Three Track System


Information regarding the Three Track System and the track assignment process can be found at www.byui.edu/admissions.

9. Continuing Education: Non degree-seeking students desiring to


enroll in evening, online, or Summer Session classes at BYU-Idaho
should submit the following:
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Part 3: Ecclesiastical Endorsement
-$35 non-refundable Application fee (if never previously paid
to BYU-Idaho)
-Proof of English prociency (where applicable; see International students and U.S. students living in a foreign
country elsewhere in this section of the catalog)
Note: Applicants who are currently denied as matriculated
students at BYU-Idaho are not eligible for admission to
Continuing Education.

Returning Missionary Program


U.S. citizens and permanent residents who apply for the rst available
semester following completion of a full, honorable LDS mission may
be eligible for a waiver of the application deadline through the Returning Missionary Program. More information about this program
is found at www.byui.edu/admissions.
For full details on applying for admission, see www.besmart.com or
contact BYUIdaho Admissions at (208) 496-1300.

10. Pathway: Non degree-seeking students taking classes online and


via their local Institute of Religion program see pathway.lds.org):
-Part 1: Student Information
-Part 2: School Selection
-Proof of English Prociency (where applicable; see pathway.
lds.org for more information about approved English prociency options for Pathway)

60

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses, 2014-2015


Semester Tuition:
LDS Members .........................................................................12 or more credits ................................................................... $1,875
LDS Members .........................................................................1 to 11 credits per credit .......................................................... $ 156
Non-LDS ................................................................................ 12 or more credits ................................................................... $3,750
Non-LDS ................................................................................ 1 to 11 credits per credit ......................................................... $ 312

Registration Related Expenses:


Insurance
All plans will include prescription coverage and have a $500 deductible.
Student per semester (single & married) .....................................................................................................................................$398
Student & Dependent(s) per semester. .....................................................................................................................................$1,498
(Student Health Insurance Premiums may be subject to change at any time. For current rates and coverage, please refer to the student insurance
handbook at http://www.dmba.com/nsc/STUDENT/handbooks.htm.)
Late Tuition and Student Health Insurance Charge.............................................................................................5% of unpaid balance
Class Fees ............................................................................................................................................. variable (see class description)
Key Deposit ....................................................................................................................................................................................$5
Credit by Examination and Vertical Credit .............................................................................................................................. $15-40

Miscellaneous Expenses:
Application for Admission .............................................................................................................................................................$35
ID Card Replacement ...................................................................................................................................................................$10
Vehicle Parking Permit ...................................................................................................................... Varies, depending on parking lot
Cap and Gown Purchase ...............................................................................................................................................................$30
Diploma Reprint ...........................................................................................................................................................................$25

Estimated Expenses:
Books and Supplies (per year) ..................................................................................................................................................$1,000
Housing (per year).................................................................................................................................................. $1,500 to $3,000
Food and Personal Items (per year) ......................................................................................................................... $2,500 to $3,500
Laptop (one time) ..................................................................................................................................................... $900 to $1,200
Brigham Young University-Idaho reserves the right to change fees listed without notice.

61

Financial Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Financial Aid Determination Date: Date used to determine the
number of eligible credit hours for awarding of Federal Financial
Aid.

STUDENT FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY


This section describes the CONTRACTUAL FINANCIAL
AGREEMENT between Brigham Young University-Idaho
(BYU-I) and each student who attends any regular school session
and/or enrolls in any credit class.
1. Enrollment at BYU-I constitutes a contractual nancial obligation
to pay tuition and fees for classes in which a student is enrolled.
2. It is the students responsibility to abide by published payment
and registration deadlines.
3. BYU-I Personal Account information can only be released to the
student. It is the students responsibility to notify parents/legal
guardians of account balances, or to authorize a parent/legal
guardian to access a students BYU-I Personal Account for payment purposes.
4. Federal Student Aid Title IV funds (nancial aid), if authorized,
automatically pays charges assessed to the students account for
tuition, fees, room, and board (if contracted through BYU-I).
5. The student is responsible for repayment of nancial aid funds
upon withdrawal from school or otherwise failing to meet eligibility requirements for nancial aid disbursed to the student.
6. The student may give authorization to BYU-I to use nancial aid
funds to pay all charges incurred on the students BYU-I Personal
Account by completing a Federal Financial Aid Authorization
Form.
7. The student is responsible for payment of tuition/fees by the
published deadlines regardless of whether nancial aid, scholarship, or grant funds are to be used, subject to late charges, interest
charges, and other penalties as described below.
8. The student is responsible for payment of any and all charges
incurred on the students BYU-I Personal Account during the
course of any school semester or session.
9. If a student does not pay the balance of tuition/fees by the
published deadline, the student is responsible to pay an additional
5% late charge, and a nancial hold will be placed on the students
BYU-I Personal Account restricting registration for future semesters and the ability to obtain ofcial transcripts or diplomas.
10. A service charge of 1% per month will be assessed for any outstanding balances on a students BYU-I Personal Account.
11. Outstanding balances that continue to remain unpaid will be subject to customary collection proceedings, including from BYU-I
and/or third-party collection agencies. Collection proceedings
may result in reporting to credit bureaus. The student is responsible for all collection costs incurred in the collection of debts
owed, including attorneys fees.

Full-Time/Part-time Status
Tuition is based upon the number of registered credits (including
audited classes). Students taking 12 or more credits per semester are
considered full-time, and will be assessed tuition at the full-time rate.
Otherwise, a student is considered part-time, and tuition is assessed
for each credit for which the student is registered.

Tuition Computation/Assessment
Tuition is computed and assessed at the time a student registers for
classes. A students nal tuition assessment will be the higher of the
number of credits registered for at one of three dates as follows:
1) Assessment Date;
2) Registration Deadline; or
3) Financial Aid Determination Date.
Below are some examples of how the tuition assessment is computed.
Please note that in the examples, the Assessment Date is after the
Registration Deadline, and 12 credits represent a full-time student
and could be 12 or more credits.
Registration Deadline

Assessment Date

Financial Aid
Determination Date

Resulting number of
credits assessed

Student A

12 credits

12 credits

10 credits

12 credits

Student B

9 credits

12 credits

9 credits

12 credits

Student C

10 credits

8 credits

8 credits

10 credits

For full-time students no additional tuition is assessed for classes


added after the Payment Deadline. However, if individual classes are
dropped which result in the student becoming a part-time student, a
full tuition refund will be given if the classes are dropped prior to the
Registration Deadline. For further tuition refund information, see
the Tuition Refunds section below.
For part-time students, any classes added will be assessed additional
tuition for the appropriate number of credits up to a maximum of
the full-time rate. However, if individual classes are dropped, a full
tuition refund will be given if the classes are dropped prior to the
Registration Deadline. For further tuition refund information, see
the Tuition Refunds section below.

Class Fees
Certain classes may have an additional fee due to the unique expenses
associated with that class. Generally, these fees are for supplies, travel,
lab fees, private lessons, or other expenses associated with a particular
class. Class fees are considered purchased and used after the Registration Deadline. There is no refund of class fees after the Registration
Deadline, unless the instructor certies to the Bursars Ofce that a
refund is warranted.

TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER CHARGES


Definition of Critical Dates
Assessment Date: Date in which classes were added to or dropped
from a students class schedule.
Payment Deadline: Date in which tuition is billed and posted to the
students Personal Account and in which full payment is due (First
Day of Classes for a semester or term).

Other Charges
Except as specically noted below, other items or services purchased
or used from various campus locations may be paid by one or more
of the following payment methods: cash, check, credit card, I-Card,
or charged to the students Personal Account. Items charged to a
students Personal Account are due on the last day of the month following purchase or service. Federal Financial Aid may be authorized
by the student to pay for these charges. If the student does not pay
the outstanding charges by one week following the start of classes,
a nancial hold will be placed on the students Personal Account
restricting registration for future semesters, and the ability to obtain
ofcial transcripts or diplomas, a late charge of 5% will be assessed on
any outstanding balance in addition to a 1% per month service charge
on any outstanding balance.

Registration Deadline: Last day to register or add classes to a


students class schedule, and the last day to drop classes and
receive a full tuition/fee refund (one week after the start of classes
for a semester or term.) Late charges on any unpaid balance of
tuition/fees will be assessed on this date.
Waiver Deadline: Last day for a student to enroll dependents in
the Student Health Plan, and the last day to submit a waiver
of insurance, if eligible. This date is the same date as the
Registration Deadline (one week after the start of classes for a
semester or term).

62

Financial Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Books and Supplies

TUITION PAYMENT DEADLINE

Books and school supplies may be purchased at the University Store


using cash, check, bank card, declining balance using an I-Card, or by
charging them to the students Personal Account.

The tuition payment deadline is the rst-day of classes for all


students. However, no late charges will be assessed until one week
after the start of classes to allow for changes to class schedules.

Student Health Plan

Full-time students who have been charged the full-time rate will not
incur additional tuition charges for classes added subsequent to the
Tuition Payment Deadline, regardless of whether they were semester
or block classes. However, any additional class fees will be assessed
and will be required to be paid in full immediately.

BYU-I requires all traditional, matriculated students to have adequate


medical insurance coverage in the Rexburg area while enrolled in
school and wherever they are living during off-track periods.
To satisfy this requirement, all students are required to enrolled in
the Student Health Plan or complete a health Plan waiver when registering for classes. A student may waive the Student Health Plan if
they are already covered by an Affordable Care Act compliant health
care plan, or insurance is provided by their parents, their employer,
their spouses employer, Medicare or Complete Coverage Idaho
Medicaid.

Part-time students who add classes after the Tuition Payment


Deadline will be required to pay additional tuition immediately, up to
the maximum of the full-time rate, plus additional class fees.
All students registered for Second Block Only classes or Summer
Session classes are considered part-time. Students who add classes
subsequent to the Tuition Payment Deadline will be required to pay
additional tuition immediately, plus additional class fees.

Enrollment in the Student Health Plan will be effective the rst day
of the semester. Students will not be enrolled if they submit a Health
Plan Waiver by the waiver deadline. Limited additional enrollment
options are available for students that graduate or lose their status as
a continuing student.

TUITION REFUNDS
Tuition refunds will only be given as follows:
1. Classes dropped up to the Registration Deadline (one week after classes start see current academic calendar for specic dates)
Students may drop classes at any point during the registration
period up until the Registration Deadline. A full tuition refund
will be given for classes dropped up to the Registration Deadline.
NO REFUND will be given for dropped classes after the Registration Deadline unless the student ofcially withdraws from
BYU-Idaho (see below).
2. Complete withdrawal from school
When a student withdraws from BYU-I after the Registration
Deadline, a pro-rated refund will be given until 60% of the term
or semester has passed. There will be NO REFUND given when
a student withdraws from school after 60% of the term or semester has elapsed.
3. Exceptions to the Tuition Refund Policy
BYU-I recognizes there may be situations beyond a students
control where an exception to the above policy may be warranted.
The following exceptions will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis
to determine whether the situation merits an exception:
A) Death of the student;
B) Death of an immediate family member where continuing
school is impractical;
C) Medical condition requiring extended medical care where
continuing school is impractical;
D) Acceptance of a qualifying internship.

When enrolled in the Student Health Plan, the premium will be


charged to the students Personal Account and is due and payable by
the Payment Deadline. If the student does not pay the premium by
the Registration Deadline, a 5% late charge on any unpaid balance
will be assessed. In addition, a 1% per month service charge on any
outstanding balance will be assessed until the premium is paid in full.

Student Health Center Medical Care


Only Matriculating students and their dependents have access to the
Student Health Center. Costs for visits and services are the responsibility of the student. If the student has insurance coverage other than
through the Student Health Plan, the student has the responsibility
to submit claims to that insurance company. The Student Health
Center does not bill insurance other than through the BYU-I Student
Health Plan.

Campus Housing
Students may enter into a Housing contract for on-campus housing
through the Housing Ofce. Payments are due in accordance with
Housing contracts signed by the student.

Long Distance Phone Cards


Students living in on-campus housing may acquire a BYU-I long distance phone card through the Bursars Ofce. Long distance charges
will be billed to the students Personal Account.

Federal Student Aid (Title IV) Refunds


When a student receives Federal Student Aid (Title IV) funds to
attend BYU-I, and subsequently withdraws from school, federal laws
and regulations require BYU-I to determine whether any unearned
Title IV funds were awarded and whether those funds need to be
returned to the Department of Education and/or to the lending
agency. For further information regarding return of Title IV funds,
please see the Student Financial Aid section of the Catalog or contact
the Financial Aid & Scholarships Ofce.
Financial Aid & Scholarships Ofce
Brigham Young University-Idaho
525 South Center St
Rexburg, ID 83460-1610
(208) 496-1608
www.byui.edu/FinancialAid

Dining Dollars
Students may purchase Dining Dollars for use at all campus Food
Services locations. Dining Dollars may be purchased through Food
Services ofce or online at: my.byui.edu/DiningDollars.

Miscellaneous Charges
Students may be charged additional items for class use, Student
Activities fees, or other miscellaneous purchases made at various locations across campus.

63

Financial Policies
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

PERSONAL ACCOUNTS

Credit Card Policy

Each student has their own Personal Account at BYU-I where


charges, payments, deposits, and disbursement of nancial aid, scholarships, payroll, etc. are recorded.

BYU-Idaho accepts Visa, MasterCard, and Discover for payment on a


students Personal Account. A convenience fee will be charged for all
payments made using a credit card. Currently the processing fee is
2.75%, but is subject to change at any time. All credit card payments
must be made online at my.byui.edu. Credit card payments are not
accepted at the Cashiers Ofce.

Students can have full access to all BYU-I online resources, including their Personal Account by entering their Net ID and Password at
my.byui.edu.

Third-Party Authorization
Any transactions performed using the students Net ID and Password
are considered to be performed by the student. Therefore, care
should be taken to safeguard this information and not disclose it to
anyone else. See below for information on how to authorize a thirdparty to make payments on your Personal Account.

Students should safeguard their Net ID and password and should not
share them with anyone. Students are responsible for any transactions done online through their Personal Account.
Students may authorize a third-party (parents or others) to have
limited access to their Personal Account. To grant a third-party
authorization to access your Personal Account, log on to your
Personal Account Summary using your Net ID and password and
select the MAKE ONLINE PAYMENT link and then under the
PARENT/AUTHORIZED USER section, click ADD NEW.

Personal Account Statements


Students who have continuing student status at BYU-I, and are
enrolled in classes, receive a monthly statement notifying them of
any balance owing on their Personal Account, and are directed to
go online to make payment. Students who are off-track or who
otherwise are not attending school will have Personal Account Statements mailed to their mailing address on le at BYU-I. Students are
encouraged to keep their mailing address current at all times.

Cash on Deposit

Students are responsible for all charges on their Personal Account and
should not rely on monthly statements to remind them of payment
deadlines. Students may view/print their Personal Account Statement
at any time by logging on to their Personal Account at my.byui.edu.

Students are encouraged to utilize campus ATM machines for many


of the banking needs. For purposes of conducting BYU-I business,
BYU-I may make transfers to a students Cash on Deposit account at
BYU-I. Funds deposited in a students Cash on Deposit account may
be used at any time for payment of debts owed to BYU-I. Funds
may also be deposited directly to a students personal bank account if
the student is enrolled in BYU-Is eRefund program.

Methods of Payment

Check Cashing

All payments to a students Personal Account must be made by the


deadline dates. Payments may be made using the following methods:
Online at my.byui.edu:
1. Electronic Check (E-Check) direct transfer of funds from
a personal checking or savings account (no fee);
2. Visa, MasterCard, or Discover. 2.75% convenience fee
charged.
In person at the Bursars Ofce 130 Kimball Building:
1. Cash
2. Personal or Certied Check
3. Money Order
4. I-Card
Mail:
1. Personal or certied check
2. Money Order
Do not send cash by mail

Third-Party Checks
BYU-I will cash third-party checks for students up to the amount of
$400 per day. Any amount in excess of $400 must be deposited to
the students Personal Account.
Personal Checks
BYU-I will cash personal checks for students up to the amount of
$400 per day.
Returned (Bad) Checks/E-Checks
If a personal check or E-Check is returned by the bank for nonsufcient funds, it will be automatically submitted to the bank a
second time for payment. All items returned by the bank to BYU-I
will be cancelled or reversed, and appropriate service charges will be
assessed as if the payment had not been received. E-Checks may also
be returned if incorrect bank information is provided. Additionally,
BYU-I may assess a $5.00 returned check fee. Multiple returned
payments may result in BYU-I requiring future payments by cash or
bank certied check only.

Send payment to:


Bursars Ofce
Brigham Young University-Idaho
525 S Center St
Rexburg, ID 83460-1625
BYU-I can only accept funds that cover a students educational
expenses. A cost of attendance amount is established which includes
tuition, fees, room and board, other required expenses, and a modest
allowance for cost of living (see the Tuition, Fees and Expenses Section of the catalog). This amount represents the maximum amount
we can accept on behalf of a student for a single academic year. If
a student overpays, the Bursars Ofce will review the account and
contact the student to determine how any overpayment should be
handled. In some cases the funds may be set aside for the following
year. In other cases, the payment will be refunded to the sender.

BYU-Idaho I-Card
All traditional matriculating students and their spouses can obtain
a BYU-Idaho identication card (called I-Card) at the ID Center
located in the Bursars Ofce, KIM 130. This card is used campuswide to identify students and is required to 1. transact business at the
Cashiers Ofce, 2. use any I-Card dollars or Dining Dollars, etc.
This card serves as an Activity Card which includes access to the Hart
Building, McKay Library, and other facilities on campus. Spouses
must purchase an annual pass to the Hart Building before they can
use those facilities. This card also entitles students to attend music,
drama, and other performances at a discount.
For further information regarding the terms and conditions for use of
the I-Card, visit byui.edu/nancial-services/my-account/i-card.

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Support Services
...our academic training must be
as impeccable as our lives.
-President Ernest L. Wilkinson

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Student Financial Aid

or spouses federal tax form. Other information such as number of


individuals in the household, number attending college, value of
savings accounts and assets, etc., will need to be reported.

For more detailed and up- to-date information, please visit the StudentFinancial Aid website at www.byui.edu/nancial-aid.

After the students FAFSA has been submitted to the U.S.


Department of Education, a Student Aid Report (SAR) will be
emailed to the student, usually within three to four business days.
This same SAR is sent electronically to BYU-Idaho, where the
information is used to determine the types of aid for which the
student is eligible.

BYU-Idaho offers Federal Student Government Aid and University


Aid to assist students in nancing their education.

FEDERAL AID (Title IV Funds)


A Federal Pell Grant is awarded by the U.S. Department of
Education on the basis of nancial need. Pell Grants are based on the
estimated cost of attendance, length of the enrollment period, and
number of credits a student carries. The student does not have to be
enrolled full-time to qualify for a Pell Grant award; however taking
less than full-time credits will result in a prorated award. The student
must be an undergraduate who does not already have a bachelors
degree. Pell Grants do not have to be repaid.

One week after submitting a FAFSA, students should check their


online Financial Aid Document Tracking link (under the FINANCES
tab at my.byui.edu) to verify their FAFSA was received by BYU-Idaho
and to determine if any additional information is needed to process
their application. Any additional documentation requested should
be submitted as soon as possible to avoid delays in receiving federal
nancial aid. Students can expect federal aid award information to
be available in their online Financial Aid Awards link (also under the
FINANCES tab at my.byui.edu) within 8-10 weeks of submitting the
last requested document.

The Subsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan is need-based.


Principal and interest payments are postponed while the student is
enrolled in school at least half time and during the six-month grace
period after graduation or ceasing to attend school. While the student
is enrolled at least half time the federal government pays the interest
for the student. To apply, see How to Apply for a Federal Student
Loan in this section.

How to Apply for a Federal Student Loan


To apply for federal loans, students must rst complete the FAFSA.
Once the FAFSA is completed and the students nancial aid award
amounts have been determined, a student loan offer will appear on
the Financial Aid Awards link (under the FINANCES tab at my.byui.
edu. Loan offers are generally made for two semesters at a time. This
means any loan amount accepted would be split equally between the
two semesters.

The Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan is not need-based.


Students may qualify for this program as long as their educational
costs exceed the amount of nancial assistance awarded. Principal
and interest payments are postponed while the student is enrolled in
school at least half time and during the six-month grace period after
graduation or ceasing to attend school. The student is responsible for
paying the interest that accrues on the loan. To apply, see How to
Apply for a Federal Student Loan in this section.

To receive loan funds, students must accept any portion of their loan
offer from their award statement and complete a Master Promissory
Note (MPN) and entrance loan counseling at www.studentloans.
gov. Once these steps are completed, loan funds would generally be
available within a few business days. Please note: students must be
enrolled in at least 6 credits to be eligible for federal student loans.

Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students(PLUS)


is available for dependent undergraduate students. The amount
borrowed by the parent may not exceed the estimated cost of
attendance less other nancial assistance the student has been or
will be awarded during the period of enrollment. Please contact the
Student Financial Aid Ofce to determine eligibility for individual
loan amounts.

Deadlines for Federal Student Aid


Priority Deadline
In order to receive federal aid by the tuition payment deadline,
students need to have their FAFSA and required documents
submitted two months prior to attending BYU-Idaho. Students
not meeting this priority deadline will not be denied aid; however,
funding will not be available until later in the school year and late
fees will be assessed. The Student Financial Aid Ofce will NOT be
responsible for any late fees if this deadline is not met.

General Eligibility for Federal Student Aid


In general, a nancial aid recipient must meet the following eligibility
standards:
1. Have a high school diploma, G.E.D. certicate, or a high
school equivalency certicate issued by the state.
2. Be admitted and enrolled as a degree-seeking student.
3. Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen.
4. Be making satisfactory academic progress. For details please
go to www.byui.edu/nancial-aid/policies/satisfactoryacademic-progress.
5. Be current on any required repayments of federal grants
and/or federal student loans received for attendance at any
school.
6. If required, a male student must be registered with Selective
Service.
7. Have a valid Social Security Number.

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)


The federal processor will not accept a 2014-15 FAFSA after June
30, 2015 or the last date of attendance, whichever comes rst. BYUIdaho must receive a valid Student Aid Report (SAR) electronically
by the students last day of enrollment for the academic year. Students
should complete their FAFSA and submit any required documents no
later than two months before their last day of attendance.

Verification
If a students FAFSA is selected for verication, the verication
process must be completed within 110 days after the students last
day of enrollment or approximately Sept. 15, 2015, (whichever is
earlier). It is best to turn in all documents no later than two month
before the last date of enrollment. Please do NOT procrastinate! It
is the students responsibility to be aware of all deadlines. For more
details and up-to-date information on deadlines, visit the Financial
Aid website at www.byui.edu/nancial-aid.

How to Apply for Federal Student Aid


All students applying for federal student aid must rst complete a Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine eligibility.
Apply at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA requires information from
the students federal tax form and possibly the students parents

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Student Loans

UNIVERSITY AID

Student loans must be originated by a students last day of


enrollment at BYU-Idaho for the academic year.

To be considered for university scholarships, students must complete


the BYU-Idaho Scholarship Application each year online. The
application is available through the Student Financial Aid website
at www.byui.edu/nancial-aid from November 1st-April 15th.
Scholarship eligibility is determined through the application for the
following academic year. Online students are not currently eligible
for university scholarships. See below for more information regarding
each scholarship type:

Financial Aid Determination Date (FADD)


Pell Grant amounts are based on the number of credits a student is
registered for on the FINANCIAL AID DETERMINATION DATE.
This is the last date to drop classes without receiving a W grade. Pell
Grant amounts are recalculated as needed after the Financial Aid
Determination Date. Students may owe funds or receive additional
funds based their credits as of FADD. If BYU-Idaho receives a
students FAFSA information after the FADD, the students Pell
Grant amount would be based on his/her enrollment as of the day
the students nancial aid application is processed.

Academic Scholarships for Incoming Freshmen


New freshman applying to BYU-Idaho may be considered for this
scholarship. Scholarship amounts ranges from quarter to full LDS
tuition. The scholarship is awarded based on academic criteria (High
School GPA, ACT/SAT scores). Students must be regular daytime
students enrolled in 14 or more credits during the semester for which
they are awarded.

Returning Federal Student Aid (Title IV Funds)


When a student completely withdraws from school, the university is
required to determine the percentage of Title IV funds earned by
the student and to return the unearned portion to the government.
This percentage is determined according to the number of days the
student participated in classes. The return of funds policy follows
these steps:
1. Determine the percentage of the enrollment period
completed by the student. (If the calculated percentage
exceeds 60%, the student has earned all of his/her Title
IV aid for the enrollment period.) Days participated Days
in Enrollment Period
= Percentage of Enrollment Period Completed
2. Calculate the earned portion of the federal aid.
Total Aid Awarded x Percentage of Enrollment Period Completed = Earned Aid
3. Determine the amount of unearned aid.
Total Aid Awarded - Earned Aid = Unearned Aid
4. Determine the amount of unearned charges. Total Institutional Charges x Percentage of Unearned Aid = Unearned
Charges
5. Return the Lesser of Unearned Aid or Unearned Charges,
based on the type of aid disbursed, in the following order:
(1) Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, (2) Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan, (3) Federal PLUS (Parent) Loan, and
(4) Federal Pell Grant.

Academic Scholarships for Continuing Students


Academic scholarships are available for BYU-Idaho continuing/
returning students who have accumulated between 28-129 BYUIdaho credits. New transfer students who enroll with at least 28
earned credits would be considered based on transfer GPA. Transfer
students who do not qualify upon entry must earn 28 BYU-Idaho
credits to be considered. Awards are made based on the semesters
the student indicates on the scholarship application. Students with
current awards are reevaluated after each winter semester for the
following academic year. Students must be regular daytime students
enrolled in 14 or more credits during the semester for which they are
awarded.

General BYU-Idaho Scholarships


General BYU-Idaho scholarships are available to all new and
continuing students based on a students nancial need, involvement,
and self-reliance. Students must complete the FAFSA to be
considered. These scholarships are awarded based on full-time
enrollment (12 or more credits); however, a prorated portion of the
scholarship can be received if the student takes at least 6 credits. To
learn more, visit the scholarship section of our website at
www.byui.edu/nancial-aid.

Talent Scholarships
Veterans Benefits

Talent scholarships are available for students with talents in Art,


Dance, Music, Theatre Arts, and Journalism. Students should
contact the appropriate department for information on requirements
and deadlines.

First time students receiving Veterans Education Benets must


contact the Student Financial Aid Ofce to establish eligibility.
Continuing students must notify the Student Financial Aid Ofce
regarding enrollment at the beginning of every semester or term they
plan to attend so BYUIdaho can certify the student.

University Aid Deadlines


The BYU-Idaho Scholarship Application is available through the
Student Financial Aid website at www.byui.edu/nancial-aid from
November 1st- April 15th each year. This is the application to apply
for scholarships from the university.

Students receiving VA benets can only be paid for those classes that
apply toward graduation. If students change their major, status or
enrollment after certication, additional forms need to be completed.
Please contact the Student Financial Aid Ofce for more information
about these forms.

Financial Aid Determination Date (FADD)


Scholarship amounts are based on the number of credits the student
is registered for on the 23rd day of the semester, the FINANCIAL
AID DETERMINATION DATE (FADD).This is the last day to
drop classes without receiving a W grade. Students are responsible to
be aware of the FADD each semester, as well as the individual credit
requirements for each of their scholarships. Scholarship amounts are
recalculated as needed after the Financial Aid Determination Date.
Students may owe funds or receive additional funds based on their
credits as of FADD. It is a students responsibility to repay any scholarship funds for which he/she is not eligible.

STATE AID
To determine what nancial aid may be available from your state,
please visit your state website. A list of state websites can be found
online at www.usa.gov/Agencies/State-and-Territories.shtml.

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Academic Scholarships- If the student is enrolled in less than 14
credits as of midnight on the FADD, the entire amount of the
scholarship will be reversed and the student will be required to return all scholarship funds. (Exceptions can be granted for students
in their last semester before graduating.)
Other BYU-Idaho Scholarships If a student is enrolled in 6-11
credits as of midnight on the FADD, the award amount will be
prorated based on the number of credits on FADD. If a student
has less than 6 credits, the entire scholarship will be returned. (Exceptions can be granted for students in their last semester before
graduating.)

Exceptions are time-bound and may be withdrawn at any time. Those


whose spouse has passed away or are divorced must receive an exception from the Housing & Student Living Ofce to live in approved
housing. Failure to comply with approved housing guidelines will
result in a hold being placed on the student record. This hold may
prevent a student from registering for, adding, or dropping classes.
Individuals in the following categories must seek housing in the
community market: (a) those who have not been admitted as BYUIdaho students; (b) students who have been suspended for an Honor
Code violation; (c) students on academic suspension; and (d) single
students with children. All students living off campus must provide
the university with their current local street address while enrolled
at BYU-Idaho. Students giving a false address are in violation of the
Honor Code and subject to disciplinary action through the Student
Honor Ofce, which may include suspension.

Contact Information
BYUIdaho Student Financial Aid Ofce
100 Kimball Building
Rexburg, ID 83460-1610
(208) 496-1600 phone
(208) 496-6711 fax
www.byui.edu/nancial-aid

Student Living
Outside the home, the apartment represents the most natural and
effective place for you to practice living according to the teachings of
the Savior. Your genuine efforts to love and respect roommates, take
responsibility for the culture within your apartment and throughout
the complex, and honor the commitments you have made while helping others do the same will contribute to a spirit of unity, accountability, and integrity in the apartment. Student Living at BYU-Idaho is,
in essence, a pattern for gospel-centered living reective of Zion.

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
On-campus student jobs are available each semester and also during
the summer session. Job opportunities can be found online at www.
byui.edu/studentemployment. The Student Employment Web page
contains information about the job application process, required
identication, wages and other frequently asked questions. Additional
job opportunities for students can be found off campus in Rexburg,
Idaho Falls and surrounding communities.

On-Campus Housing
BYU-Idaho owned and operated apartments for men and women
are conveniently located on campus in close proximity to the student
center and many academic buildings. Utilities, Internet, and coin-op
central laundry facilities are provided in each of the six buildings.
Parking permits are available for a nominal fee.

Requirements to Work on Campus


Students are eligible to be hired for on-campus employment if they
are fully matriculated and taking 6 or more credits during on-track
semesters (or an equivalent credit load per block). Student employees
are normally limited to a maximum of 20 hours of work per week on
campus while school is in session.

Students should follow the application instructions located at the


bottom of each job posting. Resumes are required for most jobs and
students are encouraged to dress professionally when applying.

Reservations for on-campus apartments are made on a rst-comerst-serve basis. Check our web site for contract options and costs.
Contracts are available for winter, spring, and fall semesters, as well
as for summer session and Christmas break. A refundable deposit of
$75 is required when signing a contract. A onetime processing fee
of $25 will also be charged for new tenants. Students can purchase a
contract online at byui.edu/housing.

Employment Paperwork

On-Campus Cooking Style for Women and Men

Federal government regulations require proof of identity and eligibility to work in the United Sates. All documents must be original.
Laminated cards, copies and faxes are not acceptable. For a complete
list of appropriate I.D., visit the employment Web site listed above.
Student employment questions can be directed to the Human
Resources ofce located in Kimball 226, phone 496-1700 or at
humanresources@byui.edu.

Each apartment has a kitchen, living room, and bathroom. Hallway


closets provide extra storage. Cooking style apartments include two
bedrooms (four roommates) and are furnished with lofted or bunked
beds, a desk, chair and dresser per student. Kitchens are furnished
with a microwave, oven, dishwasher, refrigerator, disposals and a
kitchen table with four chairs. Students provide their own dishes
and cooking utensils. Apartments include a furnished living room
space with two couches. Main lounges include televisions and a large
gathering space.

HOUSING

On-Campus Non-Cooking for Men

Single-student Approved Housing

Each apartment has three bedrooms (six roommates) and a living


room, double-sink bathroom, and closets in the hallway for storage.
Living rooms are furnished with a sofa and loveseat. Each bedroom
is furnished with a bunk bed, desk and chair for each student and a
small refrigerator/freezer/microwave. Each bedroom also includes a
high-efciency closet with short and long hanging spaces and dresser
drawers for each student including personal vanity areas with storage
for small personal items. Main lounges have televisions and a space
for large gatherings. A Ping-Pong table, pool table, and foosball table
are also available in the upper lounge. Kitchens are not available in
the apartment, but the upper lounge offers a small kitchen for limited
use. Meal plan information is available at byui.edu/foodservices.

Job Application Procedures

All single students under the age of 30 must live in approved housing
unless they live at home with their parents. Only admitted students
are eligible to live in approved housing beginning in their rst assigned semester. Individuals enrolled in Continuing Education who
are not admitted to a track or online-only students are not eligible
to live in approved housing. Students who wish to live with a relative
must receive an exception from the Housing & Student Living Ofce
to live outside of approved housing. Exceptions are granted on a
case-by-case basis and do not constitute an approval of the dwelling,
but rather temporary approval of the living situation for the student.

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Off-Campus Housing

THE DAVID O. McKAY LIBRARY

A list of approved off-campus housing is maintained online at byui.


edu/housing with information about price, facilities, furnishings,
etc. Students desiring off-campus housing must make arrangements
directly with the landlord or manager.

The David O. McKay Librarys collections number nearly one million


items including books, CDs, DVDs periodicals, microforms and
sheet music. These collections are enhanced by hundreds of online
databases that offer e-books, digital government publications, and
millions of full-text journal articles. Items not available in the library
may be requested through interlibrary loan and received within a few
days from other libraries around the nation.

Family Housing
University Village is located on the south end of campus and offers
a choice of two-bedroom townhouses or ats. There are a limited
number of three-bedroom apartments as well. Rent includes electricity, heat, water/sewer, garbage, cable, and Internet. Each apartment
has a dishwasher, oven, refrigerator, disposal, and washer/dryer
hookups.

The library maintains more than 300 computer work stations (PCs
and Macs) with access to research materials, the Internet and e-mail,
and with production tools such as word processing and spread sheets.
Seating for approximately 1,200 users, including study carrels, tables,
and group study rooms, is available throughout the building. The
McKay Commons provides an area for individual as well group
study near personnel from the Library, Academic Technology and
Academic Support who will help with research, computer applications
and study skills.

Community Housing
There is a variety of off-campus, family apartments available in
Rexburg. A list of information concerning off-campus community
apartments may be obtained online at byui.edu/housing or from the
Housing & Student Living Ofce.

The Family History Resource Center is staffed by skilled assistants


and knowledgeable instructors to help students with their Family
History research needs.

For additional information please contact:


housing@byui.edu
(208) 496-9220

Library personnel are eager to help patrons locate and use materials.
Library orientation is offered via walking tours that begin at the
service desk near the southeast entrance and through a series of
workshops held throughout the semester, introducing resources that
are available at the McKay Library. Librarians also teach one-credit
Library Research classes each block.

University Store
The University Store provides students with textbooks, classroom
supplies, and a wide variety of discretionary and convenience items.
The following tips can help in having a successful store experience.

Students, faculty and staff use their BYUIdaho ID card to check


out books. Additional information is available at the library website,
www.lib.byui.edu.

Avoid the Rush


To avoid the lines during the busy back-to-school period, you can use
the textbook reservation system; purchase your textbooks online at
www.byuistore.com or shop early at the store. Many textbooks are
on the shelves up to three weeks prior to the beginning of classes.

Disability Services
Brigham Young University Idaho provides reasonable accommodations to qualied students with disabilities pursuant to applicable
disability law.

Returns
Textbooks pruchased at the beginning of a semester may be returned
for full refund throught the end of the day following the last day to
add/drop classes. Returned books must be in resalable condition
and a receipt must be provided for proof of purchase.

Information regarding services for BYUI students with disabilities


may be found at http://www.byui.edu/disabilities
Disability Services
156 & 158 McKay Library, East Wing
BYUIdaho
Rexburg, ID 83460-0425
(208) 496-9210
(208) 496-5210 fax
Email: disabilityservices@byui.edu

Buy Backs
The University Store buys used textbooks at the end of the semester
during test week. The number of books bought depends on estimated future course enrollments. Excess textbooks and books not being
used again on campus are bought at the same location by a wholesale
book company for resale in the national textbook market.

Check Cashing
Checks may be cashed for up to $25 over the amount of purchase. A
current student ID must be presented and the student number, local
address, and telephone number must be clearly written on all checks.
Payroll checks or large personal checks may be cashed at the Cashiers
Ofce in the Kimball Building.

Student Charges
All registered students have a charge account set up throught the
BYU-Idaho Bursars Ofce. This account can be used to purchase
textbooks, computers, and school supplies. The balance must be paid
off within thirty days of the date of purchase. Payments can be made
at the Cashiers Ofce in the Kimball Building.

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STUDENT HEALTH CARE SERVICES

COUNSELING CENTER

The Student Health Center (SHC), which is open to matriculating students and their dependents is located at the east end of the
Kimball parking lot. The SHC offers comprehensive services such
as: outpatient diagnosis and treatment, laboratory testing, radiology
with interpretation, and a pharmacy offering prescription and over
the counter medications. If you have questions, browse our website
at www.byui.edu/healthcenter, call us at (208) 496-9330, or come in
for more information.

The Brigham Young UniversityIdaho Counseling Center is located


on the second oor of the Student Health and Counseling Center.
The Counseling Center is staffed by well-trained professional counselors. Students who come to the Counseling Center receive help
with a wide range of personal problems--from adjusting to university
life, to depression and other emotional difculties.
Students are assured of reliable, professional assistance in an atmosphere of warmth and understanding where condentiality is maintained. Counseling is intended primarily for those students who can
be helped in a relatively short time. Degree seeking students admitted
to a track are eligible for services. There is no fee for counseling.

When is the SHC & Pharmacy Open?


Student Health Center hours* are as follows:
- Mondays, Wednesday, Thursdays, and Fridays: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
- Tuesdays: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (last appointment at 1:20 p.m.) and 3
p.m. to 5 p.m.
Pharmacy opens at 9 a.m.
*The SHC is closed on holidays and opened limited days during the
break between the Fall and Winter semesters.

After-Hours Care
Urgent evaluation and care may be obtained at local immediate care
centers or hospitals. Visits outside of the Student Health Center are
billed at standard rates. For the greatest cost-benet, students are
encouraged to wait until the Health Center is open for evaluation and
treatment of non-emergency problems.

Private Insurance and Student Health Plan


If a student has both the Brigham Young University- Idaho Health
Plan and private insurance, the BYU-Idaho Health Plan is the primary
coverage. The SHC does not bill private insurance companies for
medical services provided. Refer to the Financial Policies section of
the catalog for information on the Brigham Young University-Idaho
Student Health Plan. Please note that the Student Health Center
Pharmacy is able to directly bill ~90% of all major private insurance
companies for prescriptions.

Recommended Immunizations
The following immunizations are recommended for all members of
campus community to receive prior to attending classes:
MMR: All members of campus community born after 1956
Polio: International travelers to areas or countries where polio is
epidemic or endemic
Varicella: A11 members of the campus community who has not
had chicken pox
T-dap: All members of campus community
Hepatitis A: Adult high risk groups (those traveling to countries
where Hepatitis A is moderately or highly endemic)
Hepatitis B: All college students
Meningococcal Meningitis: All college students
Inuenza: All members of campus community
For more information regarding these immunizations and others recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, visit:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/college.htm.
To receive these immunizations upon arrival at campus, contact the
Student Health Center at (208) 496-9330 to schedule an appointment with the immunization nurse.

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THE TESTING CENTER

Proctored Exams at BYUIdaho

Location:
Ofce Hours:

The BYUIdaho Testing Center provides proctoring services to individuals that need to take an exam offered through another institution
or organization. The fee for this service is $5.00 payable by cash,
check or credit card at the time of testing unless the organization
pays the fee. To make arrangements for your test to be proctored at
the BYUIdaho Testing Center, please contact:

Phone:

Manwaring Center Basement


8:00am - 5:00pm
Monday Friday
(208) 496-1751

The Testing Center is located in the northwest corner of the lowest


level of the Manwaring Center. To get there, enter the west doors of
the Manwaring Center basement or go down the stairs across from
the University Store toward the BYU-Idaho Center. Testing Center
hours can be found at: http://www.byui.edu/testing-services

BYUIdaho Testing Services


525 South Center STOP 0780
Rexburg, Idaho 83460
Phone: (208) 496-1760
onlinetesting@byui.edu

Tests Administered at the BYUIdaho Testing Center


The Testing Center provides classroom testing for the University
in the form of write-on tests, multiple choice tests, computer-based
tests, or a combination of these methods. In addition, the Testing
Center provides batch scoring for multiple choice tests administered
in the classroom on answer sheets. The Testing Center has a main
testing room containing 280 desks and 70 computer stations. The
music room provides constant instrumental music to ease test anxiety
and can accommodate 130 students. In addition there are 4 accommodated testing rooms and a high-stakes testing area with 11
computer and 2 paper/pencil stations.

The Testing Center is dedicated to enhancing the learning and


teaching process while adhering closely to the National College Testing Association (NCTA) Professional Standards and Guidelines for
testing.

The BYUIdaho Testing Center also administers the following:

Automotive Service Excellence Exam (ASE)

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

COMPASS Placement Testing

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)

Law School Admissions Test (LSAT)

Miller Analogies Test (MAT)

Pearson VUE Certication Testing

Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers (Praxis)

Residual ACT

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)

BYUIdaho Online Course Exams


If you are taking BYU-Idaho online courses, you may need to take
some of your exams with an approved proctor. If you are in Rexburg
or the surrounding area you will need to take your tests in the BYUIdaho Testing Center. Otherwise, you will need to nd an approved
proctor. For more information regarding proctors go to: http://
www.byui.edu/testing-services/proctoring
It is the students responsibility to contact the proctor to set up an
appointment to take each individual exam. A request must be submitted to Online Testing each semester. Proctors or testing centers may
charge a fee to administer the exam which the student is responsible
to pay. If you have any questions regarding suitable proctors, please
contact Online Testing:
E-mail (preferred): onlinetesting@byui.edu
Phone: (208) 496-1760
Hours: 8:00 am 8:00 pm (Mountain Time)
For emergencies after hours, please contact the BYU-Idaho Help
Desk ( 208) 496-9000.

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Academic Support Services


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Academic Support Center

The writing assistants work as an objective audience for writers and


involve students directly in the critical thinking/writing process. The
Writing Center is a great resource for students especially when they
come for assistance in the early stages of the drafting process.

Introduction
The Department of Academic Support offers a variety of learning
support programs described below. These include the Tutoring Center and centers specializing in reading, writing, math, study skills, oral
presentations, and English as a second language.

MATH STUDY CENTER


The Math Study Center provides support for all math students on
campus with three separate services:
The drop-in Math Study Center is open 55 hours per week, 9 am - 5
pm on Monday and Friday, 9 am - 9 pm on Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, and 11 am - 2 pm on Saturday, (closed for devotionals and
forums) with a staff of tutors available to answer math questions for
all math classes. Test review is also available for Math 100 and 101.

Tutoring Center
Students who desire help beyond their regular classroom instruction
may seek assistance at the Tutoring Center. Tutors are chosen from
students who have succeeded academically in the class, completed a
tutor-training program, and have been approved by their department.
There is no cost for this service; however, students are encouraged
to seek rst all possible help from instructors and class help sessions
before signing up for tutoring. To sign up and schedule tutoring appointments, see the tutor request link on your my.byui.edu page.

One-on-one tutors: This service is recommended for those desiring


more individualized help than what is offered in the drop-in center.
Free tutors are available for all math classes offered at BYUIdaho.
One-on-one tutoring sessions can be scheduled online. Go to
my.byui.edu and under the links select Tutor Request. Any inquiries
can be directed to MCK 272.

Reading Center
The Reading Center offers help with basic and advanced reading
skills In the Center, tutors strive to give students an opportunity
to improve those reading strategies necessary for college success.
Students who come to the Reading Center for help, may work to
improve any of the following: vocabulary, reading comprehension,
spelling, study skills, and reading efciency. The Center offers a study
buddy to any student who needs assistance in organizing and completing assignments. Students receiving help may register for credit
(E100 or E102) or may come for no credit. Many students come to
the Reading Center for help with understanding reading assignments
in their classes. Everyone and anyone is welcome.

Math requirement preparation courses (Math 100A, Math 100B, and


Math 101) are designed to prepare students for their university math
requirements: They are taught in a lecture based setting by a dynamic
group of professors.

Study Skills Center


The Study Skills Center assists students in improving their study
practices. Students may obtain help through one-on-one counseling,
enrollment in one of several study skills courses, or through self-help
tutorials, assessments, and handouts.

English Transitional Center


The English Transitional Center (ETC) is designed to help students
with English as a Second Language (ESL) adjust to their role as
matriculated college students. The ETC helps students improve
and practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.
Through English 102 modules, students may receive individual
(peer tutor) help with pronunciation, grammar, writing, vocabulary,
reading comprehension, and conversation skills. English 102 may be
taken for credit or non credit. English 108 (orientation and verbal
communication) and English 109 (writing) are classroom setting
courses offered to ESL students. Students receive college credit
towards graduation for all of these courses.

Study skills courses include GS-102, a one credit block class designed
to help students improve their learning effectiveness, attitudes, and
motivation. Time management, retention, note taking techniques,
text book study methods, test taking strategies, and critical thinking
skills are all part of the curriculum. GS-105 College Success is a two
credit semester long course designed to help students make a smooth
transition from high school to BYU-Idaho. The purpose of the class
is to introduce students to the BYU-Idaho Learning Model, equip
students with basic college study skills, familiarize students with campus resources, and connect students with academic planning tools.
The GS-103 A-F study skills modules are six .5 credit online courses
that are four weeks in duration and offered each block. These modules include:

Writing Center
The Writing Center provides a relaxed environment for students who
want to improve their writing skills. Qualied student assistants work
individually with writers in free, twenty-minute sessions. Walk-ins are
welcome. Because the Center teaches writing as re-writing, students may expect help throughout the writing process as they move
their papers from rough drafts to the nal product. Writing assistants
and students work together to accomplish the following:

Discover and generate ideas for essays


Compose strong introductions and conclusions
Develop support through detailed, concrete discussions
Organize and focus evidence
Construct topic sentences and transitions
Write research papers, resumes and letters of applications, proposals, summaries, responses, and literary critiques
Reinforce skills through practicing on C.L.I.P.S. *a computer
program that utilizes rules, advice, examples, and computer drills
to strengthen weak areas in punctuation, grammar, and usage

Concentration
Note Taking and Listening
Thinking Skills
Textbook Study
Time Management
Test Taking Skills

To identify academic weaknesses, students may take an online self


assessment of their study practices on the following link: https://tutortrack.byui.edu/tracweb40/main.4sp?orl=S-ASSESS-byu2010
For more information, please visit us in the McKay Library, room
120F.

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Academic Support Services


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Presentation Center
The Presentation Practice Center (PPC) is designed to help students
develop, practice, and polish oral presentations in a professional and
condent manner. Help is available for speeches, presentations, and
teaching, to all university students in all majors/disciplines. The
PPC has trained tutors who coach individuals and/or groups in a
positive and constructive manner. Tutors assist the participant by
developing condence in public speaking, creating outlines, developing topics, and using technologies. Recordings of sessions can be
provided for further student evaluations and critique. Sign up for an
appointment online to meet with tutors and practice presentations in
an environment with up-to-date equipment.

Online Tutoring
Students who are not currently living in the Rexburg area have access
to several online tutoring options. Video tutorials are available on the
Academic Support Centers website to help clarify concepts that students frequently struggle with. Students also have the option to chat
with a math or writing tutor. Finally, students who need additional
help can sign up for a tutoring session with an online tutor. These
sessions utilize technologies like Skype to help simulate a face-toface tutoring experience. The services are available at no cost to the
student. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please
visit the Academic Support Centers website.

Academic Service Center (BUILD)


The Academic Service Center (BUILD) offers academically related
volunteer opportunities and services. We have eight volunteer
tutoring centers for students to get help in science and language
courses, an online volunteer tutor matching service, mentoring, and
offer advertising experience for practicum credit. We also promote
meaningful academic service in Pathway Speaking Partners, Gateway
Seminars, and Project $2k. All services offered are made possible
through student leaders and student volunteers. We support teaching and learning on campus as well as foster academic success and
personal growth for all who participate.
To nd out more about our services or to give back in academic
service please visit: www.byui.edu/AcademicSupport and select
Volunteer Opportunities.

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Academic Support Services


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

ACADEMIC DISCOVERY CENTER

Professional Preparation Services

The Academic Discovery Center (ADC) provides academic and


career services to current students, future students and alumni. In
addition to our main location in the Hyrum Manwaring Student
Center, major-specic centers are located across campus in each of
the six academic colleges. A wide variety of resources are available at
each center to help students:
Explore career and life opportunities
Declare a college major, minor and/or clusters
Plan and sequence classes
Develop career plans and career preparation skills
Find internships and full-time employment
Prepare for graduate school
Make successful career transitions

Students should prepare to present themselves successfully to potential employers and internship experience providers. The ADC provides students with workshops, literature and samples to help them
get started writing their rsums, cover letters and to prepare for
interviews. Students can then schedule an appointment with a trained
mentor to receive one-on-one feedback and guidance for applying
these principles and ideas to their specic needs and situation. Assistance is also available for certain graduate school documents, letters
and other post-graduate career paperwork. Career workshops teach
students the art of assessing and marketing their skills, networking
effectively, communicating with power, enhancing negotiation skills
and additional career-related topics.
Other Valuable Resources Available through the ADC
Career Networking Center (MC 127A) for academic research,
career research and networking
Online databases for jobs, internships and careers
Web-based tools to assist in decision making, planning and
perfecting skills

Advising Services Choosing a Major, Career and Life Options


The ADC has advising counselors and peer advisors available to help
with questions about academic and career decisions. Advisors have
many resources available to empower students as they make choices
for their future.

ACADEMIC DISCOVERY CENTERS


Academic Discovery Center Main Office

Students who are uncertain about their intended major or career are
encouraged to take advantage of Career Explorations (GS100) and
other resources available at the ADC. For example, computerized
assessments assist students in evaluating their interests, skills, abilities
and values as they relate to major and career options.
Students may declare or change majors at the colleges ADC location
in which their intended major is housed (see locations listed below).

129 Manwaring Center (208) 496-9800


academicdiscoverycenter@byui.edu
Career Exploration; Foundations; General Advising; General Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies; Internship Processing & Registration; Special Needs Advising; University Studies

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences


240 Benson (208) 496-9830
calsacademicdiscoverycenter@byui.edu
Biology; Health; Horticulture; Nursing; Plant & Animal Science; Pre-Health Professions; Agribusiness; Recreation & Human
Performance

Faculty Mentors
In addition to the Academic Discovery Center, students are also
assigned a faculty mentor upon major selection. The faculty mentoring program was established on campus to help students get direction
and support from experienced professionals. Faculty Mentors provide
guidance within the major as it relates to department outcomes,
industry standards and individual goals. Students may also visit with
their mentor for portfolio feedback, career and graduate school guidance, networking advice and other discipline-specic information.

College of Business and Communication


227 Smith (208) 496-9840
cbcacademicdiscoverycenter@byui.edu
Accounting; Business Management; Communication; Computer
Information Technology; Web Design & Development; Agribusiness

It is never too early to begin building a relationship with your faculty


mentor. Students typically begin working with their faculty mentor as
they approach their junior year. Juniors and seniors should continue
to work with their colleges ADC for graduation planning assistance.

College of Education and Human Development


309 Hinckley (208) 496-9850
cehdacademicdiscoverycenter@byui.edu
Home & Family; Psychology; Religious Education; Sociology;
Social Work; Special Education; Teacher Education

Internship Assistance and Registration


An academic internship is a valuable and integral component of
a BYUIdaho education. A BYUIdaho academic internship is a
cooperative program between the university and approved Experience
Providers (employers). The purpose of an internship is to gain
professional work experience, to apply skills and knowledge obtained
through course curriculum and to expand understanding of various
career opportunities.

College of Language and Letters


296 Smith (208) 496-9860
cllacademicdiscoverycenter@byui.edu
English; Foreign Languages & Literature; Geography; History;
Humanities & Philosophy; International Studies; Political Science;
Pre-Law

College of Performing and Visual Arts

A faculty internship coordinator is assigned within each academic


department to assist students in understanding and arranging
an academic internship. In many cases, an academic internship is
a required element for both associate and bachelors programs.
Students should meet as soon as possible with their coordinator
to understand internship requirements, prerequisites and timing
of experiences. A list of assigned internship faculty coordinators is
available on our website.

376 MC (208) 496-9870


cpvacademicdiscoverycenter@byui.edu
Art; Music; Theatre & Dance

College of Physical Sciences and Engineering


106 Austin (208) 496-9880
cpseacademicdiscoverycenter@byui.edu
Architecture & Construction; Chemistry; Computer Science &
Electrical Engineering, Geology; Interior Design; Mathematics;
Mechanical Engineering; Physics

74

Activities
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

The Student Activities Program

Volunteer

The BYU-Idaho Student Activities program invites individuals to


experience the power of acting for themselves through involvement
in student-led programs and events.

Students who desire a more active role can volunteer their time as a
coach, workshop instructor, or can take responsibility to organize an
event like a blood drive. These are just a few of the hundreds of ways
students can be involved. Lead a one-time event like a music show
or coordinate weekly efforts for ongoing programs like community
service opportunities. As students participate and volunteer they gain
new knowledge and skills that can become additional opportunities
to volunteer time in a variety of leadership roles.

Students have the opportunity to Participate, Volunteer, and Lead.


As students take action and become involved they experience what
Elder Henry B. Eyring called leadership training of the broadest and
most exciting kind. With activities and events from eight different
areas there really is something for everyone. We provide a wide range
of activities to meet the diverse interests and abilities of the students.
New ideas are always welcome and can be proposed through our
Student Activities website.

Lead
In the Activities program, students can organize, lead, and train other
students. Through this unique program of participation students
develop personal and spiritual qualities that prepare them for life.
Student leaders are given a framework where they counsel with
advisors and then act for themselves. Students take the lead in, and
are responsible for, organizing and administering every aspect of the
day-to-day operations of the program.

Participate
Each semester there are literally thousands of opportunities to get
involved. Students can choose to participate in weekly dances or
talent workshops, play a competitive or recreational sport, or learn
more about the unique opportunities in Southeast Idaho through the
outdoor program. Opportunities to serve or learn new life skills also
exist. Students can choose from a variety of things such as performing
in a show, going rock-climbing, or attending a tness class or wellness
workshop.

Make more of your educational experience at BYU-Idaho by becoming involved in the Student Activities program. To learn more contact
us at (208) 496-7300 or activities@byui.edu or visit us online at
www.byui.edu/activities.

75

Academic Programs
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Academic Programs
...no greater event ever happened in
our town, than the establishment of
the Ricks Academy on November 12,
1888. Nothing that will happen in the
future can surpass its importance. It
is the event of all events in our history,
and a hundred years from now it will
be recognized as such.
-Principal Ezra C. Dalby
The Spirit of Ricks
-David L. Crowder

76

Academic Support
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

English Transitional Center (ETC)

Department of

Academic Support

The English Transitional Center (ETC) is designed to help students


with English as a Second Language (ESL) adjust to their role as
matriculated college students. The ETC helps students improve and
practice their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.
Through English 102 modules, students may receive individual
(peer tutor) help with pronunciation, grammar, writing, vocabulary,
reading comprehension, and conversation skills. English 102 may be
taken for credit or non credit. English 108 (orientation and verbal
communication) and English 109 (writing) are classroom setting
courses offered through the Academic Support Center for second
language speaker students who have been accepted to BYUIdaho.
Students receive college credit towards graduation for all of these
courses.

Writing Center
The Writing Center provides a relaxed environment for students
to work with trained assistants to improve their writing process.
Qualied student assistants work individually with writers with free,
twenty-minute sessions. Because the Center teaches writing through
revision, students may expect help throughout the writing process
as they move papers from rough drafts to nal projects. Writing Assistants work as an objective audience and involve students directly in
the critical thinking/writing process. Writing Assistants and students
work together to discover and generate ideas, develop logical concrete support, organize and focus evidence, and format documentation.

Greg Hazard, Department Chair


Daniel Baird, Josh Davenport, Julie Engstrom, Michael Gentry
Sheldon Lawrence, Rich Llewellyn, Doug Ricks, JP Sloop, D.].
Teichert
Deborah Reed, Secretary (208) 496-4270
http://www.byui.edu/Academicsupport

The Center also helps students revise research papers, polish resumes,
letters of application, proposals, summaries, responses, and literary
critiques. In addition, the Writing Center helps students reinforce
basic skills through practice on C.L.I.P.S.* a computer program that
utilizes computer drills to strengthen weak areas in punctuation,
grammar, and usage. Walk-ins are welcome. The Center is a great
resource for students especially for those who need assistance in the
early stages of the drafting process.

Introduction
The Academic Support Center offers a variety of learning support
programs described below. These include the tutoring, reading, writing, math, study skills, presentation practice, and English transitional
centers.

Tutoring Center

Math Study Center

Students who desire help beyond their regular classroom instruction


may seek assistance at the Tutoring Center. Tutors are chosen from
students who have succeeded academically in the class, completed a
tutor-training program, and have been approved by their department.
There is no cost for this service. To sign up and schedule tutoring appointments, see the tutor request link on your my.byui.edu page.

The Math Study Center provides support for all math students on
campus with three separate services:
The drop-in Math Study Center is open 55 hours per week, 9 am - 5
pm on Monday and Friday, 9 am - 9 pm on Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, and 11 am - 2 pm on Saturday, (closed for devotionals and
forums) with a staff of tutors available to answer math questions for
all math classes. Test review is also available for Math 100 and 101.

Reading Center
The Reading Center offers help with basic and advanced reading
skills in the Center. Tutors strive to give students an opportunity
to improve those reading strategies necessary for college success.
Students who come to the Reading Center may work to improve
any of the following: vocabulary, reading comprehension, spelling,
study skills, and reading efciency. The center offers a study-buddy
to any student who needs assistance in organizing and completing
assignments. (Students receiving help may register for credit (E100
or E102) or may come for no credit). Many students come to the
Reading Center for help with understanding reading assignments in
their classes. Everyone and anyone is welcome.

One-on-one tutors: This service is recommended for those desiring


more individualized help than what is offered in the drop-in center.
Free tutors are available for all math classes offered at BYUIdaho.
One-on-one tutoring sessions can be scheduled online. Go to
my.byui.edu and under the links select Tutor Request. Any inquiries
can be directed to MCK 272.
Math requirement preparation courses (Math 100A, Math 100B, and
Math 101) are designed to prepare students for their university math
requirements: They are taught in a lecture based setting by a dynamic
group of professors.

77

Academic Support
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Academic Service Center (BUILD)

Online Tutoring

The Academic Service Center (BUILD) offers academically related


volunteer opportunities and services. We have eight volunteer
tutoring centers for students to get help in science and language
courses, an online volunteer tutor matching service, mentoring, and
offer advertising experience for practicum credit. We also promote
meaningful academic service in Pathway Speaking Partners, Gateway
Seminars, and Project $2k. All services offered are made possible
through student leaders and student volunteers. We support teaching and learning on campus as well as foster academic success and
personal growth for all who participate.

Students who are not currently living in the Rexburg area have access
to several online tutoring options. Video tutorials are available on the
Academic Support Centers website to help clarify concepts that students frequently struggle with. Students also have the option to chat
with a math or writing tutor. Finally, students who need additional
help can sign up for a tutoring session with an online tutor. These
sessions utilize technologies like Skype to help simulate a face-toface tutoring experience. The services are available at no cost to the
student. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please
visit the Academic Support Centers website.

To nd out more about our services or to give back in academic


service please visit: www.byui.edu/AcademicSupport and select
Volunteer Opportunities.

Study Skills Center


The Study Skills Center assists students in improving their study
practices. Students may obtain help through one-on-one counseling,
enrollment in one of several study skills courses, or through self-help
tutorials, assessments, and handouts.
Study skills courses include GS-102, a one-credit block class designed
to help students improve their learning effectiveness, attitudes, and
motivation. Time management, retention, note-taking techniques,
textbook study methods, test-taking strategies, and critical thinking
skills are all part of the curriculum.
GS-105 College Success is a two credit semester-long course designed to help students make a smooth transition from high school
to BYU-Idaho. The purpose of this class is to introduce students to
the BYU-Idaho Learning Model, equip students with basic college
study skills, familiarize students with campus resources, and connect
students with academic planning tools. The GS-103 A-F study skills
modules are six .5 credit online courses that are four weeks in duration and offered each block. These modules include:

Concentration
Note Taking and Listening
Thinking Skills
Textbook Study
Time Management
Test-Taking Skills

To identify academic weaknesses, students may take an online self


assessment of their study practices on the following link: https://tutortrack.byui.edu/tracweb40/main.4sp?orl=S-ASSESS-byu2010
For more information, visit us in the McKay Library, Room 120F.

Presentations Practice Center


The Presentation Practice Center (PPC) is designed to help students
develop, practice, and polish oral presentations in a professional and
condent manner. Help is available for speeches, presentations, and
teaching, to all university students in all majors/disciplines. The PPC
has trained tutors who coach individuals and/or groups in a positive
and constructive manner. Tutors assist the participant by developing
condence in public speaking, creating outlines, developing topics,
and using technologies. Recordings of sessions can be provided for
further student evaluations and critique. Sign up for an appointment
online to meet with tutors and practice presentations in an environment with up-to-date equipment.

78

Academic Support
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Course Descriptions
ENG 100 Reading Comprehension

Credits*

ing notes using the techniques learned and will learn how to use their notes for maximum
recall. This module is well suited to students who are taking other concurrent courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:2:2)

Course Fee: $5.00


Prerequisite: ACT composite score 17 or below and/or instructor referral
Emphasizes basic reading skills: vocabulary building, comprehension, and fluency.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ENG 102R Reading Assist and Textbook Comp

GS 103C Thinking Skills

(0.5-2:1:1)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $5.00
Emphasizes skills for textbook study and comprehension. Students may register for a .51.0 credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (Individual tutoring available)
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ENG 106 Basic Writing

GS 103D Textbook Study

(3:1:3)

GS 103E Time Management

(3:3:1)

(3:3:2)

Focuses on the improvement of English skills for foreign speakers. Emphasizes oral
communication.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ENG 109 ELD - Writing

GS 103F Test Skills

(3:3:1)

(1:0:3)

A study of arithmetic and applications using arithmetic. This course is only for those
needing a review of elementary school arithmetic including signed numbers, fractions,
decimals, and percents.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

MATH 100B Beginning Algebra

GS 105 College Success

(2:0:3)

GS 108A Tutor Training: General

(3:3:0)

GS 108B Tutor Training: Reading

(1:1:0)

(0.5:0:2)

GS 108C Tutor Training: Writing

This online three and a half week course is aimed at enhancing student concentration
through physiological preparation, awareness of learning style, identifying personal
internal and external distractions and applying strategies for overcoming these. Students
will learn how good concentration can enhance memory and what can be done to retain
information learned. Note: This module is well suited to students who are taking other
concurrent courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

GS 103B Note Taking and Listening

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Tutor training to meet student needs and national certification. Training in establishing
rapport, assessing needs, teaching study habits, and helping students accept responsibility.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

This class is designed to help students improve their learning effectiveness, attitudes and
motivation. Time management, memorization methods, note taking skills, textbook study
methods, test taking strategies, and critical thinking are all part of the curriculum.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

GS 103A Concentration and Memorization

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Tutor training to meet student needs and national certification. Training in establishing
rapport, assessing needs, teaching study habits and helping students accept responsiblity.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Fundamental operations of algebra, properties of exponents, solving linear, fractional,


radical and quadratic equations, graphing linear and quadratic functions. Math 101 may
not be taken for credit if FDMAT 110 has been completed with a grade of B: or higher.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

GS 102 Study Skills

(2:2:0)

This class is designed to help students make a smooth transition from high school to
BYU-Idaho. The purpose of the class is to introduce students to the BYU-Idaho Learning
Model, equip students with basic college study skills, familiarize students with campus
resources, and connect students with academic planning tools.
(Winter and Fall)

The arithmetic of integers and rational numbers as well as an introduction to algebra.


This course is recommended for those needing basic algebra before taking higher math
courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

MATH 101 Intermediate Algebra

(0.5:2:0)

This online three and a half week course is aimed at teaching students how to prepare
and study for exams. Students will learn how to predict possible test questions and why
its important to identify the learning outcomes of their courses. They will also be taught
basic test taking tips and specific strategies for answering multiple-choice, true-false,
and essay type tests. Students will learn the importance of performing a post exam
survey after each test. Note: This module is well suited to students who are taking other
concurrent courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Focuses on the improvement of English writing skills for foreign speakers. Emphasizes
written communication. Prepares students for FDENG 101.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

MATH 100A Arithmetic

(0.5:0:2)

This online three and a half week course is aimed at helping students to value their use
of time. Students will learn how to realize their goals through the use of semester, weekly,
and daily charts and schedules wherein priorities are set and carried out. Students will
learn how to schedule their study time for maximum efficiency and strategies for overcoming procrastination. Note: This module is well suited to students who are taking other
concurrent courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $5.00


Develops reading skills for improved textbook comprehension in the arts and sciences.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ENG 108 ELD - Oral

(0.5:0:2)

This online three and a half week course is aimed at helping students to analyze their text
books and how to study them more effectively. Students will learn the SQ3R approach
to textbook reading, textbook marking strategies, and how to improve vocabulary and
basic speed reading techniques. Theyll have the opportunity to try these methods in
their other classes. Note: This module IS well suited to students who have no concurrent
courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $5.00


Emphasizes basic writing conventions: effective sentences, paragraphs, and short essays.
Recommended for individuals with an ACT English score of 17 or below.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ENG 107 College Reading

(0.5:0:2)

This online three and a half week course is aimed at improving the critical thinking skills
of college students. Students will examine their paradigms and why they think the way
they do. They will learn to question information received to identify fallacies in reasoning.
They will also learn basic problem solving skills for life and for their problem based
courses. Note: This module IS well suited to students who have no concurrent courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Tutor training to meet student needs and national certification. Training in establishing
rapport, assessing needs, teaching study habits, and helping students accept responsibility.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

GS 108D Tutor Training: Math

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Tutor training to meet students needs and content area certification. Training in
establishing rapport, assessing needs, teaching study habits, and helping students accept
responsibility
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(0.5:0:2)

This online three and a half week course is aimed at improving listening and note taking
skills. Students will learn to identify important points in classroom lectures and learn
note taking strategies for increasing the quality of their notes. Students will practice tak-

79
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Accounting
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Department of

Professionalism
6) Students will demonstrate integrity and ethical behavior.
7) Students will demonstrate the ability to work productively and
appropriately in teams with diverse individuals as both a member
and a leader.
8) Students will employ effective written and oral communication
with professional delivery.

Accounting

Additional Information
1. As an integrated major, Accounting not only prepares you with
job-ready skills in accounting but also allows the selection of other
courses in packaging a bachelors degree to t your individual
needs and goals. Students with Accounting degrees are some of
the most sought after by recruiters.
2. To bridge the gap between academics and industry, the Accounting major requires a semester internship during your junior or
senior year. By then, you will have sufcient accounting training
to make a valuable contribution as an intern.
3. The coursework will stress analytical, interpretive, and communication skills. Rather than specializing in tax, nancial reporting or
other regulatory requirements, you will have sufcient background to recognize and anticipate important accounting issues
and the training to do research to nd the answers needed by the
decision-making team.
4. Students who major in Accounting must also choose an approved
cluster. The list of approved clusters is found in the major requirements on the following page.

Darryl Foutz, Department Chair


G. Adna Ames, Todd Blanchard, Don Campbell, Rob Clarke,
Darryl Foutz, Stephen Hunt, Kevin Packard, Keith Patterson, Lee
Saathoff, Glade Tew

For more information, see the Accounting home page at http://


www.byui.edu/accounting.

Denise Rydalch, Secretary (208) 496-3840


http://www.byui.edu/accounting//

CPA Considerations

Introduction

Upon graduation from BYU-Idaho, students desiring CPA certication should consider seeking a masters degree from another
university.

The primary focus of the Accounting Program at BYU-Idaho is to


assist in the mission of the University to prepare young people to
be disciples of the Savior and effective leaders in their homes, in the
Church, and in the communities where they live. Graduates of the
Accounting Program will be prepared to succeed in graduate studies
and make immediate contributions in the workforce. Students will
participate in a variety of learning experiences with their peers and
professionally credentialed faculty to develop the functional knowledge, technical skills, and professionalism necessary to be successful
leaders in their homes, the Church, and their professions.

Specic state requirements can be found via the AICPA website:


http://www.aicpa.org/

Signicant and desired outcomes of the program are as follows:


Functional Knowledge
1) Students will demonstrate entry-level competency in nancial and
managerial accounting, accounting systems, tax, and auditing.
2) Students will prepare and analyze accounting information in accordance with current professional standards.
3) Students will employ decision-making abilities by identifying
issues, analyzing alternatives, and choosing reasoned solutions to
problems.
Technical Skills
4) Students will use research skills to access, understand, and apply
relevant professional accounting guidance.
5) Students will demonstrate effective use of technology to support
accounting information.

80

Accounting
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Accounting (600)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Major Core Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
ACCTG 301
ACCTG 302
ACCTG 321
ACCTG 333
ACCTG 344
cont. in next column

3
3
3
3
3
3
3

cont. from previous column


ACCTG 398R
3
ACCTG 456
3
ACCTG 499
3
B 275
3
B 401
3
ECON 150
3
ECON 151
3
MATH 221A
3
45

Major Elective Courses


Take 2 courses:
ACCTG 312
3
ACCTG 322
3
ACCTG 403
3
6

Required Cluster
Students must complete one
mandatory cluster from the
following list:
2101-General Business (for
Accounting Majors)**
2304-General Economics
(for Accounting and Business
Majors)
2501-Programming
2504-Project Lifecycle

Program Notes:
A 2.5 GPA for major courses is
required for graduation

**Preferred Cluster

Total Major Credits=63


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=17
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Accounting Minor (121)


Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Minor Courses
Minor Core Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
ACCTG 301
ACCTG 321

3
3
3
3
12

Minor Elective Courses


Take 4 courses:
ACCTG 302
3
ACCTG 312
3
ACCTG 322
3
ACCTG 333
3
ACCTG 344
3
ACCTG 398R
3
ACCTG 403
3
ACCTG 456
3
ACCTG 499
3
12

Program Notes:
No Double Counting of Minor courses except for ACCTG 201 and ACCTG 202.

Total Minor Credits=24


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Accounting Concentration (D 138)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Concentration Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
B 275
ECON 150
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
ACCTG 301
ACCTG 312
ACCTG 321
ACCTG 344
MATH 221A

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
27

Elective Courses
Take 6 credits:
ACCTG 302
ACCTG 322
ACCTG 333
ACCTG 398R
ACCTG 403
ACCTG 456

3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Program Notes:

Total Concentration Credits=36


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

81

Spring-Fall---- YES

Accounting
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Basic Accounting Certicate (C 100)


Certicate Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Certicate Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 180
ACCTG 205
B 220
CIT 110

3
2
3
3
11

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 course:
B 275
ECON 150

Program Notes:
3
3
3

Total Certicate Credits=14

Accounting Pre-approved Clusters


Financial Accounting (For Non-Business Majors)
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
Financial Accounting
ACCTG 202
Managerial Accounting
ACCTG 301
Intermediate Financial Accounting 1
ACCTG 302
Intermediate Financial Accounting 2
Total Credits

3
3
3
3
12

Tax Accounting (For Non-Business Majors)


Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
Financial Accounting
ACCTG 202
Managerial Accounting
ACCTG 321
Income Tax 1
ACCTG 322
Income Tax 2
Total Credits

3
3
3
3
12

Financial Accounting (For Business Majors)


Take these courses:
ACCTG 301
Intermediate Financial Accounting 1
ACCTG 302
Intermediate Financial Accounting 2
ACCTG 344
Auditing
ACCTG 403
Advanced Accounting
Total Credits

2000

2002

Tax Accounting (For Business Majors)


Take these courses:
ACCTG 301
Intermediate Financial Accounting 1
ACCTG 302
Intermediate Financial Accounting 2
ACCTG 321
Income Tax 1
ACCTG 322
Income Tax 2
Total Credits

2003
3
3
3
3
12
2004
3
3
3
3
12

No Double Counting of major, minor or cluster courses

Course Descriptions
ACCTG 100 Introduction to Accounting

Credits*

ACCTG 205 Accounting Software

(2:2:0)

This course is the first university level accounting course most accounting students will
take. It highlights the five major fields of accounting emphasis: the accounting cycle,
business decision making, taxation, fraud detection and prevention, and financial
statement auditing. Students gain knowledge and practice in each of these fundamental
fields as part of a learning team using case studies and experiential learning.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 180 Survey of Accounting

ACCTG 221R Volunteer Income Tax Assistance

(3:3:0)

ACCTG 301 Intermediate Financial Accounting I

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 and ACCTG 202


This course builds upon the principles learned in ACCTG 201 and 202. The course is
designed to give students an in-depth introduction to financial accounting standards
and the framework underlying those standards, the measurement and reporting of the
elements of the financial statements, and the use of the time value of money concepts in
accounting. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in applying technical
concepts to selected homework problems. Students will also be expected to use the
tools of the trade to research-assigned case studies.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Requirement: 20 credits and 2.5 GPA


This course is designed to give students an introduction to financial accounting and
reporting concepts including an overview of the accounting cycle, financial statements,
related disclosures, and the ethical responsibility of accountants in business. Students
will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in applying technical concepts to selected
homework problems. Students will also need to demonstrate writing proficiency in their
assignments.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 202 Managerial Accounting

(2:2:0)

Repeatable Course: may be taken a maximum of 2 times


Prerequisites: ACCTG 180 or ACCTG 201
During the first few weeks, students learn basic income tax laws, after which they must
pass an IRS exam. For the remainder of the course, students apply their knowledge in a
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) service center on campus, where they help other
students and community members prepare their federal and state tax returns.
(Winter)

For non-business majors and certain specialized business programs. This is an


introduction to financial and managerial accounting principles with exposure to basic
accounting statements, processes, and management applications. This course should not
be taken by Accounting Majors or Business Majors.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 201 Financial Accounting

(2:2:0)

Prerequisites: ACCTG 180 or ACCTG 201


This class takes an in-depth look at accounting software using Intuit QuickBooks Pro.
Topics include invoicing, inventory control, payments, and a complete setup of a new and
existing company. An in-depth accounting knowledge is not required.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 302 Intermediate Financial Accounting II

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: ACCTG 301


This course is a continuation of ACCTG 301, Intermediate Financial Accounting I. The
course is designed to give students an in-depth introduction to those financial accounting
principles and concepts governing the measurement and reporting of assets and
liabilities. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in applying technical
concepts to selected homework problems using Excel. Students will also be expected to
use the tools of the trade to research assigned case studies.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: ACCTG 201


Managerial Accounting is concerned with providing information to managers who direct
and control business operations. The information is used primarily to analyze business
problems, identify alternatives, and make appropriate decisions. This course is designed
to introduce you to a variety of topics in managerial accounting and help you learn the
mechanics of common managerial calculations; use spreadsheets to capture accounting
data, analyze business problems, and develop alternative plans; make informed
decisions; and communicate your analysis and decision effectively.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

82
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Accounting
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
ACCTG 312 Cost Accounting

(3:3:0)

ACCTG 403 Advanced Accounting

Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 and ACCTG 202


This course builds upon concepts learned in ACCTG 201 and ACCTG 202. It emphasizes
the use of cost data in the decision making process and seeks to sharpen students'
analytical, practical, and interpretative skills. The student will study the impact of cost
allocation in business decisions using various costing systems and methodologies.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 321 Income Taxation I

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 and ACCTG 202


This course is a study of the basic features of the federal income tax laws as applied to
individual taxpayers. It emphasizes compliance procedures, the determination of taxable
income, and the determination of the tax liability. The students learn to communicate
using common income tax vocabulary and terminology and obtain practical experience
with tax compliance by preparing income tax returns.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 322 Income Taxation II

ACCTG 456 Accounting Information Systems

(3:3:0)

ACCTG 499 Accounting Capstone

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ACCTG 301


This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of current practices and
standards in professional auditing and assurance services. The focus is on the practice of
auditing in the public accounting context, but will also include discussion of other types of
auditing such as fraud auditing and assurance services. Students will study United States
GAAS as defined by both the AICPA and the PCAOB.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 398R Professional Internship

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ACCTG 302 and ACCTG 398R


This accounting capstone course adopts the case method of instruction to give students
practice in applying their accounting skills in solving a variety of business problems.
Instead of a one-right-answer approach, the cases contain ambiguities and complexities
which model the reality of the business world.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $26.00


Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 and ACCTG 202
This course focuses on developing analysis and problem solving skills using Microsoft
Excel. The two main tools used in this course are Excel and Visual Basic for Applications
(VBA). The first section of the course develops skills in solving complex financial problems
using Excel. Students learn to understand and diagram complex financial problems,
identify their key components, order the calculations, and perform the appropriate
calculations. The next section of the course focuses on building custom procedures and
functions in Excel, using VBA, to provide customized solutions and Excel applications.
Students learn the fundamentals of programming including sequence, selection, and
iteration and will build a complex application using these constructs. In the final section
of the course students will become familiar with and be able to demonstrate the use of
Excel's advanced functions.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 344 Auditing

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: ACCTG 398R


This course is designed to give students an opportunity to learn about accounting
information systems by providing the opportunity to design and develop an accounting
information system using the Event-Based Accounting technique, focusing on the Revenue
cycle, Purchase cycle, Payroll cycle, and Production cycle. This approach is designed to
help students understand the purpose of accounting information systems, their strengths
and weaknesses, how they are constructed, what and how data is captured and stored,
and how information to facilitate decision making is retrieved.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: ACCTG 321


This course builds on the foundation established in ACCTG 321 and provides an
opportunity for students to acquire an understanding of more complex tax topics. This
course focuses on tax planning and research, corporate taxation, and taxation of flowthrough entities (i.e., partnerships and S corporations). Assignments help students to
develop the skills necessary for effective oral and written communication, tax research,
tax return preparation, and teamwork. Successful students learn to think like a tax accountant and planner.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ACCTG 333 Advanced Spreadsheet Application

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: ACCTG 302


This course is designed to introduce students to advanced financial accounting principles
and concepts governing purchase accounting, consolidated financial statements,
derivative instruments, and governmental entities. Students will be expected to
demonstrate proficiency in applying technical concepts to selected problems and utilizing
Microsoft Excel to simplify the complexity of consolidating the financial statements of
related entities. Students will also be expected to keep current in accounting trends and
techniques and expected to use the tools of the trade to research assigned problems.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisites: ACCTG 301 and ACCTG 321
Professional internships correlate actual work experience with accounting and business
classroom theory. Internships approved by the accounting internship director provide
students with knowledge of career opportunities and how they might prepare to take
advantage of them. The ideal internship would take place during the winter semester (the
accounting busy season) of the junior or senior year and would be off-site. Two hundred
and seventy (270) hours of quality accounting work experience is required.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

83
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Animal and Food Science majors may choose from the following
degrees:

Department of

Animal and Food Science

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science (645)


Animal Science (645) is designed to prepare students to work in
animal production agriculture, associated animal agribusiness, or to
competitively compete for entrance into veterinary school or other
related Animal Science graduate programs. Students will learn animal
anatomy and physiology, nutrition, reproduction, animal health,
genetics, meat science, animal and land interactions, and the fundamentals of animal production systems. Graduates will be prepared to
enter the workforce or continue in graduate programs.

Bachelor of Science in Food Science (648)


Food science is the use of science and engineering principles to study
food, its preservation, and processing. The Food Science degree
(648) prepares students to work in food product development, food
processing, quality assurance, and regulatory agencies in food safety,
or to enter graduate school. Students in this program will study food
chemistry and microbiology, food processing and safety, and the
analysis of food using chemical, physical, and sensory techniques.

Jim Lamb, Department Chair


Amy Baeza, Amanda Christensen, Kathy Jo Cook, Matt Dredge,
Jeff Hamblin, Shaun Harris, Kerry Huber, Jay Keller, Jim Lamb,
Kerry Powell, Zeph Quirl, Neal Ricks, Willy Twitchell, Steve
Winkel

Minor in Animal Science (140)


The animal science minor is for those students NOT majoring in a
current animal science degree but wishing to receive concentrated
training which can be coupled with a complementary major.

Kim Chidester, Ofce Assistant, Livestock Center (208) 496-4521

Department Description
The Department of Animal and Food Science prepares students to
understand and contribute to key requirements of human existence:
domesticated animal production, food processing and preservation,
and human nutrition. Three conditions in the world create a critical
need for study in these related elds: an increasing world population,
a decreasing amount of agricultural lands and a need to improve
human health and nutrition. These realities present a great variety of
opportunities for well-trained workers to serve mankind.

Minor in Nutrition (242)


The nutrition minor is designed to enhance the employability and
success of students planning on pursuing jobs that require a basic
background in nutrition. Those that would benet professionally
from complimenting their education with a nutrition minor might include those entering the Healthcare eld, Education and others. The
course selection is designed to provide a foundation in the physiology
and chemistry of nutrition, but also the practical skills that are needed
to plan and implement healthy dietary practices.

Students in these majors are focused on the scientic principles


of animal care, production of food animals, and the preservation,
processing, and presentation of that food. Learning occurs in these
areas of study through close interaction between faculty and students,
numerous opportunities for hands-on experiences, and related work
experiences or internships.
Employment opportunities for students with a background in animal
and food science are excellent and always in demand. Examples of
careers include livestock operation managers, livestock consultants,
food product developers, food safety workers, food scientists, pharmaceutical company representatives, animal health workers, meat and
dairy processing workers, genetics specialists, government agency
workers, etc.

84

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

AAS in Beef Production Management (347)


Take required Foundation courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
AS 150
AS 165
AS 247
CHEM 105
Take these courses:
AS 215
AS 215L
AS 220
AS 330
AS 336
AS 360
AS 398R

Program Notes:

Complete 1 module:
3
3
3
4
13
3
1
3
2
3
4
1
17

Reproduction Module
Take these courses:
AS 330
2
AS 333
3
AS 430
4
AS 490R
1-3
10
Nutrition Module
Take these courses:
AS 320
AS 425
AGRON 330

Meats Module
Take these courses:
AS 355
AS 465
AS 490R*

4
3
1-3
10

*AS 490R must be taken for


3 credits
3
4
3
10

Range Management
Module
Take these courses:
BIO 208
BIO 225
BIO 352

4
3
3
10

Total Major Credits=40


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=3
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Animal Science (645)


Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
AS 150
AS 215
AS 215L
AS 220
AS 247
AS 300
AS 336
AS 398R
Take 1 course:
MATH 109
*FDMAT 110
Take these courses:
CHEM 105
CHEM 106
MATH 221B
Take 1 course:
AS 488
AS 495

3
3
1
3
3
2
3
1
19
5
3
3
4
4
3
11
3
3
3

SUPPLEMENTAL
MODULES
Complete 1 module
Food Animal Production
Module
Take these courses:
AS 165
3
AS 315
4
AS 333
3
AS 425
4
14
Take 1 course:
AS 350
AS 360
AS 370
Take 1 course:
BIO 225
AS 330
AS 430

4
4
4
4
3
2
4
2

Animal Health Module


Take these courses:
AS 234
AS 315
AS 333
AS 425
Take 1 course:
AS 340
AS 350
AS 360
AS 370
Meats Module
Take these courses:
AS 165
AS 333
AS 355
AS 465
AS 490R**
Take 1 course:
AS 350
AS 360

2
4
3
4
13
4
4
4
4
4

3
3
4
3
1-3
15

Nutrition Module
Take these courses:
BIO 225
AS 234
AS 333
AS 425
AS 490R***
Take 1 course:
AS 340
AS 350
AS 360
AS 370
Pre Vet Module
Take these courses:
BIO 181
BIO 375****
CHEM 351
CHEM 481
PH 105

Program Notes:
3
2
3
4
1-3
15
4
4
4
4
4

!! Recommended for Pre-Vet


Track Students. You must complete FDMAT 108 pr FDMAT
108T
*You must complete FDMAT
108 pr FDMAT 108T
**Take AS 490R for 2 credits
***Take AS 490R for 3 credits
****This course has prerequisites of Bio 180 and Bio 181

4
3
4
4
4
19

4
4
4

Total Major Credits=53


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=27
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

85

Spring-Fall---- YES

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Food Science (648)


Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 221
3
BIO 222
1
CHEM 105
4
FS 120
3
NUTR 150
3
14

FOOD SCIENCE
COURSES
Take these courses:
FS 320
FS 340
FS 350
FS 360
FS 435
FS 440
FS 450
FS 490
FS 498R

Take 1 course:
AS 465
FS 430
2
2
3
3
4
3
3
4
3
27

MATH & PHYSICS


MODULES
Take 1 course:
PH 105
PH 121

3
3
3

CHEMISTRY MODULES
Take these courses:
CHEM 106
4
CHEM 351
4
CHEM 481
3
11

Take this course:


MATH 221B
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 112
MATH 119

Program Notes:

4
3
3
3
3
4
4
4

Total Major Credits=65


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=15
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor in Animal Science (140)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
AS 150
AS 220
AS 247
AS 336
CHEM 105

3
3
3
3
4
16

Take 1 course:
AS 340
AS 350
AS 360
AS 370

4
4
4
4
4

SUPPLEMENTAL
COURSES
Take 4 credits:
AS 165
3
AS 215
3
AS 215L
1
AS 234
2
AS 315
4
cont. in next column

cont. from previous column


AS 330
2
AS 333
3
AS 340
4
AS 350
4
AS 355
4
AS 360
4
AS 370
4
4

Program Notes:

Total Minor Credits=24


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor in Nutrition (242)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
NUTR 150
NUTR 200
NUTR 330
NUTR 400

3
3
3
3
12

Select 1 option:
CHEM 101
CHEM 101L
or
CHEM 105

3
1
4
4

SUPPLEMENTAL
COURSES
Take 9 credits:
CA 160
CA 310
CHEM 150
FS 120
NUTR 350

Program Notes:

3
3
5
2
3
9

Total Minor Credits=25


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

86

Spring-Fall---- YES

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Animal Science Concentration (D 111)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than C- for Concentration Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
AS 150
AS 215
AS 215L
AS 220
AS 300
AS 315
AS 333
AS 336
CHEM 105

3
3
1
3
2
4
3
3
4
26

SUPPLEMENTAL
COURSES
Take 1 course:
AS 340
AS 350
AS 360
AS 370

INTERDISCIPLINARY
COURSES
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

4
4
4
4
4

Program Notes:

Total Concentration Credits=33


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Animal and Food Science Pre-approved Clusters


Equine
Take these courses:
AS 220
Feeds and Nutrition
AS 247
Animal Handling
AS 340
Horse Production
AS 425
Advanced Nutrition
Total Credits
Animal Health
Take these courses:
AS 215
Anatomy/Physiology
AS 215L
Anatomy/Physiology Lab
AS 234
Veterinary Parasitology
AS 315
Animal Health
Take one course:
AS 340
Horse Production
AS 350
Small Animal Production
AS 360
Beef Production
AS 370
Dairy Production
Total Credits
Animal Reproduction
Take these courses:
AS 330
Articial Insemination
AS 333
Livestock Genetics
AS 336
Animal Reproduction
AS 430
Advanced Reproduction
Total Credits
Natural Resources
Take 4 courses:
BIO 225
Range Ecology 1
BIO 302
Ecology
BIO 325
Range Ecology 2
BIO 455
Rangeland Inventory & Analysis Lab
BIO 466
Rangeland Vegitation Manipulation &
Improvement
Total Credits
Animal Production
Take these courses:
AS 150
Introduction to Livestock
AS 165
Livestock and Carcass
AS 220
Feeds and Nutrition
Take one course:
AS 340
Horse Production
AS 350
Small Animal Production
AS 360
Beef Production
AS 370
Dairy Production
Total Credits

1001

Animal Nutrition
Take these courses:
AGRON 330 Forage Crops
AS 220
Feeds and Nutrition
AS 425
Advanced Nutrition
CHEM 106
General Chemistry
Total Credits
Beef Production
Take these courses:
AS 220
Feeds and Nutrition
AS 360
Beef Production
Take 5 - 7 credits:
AS 247
Animal Handling
AS 330
Articial Insemination
AS 333
Livestock Genetics
AS 336
Animal Reproduction
AS 355
Principles of Meat Science
AS 425
Advanced Nutrition
AS 430
Advanced Reproduction
Total Credits

3
3
4
4
14
1002
3
1
2
4
4
4
4
4
14
1003

Human Nutrition
Take these courses:
NUTR 150
Essentials of Human Nutrition
NUTR 200
Nutrient Metabolism
Take 6 credits:
CHEM 150* Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry
NUTR 330
Nutrition in the Life Cycle
NUTR 350*
Sports Nutrition
NUTR 400
Nutritional Biochemistry
Total Credits

2
3
3
4
12
1004
3
4
3
3

Food and Nutrition


Take this course:
NUTR 150
Essentials of Human Nutrition
Take 1 course:
CA 160
Culinary Fundamentals
HFED 110
Introductory Foods
Take 7 credits:
CA 260*
Applied Culinary Fundamentals
CA 310*
Culinary Nutrition
FS 120
Introduction to Food Service Sanitation
HFED 240*
Meal Management
NUTR 200*
Nutrient Metabolism
NUTR 330*
Nutrition in the Life Cycle
Total Credits

3
12
1010
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
13

1011
3
3
4
4
14
1012
3
4
3
2
3
3
4
4
4
12
1020
3
3
5
3
3
3
12
1021
3
3
2
3
3
2
2
3
3
12

*Course requires a prerequisite. See course description for more information

87

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Course Descriptions
AS 150 Introduction to Livestock Production

Credits*

AS 320 Feedlot Management

(3:3:0)

Overview of various livestock enterprises, including beef, dairy, sheep, swine and horse
industries. Basic principles used in the various industries are presented. Emphasis given to
current and future trends in animal science.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

AS 165 Live Animal and Carcass Evaluation

(3:2:2)

AS 330 Artificial Insemination

Course Fees: $10.00


This course provides an integrated approach to the principles and procedures involved in
the evaluation, grading, and selection of meat animals and their carcasses. The goal is to
provide students tools that will allow students to make accurate, objective measurement
for assessing the economically important traits in order to determine value or merit of
beef cattle, sheep, and hogs.
(Fall, Winter)

AS 215 Anatomy and Physiology

AS 333 Livestock Genetics

(3:3:0)

AS 336 Animal Reproduction

(1:0:2)

AS 340 Horse Production

(3:3:0)

(2:2:1)

AS 350 Small Animal Production

(3:3:1)

AS 355 Principles of Meat Science

(4:3:3)

Course Fees: $25.00


Meat science incorporates everything from growth and development of beef, swine and
sheep, to case ready beef products. This class is designed to expose students to every
aspect of meat science. Emphasis will be placed on carcass merits and value and will
include grading, evaluation and appraisal of meat. This course includes techniques of
slaughter, fabrication, labeling, food safety and finished retail product.
(Fall, Winter)

(2:2:0)

Provides instruction and insight into issues in food animal production. Provides instruction
on how to interpret food animal research. Provides instruction on how to summarize and
present research data.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

AS 315 Animal Health

(4:3:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: AS 150, AS 220, and AS 336
This course provides a hands-on, in-depth study of how to economically and efficiently
produce swine, sheep, goats, and poultry. The goal of this course is for the students to
learn how to transform their investment of dollars and time into profitable and rewarding
farm enterprise. The course will be centered on production traits of swine, sheep, goats,
as well as poultry.
(Winter semester, even catalog years)

Course Fees: $30.00


Animal handling and behavior is an introductory approach to the technique of pressure
and release for low stress livestock handling. Students who complete this course develop
a higher level of communication with all species of animals including cattle, sheep,
horses, and humans. Students will discuss theory in a classroom setting while gaining
hands on experience in laboratory.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

AS 300 Animal Science Seminar

(4:3:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: AS 215
This class will discuss production practices in the selection, care, and evaluation
of horses. Designed to provide students with better understanding of the modern
equine industry. Students will learn principles of horse health, breeds of horses, their
characteristics, and their uses, as well as equine behavior, anatomy and physiology,
nutrition, and reproduction. Students will also be able to create a business plan that
involves the equine field that they are interested in.
(Winter semester, odd catalog years)

Introduction to common veterinary parasites. This course covers the life cycles,
pathogenesis, identification, and treatment of the common parasites of most domestic
animals. This course will also discuss the relationship between parasites and the overall
health of the host animal. In addition the zoonotic potential of disease transmission by
parasites will be explored.
(Fall, Spring)

AS 247 Animal Handling and Behavior

(3:3:1)

Study of reproduction of cattle, sheep, horses, and pigs. Instruction in basic reproductive
anatomy, and the processes involved in prenatal development, puberty, conception, and
parturition. Application of reproductive principles as used in estrus synchronization,
insemination, ultrasonography and embryo transfer.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

Prerequisite: CHEM 105


The study of the principles of animal nutrition as applied to nutrient digestion and
metabolism, feedstuff characteristics, and principles for formulating nutritionally balanced
diets.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

AS 234 Veterinary Parasitology

(3:3:0)

Study of animal breeding principles involved in improving livestock through genetic


selection methods. Exploration of genetic theories and mating systems currently used in
animal agriculture.
(Fall, Winter)

Laboratory experience covering microscopic cellular anatomy, cadaver dissection and live
animal palpation. Two hours per week with hands on study of animal systems that pair to
the lecture portion of the class.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

AS 220 Feeds and Nutrition

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Development of manual skills required for cattle insemination using frozen semen.
Subject matter also includes principles related to selection criteria for sires, semen
storage, estrus detection and synchronization. Class time is combined with practice time
using live cattle.
(Fall,Spring)

Course Fees: $20.00


A systems approach to the study of animal anatomy and physiology. Includes structure
and function of the cell, skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive and reproductive systems.
Practical applications of anatomy and physiology and their relation to diseases and
disorders.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

AS 215L Anatomy and Physiology Lab

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: AS 220 and AS 315


Advanced preparation in the feeding of cattle for slaughter. This course will have an
emphasis on the nutrition and management of feedlot cattle and related health and
economic considerations. Covers the beef enterprise from weaning to market and relates
closely to beef cow-calf production.
(Check with department for scheduling)

AS 360 Beef Production

(4:3:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: AS 150, AS 220, and AS 336
Applied techniques and principles of beef production and management. Lectures will
be designed to help students better understand the demands, trends, and management
tools of the beef industry and they will receive hands on training concerning health
care, reproduction, nutrition, cattle selection, breeds, best management practices, and
economical tools used in management decisions.
(Fall, Spring)

(4:3:3)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: AS 215
Instruction in the areas of animal health evaluation, livestock disease prevention, and
treatment; leading to the development of the basic skills required to evaluate animal
health status and programs.
(Fall, Spring)

88
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
AS 370 Dairy Production

(4:3:2)

AS 495 Animal Capstone B

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: AS 150 and AS 220
The study of dairy cattle husbandry practices, lactation, health, milk production, and
marketing.
(Check with department for scheduling)

AS 398R Internship

(1:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


An internship is a cooperative program between BYU-Idaho Department of Animal and
Food Science and approved Experience Providers (employers). Internships provide
actual work experience that will add to or enhance the career preparation and learning
of individual students. Internships approved by the department or college internships
coordinator provide students with knowledge of career opportunities and actual work
experience in preparation for employment after graduation. The ideal internship would
take place during the students off track semester; however allowances can be made to
adjust schedules to meet specific internships. Students will not be allowed to start and
finish their internships during the 7 week summer break. Required internships should
generally be a stepping stone into your future career. Internships are typically 40-hour a
week positions that last for a length of a semester (14weeks). A maximum of one credit
hour will be available for a single approved internship.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

AS 425 Advanced Nutrition

ASV 110 Introduction to Lab Animal Science

ASV 120 Veterinary Medical Terminology

(4:3:2)

(4:3:3)

ASV 130 Animal Care and Management 1

(3:2:3)

Students are taught the care and management of dogs and cats. The safe care and
management of the animals dealt with helps prevent many potentially frustrating
situations. Technicians who can properly restrain and handle animals become invaluable
to the veterinary team and help build client satisfaction. Topics covered will include:
behavior, feeding, housing, restraint, handling and procedures.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $25.00


This course includes techniques of the modern meat processing industry and its use of
science and technology. It will include fabrication, processing, preservation, sanitation,
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP), and utilization of manufactured and
processed meat. Course will provide actual laboratory preparation of processed meats
and by-products produced in todays meat packing industry. Students will be familiarized
with several key and general concepts relating to the safe production and marketing of
processed meats.
(Spring)

ASV 131 Animal Care and Management 2

AS 488 Animal Science Capstone A

ASV 140 Zoonoses

(3:3:2)

This course is a continuation of ASV 130, dealing with agricultural animals and potentially
more procedures with cats and dogs. Students are taught the care and management
of agricultural animals including goats, sheep, pigs, cows, and horses. The safe care
and management of the animals dealt with helps prevent many potentially frustrating
situations. Technicians who can properly restrain and handle animals become invaluable
to the veterinary team and help build client satisfaction. Topics covered will include:
behavior, feeding, housing, restraint, and handling.
(Winter)

(3:2:3)

Prerequisite: AS 336
Co-Requisite: AS 425
Ranch and Land Management Planning is an Animal Science Capstone that is a systems
class integrating land health, animal behavior, communications, and economics. The central focus will be land stewardship and the interaction of animal and people in creating
an economically sustainable operation. Students will gain insight in identifying values in
land resources as well as how to magnify those values while creating sustainability. Skills
in communication for both leadership and management will be instituted for strategizing
land health goals.
(Check with department for scheduling)

AS 490R Research Practicum

(2:2:0)

Students are introduced to the terminology and basic scientific concepts necessary for
subsequent course work in the Veterinary Science Technology major. Understanding the
terminology is important for everyday situations. Proper use of the terminology is also
essential for viable communication in the workplace. Topics will include: Ethics, Safety,
Public Health issues, Anatomy and Physiology, Diagnostic Imaging, Dentistry Behavior, and
Nursing Care of many animal species. Breed identification of domestic animals will also
be covered.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisites: AS 336 and AS 330
Development of skills involved in livestock reproduction technologies such as estrus
synchronization, pregnancy detection, ultrasonography, and embryo transfer. Cattle are the
focus species.
(Spring)

AS 465 Processed Meats

(2:2:1)

Course Fees: $35.00


Students are introduced to the area of laboratory medicine and some of the animals
used in the laboratory. Research using animals is a large industry. A basic knowledge
of laboratory animal science is an important part of the foundation for veterinary
technicians. Topics covered in this course include housing, biosecurity, handling,
restraining and various procedures and sampling techniques.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

Course Fees: $5.00


Prerequisites: AS 220 and AS 336
Provide instruction in the area of advanced animal nutrition with an emphasis on nutrient
digestion mechanics, absorption, and cellular metabolism.
(Fall, Winter)

AS 430 Applied Reproduction

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: AS 336
Co-requisitie: AS 425
In a capstone experience, students will be challenged to integrate their accumulated
knowledge and technical and social skills in order to identify and solve a problem
relevant to issues encountered by professionals in their chosen discipline, and to communicate the results of their efforts to their peers. In doing so, students will have the
opportunity to demonstrate their ability to adapt to professional situations. It is hoped
that this experience will stimulate students appreciation of the need for lifelong learning
and initiate professional and personal liaisons.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

(1:1:0)

Prerequisites: BIO 221 and BIO 222


Students will learn the importance of disease control and prevention. Some diseases
dealt with in the veterinary profession are zoonotic and of public health concern. These
diseases, transmission, prevention, treatment, and epidemiology will be covered.
(Winter)

ASV 150 Veterinary Clinical Pathology 1

(3:2:3)

This course introduces basic laboratory procedures including specimen collection


and preservation, hematology, urinalysis, and fecal flotation. Hematology will include
preparation and performance of packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, white
blood cell count, and red blood cell counts. Preparation and staining of blood smears
with performance of differential white blood cell counts will also be learned. Urinalysis
will include collection methods, performance of physical and chemical tests, as well as
introduction to microscopic evaluation of urine.
(Winter)

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


This course is designed to reinforce and improve upon selected occupational competencies. Independent study, student mentored research, special assignment, and/or
advanced inquiry in an area of special interest. Registration approved after consultation
with instructor in charge (upon request).
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

ASV 160 Veterinary Pharmacology and Hospital Supply

(2:2:0)

Veterinary technology students will learn the supplies common to veterinary facilities
including, medical, surgical, and basic supplies necessary for every day operation.
The stocking and managing of inventory will be covered. The course will also focus on
pharmacology and the appropriate ordering, managing, labeling, and dispensing of drugs.
(Winter)

89
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
ASV 251 Veterinary Clinical Pathology 2

(2:2:1)

CA 160 Culinary Fundamentals

Prerequisite: ASV 150


This course is a continuation of ASV 150, Veterinary Clinical Pathology I. This course
emphasizes the coagulation cascade, its regulation and stimulation, as well as panels
used in the clinical setting to test this process. Clinical chemistry panels and the
interpretation of those panels will also be covered. The course will also cover the
preparation, collection, and performance or submittal of selected serological tests.
(Fall)

ASV 252 Veterinary Clinical Pathology 3

CA 233 Pastry

(3:2:3)

CA 234 Cake Decorating

(3:2:3)

CA 240 Confectionary

CA 260 Applied Culinary Fundamentals

(2:1:2)

CA 280 International Foods

(1:2:2)

CA 290R Special Studies

(1-6:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $15.00
Prerequisites: CA 131 or CA 160
Culinary Arts approved projects.
(Fall, Winter)

(2:1:2)

CA 298 Internship

(1-6:0:0)

Culinary Arts internship


(Fall, Winter, Spring)

CA 310 Culinary Nutrition

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisite: CA 160
This course is designed to train culinary professionals to use nutritional principles to
evaluate and modify menus and recipes, as well as respond knowledgeably to consumer
questions and needs.
(Winter Spring)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: FDENG 101 and FDMAT 108


This course will deal with the basics of small business operations, such as veterinary
clinics. It will take a deeper look into practice management software and the capabilities
of various software packages to do more than keep patient records. This will include
billing, accounts receivable, maintaining inventory of office and veterinary supplies, and
pharmaceuticals. Training will also include scheduling appointments for patient visits.
(Winter)

CA 131 Bakery

(2:1:3)

Course Fees: $60.00


Prerequisite: CA 160
This course is designed to introduce students to various cuisines of the world. During the
course the student will prepare foods from various regions of the world while discussing
the history of food as well as contemporary food trends.
(Fall, Winter, Spring - Rotating)

Prerequisite: ASV 120


This course will be procedural based. The student will learn how to properly calculate
dosages for medication and the different routes used in the administration of those
medications. There will be review of the different injection techniques such as SQ, IM,
IV, and IP. The placement of various IV catheters will be covered, demonstrated, and
performed. Performing ultrasonographic exams and the indications for those exams will
also be covered. Record keeping will be an integral part of this course.
(Winter)

ASV 295 Veterinary Office Management

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $60.00


Prerequisite: CA 160
This course is designed to continue the students learning of culinary fundamentals,
including the basic skills of advanced culinary arts such as garde manger, international
foods, and kitchen management.
(Fall, Winter)

Prerequisite: AS 215
This course reviews restraint and handling techniques of large animals (agricultural
animals) learned in ASV 131. A review of common procedures performed on large
animals such as injections, venipuncture, and medicating will be covered. The course will
emphasize the assistance in the medical and surgical care of injured or sick animals. This
will include the preparation of large animals for surgical or medical procedures and the
proper restraint needed to perform the given procedures.
(Fall)

ASV 290 Veterinary Medical Nursing

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $70.00


A course in basic candy making, sugar work, and techniques of working with chocolate.
(Fall, Winter, Spring - Rotating)

Prerequisite: ASV 270


This course is a continuation of ASV 270 and will continue to cover patient admittance,
preoperative workup and care, aseptic technique, surgical prep, anesthesia, surgical
assisting, and postoperative care. An emphasis will be placed on anesthesia and the
monitoring performed while a patient is anesthetized. An emphasis will also be placed on
preoperative radiographs, intraoperative radiographs, and postoperative radiographs.
(Winter)

ASV 280 Large Animal Nursing

(2:1:3)

Course Fees: $65.00


Prerequisite: CA 131
This course teaches the fundamentals of making special occasion and wedding cakes at a
beginning to intermediate skill level.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

This course will cover what is done with the animal from admittance to the veterinary
facility for surgery to dismissal of the animal. Topics covered will be: admission, history
collection, physical exam, preoperative blood work, preoperative medications (analgesics,
antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and preanesthetics), surgical prep, aseptic technique,
surgical assisting, postoperative care, and dismissal of the patient with client education
for aftercare and follow-up. Surgical instrumentation and preparation of the surgical
packs will also be covered
(Fall)

ASV 271 Veterinary Surgical Nurse 2

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisite: CA 131
An intermediate course in baking, desserts, and dessert presentation.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

Prerequisite: ASV 251


This course is a continuation of the two previous Veterinary Clinical Pathology courses,
ASV 150 and ASV 251. The emphasis of ASV 252 will be clinical microbiology, clinical
mycology, and necropsy techniques. This course will also have continuation of hematology,
chemistry panels, urinalysis, and serology testing.
(Winter)

ASV 270 Veterinary Surgical Nurse 1

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $40.00


This course is designed to teach students basic kitchen skills necessary for proper and
efficient food production.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

CA 334 Advanced Cake Decorating

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $75.00


Prerequisites: CA 234 and CA 131
This course teaches intermediate to advanced skills for special occasion and wedding
cakes.
(Fall, Winter)

(3:2:3)

CA 350 Food Service Management

Course Fees: $50.00


A beginning course in baking which develops practical skills through theory and hands-on
experience.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $80.00


Prerequisite: CA 160
Concepts of managing a food service operation, i.e. cost controls, data analysis, and
future forecasting.
(Fall, Winter)

90
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Animal and Food Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
CA 370 Garde Manger

(2:1:3)

FS 450 Food Chemistry

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisite: CA 260
An advanced course in the application of Garde Manger principles.
(Fall, Winter, Spring - Rotating)

CA 372 Advanced Presentation

(2:1:3)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: CA 260; or CA 160 and CA 233
This course is designed to advance student learning in the various aspects of presentation
used in culinary arts.
(Fall, Winter, Spring - Rotating)

FS 120 Introduction to Food and Food Safety

FS 490 Product Development

(3:2:3)

FS 498R Food Science Internship

(2:2:0)

(2:1:3)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: FS 120 and MATH 221B
This course covers the principles of sensory evaluation including theory, sensory physiology and psychology, experimental methods, applications, and statistical analysis.
(Fall, Spring)

FS 350 Food Analysis

NUTR 112 Nutrition and Young Children

(3:2:3)

NUTR 150 Essentials of Human Nutrition

NUTR 200 Nutrient Metabolism

(3:2:3)

NUTR 330 Nutrition in the Life Cycle

(3:2:3)

NUTR 350 Sports Nutrition

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $5.00


Prerequisites: NUTR 150 and NUTR 200 or ESS 375
Exploration into the nutritional recommendations for competitive and recreational sports.
Evaluation of dietary regimens for competitive sports, energy needs and weight control.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

(4:1:8)

NUTR 400 Nutritional Biochemistry

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: NUTR 150; and NUTR 200 or BIO 180 or CHEM 150
Advanced study of nutrition science including, carbohydrate, protein and lipid digestion,
absorption and metabolism, and their relevance in various disease states; acid base
balance; and the physiology of obesity.
(Fall)

(3:0:0)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisites: PH 105 and MATH 119; or MATH 119 and PH 121
Students in this class will learn how basic engineering principles such as mass and energy
balances, fluid flow, and unit operations apply to food processing. Packaging materials
and waste management will also be studied.
(Fall, Winter)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: NUTR 150


Review of the nutritional requirements during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood,
adolescence, adulthood and the aging process.
(Winter, Spring)

Course Fees: $60.00


Prerequisites: FS 320 and CHEM 351
Concurrent Requisites: BIO 221 and BIO 222
Students in this class will develop an understanding of the basic principles of dairy
chemistry and processing as well as put theory into practice by successfully making a
variety of common dairy products.
(Fall, Winter)

FS 440 Food Engineering

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: NUTR 150; and CHEM 101 or CHEM 105 or CHEM 106
Nutrient oriented study of nutrition facts and principles; metabolic consequences of nutrient intakes; techniques of communicating valid nutrition concepts.
(Fall, Winter)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisite: FS 320
In this course, students will study the theory and application of preservation methods
common to fruits and vegetables such as canning, freezing, drying, and freeze drying.
(Fall, Spring)

FS 435 Dairy Processing

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $5.00


Food oriented study of nutrition facts and principles as a basis for dietary choices;
consequences of food choices; scientific examination of controversial topics.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisites: FS 120, BIO 221, and BIO 222
This is the study of the interactions of microorganisms in food in the following areas: fermentation of food, principals of food preservation, foodborne diseases, and food spoilage.
(Winter, Spring)

FS 430 Fruit and Vegetable Processing

(2:2:0)

Concepts of human nutrition, nutrition education, menu planning, sanitation and food
safety with emphasis on preschool children.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

Course Fees: $30.00


Prerequisite: CHEM 351
The purpose of this course is to prepare students in all the principles, methods and
techniques necessary for quantitative physical and chemical analysis of food products
and ingredients essential for success in the food industry.
(Fall, Winter)

FS 360 Food Microbiology

(3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


An internship is a cooperative program between BYU-Idaho Department of Animal and
Food Science and approved Experience providers (employers). Internships provide actual
work experience that will add to or enhance the career preparation and learning of individual students. Internships approved by the department or college internship coordinator
provide students with knowledge of career opportunities and actual work experience in
preparation for employment after graduation. The ideal internship would take place during
the students off track semester, however, allowances can be made to adjust schedules to
meet specific internships. Students will not be allowed to start and finish their internship
during the 7 week summer break. Required internships should generally be a stepping
stone into your future career. Internships are typically 40-hour a week positions that last
for the length of a semester (14 weeks).
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

Prerequisite: FS 120
This course explores the history, development, and enforcement of laws and regulations
that affect the food processing industry and food consumers. Emphasis for the course
will be placed on the impact of legal and regulatory issues relating to food quality,
safety, formulation, labeling, marketing, grading, product and process development, and
international trade.
(Fall, Spring)

FS 340 Applied Sensory Science

(4:3:3)

Course Fees: $60.00


Prerequisites: FS 320, FS 340, FS 350, and FS 450. Also take FS 430 or FS 435.
This course is designed to provide the opportunity and challenge for students to integrate
the theory and training of various food science and technology courses to develop viable
food products. This is the IFT-required senior level capstone course that incorporates and
unifies principles from the total undergraduate curriculum.
(Fall, Winter)

Course Fees: $40.00


This course provides an overview of the food industry and its related disciplines. It also
introduces the principles of food microbiology, food safety, good manufacturing practices,
and provides an opportunity for ServSafe Certification.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)

FS 320 Food Laws, Regulations, and Additives

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisite: CHEM 351
This course explains how water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals react and interact in foods. Further emphasis will be placed on biochemical and functional
properties, enzymes, and food additives.
(Winter, Spring)

91

* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Department of

The Horticulture Program is a nationally recognized and accredited


leader in horticulture education preparing students for expanding
career opportunities in nurseries, garden centers, orist shops, oral
wholesalers, plant brokers, landscape contractors, lawn service companies, interior plant companies, greenhouses, golf courses, parks, botanical gardens, landscape management, event planning, design build,
plant production, plant breeding, horticulture sales and marketing,
and horticulture supply companies.

Applied Plant Science

The Agronomy, Crop, Soil Science Program provides excellent


connections with local and international Agricultural companies
doing research through the farm on campus, as well as coordinating
internship and employment opportunities throughout their
network in the industry. Employment opportunities for students
with a background in Agriculture are excellent. Examples of career
opportunities available are specialists in crop consulting, plant
genetics, soil and water, environmental science, GPS/GIS, machinery
management, agronomy, education, food processing, plant nutrition,
food safety, range resource management, government agency workers
and researchers. Internships are an integral component of the various
programs in the Applied Plant Science Department. They are a
doorway to the industry, and provide students with practical exposure
to real world applications of plant studies.
The Agriculture Technology Program prepares students for a
career in the technical and mechanical world of agriculture. Rapid
mechanization of the industry over the past two generations has
made shop work a larger and more essential part of agriculture
operations. Students will attain skills needed to diagnose, repair,
maintain all equipment related to agriculture systems. In addition,
learning the technology of global positioning systems and
geographical information systems will prepare technicians in all
aspects of equipment operation and maintenance.

Ben Romney, Department Chair


Greg Blaser, Daniel Dewey, Nels Hansen, Chris D. Humphreys,
Byron John, Reese Nelson, Ben Romney, Ross Spackman, Larry
Stephens, Jerry Toll, Jared Williams, Blake Willis
Forrest Barnes, Greenhouse/Garden Manager
Alvin Lusk, Ag Resource Manager

Students who seek advanced degrees nd opportunities in education,


research, extension, and government service. Several graduates of
this department have gone on to advanced degrees in Landscape
Architecture, Agriculture Engineering, Agronomy, and other industry
certication. Students who like plants, have a desire to improve the
world around them, and enjoy applying the law of the harvest will
benet from their time in the programs of Applied Plant Science.
From seed to bouquet, from farm to table, the principles of the
plants potential are the core of this Department.

Paula Arnold, Dept. Secretary, Benson 144, (208) 496-4581


http://www.byui.edu/applied-plant-science/

Department Description
The Department of Applied Plant Science emphasizes the relationship between the art and science of plant culture. This relationship
affects production on thousands of acres as well as on a smaller,
more urban scale in residential gardens and in the ornamental use of
plants where art is specically emphasized. In all these areas, plants
are an integral part of the human experience. The emphasis on both
production and aesthetics in the departments degrees and programs
has prophetic roots:
There is a great work for the Saints to do. Progress, and improve
upon and make beautiful everything around you. Cultivate the
earth, and cultivate your minds. Build cities, adorn your habitations, make gardens, orchards, and vineyards, and render the earth
so pleasant that when you look upon your labors you may do so with
pleasure, and that angels may delight to come and visit your beautiful locations. Brigham Young, Deseret News, Aug. 8, 1860, 177.
Students in these programs apply scientic knowledge to practical,
hands-on experience in the Thomas E Ricks Gardens and
Greenhouses, the Hill View Farm, the Plant Shop, the Ag Shop (Ag
Engineering Building), and The Flower Center. They also provide
produce and ornamentation for the BYU Idaho campus, events,
community and local farmers markets. The department focuses
on learning how plants grow, how to propagate them, and how to
prepare them for consumer use. From basic plant science, to artistic
embellishments for life events, this department offers a buffet of
opportunities to improve the quality of life.

92

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

AAS in Plant Science and Technology (365)


Take required Foundation courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
APS 122
APS 220
APS 220L
AGTEC 220
AGTEC 286

4
3
1
3
3
14

SUPPLEMENTAL
COURSES
Take 29 credits:
AGBUS 210
AGBUS 347
AGRON 310
AGRON 321
AGRON 325
AGRON 330
AGRON 350
AGRON 397
AGRON 425
AGRON 435
AGRON 440
cont. in next column

3
3
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
3
3

cont. from previous column


AGRON 445
2
AGRON 455
3
AGRON 460
3
AGRON 470
3
AGTEC 122
2
AGTEC 124
2
AGTEC 132
2
AGTEC 186
1
AGTEC 230
2
AGTEC 294
3
AGTEC 301
4
AGTEC 320
3
AGTEC 335
4
cont. in next column

cont. from previous column


AGTEC 360
4
AGTEC 474
3
AGTEC 486
3
APS 299R
.5
APS 339R
1
APS 412
2
APS 413
1
APS 465
3
WELD 101
3
29

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=43


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

AAS in Horticulture (372)


Take required Foundations courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
APS 122
APS 220
APS 220L
APS 412
HORT 230
HORT 297R
HORT 319
HORT 320
HORT 321
HORT 322
HORT 324

4
3
1
2
3
1
3
3
2
2
2
26

SEMINAR
Repeat 2 times:
APS 299R

0.5
1

INTERNSHIP
Take this course for 1 credit:
APS 298R
1-5
1

ELECTIVE COURSES
Take 15 credits:
AGBUS 232
AGTEC 220
APS 339R
APS 413
HORT 252
HORT 311
HORT 325
HORT 329
HORT 334
HORT 335
cont. in next column

3
3
1
1
4
2
2
2
3
3

cont. from previous column


HORT 338R
3
HORT 340
2
HORT 351
2
HORT 410
3
HORT 420
3
HORT 430
3
HORT 455
2
HORT 460
2
HORT 461
2
HORT 470
2
15

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=43


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

93

Spring-Fall---- YES

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

AAS in Floral Design (373)


Take required Foundations courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
APS 122
APS 339R
HORT 230
HORT 287R
HORT 297R
HORT 324
HORT 325
HORT 335
HORT 336
HORT 338R
HORT 435

4
1
3
1
1
2
2
3
2
3
3
25

SEMINAR
Repeat 2 times:
APS 299R

0.5
1

INTERNSHIP
Take this course for 1 credit:
APS 298R
1-5
1

ELECTIVE COURSES
Take 16 credits:
AGBUS 232
3
APS 220
3
APS 220L
1
APS 290R
1-3
APS 339R
1
APS 412
2
APS 413
1
ART 101
3
AUTO 100
1
AUTO 125
1
AUTO 126
1
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column:


B 275
3
B 283
3
CA 131
3
HFED 110
2
HFED 140
3
HORT 230
3
HORT 287R
1
HORT 334
3
HORT 338R
3
HORT 460
2
SPAN 101
4
16

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=43


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Agronomy, Crop and Soil Sciences (642)


Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
APS 122
4
APS 220
3
APS 220L
1
APS 300R
1
APS 398R
1-5
CHEM 101
3
13

Take these courses:


AGRON 321
AGRON 325
AGRON 397
AGRON 470
AGTEC 286

4
3
2
3
3
15

AGRONOMY COURSES
Take 23 credits:
AGRON 330
3
AGRON 350
3
AGRON 425
3
AGRON 430
3
AGRON 435
3
AGRON 440
3
AGRON 445
2
AGRON 455
3
AGRON 460
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


APS 412
2
APS 413
1
APS 465
3
BIO 331
3
23
Take 3 credits:
AGTEC 186
AGTEC 220
AGTEC 320
AGTEC 486

Program Notes:

1
3
3
3
3

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

94

Spring-Fall---- YES

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Agriculture Technology (644)


Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
AGRON 122
3
AGTEC 220
3
6
Take these courses:
AGTEC 186
AGTEC 320

1
3
4

Take these courses:


AGED 460
AGTEC 286
AGTEC 335
AGTEC 360
AGTEC 474
APS 398R
WELD 101
SEMINAR
Repeat 2 times:
APS 299R

2
3
4
4
3
1-5
3
20

AG TECHNOLOGY
COURSES
Take 8 credits:
AGTEC 122
AGTEC 132
AGTEC 230
AGTEC 294
AGTEC 301

2
2
2
3
4
8

.5
1

SUPPLEMENTAL
COURSES
Take 15 credits:
AGBUS 210
AGBUS 347
AGRON 330
AGTEC 124
AGTEC 125
AGTEC 486
B 220
B 370
CONST 230
CONST 240
CONST 250
ME 231

Program Notes:

3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Horticulture
Design/Build/Maintain Emphasis (695-14)
Take required Foundations courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these course:
APS 122
APS 220
APS 220L
APS 339R
APS 412
HORT 230
HORT 297R
HORT 320
HORT 322
HORT 324
HORT 335

4
3
1
1
2
3
1
3
2
2
3
25

SEMINAR
Repeat 2 times:
APS 299R

0.5
1

INTERNSHIP
Take this course for 1 credit:
APS 298R
1-5
1

EMPHASIS COURSES
Take these courses:
HORT 252
4
HORT 319
3
HORT 321
2
HORT 329
2
HORT 340
2
HORT 351
2
HORT 410
3
HORT 430
3
HORT 453
3
24

ELECTIVE COURSES
Take 4 credits:
AGBUS 232
3
AGTEC 220
3
APS 290R
1-3
APS 339R
1
APS 413
1
ENG 316
3
HORT 311
2
HORT 325
2
HORT 334
3
HORT 336
2
HORT 338R
3
HORT 350R
1
HORT 420
3
HORT 455
2
HORT 460
2
HORT 461
2
HORT 470
2
4

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

95

Spring-Fall---- YES

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Horticulture
Production Emphasis (695-15)
Take required Foundations courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these course:
APS 122
APS 220
APS 220L
APS 339R
APS 412
HORT 230
HORT 297R
HORT 320
HORT 322
HORT 324
HORT 335

4
3
1
1
2
3
1
3
2
2
3
25

SEMINAR
Repeat 2 times:
APS 299R

EMPHASIS COURSES
Take these courses:
AGBUS 232
3
HORT 321
2
HORT 325
2
HORT 334
3
HORT 375
1
HORT 420
3
HORT 455
2
HORT 460
2
HORT 461
2
HORT 470
2
22

0.5
1

INTERNSHIP
Take this course for 1 credit:
APS 298R
1-5
1

ELECTIVE COURSES
Take 6 credits:
AGTEC 220
3
APS 290R
1-3
APS 339R
1
APS 413
1
HORT 252
4
HORT 311
2
HORT 319
3
HORT 329
2
HORT 336
2
HORT 338R
3
HORT 340
2
HORT 350R
1
HORT 351
2
HORT 410
3
HORT 430
3
HORT 453
3
6

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Horticulture
Floral Design Emphasis (695-16)
Take required Foundations courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
APS 122
APS 220
APS 220L
APS 339R
APS 412
HORT 230
HORT 297R
HORT 320
HORT 322
HORT 324
HORT 335

4
3
1
1
2
3
1
3
2
2
3
25

SEMINAR
Repeat 2 times:
APS 299R

0.5
1

INTERNSHIP
Take this course for 1 credit:
APS 298R
1-5
1
EMPHASIS COURSES
Take these courses:
APS 339R
1
HORT 325
2
HORT 336
2
HORT 338R
3
HORT 435
3
HORT 436
1
HORT 437
1
HORT 460
2
15

ELECTIVE COURSES
Take 10 credits:
AGBUS 232
3
AGTEC 220
3
APS 290R
1-3
APS 339R
1
APS 413
1
AUTO 100
1
AUTO 125
1
AUTO 126
1
HFED 110
2
HFED 140
3
HORT 252
4
HORT 287R
1
HORT 311
2
HORT 319
3
HORT 321
2
HORT 329
2
HORT 334
3
HORT 338R
3
HORT 340
2
HORT 351
2
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


HORT 410
3
HORT 420
3
HORT 430
3
HORT 453
3
HORT 455
2
HORT 461
2
HORT 470
2
WELD 101
3
10

Program Notes:

SPECIAL PROBLEMS
Take this course for 1 credit:
APS 290R
1-3
1
FLORAL COURSES
Repeat this course 2 times:
HORT 287R
1
2

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

96

Spring-Fall---- YES

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Agriculture Education Composite (825)


Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
EDUCATION CORE
Take these courses:
ED 200
2
ED 304
3
ED 461
3
ED 492
10
SPED 360
2
20

CORE COURSES
Take 1 course:
ACCTG 180
AGBUS 201
Take these courses:
AGBUS 210
AGBUS 347
AGED 297
AGED 380
AGED 450
AGED 452
AGED 460
APS 122
APS 220
APS 220L
AGTEC 122
AGTEC 286
AS 150
AS 220
AS 336
HORT 320
HORT 334
WELD 101

TECHNOLOGY
COURSES
Take 4 credits:
AGTEC 124
AGTEC 220
AGTEC 335
AGTEC 360

3
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
3
2
4
3
1
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
49

ANIMAL SCIENCE
COURSES
Take 1 course:
AS 340
AS 360
AS 370

Program Notes:

2
3
4
4
4

4
4
4
4

Total Major Credits=60


Education Core Credits=20
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- NO

Minor in Horticulture (204)


Minor Requirements
CORE COURSES
Take this course:
APS 122
Take 1 course:
HORT 230
HORT 335

4
4
3
3
3

ELECTIVE COURSES
Take 19 credits:
APS 299R
.5
APS 339R
1
APS 412
2
APS 413
1
HORT 230
3
HORT 252
4
HORT 287R
1
HORT 311
2
HORT 319
3
HORT 320
3
HORT 321
2
HORT 322
2
HORT 324
2
HORT 325
2
HORT 329
2
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


HORT 334
3
HORT 335
3
HORT 336
2
HORT 338R
3
HORT 340
2
HORT 410
3
HORT 420
3
HORT 430
3
HORT 435
3
HORT 455
2
HORT 460
2
HORT 461
2
HORT 470
2
19

Program Notes:
No double counting of minor courses.

Total Minor Credits=26


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

97

Spring-Fall---- YES

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Geographical Information Systems (GIS)


Technology Minor (222)
Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
CIT 111
MATH 221A, 221B or
221C
GEOG 140
GEOG 230

3
3
1
3
10

Advanced/Applied
Courses
Take 1 course:
AGTEC 286
GEOG 340
GEOL 340

GIS Project
Take 1 course*:
AGTEC 486
GEOL 440R

3
3
3

*A directed studies or other


project oriented class in a
students chosen discipline may
be substituted for this requirement with the Geography
Chairs permission.

Supplemental Courses
Take 2 courses:
AGRON 425
CIT 160
CIT 260
COMM 130
GEOG 240

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
6

3
3
3
3

Total Major Credits=22


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor in Plant Science and Technology (243)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses
CORE COURSES
Take these courses:
APS 122
APS 220
APS 220L
AGTEC 220

4
3
1
3
11

SUPPLEMENTAL
COURSES
Take 14 credits:
AGRON 310
AGRON 321
AGRON 330
AGRON 350
AGRON 425
AGRON 440
Cont. next column

3
4
3
3
3
3

Cont. from previous column


AGRON 445
2
AGRON 460
3
AGTEC 132
2
AGTEC 186
1
AGTEC 230
2
AGTEC 294
3
AGTEC 301
4
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


AGTEC 335
4
AGTEC 360
4
APS 465
3
14

Program Notes:

Total Minor Credits=25


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

98

Spring-Fall---- YES

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Applied Plant Science Pre-approved Clusters
Event Planning
Take 9 credits:
HORT 287R
HORT 325
HORT 335
HORT 338R
Take 1 course:
AGBUS 232
B 283
B 383
COMM 339
Horticulture
Take 12 credits:
APS 122
APS 299R
APS 412
APS 413
HORT 103
HORT 230
HORT 252
HORT 287R
HORT 311
HORT 319
HORT 320
HORT 321
HORT 322
HORT 324
HORT 325
HORT 329
HORT 334
HORT 335
HORT 336
HORT 338R
HORT 340
HORT 410
HORT 420
HORT 430
HORT 455
HORT 460
HORT 461
HORT 470

1500
Flower Center
Interiorscaping
Flower Arranging
Wedding and Event Planning
Ag Sales and Merchandising
Small Business Creation
Large Business Creation
Events Management
Total Credits

Crop Production
Take these courses:
HORT 103
Home Gardening
AGRON 330 Forage Crops
AGRON 435 Potato Science
AGRON 455 Cereal Crops
Total Credits

1
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
12

Crop Protection
Take these courses:
AGRON 321 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition
AGRON 325 Irrigation and Drainage
AGRON 445 Crop Advisor Certication
APS 412
Integrated Pest Management
APS 413
Crop Protection
Total Credits

1501
Introduction to Plant Science
4
Seminar (repeatable)
0.5
Integrated Pest Management
2
Pesticide Application
1
Home Gardening
3
Introduction to Architecture/Landscape Design3
Landscape Construction
4
Flower Center (repeatable)
1
Introduction to Arboriculture
2
Landscape Management
3
Plant Propagation
3
Deciduous Plant Identication
2
Evergreen Plant Identication
2
Flower Identication
2
Interiorscaping
2
Irrigation
2
Greenhouse Operations
3
Flower Arranging
3
Cultural Design Inuence
2
Wedding and Event Planning
3
Landscape Computer Operations
2
Turfgrass Management
3
Advanced Propagation
3
Advanced Landscape Design
3
Nursery Management
2
Cut Flower Crops
2
Potted Plants
2
Landscaping with Fruit and Vegetables
2
Total Credits
12

Natural Resources
Take 4 courses:
BIO 225
Range Management
BIO 302
Ecology
BIO 325
Range Ecology Systems Management
BIO 455
Rangeland Inventory & Analysis Lab
BIO 466
Rangeland Vegetation Manipulation &
Improvement
Total Credits
Soil Management
Take these courses:
APS 220
Introduction to Soils
AGRON 321 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition
AGRON 325 Irrigation and Drainage
AGRON 425 Soil Management
Total Credits

1502
3
4
3
3

4
3
2
2
1
12

Agriculture Technology
Take these courses:
AGTEC 320
Agricultural Machinery
AGTEC 335
Electronic Systems Diagnostics and Repairs
AGTEC 360
Agricultural Hydraulics
AGTEC 474
Mechanical Systems Analysis
Total Credits

3
4
4
3
14

1506
3
3
3

1507

GIS
Take this courses:
GEOL 140
Introduction to GPS

Take 1 course:
AGTEC 286
GEOG 230

Introduction to GIS
Introduction to GIS

3
3

Take 1 course:
MATH 221A
MATH 221B
MATH 221C

Business Statistics
Biostatistics
Social Studies Statistics

3
3
3

Advanced GIS in Agriculture and Natural


Resources
Advanced GIS and Spatial Analysis
Introduction to GIS for Geoscientists

3
3
3

Take 1 course:
CIT 111
CIT 160
COMM 130

3
4
3
3
13

1505

3
3
3
12

GEOG 340
GEOL 340
1503

3
3
3
3
12

GIS in Agriculture and Natural Resources


Take these courses:
AGTEC 286
Introduction to GIS
AGTEC 474
Mechanical Systems Analysis
AGTEC 486
Advanced GIS in Agriculture and Natural
Resources
Take 1 course:
CIT 225
Database Design and Development
GEOG 240
Maps and Remote Sensing
GEOG 340
Advanced GIS and Spatial Analysis
Total Credits

Take 1 course:
AGTEC 486

3
12

1504

Introduction to Databases
Introduction to Programming
Visual Media
Total Credits

6801

3
3
3
13

Some courses may have a prerequisite that must be met in order to take that
course.

99

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Course Descriptions
AGED 297 Ag Education Practicum

Credits*

AGRON 425 Soil Management

(2:1:2)

The purpose of this course is to allow those students interested in teaching high school
agriculture to gain an early field experience. Students will be required to spend at least
40 hours in the semester observing and participating in lecture and laboratory activities.
(Winter, Fall)

AGED 380 Connecting Education and Employment

AGRON 430 Soil Taxonomy and Genesis

(3:3:0)

AGED 450 Curriculum Development/Assessment in Occupational Education


(2:2:0)

AGRON 435 Potato Science

AGRON 440 Crop Physiology

(3:3:0)

(2:1:2)

This course is to help students develop specific skill sets in agricultural curriculum
laboratory exercises. The course will focus on the experiential method of teaching and
developing skills that can be transferred to secondary students relative to agricultural
course work.
(Spring, Fall)

AGRON 445 Crop Advisor Certification

(3:3:1)

AGRON 455 Cereal Crops

(4:3:2)

AGRON 460 Plant Pathology

(3:3:0)

(3:2:2)

This course will help plant growers to understand the potential for plant disease, to
recognize symptoms of disease, understand the life cycle of the pathogen, and find a way
to control, minimize or eliminate it.
(Spring)

Course Fees: $25.00


Principles and application of soil, water and plant relations, agricultural meteorology, and
irrigation.
(Spring, Fall)

AGRON 330 Forage Crops

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Crop history and biology of major cereal crops. Class will cover both warm and cool
season cereal crops. Introduction of principles involved in cereal chemistry, development
and processing.
(Winter, Spring)

Prerequisites: AGRON 122 or AGRON 220


Field identification and measurement of plant nutrient deficiencies, petiole analysis and
crop fertilization methods.
(Winter, Spring)

AGRON 325 Irrigation and Drainage

(2:2:0)

This course is a capstone class for all Agronomy majors. The international Certified Crop
Advisor program is designed to provide qualified credentials to professionals in Agriculture
who consult and make nutrient and pesticide recommendations to Grower/Producers.
Completion of the course prepares students to take two required examinations for CCA
certification.
(Winter, Spring)

Shows the importance of fruit and vegetable crops in U.S. agriculture, and their contribution to the national economy and the human diet.
(Spring, Fall)

AGRON 321 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition

(3:3:1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or higher; and either AGRON 122 or BIO 100
The science and application of crop science and physiology. Apply cellular and biochemical analysis of plant physiology to the more applied aspects of plant growth specifically
agricultural crops.
(Winter, Fall)

Competence in teaching methods, along with competence in the technical subject matter
is essential to be effective as a teacher of agriculture.
(Winter, Fall)

AGRON 310 Tree Fruit and Vegetable Management

(3:3:1)

Course Fees: $25.00


The study of potato production including seed, water, fertilizer, and harvest management.
The course includes lectures, field study and outside the classroom experiences to enable
the student to become more knowledgeable of potato management.
(Winter)

This course will help students develop an understanding of the basic techniques of identifying and selecting instructional materials and methods to effectively teach agriculture
at the secondary level. This course mainly focuses on course construction in professionaltechnical curriculum development in agriculture and its related fields.
(Winter, Fall)

AGED 460 Experiential Laboratory Methods

(3:2:2)

Prerequisites: APS 220, APS 220L, and CHEM 101 or higher


The study of soil genesis, classification, and mapping examines the evolution of soils,
their organization into natural units, and their distribution throughout the world. Physical, chemical, and morphological soil characteristics are studied both in the field and
classroom and then used to classify soils.
(Spring, Fall)

Prepares future Agricultural educators to teach school and career options to secondary
students who desire a career in agriculture or related field of endeavor.
(Spring, Fall)

AGED 452 Methods of Teaching Agriculture

(3:3:1)

Examine the science and application of soil taxonomy, genesis, chemistry physics and
microbiology to better manage soils for improving environmental quality and agricultural
suitability.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AGRON 470 Agronomy Capstone: Agro-Ecology

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


A composite study of an important field of agronomy, forage crops used in the livestock
industry. Applied production principles and management requirements will be emphasized for each crop. History and biology of major crops.
(Spring, Fall)

Course $25.00
Capstone course for agronomy, crop and soil science majors. The course is a study of
sustainable agriculture including modern agricultural impacts on natural ecosystems.
The application of modern agricultural technology to improve agriculture and economical
sustain ability.
(Winter, Fall)

AGRON 350 Plant Breeding and Genetics

AGTEC 122 Small Engines

(3:2:2)

Prerequisites: APS 122, APS 220, APS 220L, and CHEM 101 or higher
A study of plant biotechnology and the role it plays in our everyday lives from the foods we
eat, to the jobs we work at, to the diseases we suffer from. This course will not only teach
the science content that is necessary to work in a biotechnology lab, but will develop the
critical thinking skills that are necessary to keep up with the rapidly advancing scientific
knowledge.
(Winter)

AGRON 397 Agriculture Research Practicum

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Selection, adjustment, and care of small engines. Small engine theory and procedures for
complete small engine overhaul.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AGTEC 124 Compact Equipment

(2:1:2)

Total Course Fees: $10 .00


Test and repair procedures for engines, electrical, power trains, and hydraulics found on
compact equipment.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:2:0)

The practicum provides students with opportunities to participate in undergraduate


research through classroom discussion and supervised practical experience. The course
will provide for the development and improvement of critical thinking and problem solving
skills through the application of research methodologies.
(Fall)

AGTEC 125 Agricultural Maintenance Welding

(3:2:2)

An overview in the use of electric arc and oxy acetylene welding equipment with an
emphasis upon maintenance welding as it pertains to farm and ranch applications.
(Winter)

100
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
AGTEC 132 Climate Control

(2:1:3)

AGTEC 486 Advanced GIS in Agriculture and Natural Resources

System theory, diagnosis, and repair of air conditioning and heating systems in agricultural
equipment.
(Winter)

AGTEC 186 GPS Applications in Agriculture

(1:0:2)

This course will examine the technology and application of global positioning systems
(GPS) in agriculture.
(Spring, Fall)

AGTEC 220 Preventive Maintenance and Machine

APS 100 Orientation to APS

(3:2:3)

APS 122 Introduction to Plant Science

(2:1:3)

(3:2:2)

APS 220 Introduction to Soils

This course is designed to teach the basics of geographical information systems in


agriculture and natural resources and how global positioning systems and geographical information systems can be used to improve agricultural and natural resource management.
(Spring, Fall)

AGTEC 290 Individual Study

APS 220L Introduction to Soils Lab

(2:2:0)

APS 290R Special Problems

(3:2:2)

APS 298R Internship

(4:3:2)

APS 299R Seminar

(3:2:2)

APS 300R Seminar

(4:3:3)

APS 339R APS Portfolio

(1:2:2)

Course Fees: $30.00


Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 8 credits
Portfolio is a course to help students develop a personal portfolio of the skills acquired
during their studies at BYU-Idaho in preparation for employment or additional graduate
school study. Students are taught to document their learning with digital photography
web design, letters of introduction, presentation of rsum and personal vitae.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(4:3:3)

(3:3:0)

APS 398R Internship

A study of machinery efficiency, matching machines, and horsepower. Analysing and


estimating costs associated with keeping machines running.

AGTEC 474 Mechanical Systems Analysis

(1:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 4 credits


Total Course Fees: $25.00
This class will help ensure students they are on track for graduation with a review of
student grad reports and internship experiences.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A study of fundamental and advanced principles governing and regulating the transmission and control of fluid power hydraulics. Trouble shooting and system repairs.
(Winter, Fall)

AGTEC 465 Machinery Management

(0.5:2:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 2.5 credits


Guest lectures from industry leaders.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Basic electricity in farm power electrical circuits, with emphasis in starting systems, charging systems, lighting systems and accessory systems. Advanced electronics used in farm
power; fuel injection systems, monitors and controllers.
(Winter, Fall)

AGTEC 360 Agricultural Hydraulics

(1-5:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 5 credits


Work experience in the plant science industry.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $10.00


Selection, servicing, maintenance, operation, testing, repair, use and general management
of agricultural equipment.
(Winter, Fall)

AGTEC 335 Electronic System Diagnostic Repair

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 8 credits


The student may pursue a subject of interest through independent study under personal
direction of a faculty specialist.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Practical application and use of the principles and practices of major diesel engine repair.
The mechanics and operational procedures and repair of tractors and other forms of farm
power units with emphasis on adjustments,operations, and care of the power unit.
(Winter)

AGTEC 320 Agricultural Machinery

(1:0:2)

Hands on experience determining soil texture, structure, color, measuring soil pH, nitrates,
and fertilizers.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: ME 105
Rapid mechanization of agriculture over the past generation has made shop work a larger
and more essential part of agriculture operations. This course will help develop specific
skills used in agriculture mechanics and improve the ability to perform at high productive
levels.
(Winter)

AGTEC 301 Engine Repair

(3:3:0)

A basic course dealing with the formation of soils as well as the physical, chemical and
biological properties of soils.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Independent study, special assignment and/or advanced inquiry in an area of special


interest, approved after consultation with instructor in charge.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AGTEC 294 Agriculture Fabrication

(4:4:1)

Course Fees: $125.00


The basic principles of structure, form, and function of plants in both the higher and lower
plant kingdoms.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Principles, systems and applications of electrical energy in agriculture.


(Winter)

AGTEC 286 Introduction to Geography Information Systems

(0.5:2:0)

A survey of career opportunities and skills needed in the horticulture industry. Emphasis
is placed on gaining familiarity with the BYU-Idaho campus and systems of learning at the
university level.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $10.00


An overview of preventive maintenance, care and operation of Agricultural equipment.
(Spring, Fall)

AGTEC 230 Agriculture Electrification - AC

(3:2:2)

Prerequisite: AGTEC 286


This course is designed to apply geographical information systems (GIS) to agriculture
and natural resource disciplines. The course will focus on collecting, analyzing, interpolating, and decision making using GIS software and GPS equipment.
(Winter, Fall)

(1-5:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 5 credits


Work experience in the plant science industry.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:2:3)

Prerequisites: AGTEC 220 and AGTEC 335


Testing and diagnosis for various pieces of equipment related to agriculture systems
pertaining to the production of food.
(Spring, Fall)

APS 412 Integrated Pest Management

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $20.00


Identification and control of insects, weeds and diseases of ornamental plants. The use,
limitation and methods of applying pesticides including laws concerning their use.
(Spring, Fall)

101
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
APS 413 Pesticide Application

(1:1:1)

HORT 319 Landscape Management

This course will examine crop protection through the use of pesticides cultural and
biological control methods.
(Spring, Fall)

APS 465 Integrated Weed Management

(3:2:2)

HORT 320 Plant Propagation

Prerequisites: APS 122, APS 220, and APS 220L


This course is a study of weeds and their impact on agricultural production. The course
will include instruction on weed physiology, identification, control practices, and ecological impacts.
(Fall)

APS 498R Internship

(1-5:0:0)

HORT 321 Deciduous Plant Identification


(3:2:2)

HORT 322 Evergreen Plant Identification

(3:2:3)

HORT 324 Flower Identification

(3:3:1)

HORT 325 Interiorscaping

(4:3:4)

HORT 329 Irrigation

(1:0:2)

HORT 334 Greenhouse Operations

HORT 335 Flower Arranging

(3:3:1)

Course Fees: $95.00


Instruction and care in handling of flowers, historical and current application, identification and use.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(0.5:2:0)

(1:1:1)

HORT 336 Cultural Design Influence

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Horticulture Majors. Supervised practical experience for the development and improvement of horticultural skills. Repeatable up to 2 times.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

HORT 311 Introduction to Arboriculture

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisite: HORT 320
Greenhouse construction, environmental control, pest control and plant culture including
production of greenhouse floral crops.
(Spring, Fall)

Class preparation for work experience in the florist, landscape or nursery industry.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

HORT 297R Practicum in Horticulture

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisite: HORT 230
Irrigation of turf and landscape plants. Design of irrigation and landscape lighting
systems, with selection and assembly of components.
(Winter)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 8 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisite: HORT 335
This course provides training and experience in presentation of flowers in: display windows
and coolers, large banquet halls, auditoriums, custom design in residential and commercial settings. Florals skills, shop management techniques, and floral nomenclature are all
emphasized. The class is provided as an opportunity to reinforce principles learned in the
various floral classes, and to prepare students for internship and retail employment.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

HORT 288 Occupational Internship Preparation

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $25.00


Identification of indoor plants and their culture. Principles of design as applied to the
placement and use of plants. This course includes a lecture and lab experience.
(Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $40.00


Prerequisite: HORT 230
A practical course of layout and construction techniques for landscape projects. Considered are masonry, wood structures, irrigation and plant installations.
(Spring, Fall)

HORT 287R Flower Center

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Identification, landscape value, and special cultural requirements of annual and perennial
flowers.
(Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $10.00


Enhances the student's understanding of the outdoor environment and how they can
contribute to the quality of that environment through design and planning. Also a study of
the history of landscape architecture and its effect on man.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

HORT 252 Landscape Construction

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $410.00


Identification, landscape value, and special cultural requirements of evergreen trees,
shrubs and ground covers. This course includes a lecture and lab experience.
(Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $105.00


Planting and establishment of horticultural plants in the landscape including lawns, trees,
shrubs, vegetables, fruits and flowers.
(Winter, Spring)

HORT 230 Introduction to Architecture and Landscape Design

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Identification, landscape value and cultural requirements of deciduous trees, shrubs, and
ground covers.
(Spring, Fall)

Fees: $20.00
Learn basic principles, culture and production of vegetables, fruits, flowers, trees, shrubs,
and turf, as it relates to the home garden and self-reliance. (For non-Hort majors only)
This course includes a lecture and lab experience.
(Spring, Fall)

HORT 201 Plant Culture

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisites: HORT 201 or APS 122
Principles and practices used in commercial propagation of plants with emphasis on
landscape nursery stock. Includes tissue culture, seed germination, grafting, layering,
budding, cuttings and other specialized techniques.
(Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 5 credits


(Winter, Spring, Fall)

HORT 103 Home Gardening

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: HORT 201
Maintenance of trees, shrubs and turf in landscape, park, golf and athletic areas.
(Spring, Fall)

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $25.00


This course helps students understand the theories of Asian design influence, with
particular emphasis on the use of line. Principles of Asian design and their influence on
modern American floral design.
(Winter)

(2:1:2)

HORT 338R Wedding and Event Planning

Course Fees: $15.00


Establishment, culture and maintenance of trees and shrubs in the landscape.
(Spring, Fall)

(3:2:2)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Course Fees: $75.00
Prerequisite: HORT 335
Theories, methods and materials involved in wedding and special occasion arrangements
in preparation for the Spring Flower and Bridal Open House. To prepare floral majors for
opportunities to plan and design floral products for weddings.
(Winter)

102
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Applied Plant Science


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
HORT 340 Landscape Computer Operations

(2:1:2)

HORT 437 Interpretive Design

(1:1:1)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: HORT 230
Application of specific computer software programs that are commonly used in the horticulture industry; including sprinkler design, landscape design, bidding and estimating,
GPS, and the internet.
(Winter)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisite: HORT 335
Final evaluation of the student's ability to assess proper design interpretations, artistic
dimensions of the student's preparation and training, fluency with the language of flowers,
and product knowledge.
(Winter)

HORT 350R ALCA Career Days

HORT 453 Land Construction Material

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $1,000.00


Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits
This course for students selected to participate in the yearly ALCA Career Days field excursion with the Horticulture Department. The course is designed to assist students with
their preparations to communicate with potential employers during the career day events.
Students also are given special attention in perfecting practical skills that they have been
taught throughout their tenure at the University.
(Winter, Fall)

HORT 351 Landscape Contracting

HORT 455 Nursery Management

(2:1:2)

HORT 460 Cut Flower Crops

(1:1:0)

HORT 461 Potted Plants

(3:2:3)

HORT 470 Landscaping with Vegetables and Fruit

(3:2:3)

(3:3:1)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: HORT 340 and either HORT 321 or HORT 322
Artistic and functional design of landscapes.
(Winter)

HORT 435 Advanced Floral Design

(3:2:2)

Course Fees: $700.00


Prerequisite: HORT 335
Professional floral design with emphasis on retail flower shop operation, products, and
materials. Particular attention is given to developing speed, proficiency, and quality after
students have completed a floral internship experience.
(Winter)

HORT 436 Competition Design and Comment

(2:1:2)

Prerequisite: HORT 320


Principles and practical applications for fruit and vegetable establishment, culture,
production, storage,and economics.
(Winter)

Course Fees: $40.00


Advanced study of the principles, techniques, and applications of plant propagation with
emphasis on tissue culture and micropropagation.
(Winter, Fall)

HORT 430 Advanced Landscape Design

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: HORT 320
Commercial production, harvesting, marketing, and scheduling of bedding plants and
potted commercial crops.
(Winter)

Course Fee: $40.00


Prerequisite: HORT 320
Establishment, culture, and maintenance of turf grass and trees in the landscape.
(Spring, Fall)

HORT 420 Advanced Propagation

(2:1:2)

Prerequisite: HORT 320


Commercial production, harvesting, marketing and scheduling of cut flower and crops.
(Winter)

Course Fees: $1,000.00


Prerequisite: HORT 320
Case Studies of plant growth in relation to the floriculture industry with emphasis on the
physiological interactions of plant growth resulting from fertilization, plant growth regulators, growing structures, irrigation and container media.
(Spring, Fall)

HORT 410 Turfgrass Management

(2:1:2)

Course Fees: $200.00


Prerequisite: HORT 320
This course will focus on the development, organization, infrastructure, and operation of a
production nursery. This will cover production principles and practices and strategies for
wholesale and retail marketing of nursery crops. The laboratory will concentrate on the
development of skills associated with the production and marketing of nursery crops.
(Winter)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: HORT 230
Estimating, bidding, and contracting procedures for landscape construction, and
maintenance projects. A hands-on approach to bidding and estimating jobs for the Green
Industry.
(Winter)

HORT 375 Floriculture Applications

(3:2:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: HORT 340 and either HORT 321 or HORT 322
A study of the construction and design use of typical landscape construction materials
including pavers, concrete, wood, and rock.
(Winter)

(1:1:1)

Course Fees: $30.00


Prerequisite: HORT 335
Developing freestyle and structured designs from various materials for competitive designing and judging.
(Winter)

103
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Department of

7. Students studying Art History are required to take a foreign


language cluster. Student may choose any of the clusters offered
through the Foreign Language Department. However, for those
planning to pursue graduate studies in Art History, a cluster in
German is strongly recommended.

Art

All information in the Art section of this catalog is subject to change.


Please work closely with the College of Performing and Visual Arts
Academic Discovery Center (MC 376) in planning your course of
study and in your preparations for graduation. Not all upper division
courses are offered every semester.

Degree Information
The Department of Art offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Fine
Art (BFA), Bachelor of Art (BA), Bachelor in Art Education (BA), a
minor in Art Education, and a minor in Photography.
Bachelor of Fine Art areas of emphasis include:

Two-dimensional studies (drawing, painting, printmaking)

Three-dimensional studies (ceramics, sculpture)

Graphic Design

Illustration

Photography
Bachelor of Art areas of emphasis include:

Art History

Drawing

Graphic Design

Illustration

Painting

Photography

Printmaking

Three-Dimensional
Bachelor of Art Education majors include:

Art Education

Art Education Composite

Darren Clark, Department Chair


Josh Abegglen, Brian Atkinson, David Belka, Vince Bodily, Rich
Briggs, Kelly Burgener, Darren Clark, Scott Franson, Matthew
Geddes, Gerald Grifn, Wade Hunstman, Carla Jimison, Brian
Memmott, Leon Parson, Nolan Parson, Martin Raish, Shawn
Randall, Thomas Toone
Kathy Whitworth, Department Secretary (208) 496-4900
http://www.byui.edu/Art/

Introduction
The Department of Art offers studies in the following areas of
emphasis: art education, art history, book arts, ceramics, drawing,
graphic design, illustration, painting, photography, printmaking,
sculpture. These emphasis areas are designed to provide preparation
for a professional career choice as well as personal artistic enjoyment.

Admission Process
BYU-Idaho Department of Art has an open enrollment policy for all
freshmen and transfer students. Students are initially considered Art
Majors by declaring so when submitting the application to BYUIdaho. During the sophomore and/or upon completion of Art 101,
110, and 117, Art Majors are asked to visit the Academic Discovery
Center for the College of Performing and Visual Arts. The purpose
of this visit will be to receive advice on degree planning options that
include: Whether to pursue a BFA or BA degree, selecting an area of
emphasis, and how to plan for graduation within the credit limits set
by the University. Visiting the Academic Discovery Center within the
rst 3 semesters will help students better understand options, help
students plan his/her degree more efciently, and avoid compounded
problems during the nal semesters.

Notes:
1. Art 101, Introduction to the Visual Arts, should be taken by all
Art Majors their rst year.
2. The following are additional art courses, available to Art Majors,
that do not require prerequisites: Art 110, Art 117, Art 130, Art
201, Art 202, Art 220, Art 280, Art 297, and Art 336.
3. Art 297, Art Seminar, is required to be taken a minimum of four
separate semesters. It is recommended that three of these be
completed during the freshman and sophomore years.
4. All declared Art Majors, with the exception of Art History and
Art Education, are automatically admitted into the Studio Bachelor of Art Degree.
5. Admittance into the Bachelor of Fine Art Degree (BFA) is
through a portfolio review at the end of the sophomore year.
Reviews for the Fall/Winter tracks are held in March. Reviews for
the Winter/Summer track are held in November. Reviews for the
Summer/Fall track will be held in July.
6. A minimum GPA of 2.7 in major courses is required for an Art
degree. No D credit will be accepted in Art classes.

Students who wish to change their major from Art to another discipline will have the option to receive a Cluster in Art Fundamentals or
be able to use art credits in another standard degree. This will enable
students to count their Art courses toward graduation. The Art
Fundamentals cluster will include the following courses:

Art 101 Introduction to Visual Arts

Art 110 Drawing 1

Art 117 Design and Color

One upper division Art History course (Art 301, 302, 303,
304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 401, 402, 403, 404, or 407)

104

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Transfer Credits and AP & IB Credits


Students who transfer to this Department from other colleges or universities that do not have articulation agreements with BYU-Idaho
may receive equivalent art credits only after a portfolio review with
the Department chair. A catalog description of the courses taken and
a transcript from the previous institution are required.
AP & IB credit in studio arts will be granted as Art 102 (General
Art-2D) credit only. AP Art History credit may be transferred as
equivalent to Art 201 or Art 202.

BFA--Two-Dimensional Studies Emphasis (560-76)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take 6 credits:
ART 495 A-H
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

3
3
3
3
3
3
18
0.5
2
3
6
3
3
3

Art Supplemental Courses


Take this course:
ART 270
3
3
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R
Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
1-3
1-4
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Two Dimensional
Emphasis Courses
Take 14 credits:
ART 125
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
ART 210
ART 212R
ART 217
ART 220
ART 230
ART 235
ART 240
ART 250
ART 251
ART 260
ART 272
ART 280
ART 290R
ART 297R
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 310
ART 311R
ART 312R
ART 314
ART 320
ART 331R
ART 335R
ART 336
ART 337R
ART 341R
ART 342R
ART 350
ART 351R
ART 355R
Cont. next column

1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-4
0.5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Cont. from previous column


ART 356R
3
ART 357R
3
ART 361
3
ART 362
3
ART 364R
3
ART 365R
3
ART 366R
3
ART 370
3
ART 374R
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 392
2
ART 395R
1-3
ART 397R
1
ART 401
3
ART 402
3
ART 403
3
ART 404
3
ART 407
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 414
3
ART 417
3
ART 420R
3
ART 430R
3
ART 435R
3
ART 436R
3
ART 437R
3
ART 438R
3
ART 441R
3
ART 445R
3
ART 450R
3
ART 460R
3
ART 462R
3
ART 463R
3
ART 470R
3
ART 475R
3
ART 480R
3
ART 490R
1-4
ART 491R
1-4
ART 498R
1-4
14

Two Dimensional Supplemental Courses


Take 21 credits:
ART 212R
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 272
3
ART 310
3
ART 312R
3
ART 336
3
ART 350
3
ART 351R
3
ART 355R
3
ART 356R
3
ART 370
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 450R
3
ART 470R
3
ART 475R
3
21

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

105

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BFA--Three-Dimensional Studies Emphasis (560-77)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

3
3
3
3
3
3
18
0.5
2
3
3
3

Art Supplemental Courses


Take 1 course:
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 270
3
3
Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R
Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 2 courses:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
Cont. next column

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1-4
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Cont. from previous column


ART 403
3
ART 404
3
ART 407
3
6
Three Dimensional
Emphasis Courses
Take 14 credits:
ART 125
1
ART 130
3
ART 142
3
ART 160
3
ART 210
3
ART 212R
3
ART 217
3
ART 220
3
ART 230
3
ART 235
3
ART 240
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 260
3
ART 270
3
ART 272
3
ART 280
3
ART 290R
1-4
ART 297R
0.5
ART 301
3
ART 302
3
ART 303
3
ART 304
3
ART 306
3
ART 307
3
ART 308
3
ART 310
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 311R
3
ART 312R
3
ART 314
3
ART 320
3
ART 331R
3
ART 335R
3
ART 336
3
ART 337R
3
ART 341R
3
ART 342R
3
ART 350
3
ART 351R
3
ART 355R
3
ART 356R
3
ART 357R
3
ART 361
3
ART 362
3
ART 364R
3
ART 365R
3
ART 366R
3
ART 370
3
ART 374R
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 392
2
ART 395R
1
ART 397R
1
ART 401
3
ART 402
3
ART 403
3
ART 404
3
ART 407
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 414
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 417
3
ART 420R
3
ART 430R
3
ART 435R
3
ART 436R
3
ART 437R
3
ART 438R
3
ART 441R
3
ART 445R
3
ART 450R
3
ART 460R
3
ART 462R
3
ART 463R
3
ART 470R
3
ART 475R
3
ART 480R
3
ART 490R
1-4
ART 491R
1-4
ART 498R
1-4
14
Three Dimensional Supplemental Courses
Take 21 credits:
ART 220
3
ART 280
3
ART 320
3
ART 336
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 420R
3
ART 475R
3
ART 480R
3
WELD 101
3
21

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

106

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BFA--Graphic Design Emphasis (560-78)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take 6 credits:
ART 495 A-H
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Take 2 courses:
ART 142
ART 160
ART 210
ART 212R
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
ART 312R

0.5
2

Take this course:


ART 130

3
6
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407
Take this course:
ART 306

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
1-4
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Graphic Design Emphasis


Courses
Take 14 credits:
ART 125
1
ART 130
3
ART 142
3
ART 160
3
ART 210
3
ART 212R
3
ART 217
3
ART 220
3
ART 230
3
ART 235
3
ART 240
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 260
3
ART 270
3
ART 272
3
ART 280
3
ART 290R
1-4
ART 297R
0.5
ART 301
3
ART 302
3
ART 303
3
ART 304
3
ART 306
3
ART 307
3
ART 308
3
ART 310
3
ART 311R
3
ART 312R
3
ART 314
3
ART 320
3
ART 331R
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 335R
3
ART 336
3
ART 337R
3
ART 341R
3
ART 342R
3
ART 350
3
ART 351R
3
ART 355R
3
ART 356R
3
ART 357R
3
ART 361
3
ART 362
3
ART 364R
3
ART 365R
3
ART 366R
3
ART 370
3
ART 374R
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 392
2
ART 395R
1
ART 397R
1
ART 401
3
ART 402
3
ART 403
3
ART 404
3
ART 407
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 414
3
ART 417
3
ART 420R
3
ART 430R
3
ART 435R
3
ART 436R
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 437R
3
ART 438R
3
ART 441R
3
ART 445R
3
ART 450R
3
ART 460R
3
ART 462R
3
ART 463R
3
ART 475R
3
ART 480R
3
ART 490R
1-4
ART 491R
1-4
ART 498R
1-4
14
Graphic Design Supplemental Courses
Take 21 credits:
ART 230
3
ART 235
3
ART 331R
3
ART 335R
3
ART 336
3
ART 337R
3
ART 430R
3
ART 435R
3
ART 436R
3
ART 437R
3
ART 438R
3
ART 475R
3
21

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

107

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BFA--Illustration Emphasis (560-79)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280
Take 6 credits:
ART 495 A-H

3
3
3
3
3
3
18
0.5
2
3
3
3
3
6

Art Supplemental Courses


Take this course:
ART 142
3
3
Take 1 course:
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 270
3
3
Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 160
ART 240
Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R
Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
1
1-4
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Illustration Emphasis Core


Take 14 credits:
ART 125
1
ART 130
3
ART 142
3
ART 160
3
ART 210
3
ART 212R
3
ART 217
3
ART 220
3
ART 230
3
ART 235
3
ART 240
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 260
3
ART 270
3
ART 272
3
ART 280
3
ART 290R
1-4
ART 297R
0.5
ART 301
3
ART 302
3
ART 303
3
ART 304
3
ART 306
3
ART 307
3
ART 308
3
ART 310
3
ART 311R
3
ART 312R
3
ART 314
3
ART 320
3
ART 331R
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 335R
3
ART 336
3
ART 337R
3
ART 341R
3
ART 342R
3
ART 350
3
ART 351R
3
ART 355R
3
ART 356R
3
ART 357R
3
ART 361
3
ART 362
3
ART 364R
3
ART 365R
3
ART 366R
3
ART 370
3
ART 374R
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 392
2
ART 395R
1
ART 397R
1
ART 401
3
ART 402
3
ART 403
3
ART 404
3
ART 407
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 414
3
ART 417
3
ART 420R
3
ART 430R
3
ART 435R
3
ART 436R
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 437R
3
ART 438R
3
ART 441R
3
ART 445R
3
ART 450R
3
ART 460R
3
ART 462R
3
ART 463R
3
ART 470R
3
ART 475R
3
ART 480R
3
ART 490R
1-4
ART 491R
1-4
ART 498R
1-4
14
Illustration Supplemental
Courses
Take 21 credits:
ART 212R
3
ART 240
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 311R
3
ART 312R
3
ART 341R
3
ART 342R
3
ART 355R
3
ART 397R
1
ART 441R
3
ART 445R
3
21

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

108

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BFA--Photography Emphasis (560-80)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take 6 credits:
ART 495 A-H
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Art Supplemental Courses


Take 1 course:
ART 130
3
ART 142
3
ART 160
3
3
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270

0.5
2
3
6
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 2 courses:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
1
1-4
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Photography Emphasis
Courses
Take 17 credits:
ART 125
1
ART 130
3
ART 142
3
ART 160
3
ART 210
3
ART 212R
3
ART 217
3
ART 220
3
ART 230
3
ART 235
3
ART 240
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 260
3
ART 270
3
ART 272
3
ART 280
3
ART 290R
1-4
ART 297R
0.5
ART 301
3
ART 302
3
ART 303
3
ART 304
3
ART 306
3
ART 307
3
ART 308
3
ART 310
3
ART 311R
3
ART 312R
3
ART 314
3
ART 320
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 331R
3
ART 335R
3
ART 336
3
ART 337R
3
ART 341R
3
ART 342R
3
ART 350
3
ART 351R
3
ART 355R
3
ART 356R
3
ART 357R
3
ART 361
3
ART 362
3
ART 364R
3
ART 365R
3
ART 366R
3
ART 370
3
ART 374R
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 392
2
ART 395R
1
ART 397R
1
ART 401
3
ART 402
3
ART 403
3
ART 404
3
ART 407
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 414
3
ART 417
3
ART 420R
3
Cont. next column

Cont. from previous column


ART 430R
3
ART 435R
3
ART 436R
3
ART 437R
3
ART 438R
3
ART 441R
3
ART 445R
3
ART 450R
3
ART 460R
3
ART 462R
3
ART 463R
3
ART 470R
3
ART 475R
3
ART 480R
3
ART 490R
1-4
ART 491R
1-4
ART 498R
1-4
17
Photography Supplemental
Courses
Take 21 credits:
ART 160
3
ART 260
3
ART 336
3
ART 361
3
ART 362
3
ART 364R
3
ART 365R
3
ART 366R
3
ART 460R
3
ART 462R
3
ART 463R
3
21

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

109

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BA in Art
Art History Emphasis (660-9)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400

Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R

3
3
3
3
12

0.5
2

Take 3 courses:
ART 110
ART 117
ART 130
ART 160
ART 212R
ART 220
ART 240
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
ART 280

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
9

1
1-4
1

Art History Emphasis Courses


Take these courses:
ART 300
3
ART 494
3
6
Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
Take 1 course:
ART 401
ART 402
Take 1 course:
ART 403
ART 404

3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 15 credits:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407
ART 490R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-4
15

Cluster Requirement
Complete 1 preapproved
Foreign Language cluster
12
Program Notes:

3
3
3

Total Major Credits=66


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=14
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BA in Art--Standard Studio Art


Drawing Emphasis (660-186)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take these courses:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3
3
12
0.5
2
3
3
6

Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

1
1-4
1
3
3
3

Art Emphasis Courses


Take 18 credits:
ART 210
ART 212R
ART 270
ART 310
ART 311R
ART 312R
ART 336
ART 410R
ART 412R
Elective*

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Program Notes:
*Electives are any BYU-Idaho
Art Department courses without
double counting courses in the
major.

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

110

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BA in Art--Standard Studio Art


Graphic Design Emphasis (660-187)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take these courses:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3
3
12
0.5
2
3
3
6

Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

1
1-4
1
3
3
3

Art Emphasis Courses


Take 18 credits:
ART 125
ART 130
ART 230
ART 235
ART 330R
ART 331R
ART 335R
ART 336
ART 337R
ART 430R
ART 435R
ART 436R
ART 437R
ART 438R
ART 491R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BA in Art--Standard Studio Art


Illustration Emphasis (660-188)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take these courses:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3
3
12
0.5
2
3
3
6

Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

1
1-4
1
3
3
3

Art Emphasis Courses


Take 18 credits:
ART 125
ART 142
ART 210
ART 212R
ART 240
ART 250
ART 251
ART 311R
ART 312R
ART 445R
Elective*

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Program Notes:
*Electives are any BYU-Idaho
Art Department courses without
double counting courses in the
major.

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

111

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BA in Art--Standard Studio Art


Painting Emphasis (660-189)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take these courses:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3
3
12
0.5
2
3
3
6

Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

1-3
1-4
1
3
3
3

Art Emphasis Courses


Take 18 credits:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 350
ART 355R
ART 356R
ART 357R
ART 450R
Elective*

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Program Notes:
*Electives are any BYU-Idaho
Art Department courses without
double counting courses in the
major.

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BA in Art--Standard Studio Art


Photography Emphasis (660-190)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take these courses:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3
3
12
0.5
2
3
3
6

Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

1-3
1-4
1
3
3
3

Art Emphasis Courses


Take 18 credits:
ART 160
ART 260
ART 361
ART 362
ART 364R
ART 365R
ART 366R
ART 460R
ART 462R
ART 463R
ART 498R
Elective*

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-4
3
18

Program Notes:
*Electives are any BYU-Idaho
Art Department courses without
double counting courses in the
major.

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

112

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BA in Art--Standard Studio Art


Printmaking Emphasis (660-191)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take these courses:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3
3
12
0.5
2
3
3
6

Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160

3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270

3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R

3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

1-3
1-4
1
3
3
3

Art Emphasis Courses


Take 18 credits:
ART 270
ART 310
ART 336
ART 357R
ART 370
ART 374R
ART 410R
Elective*

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Program Notes:
*Electives are any BYU-Idaho
Art Department courses without
double counting courses in the
major.

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BA in Art--Standard Studio Art


Three-Dimensional Emphasis (660-192)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CArt Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 201
ART 202
ART 400
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R
Take these courses:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3
3
12
0.5
2
3
3
6

Take 1 course:
ART 130
ART 142
ART 160
Take 1 course:
ART 250
ART 251
ART 270
Take 1 course:
ART 212R
ART 312R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 course:
ART 301
ART 302
ART 303
ART 304
ART 305
ART 306
ART 307
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404
ART 407

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Take 1 credit:
ART 395R
ART 498R
Take 1 course:
ART 220
ART 280

1-3
1-4
1
3
3
3

Art Emphasis Courses


Take 18 credits:
ART 220
ART 280
ART 320
ART 336
ART 380
ART 420R
ART 480R
ART 498R
WELD 101
Elective*

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-4
3
3
18

Program Notes:
*Electives are any BYU-Idaho
Art Department courses without
double counting courses in the
major.

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

113

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BA In Art Education (860)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CEducation Core:
Take these courses:
ED 200
ED 304
ED 461
ED 492
SPED 360
Art Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 201
ART 202
ART 220

2
3
3
10
2
20

3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Take these courses:


ART 314
ART 390
ART 414
Take for 1 credit:
ART 395R
Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R

3
3
3
9
1-3
1
.5
2

Lower Division Studio


Take 6 credits:
ART 142
3
ART 210
3
ART 212R
3
ART 217
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 270
3
ART 280
3
ART 310
3
ART 312R
3
6

Upper Division Studio


Take 3 credits:
ART 310
3
ART 312R
3
ART 320
3
ART 350
3
ART 351R
3
ART 357R
3
ART 370
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 491R
1-4
3

Program Notes:
This degree requires an
Education Minor

Total Major Credits=39


Education Core Credits=20
Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=1
Education Majors Require an Education Minor for Graduation
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

114

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BA in Art Education Composite (862)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CEducation Core:
Take these courses:
ED 200
ED 304
ED 461
ED 492
SPED 360

2
3
3
10
2
20

Art Core Courses


Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 201
ART 202
ART 220
ART 314
ART 390
ART 414

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
27

Repeat 4 times:
ART 297R

0.5
2

Take for 1 credit:


ART 395R

1-3
1

Take 1 course:
ART 308
ART 401
ART 402
ART 403
ART 404

3
3
3
3
3
3

Lower Division Studio


Courses
Take 18 credits:
ART 130
3
ART 142
3
ART 160
3
ART 210
3
ART 212R
3
ART 217
3
ART 230
3
ART 235
3
ART 240
3
ART 250
3
ART 251
3
ART 260
3
ART 262
3
ART 270
3
ART 280
3
ART 290R
1-4
ART 310
3
ART 312R
3
ART 320
3
ART 335R
3
ART 357R
3
ART 361
3
ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 410R
3
18

Upper Division Studio


Courses
Take 9 credits:
ART 310
ART 312R
ART 320
ART 330R
ART 331R
ART 335R
ART 336
ART 341R
ART 342R
ART 350
ART 351R
ART 355R
ART 356R
ART 357R
ART 361
ART 362
ART 365R
ART 366R
ART 370
Cont. next column

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Cont. from previous column


ART 380
3
ART 381R
3
ART 410R
3
ART 412R
3
ART 420R
3
ART 430R
3
ART 435R
3
ART 436R
3
ART 437R
3
ART 441R
3
ART 445R
3
ART 450R
3
ART 460R
3
ART 462R
3
ART 463R
3
ART 470R
3
ART 475R
3
ART 480R
3
ART 491R
1-4
9

Total Major Credits=60


Education Core Credits=20
Education Majors Require an Education Minor for Graduation
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor in Art Education (170)


Minor Requirements
Core Courses
Take these courses:
ART 101
ART 110
ART 117
ART 220
ART 390
ART 414

3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 course:
ART 142
ART 250
ART 251

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3

No Double Counting of Minor Courses.

Total Minor Credits=21


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

115

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Minor in Photography (205)


Minor Requirements
Art Core Courses
Take 1 course:
ART 110
ART 117

3
3
3

Art Core Courses


Take these courses:
ART 160
ART 260
ART 361
ART 362

3
3
3
3
12

Take 1 course:
ART 366R
ART 460R

Photography Courses
Take 2 courses:
ART 307
ART 364R
ART 365R
ART 366R
ART 460R
ART 462R

3
3
3

Program Notes:
All photography cluster
students must own a
digital SLR camera.

3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Total Minor Credits=24


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Photography Concentration (D 140)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Concentration Courses
Core Courses
Take 1 course:
ART 110
ART 117*

3
3
3

Take these courses:


ART 160
ART 260
ART 361
ART 362
Take 1 course:
ART 366R
ART 460R

3
3
3
3
12

Take 4 courses:
ART 307
ART 364R
ART 365R
ART 366R
ART 460R
ART 462R
ART 463R

3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Program Notes:
*ART 117 is the preferred
course, but ART 110 would
also ll this requirement.

Total Minor Credits=24


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

116

Spring-Fall---- YES

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Art Pre-approved Clusters
Art - Two-Dimensional Studies
Take these courses:
ART 110
Drawing 1
ART 117
Design and Color
Take 2 courses:
ART 210
Drawing 2
ART 212R
Head Drawing
ART 250
Oil Painting 1
ART 251
Watercolor 1
ART 310
Expressive Drawing
ART 312R
Figure Drawing
Total Credits

5200

Art - Art History


Take these courses:
ART 201
Art History 1
ART 202
Art History 2
Take 2 or 3 of the following courses:
ART 301
Art of the Ancient Near East and Egypt
ART 302
Greek and Roman Art
ART 303
Medieval Art
ART 304
Far Eastern Art
ART 305
Meso-American Art
ART 306
History of Design and Illustration
ART 307
History of Photography
ART 308
American Art
ART 401
Italian Renaissance Art
ART 402
Baroque Art
ART 403
Nineteenth Century Art
ART 404
Twentieth Century Art
ART 407
Sacred Art: Art of the Worlds Religions
Total Credits

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12

Art - Three-Dimensional Studies


Take these courses:
ART 110
Drawing 1
ART 220
Ceramics 1
ART 280
Sculpture 1
ART 320
Ceramics 2
ART 380
Sculpture 2
Total Credits

5201
3
3
3
3
3
15

Art - Photography
Take 1 course:
ART 110
Drawing 1
ART 117
Design and Color
Take these courses:
ART 160
Photography 1
ART 260
Color Photography
ART 361
Digital Photography
Take 1 course:
ART 307
History of Photography
ART 364R
Advanced Black and White Photography
ART 365R
Photography 3
ART 462R
Historical Processes
ART 463R
Documentary Photography
Photo cluster students may NOT take the following courses
ART 362
Studio Lighting
ART 366R
Commercial Photography
ART 460R
Portrait Photography
Total Credits

Art - Graphic Design


Take these courses:
ART 130
Introduction to Graphic Design
ART 230
Typography
ART 235
Graphic Design
Take 1 course:
ART 331R
Information Design
ART 335R
Identity Design
ART 337R
Interaction Design
ART 430R
Sequential Design
ART 436R
Motion (Linear)
ART 437R
Advanced Typography
Total Credits

5204
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Art - Fundamentals
Take these courses:
ART 101
Introduction to Visual Arts
ART 110
Drawing 1
ART 117
Design and Color
Take 1 course:
ART 301
Art of the Ancient Near East and Egypt
ART 302
Greek and Roman Art
ART 303
Medieval Art
ART 304
Far Eastern Art
ART 305
Meso-American Art
ART 306
History of Design and Illustration
ART 307
History of Photography
ART 308
American Art
ART 401
Italian Renaissance Art
ART 402
Baroque Art
ART 403
Nineteenth Century Art
ART 404
Twentieth Century Art
ART 407
Sacred Art: Art of the Worlds Religions
Total Credits

3
3
3
15

All photo cluster students must own a digital SLR camera


There are to be no customized clusters in the photo area

Course Descriptions
ART 101 Introduction to the Visual Arts

ART 110 Drawing I

Credits*
(3:3:0)

ART 117 Design and Color

(2:1:3)

ART 125 Introduction to Computer Art

(2:1:3)

5206
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
5207
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12

(3:1:5)

(3:1:5)

(1:1:1)

Prerequisite: Art major


A basic overview of computers and CS6 (Adobe Creative Suite), Photoshop, Illustrator and
Indesign.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


A studio experience exploring the principles and practices of three-dimensional media.
Designed for non-art majors.

ART 104 Exploring Photography

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12

Prerequisite: Art major


The elements and principles of design and basic color theory are used to solve visual
design problems.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 4 credits


The fundamentals of drawing and design with an introduction to various media. This class
is designed for non-art majors.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 103 General Art-3D

3
3

Prerequisite: Art major


Fundamentals of theoretical and applied perspective, structural and proportional drawing,
light and shade, art vocabulary and basic composition.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

An art appreciation class surveying the concepts, techniques, materials and history of the
visual arts.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 102 General Art-2D

5205

ART 130 Introduction to Graphic Design

(3:3:0)

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $20.00


Exploration of contemporary visual communications within graphic design and related
fields.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

This course is designed as a non-lab photography course, which will acquaint students
with the functions and uses of a camera (digital or film) for personal and professional
needs.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

117
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
ART 142 Media Experimentation

(3:1:5)

ART 251 Watercolor I

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117


An exploration and expansion of painting and drawing media, techniques and processes
for 2-dimensional art.
(Winter Fall)

ART 160 Basic Photography

(3:2:3)

ART 260 Intermediate Photography

Course Fees: $40.00


Students, through classroom discussion and practical experience in the lab, gain a
foundation for black-and-white photography. Students must own or have access to a
digital SCR.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 201 Art History I

(3:3:0)

ART 262 Photography II

(3:3:0)

(3:1:5)

ART 270 Printmaking I

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117


Intermediate drawing class with in-depth study of proportion, composition, light and
shadow.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 212R Head Drawing

(3:1:5)

ART 272 Introduction to Lithography

ART 280 Sculpture I

ART 290R Independent Study

(3:1:5)

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisite: ART 130
An introduction to typography as a fundamental element of graphic design.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 297R Art Seminar

(3:1:5)

ART 300 Research/Writing in Art History

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


This course is intended for Art History majors, to prepare them for upper-division courses
and for further education to graduate school. It deals with the practices and methods
of art history, including visual literacy, critical reading, research and writing. This course
is a prerequisite for all upper-division Art History courses (or co-requisite for the first
upper-division course).
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:1:5)

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117


An introduction to the field of Illustration, its media, techniques and processes.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 250 Oil Painting I

(0.5:0:1)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Course Fees: $30.00
A visiting artist program designed to introduce students to a variety of artists from a
variety of disciplines.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisites: ART 130 and ART 230
Graphic design projects with an emphasis on creative, conceptual and practical solutions.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 240 Introduction to Illustration

(1-4:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 8 credits


Variable credit independent study for portfolio enhancement. Recommended to be taken
after freshman year. Independent study may be taken to fill an Art emphasis requirement
and must be approved by the faculty member within the emphasis the student would like
to study. It may not be taken to fulfill a required Art course. More information about this
course is available in the Art Department office.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $40.00


Introduction to ceramics process including skill development in hand building, throwing
on the potter's wheel and glazing. Emphasis on craftsmanship and design.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 235 Graphic Design

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $85.00


Introduction to the basic processes of sculpture: modeling, casting and assembling, with
an emphasis on the human figure.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117


A course emphasizing color to solve visual design problems. Students will apply concepts
primarily using traditional color mixing with paint and brushes.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 230 Typography

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117
The fundamentals of lithography, including image making, printing and print conservation.

(3:1:5)

ART 220 Ceramics I

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117
The fundamentals of printmaking, including image making, printing and print conservation.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: ART 110
A student learns to draw the human head and hands through studying anatomy and
drawing from live models.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 217 Design and Color II

(3:1:5)

Course Fee: $40.00


Prerequisite: ART 160
Students, through classroom discussion and practical experience in the lab, build upon
the foundational principles learned in Photography I. Students must have access to a
digital, single lens reflex camera.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A survey of art from Renaissance to Modern with an emphasis on artists and art in their
political, social, and religious context.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 210 Drawing II

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $40.00


Prerequisite: ART 160
Students, through classroom discussion and practical experience in the lab, gain a
foundation of color photography. Students must have access to a digital, single lens reflex
camera.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

A survey of art from prehistoric to Renaissance with an emphasis on artists and art in their
political, social and religious context.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 202 Art History II

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117
Survey and application of various techniques of traditional transparent watercolor painting.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117
The fundamentals of oil painting, emphasizing familiarity with the medium.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 301 Art of Ancient Near East and Egypt


Prerequisite: ART 201
A survey of the art of the ancient Near East and Egypt.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

118
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

(3:3:0)

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
ART 302 Greek and Roman Art

(3:3:0)

ART 330R Conceptual Design

Prerequisite: ART 201


A survey of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 303 Medieval Art

(3:3:0)

Recommended Prerequisite: ART 201


A survey of western art from the time of Constantine the Great to the beginning of the
Renaissance.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 304 Far Eastern Art

ART 331R Information Design

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

ART 335R Identity Design

Recommended Prerequisite: ART 201


A survey of the art and culture of major Meso-American cultures.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 306 History of Design and Illustration

(3:3:0)

ART 336 Book Arts

Recommended Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


An in-depth study of the technical and theoretical history of photography.

ART 337R Interaction

(3:3:0)

(3:1:5)

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117


Builds on the Renaissance tradition while exploring different styles of art, such as Cubism,
Expressionism and non-European art.
(Every other semester, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 311R Creative Perspective

ART 341R Narrative Illustration

(3:1:5)

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: ART 110
Recommended Prerequisite: ART 212
Proportion, structure, composition and various media for depicting the human figure.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 314 Secondary Art Methods I

ART 342R Entertainment Illustration

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: ART 240
Focus on an in-depth study; of the entertainment field. Environment design, character
design, lighting, pacing, and storytelling will be covered. Film television and computer
games are main areas of the market discussed.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $30.00


Prerequisite: Junior level status
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with Secondary Art Education
philosophy and methods. Students will be introduced to the current theory and methods
in the field and how to apply them to the secondary art classroom. Students will complete
this through reading and writing assignments, lesson planning and presentation, and
participation in a secondary art classroom.
(Winter, Fall)

ART 320 Ceramics II

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $15.00
Prerequisite: ART 240
A portfolio-building course that concentrates on visual storytelling and creating visual
ideas. Design techniques, markets, styles and professional issues will be addressed. Personal development of skill, art vocabulary and expression will be emphasized. Traditional
and digital mediums will be utilized.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117
A deeper exploration in linear perspective and applying theory in a creative way.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 312R Figure Drawing

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235,
This course focuses on the theory and skills a graphic designer will need to work in a
digitally interactive environment. These will include information architecture, interface
design, site structure, page structure, page design, typography, editorial style, graphics
and multimedia. While there will be some development with software tools this is not a
programming class. This course is designed for art majors with a graphic design emphasis.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Recommended Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


Students will gain a greater knowledge and appreciation of American art and its history.
We will cover Colonial America, the Federal Period, the Romantic Period, the American
Renaissance, the Early Modern Period and the Post Modern Period.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 310 Expressive Drawing

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $35.00


A variety of ways to make handmade books and boxes.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

ART 308 American Art

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
Advanced overview of identity/branding logo development.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

A survey of the history of graphic design and illustration.


(Every other semester, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 307 History of Photography

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
An introduction to the creative and conceptual presentation of information. Emphasis will
be on discovering concise, communicative, and creative methods for presenting a variety
of informational formats.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Recommended Prerequisite: ART 201


A survey of Far Eastern art from prehistoric cultures to the present.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 305 Meso-American Art

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
Overview of the creative and conceptual processes as they apply to graphic design.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 350 Painting II

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: ART 250
Expanded study of oil painting techniques and awareness of modern artist styles and
directions.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 351R Watercolor II

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisites: ART 110, ART 117, and ART 251
A course designed to give added experience in transparent watercolor.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $40.00


Prerequisites: ART 220 or Instructor Authorization
Explore and expand technical and design skills learned in Ceramics l.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

119
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

(3:1:5)

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
ART 355R Life Painting

(3:1:5)

ART 374R Serigraphy (Screen Printing)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisites: ART 110, ART 117, ART 212R, and ART 250
Foundation for painting representationally the full figure, including portraiture using
student-selected media.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 356R Landscape Painting

(3:1:5)

ART 380 Sculpture II

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $25.00
Prerequisites: ART 110, ART 117 and ART 250
Oil painting class focusing on principles of traditional landscape painting.
(Varies)

ART 357R Expressive Painting

(3:1:5)

ART 381R Sculpture and Media Processes

ART 390 Theory and History for Art Education

(3:1:5)

(3:1:5)

ART 392 Business for the Professional Artist

(3:1:5)

ART 395A Travel Study in the Arts (A)

(3:1:5)

ART 395B Travel Study in the Arts (B)

(1:1:0)

Repeatable Course: may take a maximum of 5 credits


Course Fees: $500.00
Course Requirement: Art majors only
Various art venues are studied in a variety of cities including workshops, galleries and
museums, architecture, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, illustration, graphic
design, and photography.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 395C Travel Study in the Arts (C)

(3:1:5)

(1:1:0)

Repeatable Course: may take a maximum of 5 credits


Course Fees: $1000.00
Course Requirement: Art majors only
Various art venues are studied in a variety of cities including workshops, galleries and
museums, architecture, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, illustration, graphic
design, and photography.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $60.00
Prerequisite: ART 362
This course will prepare students for success in commercial photography and broaden
their opportunities in Fine Art. Students must have access to a digital, single lens reflex
camera.
(Varies)

ART 370 Printmaking II

(1:1:0)

Repeatable Course: may take a maximum of 5 credits


Course Fees: $250.00
Course Requirement: Art majors only
Various art venues are studied in a variety of cities including workshops, galleries and
museums, architecture, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, illustration, graphic
design, and photography.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $35.00
Prerequisites: Take ART 160 and ART 260; or one of the following: ART 307, ART 361, or ART
364R
Student self-directed photographic projects, strategies for success as fine art and practical photographers. Students must have access to a digital, single lens reflex camera.
(Winter, Spring)

ART 366R Commercial Photography

(2:2:0)

Course Requirement: Art majors only


This course is designed to introduce art students to basic business principles for professional visual artists. Students will be given an in-depth look at operating their art career
as a small business, and teach them from a hands-on perspective how to excel in the
competitive world of the visual arts.
(Winter, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $100.00
Prerequisite: ART 160
Advanced principles of black-and-white photography, including darkroom printing, darkroom experimentation, camera exploration, and fine digital black-and-white printing will
be explored. Students must have access to a digital, single lens reflex camera.
(Varies)

ART 365R Photographic Projects

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: ART 101


Acquaint students with Secondary Art Education philosophy. Students will address the
importance of advocacy for the arts in the public schools and the community, basic history of the art education, and current trends in the field. Topics will also include aesthetics
and art criticism, with a focus on contemporary visual culture, contemporary art, and art
from non-western cultures.
(Winter, Fall)

Course Fees: $75.00


Prerequisites: Complete 2 of the following: ART 160, ART 260, or ART 361
This course will introduce the student to the controlled environment of the photographic
studio. The student will be introduced to practical and creative lighting solutions for photographing people and objects. Large format cameras and architecture will also be briefly
introduced. Students must have access to a digital, single lens reflex camera.
(Varies)

ART 364R Advanced Black/White Photography

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $300.00
Prerequisite: ART 280
This course will give more advanced experience in additive and subtractive sculpture
processes.

Course Fees: $60.00


Prerequisite: ART 160
Introduction to digital photography, including scanning software and printing. Students
must have access to a digital, single lens reflex camera.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 362 Introduction to Studio Lighting

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $85.00


Prerequisite: ART 280
An expansion of figurative sculpture: anatomy, drapery, armatures, mold making, casting
and patinas.
(Winter, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: ART 250
Expressive Painting offers an intense engagement with the ideas and processes of painting
since 1900, advancing a student towards an individualistic artistic vision and a more
competitive portfolio.
(Every other semester, see Academic Advising Center)

ART 361 Advanced Photography

(3:1:5)

Course Fee: $50.00


Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits
Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117
A course which explores various techniques of screen printing.
(Varies)

ART 395D Travel Study in the Arts (D)

(3:1:5)

(1-3:1:0)

Repeatable Course: may take a maximum of 5 credits


Course Requirement: Art majors only; Instructor Authorization
Various art venues are studied in a variety of cities including workshops, galleries and
museums, architecture, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, illustration, graphic
design, and photography.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisite: ART 270
A portfolio course for printmaking students providing experience with intaglio processes.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

120
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
ART 395R Travel Study in the Arts

ART 417 Advanced Design

(1:1:0)

ART 397R Web Portfolio

ART 420R Ceramics III

(1:1:1)

ART 430R Sequential Design

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

ART 435R Three-Dimensional Graphic Design

Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


A survey of Italian Renaissance art from 1300 to 1600.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 402 Baroque Art

(3:3:0)

ART 436R Motion (Linear)

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


A survey of European and American art of the 20th century.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 407 Sacred Art

ART 437R Advanced Typography

ART 438R Motion (Interactive)

ART 441R Advanced Illustration

(3:1:5)

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Prerequisites: ART 240 and ART 341R; or ART 342R
An in-depth study of visual storytelling and the narrative tradition of illustration.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: ART 312R
Advanced figure drawing with costumed models emphasizing composition, lighting and
varied media.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 414 Secondary Art Methods II

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
This is a project based studio course covering the principles of motion with interactivity
from a graphic design perspective. Students will develop interactive working prototypes.
This course is designed for art majors with a graphic design emphasis.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: ART 310
Students will produce a cohesive series of work which demonstrates an understanding
of expressive drawing techniques in combination with individual creative expression and
concept development.
(Every other semester, see Academic Advising Center)

ART 412R Advanced Figure Drawing

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
An in-depth study of and experimentation in typography and typeface design.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the world's seven major
religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) through
the history of their art.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 410R Expressive Drawing 2

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
This is a project based studio course covering the principles of motion and linear story
telling. Students will develop several short motion projects focusing on narrative and
movement. This course is designed for art majors with a graphic design emphasis.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


A survey of European and American art of the 19th century.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 404 Twentieth Century Art

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
Exploration of a wide range of design problems in three-dimensional forms which include:
package, signage, environmental, exhibit and retail design.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202


A survey of European art from 1600 to 1750.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 403 Nineteenth Century Art

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 130, ART 230, and ART 235
An introduction to the principles of sequencing in traditional print documents as well as
in electronic media.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Course Requirement: Art majors only


A reading survey and discussion of principal aesthetic, religious, and artistic theories
with an emphasis on reading artists' written sources from antiquity until the twenty-first
century.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 401 Italian Renaissance Art

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $40.00
Prerequisite: ART 320
Advanced ceramic techniques with personal direction for portfolio development.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


A basic web design and portfolio class that will teach students to build and maintain their
own art website.
(Varies)

ART 400 Readings

(3:1:5)

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 117


An advanced design class which solves design problems from within the emphasis of each
student.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Various art venues are studied in a variety of cities including workshops, galleries and
museums, architecture, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, illustration, graphic
design, and photography.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 445R Digital Illustration

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Prerequisites: ART 110, ART 117, ART 142, and ART 240
Exploration of digital media to produce narrative and conceptual illustrations.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:1:5)

Course Fees: $30.00


This course will acquaint students with the skills and methods necessary to prepare
them to teach art in the secondary classroom. It will build on the student's Art Education
theory and how to practically apply its concepts into curriculum development and lesson
planning.
(Winter, Fall)

ART 450R Painting III

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $25.00
Prerequisite: ART 350
Assists the student in developing a personal direction and artistic statement in painting.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

121
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Art
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
ART 460R Portrait Photography

(3:1:5)

ART 495B BFA Project Drawing

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $60.00
Prerequisites: ART 362
An in-depth study of the human form and lighting for commercial portrait photography.
Students must have access to a digital, single lens, reflex camera.
(Spring, Fall)

ART 462R History Photographic Processes

ART 495C BFA Project Graphic Design

(3:1:5)

ART 495D BFA Project Illustration

(3:1:5)

ART 495E BFA Project Painting

(3:1:5)

ART 495F BFA Project Photography

(3:1:5)

ART 495G BFA Project Printmaking

(3:1:5)

ART 495H BFA Project Sculpture

(1-4:0:0)

ART 498R Internship in the Arts

(1-4:0:0)

FA 100 Fine Arts

(1:1:0)

Course Fee: $2.00


For more information please visit http://www.byui.edu/fa100 FA 100 Performing and
Visual Arts Lab website
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: Instructor Authorization


The Capstone course for the Art History emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 495A BFA Project Ceramics

(1-4:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 4 credits


This is an independent internship course that is designed to give students a hands-on
introduction to their intended profession.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 4 credits


Independent study as needed for upper division courses or credits. Independent study
may be taken to fulfill an Art emphasis requirement and must be approved by the faculty
member within the emphasis the student would like to study. It may not be taken to
fulfill a required Art core course. More information about this course is available in the Art
Department office or the Academic Discovery Center.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 494 Senior Paper in Art History

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 4 credits


Individual research of a specific art historical subject, guided by the instructor.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 491R Independent Study II

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $85.00
Prerequisites: ART 280 and ART 380
An advanced course in sculpture that allows students to develop a personal direction of
expression.
(Winter, Fall)

ART 490R Art History Research and Special Problems

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Course Fees: $35.00
Prerequisite: ART 336
Introduction of advanced techniques of book arts and further development of technical
ability.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

ART 480R Sculpture III

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Course Fees: $50.00
Prerequisites: ART 270 and ART 370
A portfolio course for Printmaking students. Students will focus on their preferred Printmaking media to develop a portfolio of sufficient breadth and depth.
(Winter, Fall)

ART 475R Advanced Book Arts

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $40.00


Prerequisites: ART 361 or ART 365R
Exploration of documentary photographic techniques. Students must have access to a
digital, single lens, reflex camera.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Discovery Center)

ART 470R Printmaking III

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fee: $90.00


Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits
Prerequisites: ART 260 and ART 361
Photographic processes of the 19th and 20th centuries. Students must have access to a
digital, single lens, reflex camera.
(Rotating semesters, see Academic Advising Center)

ART 463R Documentary Photography

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:1:5)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Prerequisite: BFA Status
A course that is project-oriented, self-directed and exhibited or published. Students
should register according to emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

122
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Automotive
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Automotive

The Automotive Department offers the following degrees, minors,


and clusters:
(A Division of the Mechanical Engineering Department)

B.S. in Automotive Technology (#412-144)


This degree allows students to choose a minor or two clusters from
areas such as engineering, fabrication, welding, computer science,
education, writing, and much more. Graduates of this degree are
prepared for diverse careers in the automotive industry such as developing and testing new vehicles, engines, transmissions, and electronic
components. Others, depending on their minors and interests, may
choose to write or edit for automotive publications, to instruct in or
administer automotive technology programs in high schools, colleges,
and vocational schools, or to work in a myriad of other automotiverelated professions.
B.S. in Automotive Technology, with an emphasis in Business
Management (#412-143)
This degree prepares graduates for career opportunities in managing
the operations of automotive-related businesses including manufacturers, aftermarket producers, dealerships, and other technologyoriented companies. It is also a great preparation for becoming a
business owner or entrepreneur.
A.A.S. in Automotive Technology (#346)
This degree prepares students for a challenging and rewarding career
as an automotive technician in a dealership or independent repair
company.

Justin Miller, Program Coordinator


Justin Miller, Josh Tollefson, Troy Spratling

Minor in Automotive Technology


Jamie Andersen, Secretary (208) 496-7571
Automotive Ofce (208) 496-7660
http://www.byui.edu/Automotive-technology

Cluster in Automotive Technology


Automotive courses: These classes are hands-on and interactive. Much of the required course time is spent in labs, working on
vehicles with real problems. In these courses students will become
familiar with modern automotive technology. BYU-Idahos automotive facility is well equipped with state-of-the-art equipment where
students can experience the latest technology and leave prepared to
begin a successful career.

The Automotive Department prepares students for a wide range of


exciting careers in a fast-growing, rapidly-changing industry.
The demand for skilled, educated, and honest professionals continues
to intensify as the complexity of the modern automobile increases.
As a result, our graduates are highly sought after and well-compensated. Since every household and business in the world is affected by
the transportation industry, career opportunities are plentiful.

Internships: Internships are required for automotive technology majors which allow students to gain industry experience as part of their
training. Here, students will have the opportunity to apply and to
reinforce the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Internships also serve to open doors for future careers.
Elective Courses: The Automotive Department also offers elective
courses that are open to all university students, regardless of previous
experience or knowledge. These classes are designed to teach car
owners how to purchase, care for, and perform basic maintenance on
their vehicles.
Special Requirements: Students in all automotive courses (except
Auto 100 and Auto 125) are expected to have at least a basic set of
tools. A list of the required tools can be found at http://www.byui.
edu/automotive-technology/student-resourcestool-list/ and these
tools can be purchased through the school during the rst week of
the semester for a discounted price.
GPA requirements: In order to qualify for graduation with an
automotive degree, students must earn at least a C- grade in each
core curriculum class.

123

Automotive
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

AAS in Automotive Technology (346)


Take required Foundations courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
AUTO 125
AUTO 126
AUTO 131
AUTO 132
AUTO 155
AUTO 201
AUTO 221
cont. in next column

1
1
3
3
4
4
3

cont. from previous column


AUTO 231
3
AUTO 232
3
AUTO 298
1
AUTO 340
3
AUTO 350
6
AUTO 365
6
AUTO 381
3
AUTO 382
3
47

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 course:
ME 231
WELD 101
Optional Course:
AUTO 291

Program Notes:
3
3
3
0.5
0.5

Total Major Credits=50


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- NO

BS in Automotive Technology (412-143)


Business Management Emphasis
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
AUTO 125
1
AUTO 131
3
AUTO 132
3
AUTO 155
4
11

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 courses:
B 212
ME 142
ME 172
ME 231
WELD 101

Take these courses:


AUTO 201
AUTO 221
AUTO 231
AUTO 232
AUTO 298
AUTO 300
AUTO 340
AUTO 350
AUTO 365
AUTO 381
AUTO 382
AUTO 398

Emphasis Courses
Take theses courses:
ACCTG 180
CIT 110
ECON 150
MATH 221A

4
3
3
3
1
3
3
6
6
3
3
1
39

Take 1 course:
B 220
B 275
B 283

4
3
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
12

Business Courses
Apply to and take IBC
Group courses. (These courses
may not be taken as stand
alone courses. They must be
taken as the 12 credit IBC
course).
B 302
3
B 322
3
B 342
3
B 362
3
12
Optional Course:
AUTO 291

Program Notes:

0.5
0.5

3
3
3
3

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

124

Spring-Fall---- NO

Automotive
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Automotive Technology (412-144)


General Automotive Emphasis
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
AUTO 125
1
AUTO 126
1
AUTO 131
3
AUTO 132
3
AUTO 155
4
12
Take these courses:
AUTO 201
AUTO 221
AUTO 231
AUTO 232
AUTO 298
AUTO 300
AUTO 340
AUTO 350
AUTO 365
AUTO 381
Cont. next column

4
3
3
3
1
3
3
6
6
3

Cont. from previous column


AUTO 382
3
AUTO 398
1
39
Supplemental Courses
Take 3 credits:
B 212
4
CIT 110
3
ME 142
3
ME 172
3
ME 231
3
ME 331
3
ME 332
3
WELD 101
3
WELD 120
3
WELD 123
3
3

Program Notes:
REQUIRED MINOR OR CLUSTERS
Students choosing to major in Automotive Technology with a General Automotive Emphasis need
to choose either a minor or two clusters that align with their career goals. As a general rule,
minors and clusters in the areas listed below are acceptable. Other minors or clusters must be
approved by the automotive program coordinator.
Suggested areas for minors or clusters:
Agribusiness, Accounting, Administrative Assistant, Advertising, Business, Chemistry, Communications, Computer Information Technology, Computer Science, Economics, Education,
Electrical Engineering, English, Finance, Engineering, Entrepreneurship, Human Resources
Management, Manufacturing, News/Journalism, Physics, Professional Presentations, Professional Writing and Editing, Public Relations, and Welding and Fabrication.

Total Major Credits=54


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=26
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- NO

Minor in Automotive Technology (210)


Take required Foundations courses
Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take 1 course
AUTO 100
AUTO 125
Take these courses:
AUTO 126
AUTO 131
AUTO 132
AUTO 155
AUTO 231
AUTO 232

1
1
1
1
3
3
4
3
3
17

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 course:
AUTO 221
AUTO 340
AUTO 350*
AUTO 365*
AUTO 381
AUTO 382

Program Notes:
3
3
6
6
3
3
3

*By instructor authorization only.

Total Minor Credits=21


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

125

Spring-Fall---- NO

Automotive
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Automotive Engine Performance Concentration (D 123)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
AUTO 125
AUTO 131
AUTO 132
AUTO 155
AUTO 231
AUTO 232
AUTO 350
AUTO 381
AUTO 382
AUTO 398
IDS 398R
IDS 499

1
3
3
4
3
3
6
3
3
1
1-3
2
33

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 course:
AUTO 300
AUTO 340

Program Notes:
3
3
3

Total Concentration Credits=36


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- NO

Automotive Technology and Design and Manufacturing Concentration (D 124)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Course
Take these courses:
AUTO 131
AUTO 132
AUTO 231
AUTO 232
AUTO 340
AUTO 381
AUTO 382
ME 172
ME 231
ME 331
ME 332

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
33

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Program Notes:

Total Concentration Credits=36


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- NO

Automotive Powertrain Concentration (D 125)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Course
Take these courses:
AUTO 125
AUTO 131
AUTO 132
AUTO 201
AUTO 231
AUTO 232
AUTO 350
AUTO 365
AUTO 398

1
3
3
4
3
3
6
6
1
30

Take 1 course:
AUTO 300
AUTO 340

Program Notes:
3
3
3

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Total Concentration Credits=36


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

126

Spring-Fall---- NO

Automotive
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Automotive Technology Concentration (D 145)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Course
Take these courses:
AUTO 125
AUTO 126
AUTO 131
AUTO 132
AUTO 231
AUTO 232
AUTO 298
AUTO 300
AUTO 381
AUTO 382

1
1
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
24

Take 1 course:
AUTO 155
AUTO 201
AUTO 221

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take 1 course:
AUTO 398
1
IDS 398R
1-3
1

4
4
3
3

Take 1 course:
AUTO 340
AUTO 350
AUTO 362

Take this course:


IDS 499

3
6
6
3

Program Notes:

2
2

Total Concentration Credits=33


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- NO

Automotive Pre-approved Clusters


Automotive Technology
Take 1 course:
AUTO 100
Automotive Maintenance 1
AUTO 125
Automotive Major Essentials
Take these courses:
AUTO 126
Technical Skills
AUTO 131
Automotive Electrical Systems 1
AUTO 132
Automotive Engine Performance 1
Take 4 credits:
AUTO 155
Steering, Suspension and Brakes
AUTO 221
Air Conditioning & Heating
AUTO 231
Automotive Electrical Systems 2
AUTO 232
Automotive Engine Performance 2
Total Credits

Course Descriptions
AUTO 100 Auto Maintenance I

6100
1
1
1
3
3
4
3
3
3
12

Credits*

AUTO 132 Automotive Engine Performance 1

(1:1:0)

This class is a basic consumer-awareness and career exploration course. It is designed to


teach students how their automobiles work and how to maintain them. They will also be
introduced to career opportunities in the automotive field. Some of the course time will
be spent in the classroom, while some will be working in the lab with small groups.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AUTO 125 Automotive Major Essentials

(1:0:0)

This is an online course required for all automotive majors, but open to students of other
majors. It is designed to introduce students to some of the foundational principles and
knowledge required to be successful in other automotive courses.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AUTO 126 Technical Skills

AUTO 155 Steering, Suspension and Brakes

(4:2:7)

Course Fees: $30.00


A class oriented towards automotive majors that teaches service and repair procedures
on the steering, suspension, and brake systems that are found on today's cars and light
trucks.
(Spring, Fall)

(1:0:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 100 or AUTO 125
Auto 126 is a hands-on class in which students will learn and practice foundational
automotive service engineering skills. They will experience lab safety, electrical testing,
diagnostic processes, use of service information, fasteners, precision measuring, engine
operation and testing, and more. This class will prepare students for future automotive
courses and internships.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AUTO 131 Automotive Electrical Systems 1

(3:2:4)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisite: AUTO 131
This class is the second of a 4 part series. A focus on how ignition systems and computer
electronics affect drivability and exhaust emissions will be emphasized. Lab experience
will focus on diagnosing vehicles and repairing the cause of engine performance issues.
Learning to interpret scan tool data and lab scopes will be important for success.
Students may supply their own tools. Please refer to the list of required tools on the
automotive department website. Other requirements are specified by the instructor.
(Spring, Fall)

AUTO 201 Automotive Drive Trains

(4:2:7)

Course Fees: $30.00


This is a course that focuses on theories of operation, diagnosis, and maintenance,
pertaining to the drive train system. The lab experience will include the diagnosis, repair,
and/or overhaul of manual transmission/transaxle, clutch assemblies, differential axles,
drive shafts/u-joints, four wheel drive, and all wheel drive systems.
(Winter)

(3:2:4)

AUTO 221 Heat and Air Conditioning

Course Fees: $20.00


An introduction to basic electrical principles and exploration of various automotive
electrical systems. Includes a lab in which students will practice testing, diagnosing, and
repairing automotive electrical faulty on live vehicles.
(Spring, Fall)

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 131 and AUTO 132
Wiring diagrams, vacuum circuits, climate control systems, air conditioning theory, and
their computer controls diagnosis and repair of all related systems.
(Spring, Fall)

127

Automotive
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
AUTO 231 Automotive Electrical Systems 2

(3:2:4)

AUTO 381 Automotive Engine Performance 3

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisite: AUTO 131
A continuation of basic electrical principles and exploration of various automotive
electrical and electronic systems. Includes a lab in which students will practice testing,
diagnosing, and repairing automotive electrical and electronic faults on live vehicles.
(Winter)

AUTO 232 Automotive Engine Performance 2

(3:2:4)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 131 and AUTO 132
This class is the second of a 4 part series. A focus on how ignition systems and computer
electronics affect drivability and exhaust emissions will be emphasized. Lab experience
will focus on diagnosing vehicles and repairing the cause of engine performance issues.
Learning to interpret scan tool data and lab scopes will be important for success.
Students must supply their own tools. Please refer to the list of required tools on the
automotive department website. Other requirements are specified by the instructor.
(Winter)

AUTO 290 Independent Study

AUTO 382 Automotive Engine Performance 4

(1-3:0:0)

AUTO 398 Auto Professional Internship

(0.5:2:0)

(1:0:0)

Twelve consecutive weeks of supervised on-the-job training, totaling at least 200 hours.
Required for all automotive majors. Conditions of internship are handled on an individual
basis by department intern coordinator.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AUTO 300 Automotive Business Management

(3:2:2)

Course Fees: $20.00


A study of business management in the automotive industry including human resources,
accounting, legal, and management practices in applications that are unique to the
automotive industry. Also covers professional networking and career planning.
(Winter)

AUTO 340 Auto Alternate Fuel Systems

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $30.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 155, AUTO 201 and AUTO 232
This course discusses the newest information of today's fuels and alternative power
sources. Hybrid systems and alternate fuels such as ethanol, methanol, diesel, bio-fuel,
will be the focus of the class. System comparisons, operation of these systems and how
they impact the transportation industry will be explored as well.
(Winter)

AUTO 350 Major Engine Repair

(6:3:9)

Course Fees: $30.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 201, AUTO 231 and AUTO 232
This course teaches the theory, operation, diagnosis and repair of automotive engines.
(Winter)

AUTO 365 Auto Transmissions/Transaxles

(1:0:0)

A customized internship designed to help automotive students obtain experience in the


sector of the automotive industry that they wish to obtain eventual employment in.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 2 credits


This class covers the basic information and procedures necessary to prepare to take the
national ASE certification tests. Students will discuss test methodology, as well as take
practice certification tests.
(Winter, Fall)

AUTO 298 Automotive Internship

(3:2:4)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 231 and AUTO 232
Engine management systems with an emphasis in computer controls, multiplexing, late
model power train innovations, and on board diagnostics.
(Spring, Fall)

Special problems in automotive skills. Credit and schedule arranged with Automotive
Department Chair.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

AUTO 291 Certification

(3:2:4)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 231 and AUTO 232
Auto 381 is the third of a four part automotive engine performance sequence at BYUIdaho. About 1/3 of the time will be spent in class and demonstrations while the other
2/3 will be spent in lab working on customer vehicles with real problems. Lab projects
will relate directly to engine performance issues. Engine performance is a broad topic
and is the one area of automotive technology that is challenging due to the fact that
many of the changes that occur each year with automobiles are with power-train construction and systems management of the ignition, fuel, and emissions systems. In fact, most
every system found on today's vehicles has impact on engine performance since they are
networked together.
(Spring, Fall)

(6:3:9)

Course Fees: $30.00


Prerequisites: AUTO 201, AUTO 231 and AUTO 232
Theory of operation, diagnosis and repair of common automatic transmissions used in
passenger cars and light trucks.
(Winter)

128
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Zoology (700-170)

Department of

Biology

The zoology emphasis is designed to prepare students for career


opportunities and graduate work in zoology and related areas. This
emphasis will provide students with opportunities to study the structure, function, diversity, ecology, and evolution with an appropriate
minor or clusters. This emphasis can qualify students for entry-level
positions in industry or government agencies, as well as for further
study at the graduate level.

Neuroscience (700-62)
Neuroscience is a multi-disciplinary program that focuses on the
development, structure and function of the nervous system and its
regulation of body systems and behavior. The neuroscience emphasis
examines topics such as molecular and cellular neurobiology,
neuroanatomy, the neural basis of behavior, learning, memory,
cognition and perception, neuroendocrinology, neurophysiology,
neuronpharmacology, and neurological disorders. Students will be
prepared to pursue advanced degrees in biology, psychology, and
neuroscience or to enter into the pharmaceutical and biotechnology
workforce. Neuroscience is an excellent pre-professional eld of study
for those interested in health professions, law, or business.

Environmental Biology (700-68)

John Zenger, Department Chair


Joseph Anderson, Gary Baird, Lanning Baker, Eric Billman, Tate
Carter, Steven Christenson, Van Christman, Robert Coleman,
Mark Dewall, Clair Eckersell, John Grifth, Ehren Haderlie,
Michael Groesbeck, Holden Higginbotham, Alan Holyoak, Jason
Hunt, Todd Kelson, Sidney Palmer, Seth Ririe, Jason Shaw, Dave
Stricklan, Russell Thurston, Travis Wall, Gene Weller, Dwight
Wray, John Zenger

The Environmental Biology emphasis is designed to prepare students


for careers and graduate studies in the biology-related elds of
environmental science. Students selecting this emphasis complete all
core courses for the Biology Major, as well as specied coursework
designed to prepare them for work as environmental biologists. This
sector of environmental science is expected to undergo signicant
increases in employment opportunities for the foreseeable future, and
career paths for people trained in this eld are found in education,
government, industry, and non-governmental organizations.

Lark Hillier, Department Secretary (208) 496-4600


http://www.byui.edu/biology/

Human Biology (700-69)


The Human Biology emphasis is designed for students planning on
careers centered on human health and well-being, such as medicine,
dentistry, optometry, podiatry, physical/occupational therapy, etc.,
and for students desiring to pursue graduate degrees in anatomy and
physiology. The courses were chosen to prepare students for further
study in these professional schools as well as for students interested in
continuing their education in graduate school.

Department Description
The Department of Biology provides a variety of classes for students
seeking a degree in biology and many biology courses servicing a
number of non-biology majors such as Nursing, Exercise Science and
Health Science. Bachelor of Science degrees are offered in Biology,
Ecology/Wildlife/Fisheries, and Biology Education. Minors can be
earned in Biology, Natural Resources and Biology Education.

Biotechnology (700-70)

Program Descriptions

Biotechnology is the application of biological information and techniques to meet medical, agricultural, and environmental needs. Students selecting this emphasis will be well prepared to pursue graduate
studies in genetics, molecular biology, cellular biology, biochemistry
and physiology. The emphasis will also prepare students for immediate employment as entry level technicians in one of hundreds of
different biotechnology companies and university research labs. The
emphasis will also serve pre-professional students interested in one of
the medical professions.

B.S. in Biology (700)


The biology degree provides a solid foundation in biology. It is
designed to prepare students for professional programs in medicine,
dentistry, optometry, podiatry, physical/occupational therapy, etc., or
graduate programs in botany, ecology, natural resources, biotechnology, microbiology, neurobiology, etc. In addition, the degree
provides preparation for those students seeking employment after
completing a bachelors degree. Students majoring in Biology select
one of the following emphases depending on their interests and
career goals.

Microbiology (700-55)
The Microbiology emphasis is designed to prepare students for career
opportunities and graduate work in microbiology and related elds
such as bacteriology, immunology, medical microbiology, and virology. Although this emphasis does not give students the depth that a
degree in microbiology does, it will give students sufcient background and training to work in laboratories using basic microbiological techniques and to pursue further study in the eld.

129

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

B.S. in Plant and Wildlife Ecology (488)


This degree provides a powerful foundation for most ecological and
natural resource related elds. It offers ve separate areas of specialization, with course work requirements designed to meet State and
Federal hiring prerequisites, and to prepare students for graduate
studies.

Range Emphasis (488-179)


The Range emphasis prepares students for careers in rangeland
conservation, rangeland ecology, rangeland/livestock production
consulting, wildlife and livestock production in a rangeland setting, or
for post-baccalaureate studies in rangeland ecology related elds.

Ecology Emphasis (488-180)


The Ecology emphasis is designed to be somewhat broader than the
other emphasis in the 487 series and should be taken by students interested in careers in conservation biology, natural history education/
interpretation, natural resource policy/law, as park rangers, or as a
foundation for post baccalaureate studies in ecology related elds.

Wildlife Emphasis (488-176)


The Wildlife emphasis prepares students for careers as wildlife biologists, conservation ofcers, natural resource managers, park rangers,
natural resource policy/administration ofcers, and for legal careers
and post-baccalaureate studies in wildlife related elds.

Fisheries Emphasis (488-177)


The Fisheries emphasis prepares students for careers as sheries biologists, conservation ofcers, natural resource managers, park rangers,
natural resource policy/administration ofcers and for legal careers
and post-baccalaureate studies in sheries related elds.

Plant Biology Emphasis (488-178)


The Plant Biology emphasis prepares students for careers as botanists.
The degree also provides a strong foundation for post-baccalaureate
studies in plant ecology, physiology, systematic, pathology, or other
related elds.

B.S. in Biology Education (800)


The Biology Education Major at BYUIdaho requires completion of
specic coursework in Biology, BYUIdaho Foundations classes, and
Education classes needed for certication as a secondary education
teacher in the state of Idaho (Idaho certication qualies graduates to
teach in 44 states). The Biology Education major at BYUIdaho also
requires the completion of a Science Education Minor. Students who
graduate from this program are eligible for teacher certication in
biology and in their chosen Science education minor.
For a listing of approved Secondary Science Education majors and
minors, see the Teacher Education section of this catalog or the program notes for BS in Biology Education.

B.S. in Biology Education Composite (805)


A second pathway to the Biology Education Major at BYUIdaho
requires completion of specic coursework in Biology, BYUIdaho
Foundation classes, and Secondary Education classes needed for
certication as a teacher in the State of Idaho. The Composite Biology Education major at BYUIdaho does not require a minor, but
gives more emphasis to preparation in the various biological sciences.
Students who graduate from this program are eligible for teacher
certication in biology but do not receive any other teaching endorsements.

130

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Plant and Wildlife Ecology


Wildlife Emphasis (488-176)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 199
1
BIO 208
4
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13

Take these courses:


AGTEC 286
AGTEC 486
BIO 225
BIO 302
BIO 303
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 375
BIO 379
BIO 423
BIO 475
MATH 221B
Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 498R

3
3
3
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
36

Take these courses:


AS 215
BIO 307
BIO 312
BIO 351
BIO 360
BIO 390
BIO 392
BIO 445
BIO 446
BIO 447

Program Notes:
4
3
4
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
30

1-4
1-4
1

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Plant and Wildlife Ecology


Fisheries Emphasis (488-177)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 199
1
BIO 208
4
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13

Take these courses:


AGTEC 286
AGTEC 486
BIO 225
BIO 302
BIO 303
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 375
BIO 379
BIO 423
BIO 475
MATH 221B
Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 498R

3
3
3
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
36

Take these courses:


BIO 307
BIO 312
BIO 314
BIO 331
BIO 351
BIO 360
BIO 420
BIO 445
BIO 446
Take 1 course:
BIO 390
BIO 392

Program Notes:
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
28
2
2
2

1-4
1-4
1

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

131

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Plant and Wildlife Ecology


Plant Biology Emphasis (488-178)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 199
1
BIO 208
4
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13

Take these courses:


AGTEC 286
AGTEC 486
BIO 225
BIO 302
BIO 303
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 375
BIO 379
BIO 423
BIO 475
MATH 221B

3
3
3
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
36

Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 498R

Take these courses:


APS 220
APS 220L
APS 413
BIO 209
BIO 210
BIO 391
BIO 392
BIO 393
BIO 401R
BIO 408
CHEM 351

Program Notes:
3
1
1
4
3
2
2
4
1
4
4
29

1-4
1-4
1

Total Major Credits=79


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=1
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Plant and Wildlife Ecology


Range Emphasis(488-179)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 199
1
BIO 208
4
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13

Take these courses:


AGTEC 286
AGTEC 486
BIO 225
BIO 302
BIO 303
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 375
BIO 379
BIO 423
BIO 475
MATH 221B
Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 498R

3
3
3
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
36

Take these courses:


APS 220
AGRON 425
AS 220
AS 360
BIO 210
BIO 325
BIO 351
BIO 455
BIO 466
Take 1 course:
BIO 390
BIO 392

Program Notes:
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
28
2
2
2

1-4
1-4
1

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

132

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Plant and Wildlife Ecology


Ecology Emphasis (488-180)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 199
1
BIO 208
4
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13

Take these courses:


AGTEC 286
AGTEC 486
BIO 225
BIO 302
BIO 303
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 375
BIO 379
BIO 423
BIO 475
MATH 221B
Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 498R

3
3
3
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
36
1-4
1-4
1

Take 1 course:
BIO 445
BIO 446
BIO 447
BIO 448
Take these courses:
APS 220
APS 220L
BIO 210
BIO 351
BIO 392
BIO 393
BIO 408
BIO 420
CHEM 351

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
2
4
4
3
4
27

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Biology
Microbiology Emphasis (700-55)
Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 180
4
BIO 199
1
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13
Take these courses:
BIO 375
BIO 475
MATH 221B

3
3
3
9

Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 497
BIO 498R
Take these courses:
BIO 181
BIO 377

1-4
3
1-4
1
4
3
7

Take these courses:


BIO 321
BIO 410
BIO 411
BIO 412
BIO 413
Take 6 credits:
BIO 376
CHEM 481
CHEM 482
HS 370

Program Notes:
4
3
3
3
2
15
3
3
3
3
6

Total Major Credits=51


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 29
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

133

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Biology
Neuroscience Emphasis (700-62)
Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 180
4
BIO 199
1
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13
Take these courses:
BIO 375
BIO 475
MATH 221B

Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 497
BIO 498R
Take these courses:
BIO 181
BIO 377

1-4
3
1-4
1

Take these courses:


BIO 240
BIO 461
BIO 485

4
5
4
13

4
3
7

Take 9 credits:
BIO 376
BIO 380
BIO 460
BIO 462
PSYCH 342
PSYCH 370
PSYCH 384

Program Notes:
3
4
4
2
3
3
3
9

3
3
3
9

Total Major Credits=52


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 28
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Biology
Environmental Biology Emphasis (700-68)
Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 180
4
BIO 199
1
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13
Take these courses:
BIO 375
BIO 475
MATH 221B

3
3
3
9

Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 497
BIO 498R
Take these courses:
BIO 181
BIO 379

1-4
3
1-4
1
4
3
7

Take these courses:


BIO 250
BIO 302
BIO 423
CHEM 220
GEOG 230
Take 6 credits:
BIO 314
BIO 351
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 390
BIO 391
BIO 392
BIO 393
BIO 420

Program Notes:
4
4
3
5
3
19
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
4
3
6

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

134

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Biology
Human Biology Emphasis (700-69)
Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 180
4
BIO 199
1
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13
Take these courses:
BIO 375
BIO 475
MATH 221B

3
3
3
9

Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 497
BIO 498R

1-4
3
1-4
1

Take these courses:


BIO 181
BIO 377
Take these courses:
BIO 460
BIO 461

4
3
7
4
5
9

Take 10 credits:
BIO 240
BIO 321
BIO 376
BIO 380
BIO 381
BIO 383
BIO 386
BIO 410
BIO 411
BIO 413
BIO 462
CHEM 481
ESS 375
HRHP 359

4
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
10

Take 3 credits of any 400


level Biology Course
BIO 4XX
3
3

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=52


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 28
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Biology
Biotechnology Emphasis (700-70)
Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 180
4
BIO 199
1
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
13
Take these courses:
BIO 375
BIO 475
MATH 221B

3
3
3
9

Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 497
BIO 498R
Take these courses:
BIO 181
BIO 377

1-4
3
1-4
1
4
3
7

Take these courses:


BIO 321
BIO 376
CHEM 351
CHEM 481
Take 8 credits:
BIO 410
BIO 411
BIO 412
BIO 413
CHEM 220

Program Notes:
4
3
4
3
14
3
3
3
2
5
8

Total Major Credits=52


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 28
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

135

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Biology
Zoology Emphasis (700-170)
Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Introduction to Biology
Module
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
BIO 180
4
BIO 181
4
BIO 199
1
MATH 221B
3
12
Science Module
Take these courses:
BIO 375
BIO 377
BIO 475
CHEM 105
CHEM 106

Animal Diversity Module


Take this course:
BIO 204
4
4
Take 9 credits:
BIO 312
BIO 331
BIO 445
BIO 446
BIO 447
BIO 448

4
3
3
3
3
3
9

3
3
3
4
4
17

Enrichment Module
Take 9 credits:
BIO 208
BIO 209
BIO 302
BIO 312
BIO 314
BIO 331
BIO 362
BIO 380
BIO 381
BIO 383
BIO 401R
BIO 420
BIO 445
BIO 446
BIO 447
BIO 448
BIO 460
BIO 461
BIO 499R

4
4
4
4
3
3
3
4
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
4
5
1-6
9

Internship
Take 1 course:
BIO 398
BIO 497
BIO 498R

Program Notes:
1-4
3
1-4
1

Total Major Credits=52


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 28
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Biology Education (800)


Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Education Core
Take these courses:
ED 200
ED 304
ED 448
ED 461
ED 492
SPED 360

2
3
3
3
10
2
23

Take these courses:


BIO 180
BIO 181
BIO 204
BIO 209
BIO 305
BIO 375
BIO 405
BIO 475
Take 1 course:
BIO 250
BIO 302

4
4
4
4
2
3
3
3
27
4
4
4

Take 1 course:
BIO 210
BIO 312
BIO 321
BIO 331
BIO 445
BIO 446
BIO 447
Take 1 course:
BIO 377
BIO 378

Program Notes:
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2

Students in this education major are required to take a


Science Education Minor (worth 20 credits) for graduation.
The possible Minors are: Natural Science Education (130),
Chemistry Education (172), Physics Education (178), Earth
Science Education (181), or Physical Science
Education (182)
Once you have completed 24 university credit hours a hold will
be placed on your registration until you speak with the Biology
Education Program Director.

Total Major Credits=36


Education Core Credits=23
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

136

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Biology Education Composite (805)


Take required Foundation courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Education Core
Take these courses:
ED 200
ED 304
ED 448
ED 461
ED 492
SPED 360

2
3
3
3
10
2
23

Take these courses:


BIO 180
BIO 181
BIO 204
BIO 209
BIO 221
BIO 222
BIO 230
BIO 302
BIO 303
BIO 305
BIO 375
cont. in next column

4
4
4
4
3
1
4
4
2
2
3

cont. from previous column


BIO 405
3
BIO 475
3
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
49
Take 1 course:
BIO 377
BIO 378

3
2
2

Take 1 course:
BIO 210
BIO 312
BIO 321
BIO 331
BIO 445
BIO 446
BIO 447
Take 1 course:
BIO 376
MATH 221B

Program Notes:
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3

Once you have completed 24


university credits hours a hold
will be placed on your registration until you speak with the
Biology Education Program
Director.

3
3
3

Total Major Credits=57


Education Core Credits=23

This major is available on the following tracks:


Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Natural Resources Minor (141)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses:
BIO 302
BIO 351
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 423

4
3
3
3
3
16

Take 6 credits:
APS 220
APS 220L
BIO 208
BIO 209
BIO 210
BIO 307
BIO 312
BIO 314
BIO 331
continued next column

3
1
4
4
3
3
4
3
3

cont. from previous column


BIO 379
3
BIO 390
2
BIO 391
2
BIO 392
2
BIO 393
4
BIO 408
4
BIO 420
3
BIO 446
3
BIO 447
3
GEOG 230
3
6

Program Notes:

Total Minor Credits=22


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

137

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Minor in Biology (143)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Minor Courses
Take these courses:
BIO 208
BIO 302

4
4
8

OR
Take these courses:
BIO 180
BIO 181
Take 4 credits:
CHEM 101
CHEM 101L
OR
CHEM 105

4
4
8
3
1

Take 8 credits:
BIO 302
BIO 312
BIO 314
BIO 321
BIO 331
BIO 351
BIO 352
BIO 362
BIO 375
BIO 376
BIO 377
BIO 379
continued next column

4
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

cont. from previous column


BIO 380
4
BIO 390
2
BIO 391
2
BIO 392
2
BIO 393
4
BIO 408
4
BIO 410
3
BIO 411
3
BIO 412
3
BIO 413
2
BIO 420
3
BIO 423
3
BIO 446
3
continued next column

cont. from previous column


BIO 447
3
BIO 460
4
BIO 461
5
BIO 475
3
BIO 485
4
CHEM 481
3
8

Program Notes:

4
4

Total Minor Credits=20


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor in Biology Education (173)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Minor Courses
Take these courses:
BIO 204
BIO 208
BIO 302
BIO 475

4
4
4
3
15

Take 1 course:
BIO 209
BIO 210

4
3
3

Take 1 course:
BIO 375
BIO 378

Program Notes:
3
2
2

Students wishing to take this education minor are required to


combine it with a Science Education Major for graduation.
The possible majors are:
Chemistry Education (810), Earth Science Education (870), or
Physics Education (870).

Total Minor Credits=20


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

138

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Biology Pre-approved Clusters
Pre-Veterinary
Take these courses:
BIO 221
General Microbiology
BIO 222
General Microbiology Lab
BIO 375
Genetics and Molecular Biology
PH 105
Introductory Applied Physics 1
Take 1 course:
BIO 180
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 208
General Botany
Total Credits
Recreation Therapy (Recreation Management Majors)
Take these courses:
BIO 264
Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 264L
Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
BIO 265
Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 265L
Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
Take 4 credits:
BIO 240
Neurobiology
HS 280
Medical Terminology
HS 349
Sports Medicine
HS 349L
Sports Medicine Lab
HS 351
Gerontology
Total Credits
Natural Resource (Recreation Management Majors)
Take this course:
BIO 202
Natural Resource Management
Take 9 credits:
BIO 225
Range Ecology
BIO 302
Ecology I
BIO 307
Wildlife Law and Enforcement
BIO 351
Principles Wildlife Management
BIO 423
Natural Resource Policy
GEOG 230
Introduction to GIS
Total Credits
Neuroscience (Psychology Majors)
Take these courses:
BIO 240
Neurobiology
BIO 485
Advanced Neuroscience
Take 4 credits:
BIO 180
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 264
Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 264L
Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
BIO 265
Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 265L
Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
Total Credits
Biological Illustrations (Art Majors)
Take these courses:
BIO 208
General Botany
BIO 460
Human Anatomy
Take 7 credits:
BIO 204
Vertebrate and Invertebrate Strategies
BIO 209
An Evolutionary Survey of Plants
BIO 210
Plant Systematics
BIO 221
General Microbiology
BIO 331
General Entomology
BIO 380
Histology with Lab
BIO 445
Ichthyology
BIO 446
Ornithology
BIO 447
Mammalogy
Total Credits

Microbiology
Take these courses:
BIO 221
General Microbiology
BIO 222
General Microbiology Lab
OR
BIO 321
Biology of Microorganisms
Take 8-11 credits:
BIO 410
Immunology
BIO 411
Medical Microbiology
BIO 412
Virology
BIO 413
Advanced Microbiology Lab
HS 370
Epidemiology
Total Credits

1100
3
1
3
4
4
4
15
1101
3
1
3
1

Biotechnology/Forensics
Take these courses:
BIO 180
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 375
Genetics and Molecular Biology
BIO 377
Techniques in Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology
Take 1 course:
BIO 376
Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 481
Biochemistry I
Total Credits

4
2
3
1
2
12

1103

Health Professions Prerequisites


Take 12-15 credits:
BIO 180
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 181
Introduction to Biology II
BIO 221
General Microbiology
BIO 222
General Microbiology Lab
BIO 321
Biology of Microorganisms
CHEM 105
General Chemistry I
CHEM 106
General Chemistry II
CHEM 351
Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 352
Organic Chemistry II
PH 105
Introduction to Applied Physics I
PH 106
Introduction to Applied Physics II
Total Credits

1104

Pre-Profession
Take these courses:
BIO 180
Introduction to Biology I
BIO 181
Introduction to Biology II
Take 5-7 credits:
BIO 375
Genetics and Molecular Biology
BIO 376
Cell and Molecular Biology
BIO 460
Human Anatomy with Lab
BIO 461
Principles of Physiology
CHEM 481
Biochemistry I
Total Credits

1102
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
13

4
4
4
3
1
3
1
12

4
4
4
4
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
15

139

1105
3
1
4
3
3
3
2
3
12
1106
4
3
3
3
3
13
1107
4
4
3
1
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
12
1200
4
4
3
3
4
5
3
13

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Course Descriptions
BIO 180 Introduction to Biology I

Credits*

BIO 222 General Microbiology Lab

(4:3:2)

Biology 180 is the first semester of a year-long Introduction to Biology course. It includes
the areas of biological chemistry, cellular structure and function, and metabolism. There
is a weekly lab in addition to the lecture. This course is a prerequisite for most other
upper division courses in Biology.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 181 Introduction to Biology II

BIO 225 Range Management

(4:3:2)

BIO 230 Human Biology

(1:1:0)

BIO 240 Neurobiology

BIO 250 Environmental Biology with Lab

(4:3:3)

BIO 250L Environmental Biology Lab

(4:3:3)

BIO 264 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

(4:3:2)

BIO 264L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab

(1:0:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Bio 264 L is the laboratory accompaniment of the first part of a two-semester course
studying the anatomy and physiology of the human body. While the lecture mainly focuses
on physiology, most of the anatomical learning occurs in this lab. The course is designed
for students of nursing and the allied health professions. Students wishing to apply to
the nursing program must complete both the lecture and lab components. This course is
not acceptable for biology major credit. (These students should take Bio 460 and 461
instead of 264 and 265.)
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(4:3:3)

BIO 265 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: BIO 264


Second part of a two-semester course to prepare students for further study in the health
and medical fields. Specifically designed for students of nursing and the allied health
professions. Includes structure and function of the senses, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine and reproductive systems. Not acceptable for biology
major credit.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisite: BIO 208
A basic course in vascular plant classification, systematics, and nomenclature, including a
survey of common or important vascular plant families, with emphasis on flowering plants
and the local flora. Students will also learn the skills necessary for plant identification.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 221 General Microbiology

(3:3:0)

First part of a two semester course to prepare students for further study in the health and
medical fields. Specifically designed for students of nursing and the allied health professions. Includes basic biochemistry, structure and function of the cell, tissues, skeleton,
muscles and nervous systems of the body. Not acceptable for biology major credit.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: BIO 208
An introduction and overview to the evolution, phylogeny, morphology, anatomy, and life
history of various photosynthetic organisms, including cyanobacteria, archaea, protists,
algae, and land plants, but also including some non-photosynthetic organisms traditionally considered plants, such as fungi, slimemolds, and watermolds.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 210 Plant Systematics

(1:0:2)

Selected experiments dealing with possible human impact on the ecosystems.

Course Fees: $10.00


An introduction to Botany including cell structure/function, plant physiology, heredity,
evolution, reproduction, plant anatomy. Lab is required.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 209 An Evolutionary Survey of Plants

(4:3:2)

This course will use basic ecological principles to examine environmental issues. The
environmental issues range from local to global and include direct and indirect human
impact on ecosystems. This class includes a 2 hour lab (Bio 250L) to allow hands on
understanding of what is covered in lecture.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Course Fees: $10.00


Comparative organization and evolutionary significance of adaptive morphological,
physiological, behavioral, reproductive and ecological differences in vertebrates and
invertebrates.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 208 General Botany

(4:3:2)

This is an introductory course in Neuroscience. It covers the elements of Neurobiology


by providing an introduction to the nervous system; examines cellular communication,
sensory, motor and integrating systems, such as, the neural basis of behavior; and explores the plasticity of neural systems in learning, during development and via hormonal
influences.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Course Fees: $25.00


The management of natural resources such as wildlife, fisheries, forests, range, and recreational lands. The orientation of the course will be ecological with emphasis on economic
principles, ecosystem interrelationships and current National Natural Resource Policy.
(Winter and Fall)

BIO 204 Invert/Vertebrate Zoology

(4:3:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


An introductory course in human anatomy and physiology for non-science and non-health
professions majors.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

The course will be divided into 6 modules as follows: 1: General Overview *Required
for all students* 2: Ecology/Wildlife 3: Graduate Programs / Academic Careers 4: PreProfessional Careers (med, dent, opt, vet, etc.) 5: Industry Careers (lab, pharmaceutical
reps, etc.) 6: Allied Health (chiropractics, PA, OP, PT, etc.) Each student will be expected
to attend all of Module 1: General Overview, then select three of the remaining five
modules. Modules may be taught by different faculty members. Each module will have
its own unique information pertinent to the topics covered and a set of requirements for
those students who attend that module. These requirements may include reading assignments, reports, summary sheets or written papers.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 202 Natural Resource Management

(3:3:0)

Subject material will focus on: rangeland management history, physical characteristics
descriptions of rangelands, rangeland plant physiology, ecology, inventory, monitoring,
stocking rates, grazing methods, wildlife livestock distribution, animal nutrition, multiple
use management, livestock production on rangelands, rangeland wildlife and manipulation of range vegetation.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: BIO 180
Bio 181 is the second semester of a year-long Introduction to Biology course. It includes
the areas of classical genetics, molecular biology, ecology, and evolution. There is a
weekly lab in addition to the lecture.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 199 Biology Orientation

(1:0:2)

Course Fees: $5.00


Co-requisite: BIO 221
In this course, students use the microscope to study different types of microorganisms
and learn the methods used to grow, identify, and characterize them.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

In this course, students will study the microorganisms (especially bacteria and viruses),
their metabolism and requirements for growth, the methods used to grow and study them,
the disease processes caused by them, methods used to control their growth, and the
immune response to infection and disease.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

140
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
BIO 265L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab

(1:0:2)

BIO 325 Range Ecology Systems Management

Course Fees: $10.00


Bio 265 L is the laboratory accompaniment of the second part of a two-semester course
studying the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course is designed for
students of nursing and the allied health professions. Students wishing to apply to the
nursing program must complete both the lecture and lab components. This course is not
acceptable for biology major credit. (These students should take Bio 460 and 461 instead
of 264 and 265.)
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 302 Ecology I

BIO 331 General Entomology

(4:3:3)

BIO 351 Principles Wildlife Management

(2:2:0)

BIO 352 Wildland Ecology and Range Plants

(2:1:2)

BIO 360 Principles of Fish Management

(3:3:0)

BIO 362 Stream Ecology

(1:1:0)

BIO 375 Genetics and Molecular Biology

(4:3:3)

BIO 376 Cell and Molecular Biology

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: BIO 181 or BIO 302


Principles, processes and methodology of molecular and cell biology. Interactions at the
cellular level including: structure and function of membranes, organelles and cytoskeletal
elements, energy metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle, cell-cell communication and
cellular movement.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: BIO 302 or BIO 181


An introduction to the ecology, diversity, structure, and function of marine communities.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 321 Biology of Microorganisms

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: BIO 208 or BIO 181


An investigation of the transmission of heritable material in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
Topics include classical genetics (patterns of inheritance, linkage and chromosome mapping), molecular biology (DNA structure and function, gene expression, biotechnology),
and population genetics.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: BIO 181, BIO 204, or BIO 302
An introduction to the diversity, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of invertebrate
animals.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 314 Marine Biology

(3:2:2)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisites: BIO 181 or BIO 302
An in-depth examination of riparian ecology. Emphasis is placed on the structure and
function of running waters. Links to terrestrial and riparian components of applicable
ecosystems will be investigated. The political issues that impinge on water issues are
explored.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

The goal of this class is to familiarize students with the principles of effective scientific
communication. We will cover areas of scientific communication that students will need
to know to be successful in their careers. Students will learn the basic rules of word,
grammar, and punctuation usage; as well as an approach to the style of writing. They will
then apply these principles when writing papers, reports, resumes; and when preparing
scientific presentations and posters.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 312 Invertebrate Zoology

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: BIO 302
Introduces students to the science of fisheries management and demonstrate how
fishery biology principles and methods are applied to management of recreational and
commercial fisheries.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

In-depth analysis of legal mandates, (Federal and State) from a resource protection paradigm. Review of environmental law and evidence collection in relation to the atmosphere
associated with the judicial system. Description of field techniques for evidence collection,
case investigation and arrest.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 311 Professional School Preparation

(3:2:2)

Course Fees: $50.00


This course requires identification of some 200 species from the intermountain area of
the west. Successful students will be able to identify mounted specimens by common,
scientific, and family names. Species are taken from a variety of habitats. Manditory
fieldtrip.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Prerequisites: All Education 200 level courses, BIO 204, BIO 208, and BIO 221; and BIO 209
or BIO 210
This class is designed to be taken in the 1st semester of the junior year. Students in this
class receive experience in lesson preparation and teaching of general biology topics to
non-majors biology students. This class is based on a mix of classroom discussion on
various aspects of science teaching, and preparation and execution of mentor-directed
teaching experiences.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 307 Wildlife Law and Enforcement

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $15.00


Introduces students to the art and science of wildlife management. This course will provide a foundation course from which students who major in Ecology and Wildlife may build
a successful collegiate experience and professional career. It will also provide insight into
the wildlife discipline for non-wildlife majors.
((See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Prerequisite: BIO 302


A continued introduction to Ecology including energy and nutrient cycling, community
composition, succession, ecosystem function, distribution and characterisitics of major
biomes.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 305 Science Teaching Principles

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $10.00


An introduction to Entomology with lectures and laboratories on insect structure, development, classification, behavior and control. An insect collection and fieldwork are required.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisites: BIO 208 or BIO 181
An introduction to Ecology including climates and distribution of life, adaptations of life to
environmental conditions, life history characteristics, population characteristics, competition, predation and parasitism. Lab is required.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 303 Ecology II

(3:3:0)

Areas of discussion include pasture lay out, fence design, water systems, herding effect,
grazing systems, leasing, permits, BLM, state ground, private ground, lease ground, forage
estimates, photosynthesis, energy store, tools of land management, drought management.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 377 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

(3:0:6)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: BIO 208 or BIO 181
Biology 377 is a comprehensive laboratory course designed to familiarize students with
essential laboratory techniques in molecular biology, cellular biology, genetics, and
biochemistry. The course topics demand a rigorous but rewarding schedule that enables
students to follow several multi-session projects from start to finish. Students successfully completing the course will find they have most of the skills necessary to work as an
entry level laboratory technician.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(4:3:2)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisite: BIO 208
Concurrent requisite: BIO 181
The topics covered will include microbial diversity, the methods used to study microorganisms, microbial metabolism and genetics, the role of microorganism in causing disease,
the immune response, the methods used to control microorganisms, and the use of
microorganisms by man.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

141
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
BIO 378 Technology in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

(2:0:6)

BIO 398 Natural Resource Internship

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: BIO 208 or BIO 181
BIO 378 is a 10 week comprehensive laboratory course designed to familiarize students
with essential laboratory techniques in molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry. The
course topics demand a rigorous but rewarding schedule that enables students to follow
several multi-session projects from start to finish.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 379 Range and Wildlife Analysis

BIO 401R Readings in Biology

(3:0:6)

BIO 405 Biology Teaching Methods

(4:3:3)

(3:3:0)

BIO 408 Advanced Botany

Prerequisites: CHEM 101; and one of the following: BIO 264 and BIO 265; or BIO 461
A study of the derangement of function of the body seen in disease states.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 383 Human Embryology

(3:3:0)

BIO 410 Immunology

(3:3:0)

BIO 411 Medical Microbiology

(2:2:0)

BIO 412 Virology

(2:0:0)

BIO 413 Advanced Microbiology Lab

(2:2:0)

(2:0:4)

Prerequisite: BIO 321


This course is a comprehensive laboratory experience designed to familiarize students
with the essential and commonly practiced techniques in the field of microbiology. Topics
include microbial culturing, staining, and detection through biochemical, fluorescent,
and serological methods, as well as experience with animal tissue culture. Students will
learn and practice common technical procedures that apply to a variety of molecular
and microbiological laboratory settings. Students will develop proficiency in experimental
design, aseptic technique, data analysis, record-keeping, and scientific writing.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: BIO 302


Restoration ecology is the study of the restoration of degraded and damaged ecosystems.
This class will examine the current state of knowledge in this area through case studies
and project design/implementation.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 393 Range and Wildland Plant Ecology

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: BIO 321
An introductory course on viruses that explores the characteristics common to all viruses.
Particular emphasis will be placed on the replication strategies used by various animal
viruses as well as the interactions between these viruses and the host cells they infect.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Prerequisite: BIO 302


This course will evaluate the ecological and economic impacts of invasive species in a
variety of habitats. What governs their invasions and treatment feasibility.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 392 Range and Wildland Restoration

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: BIO 321
Medical microbiology includes the study of bacteriology, mycology, and virology. The
major areas of emphasis will focus on host-parasitic interactions between humans and
bacteria. Paradigms in bacterial virulence factors will be stressed.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Prerequisite: BIO 302


This course will focus on fire history, safety, terms, behavior, current and past polices,
general effects of fire on soils, watersheds, and animal and plant communities.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 391 Weed Ecology

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: BIO 321
An introduction to the functions of the cells and proteins that make up the immune system of the body. The topics that will be discussed include innate immunity, structure and
function of immune system molecules, the genetics of the immune system, lymphocyte
development and activation, failure of immunity, and immune system diseases.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Prerequisites: BIO 264 and BIO 265; or BIO 461


This course is designed to help Biology students understand the basic principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and the clinical application of drugs. The mechanisms
of drug action are emphasized to correlate physiological and pharmacological principles.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 390 Fire Ecology

(4:3:3)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisite: BIO 208
This course covers advanced topics in plant structure and function. Advanced concepts in
plant morphology, anatomy, and physiology. Previous or concurrent enrollment in organic
chemistry is required.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Prerequisites: BIO 265 or BIO 180


This course is intended to provide a foundation of understanding for the processes
involved in creating gametes and their participation in the process of conception. A
discussion will then continue to discover the processes important in the development of a
fully formed and functional fetus. This course will examine the cellular and morphological
development of most of the major human body systems. The study of human embryology
is important to provide a logical framework for understanding structure and function in
the study of anatomy and physiology.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 386 Pharmacology

(3:2:3)

Course Fees: $10.00


Prerequisites: BIO 305, ED 304, and ED 361
General science teaching methods needed for certification in secondary education in the
field of biology are taught. The course focuses on classroom and laboratory techniques
specific to science teaching. Practical experience in teaching laboratories, lectures and
demonstrations will be emphasized. Students will build a science unit which demonstrates their understanding and application of inquiry and the use of a multitude of other
teaching, learning, and assessment strategies.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: BIO 264 and BIO 265; or BIO 181
Microscopic anatomy of cells and tissues and their relationship to the function of the cell.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 381 Pathophysiology

(1:1:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Selected readings in biology.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $40.00


Prerequisites: MATH 221A or MATH 221B; and BIO 181 or BIO 302)
Laboratory course designed to familiarize students with essential laboratory and field
techniques in ecology and natural resource based fields.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 380 Histology with Lab

(1-4:0:0)

This course is designed to award university credit for occupational training-based internships in any biomedical or ecological field. This course is meant for students engaged in
operational duties of a facility. Students wishing to engage in research-based internship
training are encouraged to enroll in the department's research internship (Bio 498R).
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(4:3:2)

Prerequisite: BIO 302


The purpose of this course is to elaborate on information gained in ecology (Bio 302). We
will explore plants' complex interactions with their environments, looking often to adaptations which enable species to exploit particular ecological niches. Understanding such
interactions will require the incorporation of concepts drawn from various other fields
including: geology, chemistry, climatology, and mathematics.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 420 Principles of Limnology

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: BIO 302 or BIO 181


An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of inland water systems,
with a particular focus on lakes, ponds, and reservoirs.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

142
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
BIO 423 Natural Resource Policy

(3:3:0)

BIO 475 Evolutionary Science

Course Fees: $10.00


Introduction to theory, processes, and techniques for the management of natural
resources.Emphasis on ecological processes and public policy issues.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 445 Ichthyology

(3:2:2)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisites: BIO 302 or BIO 181
A study of the biology of fishes.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 446 Ornithology

BIO 485 Advanced Neuroscience

(3:2:2)

BIO 490 Special Problems

(3:2:2)

BIO 497 Senior Seminar

(3:2:3)

BIO 498R Research/Occupational Internship

(3:2:2)

BIO 499R Undergraduate Research

(4:3:2)

(5:4:3)

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisites: BIO 181; and BIO 180 or BIO 208 or Instructor Authorization
In-depth coverage of general physiologic principles and homeostatic mechanisms regulating human organ system function.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 462 Head and Neck Anatomy

(2:1:3)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisites: BIO 264 or BIO 460
Anatomy of the human head and neck for Biology Majors. Comprehensive, in depth study
of the development, organization and relationships of the anatomical structures of the
head and neck. The lecture component of the course introduces the content, while the
lab allows the opportunity to study the regions of interest from models, atlases and from
dissected cadavers.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 466 Rangeland Vegetation Improvement

(1-6:0:0)

This course is designed to award University credit for student mentored research on the
BYU-I campus by a faculty member in the Biology Department.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: BIO 181 or Instructor Authorization


Regional human anatomy for Biology Majors. Comprehensive regional study of gross
human anatomy with emphasis on the limbs, and the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic
cavities.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

BIO 461 Principles of Physiology

(1-4:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 8 credits


This course is designed to award university credit for research-based internships in any
biomedical or ecological field. This course is meant for students engaged in laboratory
or field research. Students wishing to engage in occupational training (ie. working in a
doctor's office) are encouraged to enroll in the department's occupational internship
(BIO 398).
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisite: BIO 225
Rangeland ecology and vegetation measurements including condition, trend, utilization,
suitability and production.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 460 Human Anatomy with Lab

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: BIO 302 and BIO 181


A capstone course in which participants discuss topics related to the practice of scientific writing. Each participant produces a written review paper or research proposal, and
other relevant support documents such as a letter of application and a curriculum vitae.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: BIO 331


This is an advanced course that will cover the diversity of insect biology and structure
with an emphasis on the identification of adults. It will include coverage of speciation,
evolutionary relationships, approaches to classification, nomenclature, zoogeography and
techniques of collection. One extended camping field trip is required.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 455 Rangeland Inventory/Analysis Lab

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Determined by consultation with a faculty mentor.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisites: BIO 208 or BIO 181
A study of mammalian diversity, systematics, evolution, morphology, distribution, and
natural history. At least one field trip is required.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 448 Insect Systematics

(4:3:3)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisite: BIO 240
Fundamentals of Neuroscience covering neuroanatomy, cellular and molecular neuroscience, development of the nervous system, sensory systems, motor systems, regulatory
systems and behavioral and cognitive neuroscience. The associated lab offers students
the chance to perform hands-on experiments involving modern neuroscience techniques
using state-of-the-art equipment and protocols.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisites: BIO 208 or BIO 181
An in-depth study of avian (bird) biology including evolutionary history, systematics,
anatomy, physiology, behavior and reproduction. Lab is required.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

BIO 447 Mammalogy

(3:2:2)

Prerequisites: BIO 375 and BIO 181 or BIO 208


Basic Darwinian evolution and the history of evolutionary thought is presented. Includes
the study of the scientific processes through with both microevolution and macroevolution occur, the history of life on earth, phylogenetics, cladistics, molecular evolution,
sexual selection, population genetics, and rates of evolution.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: BIO 225


Rangeland habitat improvement by manipulating plant communities. Techniques include:
prescribed fire, biological control, herbicide treatments, mechanical treatments and
manipulation by herbivory. Economic considerations of these techniques are investigated.
(See Rotation Schedule on page 144)

143
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Biology
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Biology Course Rotation Schedule

Someclasseswillnotappearinthisrotationschedule
becausetheyareofferedeverysemester.
Class
Bio204
Bio209
Bio210
Bio230
Bio240
Bio250
Bio303
Bio305
Bio307
Bio311
Bio312
Bio314
Bio325
Bio331
Bio351
Bio352
Bio360
Bio362
Bio376
Bio379
Bio380
Bio381
Bio383
Bio386
Bio390
Bio391
Bio392
Bio393
Bio405
Bio408
Bio410
Bio411
Bio412
Bio420
Bio423
Bio445
Bio446
Bio447
Bio448
Bio455
Bio462
Bio466
Bio485

Fall14
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

Win15
X
X

Spr15

Fall15

X
X
X

X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X
X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X

X
X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X
X

X
X

X
X
X
X

Fall16
X

X
X
X

X
X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

Spr16

X
X

Win16

X
X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

Althoughunforeseencircumstancesmayresultinoccasionalchangesto
thisschedule,wewillmakeeveryattempttoadheretoit.

144

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Department of

Business Management Standard Degree Graduation Requirements

Business Management

1. Wireless laptop computers are required for all Business Management majors.
2. Successfully complete B 100 with a C- or higher in order to move
on to the next group of business classes.
3. Complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher one of the following: B
275 or B 298. If doing B 298 student must be enrolled within the
rst three weeks of the semester. The B 298 Beginning Internship requires a minimum of seven weeks work and a minimum of
15 hours per week with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher before enrolling
in the Integrated Business Core
(IBC: B 302, B 322, B 342 and B 362).
4. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher Acctg 201,
Acctg 202, Econ 150, Econ 151, B 211, B 212, and B 220 in
order to move on to the next group of business classes.
5. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher the Integrated
Business Core (IBC: B 302, B 322, B 342, and B 362).
6. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher one of the following: Econ 358, B 380 or B 483
7. Successfully complete B 398 Advanced Internship with a C- or
higher for two credits with a minimum of 270 hours work over
a 7-week period with a minimum of 20 hours per week. Must be
enrolled and working within the rst three weeks of the semester.
8. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher the Emphasis
(Entrepreneurial Management, Finance, Marketing, or Supply
Chain Management) and Capstone (B 499A).
9. Strongly recommend the completion of one of the following: One
or two clusters or a 24-credit minor.

Kimball Galbraith, Department Chair


Chris Andrews, Craig Bell, Bill Crawford, R. Drew Eagar, Jack
Fuller, Kimball Galbraith, D. Joshua Holt, Casey Hurley, Jayson
Kunzler, Kent Lundin, Mark Nygren, Phil Packer, Derick Rhoton,
Kevin Shiley

Business Management Concentration Degree Graduation


Requirements

Amy Staiger, Department Secretary (208) 496-3620


http://www.byui.edu/BusManagement/

1. Wireless laptop computers are required for all students completing


the Business Management Concentration.
2. Successfully complete B 100 with a C- or higher in order to move
on to the next group of business classes.
3. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher B 211 and
B 212 in order to move on to the next group of business classes.
4. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher the Integrated
Business Core (IBC: B 302, B 322, B 342, and B 362).
5. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher one of the
following: B 380 or B 483
6. Successfully complete with a 2.5 GPA/C- or higher Business
Capstone B 499A .
7. Successfully complete IDS 398 and IDS 499.

Introduction
The mission of the Business Management Department is to create a
learning environment for students to acquire the knowledge, skills,
and experiences necessary to make an immediate contribution in the
workplace and to rapidly grow into leadership positions in their organizations. We will do this by partnering with industry and nonprot
organizations to provide mentoring, seminars, consulting projects,
practiced application and internships to allow the students to apply
what they have learned via case study and classroom discussion. Graduating students will emerge with an innovative and entrepreneurial
spirit, technological and spreadsheet analysis, and key communication
and problem-solving skills.
General advisement questions should be directed to the College of
Business and Communication Academic Discovery Center,
Smith 227, (208) 496-9840.

Career Opportunities
Students graduating from this major will be prepared for entry-level
management positions in nance, marketing, supply chain management/operations and management. They will also receive sufcient
knowledge to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities in the industry
of their choice after gaining relevant experience. The entrepreneurial
management emphasis is designed to help students develop critical
skills in management, innovation, agility, adaptability, critical thinking, creativity, risk taking, and new idea generation by examining and
testing various business models and business plans. Within the nance
area, students will be particularly suited for opportunities in nancial
services, banking, and corporate nance. Within the marketing area,
students will be well prepared for careers in sales, marketing research,
marketing services, or business-to-business/business-to-consumer
marketing. Within the supply chain area, students will be prepared
for careers in procurement, production and operations management,
forecasting and production planning, and logistics management.

Central Aims - Students who successfully complete the degree will


demonstrate the following skills:
1. Demonstrate effective leadership in a variety of settings.
2. Apply principles of innovation in business contexts.
3. Demonstrate prociency in developing and using spreadsheets to
conduct business analysis.
4. Effectively read and understand nancial statements to make business decisions that improve the health of an organization.
5. Demonstrate professional writing skills in business contexts.
6. Gain critical competencies in nance, marketing, supply chain
management, or entrepreneurship management.
7. Show integrity in professional and personal settings.

Accessibility of Business Management Courses


B 100, B 101, B 183, B 201, B 220, B 225, B 240, B 250, B 275, B
283, B 370, B 380, B 383, B 413 and B 483: available to all students
B 120 is available for online degree students only.

145

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Administrative Assistant/Ofce Manager AAS (370)


Take required Foundation courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
B 129
B 220
B 240

3
3
3
9

Supplemental Courses
Take 26 credits:
ACCTG 180
ACCTG 205
B 201
B 211
B 250
B 283
B 370
CIT 110
CIT 230
COMM 130
COMM 175
COMM 310
COMM 339

Program Notes:
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
26

Major Credits=35
Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=8
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management AAS (371)


Take required Foundation courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
3
ACCTG 202
3
B 100
1
B 183
3
B 211
3
B 212
4
B 220
3
B 283
3
B 298R
1-5
continued next column

cont. from previous column


B 301 or B 302
3
B 321 or B 322
3
B 341 or B 342
3
B 361 or B 362
3
ECON 150
3
ECON 151
3
42

Program Notes:

Major Credits=42
Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=1
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

146

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Applied Management (405)


Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CAAS Degree
Complete an AAS:
*AAS degrees vary from 33.5
to 54 credits. Students should
complete all requirements
for their specic AAS before
moving on to the BS in
Applied Management degree.
Students must reach a total
of 120 credits in order to
graduate.
Pre-IBC Courses
Take these courses prior to the
IBC Group.
ACCTG 180
3
B 101
3
6

IBC Courses
Apply to and take IBC
Group courses:
(These courses may not be
taken as stand alone courses.
They must be taken as the 12
credit IBC course. Students
should contact the Business
Management ofce to be
authorized to add courses.)
B 302
3
B 322
3
B 342
3
B 362
3
12

Supplemental Courses
Take 3 credits:
B 220
B 250
B 275
B 283
B 370
B 383
B 483
CIT 200 level or above
ECON 358

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Post-IBC Course
Take this course after the
IBC but before your last
semester:
B 398**
2
2
**Meet with the College of
Business and Communication Internship Coordinator to register for your
business-focused internship
the semester before you begin
your internship.

Program Notes:
***Students need to complete
enough elective credit to
reach the 120 credit requirement. Remember that you
must complete at least 15
credits of 300-level or above
while at BYU-Idaho in
order to graduate.

Major Credits=80***
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Business Management
Marketing Emphasis (415-95)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
B 100
B 211
B 212
B 220
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362
B 398
B 499A
ECON 150
ECON 151

3
3
1
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
39

Take 1 course:
B 380
B 483
ECON 358
Take 1 course:
B 275
B 298R

3
3
3
3
3
1-5
1

Marketing Courses
Take these courses to complete
Primary Emphasis:
B 439
1
B 443
2
B 446
2
B 448
1
B 452
2
B 453
2
10
Take 2 credits:
B 451
OR
B 457
AND
COMM 231A

Program Notes:

2
1
1
2

Major Credits=55
Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

147

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Business Management
Finance Emphasis (415-96)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
B 100
B 211
B 212
B 220
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362
B 398
B 499A
ECON 150
ECON 151

3
3
1
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
39

Take 1 course:
B 380
B 483
ECON 358
Take 1 course:
B 275
B 298R

3
3
3
3
3
1-5
1

Finance Courses
Take these courses to complete
the Primary Emphasis:
B 401
3
B 410
3
B 428
1
B 433
1
8

Program Notes:

Cboose from the following


options:
Advanced Investments and
Capital Markets
Take these courses:
B 411
3
B 424
1
4
Banking and Corporate
Financial Management
Take these courses:
B 424
1
B 432
3
4
New Venture Financing
Take these courses:
B 424D
1
B 475
3
4

Major Credits=55
Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Business Management
Supply Chain Management Emphasis (415-97)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
B 100
B 211
B 212
B 220
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362
B 398
B 499A
ECON 150
ECON 151

3
3
1
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
39

Take 1 course:
B 380
B 483
ECON 358
Take 1 course:
B 275
B 298R

3
3
3
3
3
1-5
1

Supply Chain Management


Courses
Take these courses:
B 461
3
B 466
3
B 468
3
B 478
3
12

Program Notes:

Major Credits=55
Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

148

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Business Management
Entrepreneurial Management Emphasis (415-171)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than CCore Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
B 100
B 211
B 212
B 220
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362
B 398
B 499A
ECON 150
ECON 151

3
3
1
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
39

Take 1 course:
B 380
ECON 358
Take 1 course:
B 275
B 298R

3
3
3
3
1-5
1

Entrepreneurial Management Courses


Take these courses:
B 283
3
B 383
3
B 483
3
9
Take 3 credits:
ACCTG 205
B 183
B 250
B 475

Program Notes:

2
3
3
3
3

Major Credits=55
Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor for Non-Business Related Majors (189)


Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses / No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take 9 credits:
(Credits cannot also be part
of major or Foundations
requirements. See Business
Mgmt Dept for appropriate
substitutions)
B 101
3
ECON 150
3
MATH 221A
3
9
Take 1 course:
ACCTG 180
ACCTG 201

IBC Courses
Take these courses (This is a
12 credit class):
B 302
3
B 322
3
B 342
3
B 362
3
12
(Contact the Business
Department for Additional
Information)

Program Notes:
Students are required to complete B 101, Acctg 180 (or Acctg 201),Econ 150, Math 221A and show
spreadsheet competency. (If one of these courses has already been completed to fulll a major requirement, choose an alternate course from the list below. If student has completed CIT 140,
they do not have to complete an exam to show spreadsheet competency. Do not take both Acctg 180 and
Acctg 201. Choose only one of them.)

3
3
3

Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

149

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Minor for Business Related Majors Finance Emphasis (224)


(Accounting Majors)
Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses / No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
B 321
B 341
B 361
B 499A

3
3
3
3
12

Emphasis Courses
Take 12 credit Finance
Emphasis:
B 401 (part of major)
B 410
B 428
B 433
Take 3 credits:
B 225
B 370
B 383
B 483

Program Notes:

Choose 1 of the following tracks:


Advanced Investments and
Capital Markets
Take these courses:
B 411
3
B 424
1
4

3
1
1
5

Banking and Corporate


Financial Management
Take these courses:
B 424
1
B 432
3
4
New Venture Financing
Take these courses:
B 424D
1
B 475
3
4

3
3
3
3
3

Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor for Business Related Majors Marketing Emphasis (225)


(Accounting Majors)
Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses / No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
B 321
B 341
B 361
B 499A

3
3
3
3
12

Marketing Emphasis
Courses
Take these courses:
B 439
B 443
B 446
B 448
B 452
B 453

1
2
2
1
2
2
10

Take 2 credits:
B 451
or
B 457
and
COMM 231A

Program Notes:
2
1
1
2

Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor for Business Related Majors Supply Chain Management (226)


(Accounting Majors)
Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses / No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
B 321
B 341
B 361
B 499A

3
3
3
3
12

Emphasis Courses
Take these courses:
B 461
B 466
B 468
B 478

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
12

Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

150

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Minor for Business Related Majors Finance Emphasis (227)


(Economic and CIT Majors)
Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses / No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses as the
12-credit IBC:
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362

3
3
3
3
12

Emphasis Courses
Take these courses:
B 401
B 410
B 428
B 433

Program Notes:

Choose 1 of the following tracks:


Advanced Investments and
Capital Markets
Take these courses:
B 411
3
B 424
1
4

3
3
1
1
8

Banking and Corporate


Financial Management
Take these courses:
B 424
1
B 432
3
4
New Venture Financing
Take these courses:
B 424D
1
B 475
3
4

Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor for Business Related Majors Marketing Emphasis (228)


(Economic and CIT Majors)
Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses / No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses as the
12-credit IBC:
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362

3
3
3
3
12

Marketing Emphasis
Courses
Take these courses:
B 439
B 443
B 446
B 448
B 452
B 453

1
2
2
1
2
2
10

Take 2 credits:
B 451
or
B 457
and
COMM 231A

Program Notes:
2
1
1
2

Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor for Business Related Majors Supply Chain Management (229)


(Economic and CIT Majors)
Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses / No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses as the
12-credit IBC:
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362

3
3
3
3
12

Take these courses:


B 461
B 466
B 468
B 478

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
12

Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

151

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Business Management Concentration (D 128)


Concentration Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Concentration Courses / No Double Counting of Concentration Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
B 100
B 211
B 212
B 302
B 322
B 342
B 362
B 499A

1
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
23

Program Notes:

Take 1 course:
B 380
B 483

3
3
3

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Concentration Credits=29
This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Supply Chain and Operations Management Concentration (D 137)


Concentration Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Concentration Courses / No Double Counting of Concentration Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
B 211
B 301
B 341
B 361
B 399
B 461*
B 466
B 468
B 478*
ME 340

3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
3
3
28

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 of the following
groups:
B 212

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take 1 course:
IDS 398R
1-3
ME 398R
1
1

Program Notes:
*B 461 and B 478 must be taken concurrently.

OR
ME 142
MATH 330

3
3
4

Concentration Credits=33
This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Administrative Assistant/Ofce Manager Concentration (D 144)


Concentration Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Concentration Courses / No Double Counting of Concentration Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
B 129
B 220
B 240
CIT 110

3
3
3
3
12

Supplemental Courses
Take 20 credits:
Take 1 or more of the following courses:
B 370
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 339
3

Take the remaining credits


from the following courses:
ACCTG 180
3
ACCTG 205
2
B 201
3
B 211
3
B 250
3
B 283
3
CIT 230
3
COMM 130
3
COMM 175
2
20

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Program Notes:

Concentration Credits=35
This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

152

Spring-Fall---- YES

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Administrative Assistant Certicate (C 101)


Certicate Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Certicate Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 205
B 129
B 220
CIT 110

2
3
3
3
11

Supplemental Courses
Take 1 course:
ART 130
CIT 230
COMM 150

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3

Total Certicate Credits=14

Professional Sales Certicate (C 102)


Certicate Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Certicate Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 180
B 101
B 120
B 341
COMM 150

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
15

Total Certicate Credits=15

Business Fundamentals Certicate (C 105)


Certicate Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Certicate Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201
ACCTG 202
B 211
B 212
B 298R
ECON 150
ECON 151

Program Notes:
3
3
3
4
1-5
3
3
20

Total Certicate Credits=20

Entrepreneurship Certicate (C 106)


Certicate Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Certicate Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
B 183
B 250
B 283
B 383
B 483

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
15

Total Certicate Credits=15

153

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Business Pre-approved Clusters
General Business
Take this course:
ACCTG 180
Survey of Accounting
Take 1 course:
B 101
Introduction to Business
B 211
Business Fundamentals I
Take 1 course:
AGBUS 210
Agricultural Economics
ECON 150
Economic Principles and Problems - Micro
B 201
Introduction to Finance
B 275
Business Law and Legal Environment
Take 3 credits:
B 301
Financial Management
B 321
Organizational Effectiveness
B 341
Marketing Management
B 361
Production and Operations Management
B 370
Human Resource Management
B 380
Introduction to International Business
B 383
Large Business Creation
B 483
Entrepreneurial Management
Total Credits
General Business (For Accounting Majors)
Take these courses:
B 321
Organizational Effectiveness
B 341
Marketing Management
B 361
Production and Operations Management
B 499A
Principles of Business Strategy
Total Credits
Administrative Assistant
Take these courses:
B 129
Ofce Procedures
B 220
Advanced Writing in Professional Context
B 240
Advanced Word Processing
Take 3 credits:
ACCTG 180
Survey of Accounting
ACCTG 205
Accounting Software
B 201
Introduction to Finance
B 211
Business Fundamentals I
B 370
Human Resource Management
CIT 110
Introduction to Excel
CIT 230
Web Frontend Development
COMM 130
Visual Media
COMM 175
Communication Essentials
COMM 310
Creating Online Media
COMM 339
Event Management
Total Credits
Real Estate
Take this course:
B 225
Fundamentals of Real Estate
Take 9 credits:
ACCTG 180* Survey of Accounting
ARCH 100
Survey of Architecture and Construction
B 413
Advanced Real Estate
CONST 120
Framing Systems
CONST 210** Finishing Systems
CONST 330** Construction Estimating
CONST 350** Soils
Total Credits

Business Fundamentals
Take the following courses:
ACCTG 201
Financial Accounting
B 211
Business Fundamentals I
ECON 150
Economic Principles and Problems - Micro
Take 3 credits:
ACCTG 205
Accounting Software
ART 392
Business for the Professional Artist
B 225
Fundamentals of Real Estate
B 250
Web Business I
B 275
Business Law and the Legal Environment
B 283
Small Business Creation
B 301
Financial Management
B 321
Organizational Effectiveness
B 341
Marketing Management
B 361
Production and Operations Management
B 370
Human Resource Management
B 413
Real Estate
HS 285
Hospital and Health Administration
Total Credits

2100
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12

Finance Cluster (Application Only, see Advising)


Take these courses as one 12-credit class during one semester:
Take these courses:
B 401
Advanced Financial Management
B 410
Investments
B 428
Real Estate Management
B 433
Personal Finance
Choose 1 of the following tracks:
Advanced Investments and Capital Markets
Take these courses:
B 411
Advanced Investments
B 424
Finance Law for Corporate and Advanced
Investments

2101
3
3
3
3
12
2103
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
12
2106
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
12

*No double counting of major/minor coursework


**Prerequisites will need to be met
Human Resource Management
Take this course:
B 370
Human Resource Management
Take 9 credits:
B 321*
Organizational Effectiveness
COMM 150
Interpersonal Theory and Practice
COMM 450
Conict Management and Negotiation
SOC 323
Race and Ethnic Relations
Total Credits

2111
3
3
3
3
3
12

*Business majors cannot take B 321 as an option for this cluster.

154

2109
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
2112
3
3
1
1

3
1

Banking and Corporate Financial Management


Take these courses:
B 424
Finance Law for Corporate and Advanced
Investments
B 432
Corporate Financing and Banking

1
3

New Venture Financing


Take these courses:
B 424D
Legal Aspects of Financing New Ventures
B 475
Financing New Ventures
Total Credits

1
3
12

Supply Chain Management Cluster (Application Only, see Advising)


Take these courses as one 12-credit class during one semester:
Take these course:
B 461
Supply Chain Risk and Flexibility Management 3
B 466
Global Sourcing
3
B 468
Logistics Management
3
B 478
Supply Chain Analysis and Modeling
3
Total Credits
12

2113

Marketing (Application Only, see Advising)


Take these courses as one 12-credit class during one semester:
Take these course:
B 439
Project Management for Marketers
1
B 443
Marketing Research Skills
2
B 446
Consumer Behavior and Customer Service
2
B 448
Marketing Law
1
B 452
Sales and Negotiations
2
B 453
Marketing Strategy Research
2
Take 2 credits from:
B 451
Internet Marketing
2
or
B 457
Retail Management
1
and
COMM 231A Basic Advertising Skills: Creative Development 1
Total Credits
12

2114

Entrepreneurship
Take 12 credits:
B 183
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
B 250
Web Business Creation
B 283
Small Business Creation
B 383
Large Business Creation
B 483
Entrepreneurial Management
Total Credits

2115
3
3
3
3
3
12

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Course Descriptions
B 100 Business Management Orientation

B 212 Business Fundamentals II

Credits*
(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $8.00


This course introduces and prepares students to enter the Business Management program.
The vision of the university, college, and department will be discussed. Students will
review and prepare their 4-year academic plan, gain basic technology skills and
understanding, and be introduced to the College of Business and Communication Career
Map.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 101 Introduction to Business

B 220 Advanced Writing in Professional Contexts

B 225 Fundamentals of Real Estate

(3:3:0)

B 240 Advanced Word Processing

(3:3:0)

B 250 Web Business Creation

(3:3:0)

B 275 Business Law and Legal Environment

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $13.00


An introduction to legal environment in which businesses operate as well as an overview
of laws impacting business. Topics include understanding the legal system, contracts,
ethics, intellectual property, antitrust, employment, business organizations and securities.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 283 Small Business Creation

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $13.00


Ideally, a student will have completed B 183 before moving on to B 283. Designed to
introduce students to the basics of small business creation, understand the importance of
creating systems, and expose students to the many career opportunities available in the
field of entrepreneurship. Students will learn about startups, buying existing businesses,
franchises, and family run businesses. Through class discussions, entrepreneur cases,
guest entrepreneurs, selected readings, and team projects, students will gain a clear
understanding of entrepreneur opportunities. Each student will participate in actually
starting a microbusiness during the semester, drafting a one page business plan on their
own big idea and networking with entrepreneur mentors to support their entrepreneur
idea.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $13.00


This is an introductory course to familiarize non-business majors with the basic vocabulary
and substantive knowledge of personal finance, financial institutions, and business
finance. The class will provide an opportunity to develop skills in effective communication,
financial analysis, and problem solving. Ethics in the area of finance will be discussed.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 211 Business Fundamentals I

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $13.00


This course is designed for any student interested in building a web-based business.
Students will go through the necessary steps to build and launch a web-based business
that is capable of accepting online payments.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Introduction to Entrepreneurship is intended to guide students exploration and


introspection as they prepare for the next stage in their Lifes Journey. Through case
studies, entrepreneur video clips, LDS perspectives, ethical challenges, life-planning, and
accountability exercises, students will get clearer about what matters most to them. Theyll
gain perspective on how to make decisions, how to learn and grow, and identify long-range
goals and next steps. Theyll discover strategies for staying true when they are distracted,
discouraged, or simply want to quit. A life in business can be truly gratifying, but only when
business success is part of something bigger. It is one thing to write a business plan, but
more importantly in this course you will learn how to draft a life plan and begin with the
end in mind. This course will help you integrate your dreams, values, and future plans
and undertake the ultimate act of entrepreneurship: building a life of meaning.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 201 Introduction to Finance

(3:3:0)

Provides a thorough understanding of Microsoft Word and enhances efficiency, effectiveness, and professionalism in users and documents. Students will customize and automate information using Microsoft Office 2010- Word, Excel, and Access. Topics include
navigation and format in business documents and envelopes, graphics, tables, charts,
labels, themes, styles, forms, macros, and merging and sorting.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: FDENG 101 and CIT 110


Students will develop and apply functional office skills in time management, interpersonal
communications, records management, teamwork, and customer service. Students also
learn how to plan meetings, take minutes, and use critical decision-making skills to identify and solve problems. This is a service-learning course in which students are required to
participate in weekly volunteer work in an office setting.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 183 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $13.00


A one-semester course in basic real estate practices and finance. The course is intended
as a first course in real estate. The format is lecture and discussion.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

For non-business majors only.


Recommended for students wanting to gain an overview of business management, marketing, accounting, human resource management, and small business entrepreneurship.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 129 Office Procedures

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $13.00


Prerequisite: FDENG 101 and 22 credits
Emphasizes professionalism, critical thinking, and effective communication, examines
solutions, and includes job application documents, interview strategies, and presentation
guidelines.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $13.00


This course is intended to introduce students to all the aspects of business management.
Students will learn about marketing, finance, human resources, management, and globalization. All students will be able to see the benefits and challenges of both small and big
businesses. This course will include class discussions, business cases, learning activities,
and team projects. Each student will develop a business exploration plan and examine
important life skills that are essential in business and in life.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 120 Sales and Customer Relations

(4:4:1)

Course Fees: $17.00


Prerequisites: B 211 and ACCTG 201 and ECON 112 or ECON 150
This course is focused on helping students to acquire, develop, and apply the analytical
skills that are needed to address today's challenging business problems. At the core of
this course is a wide range of business problems called mini-projects. These mini-projects
are designed to be realistic and representative of the business activities that might be
required of students in the workplace.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: varies ($15.00 - $17.00)


Prerequisite: B 100 and FDMAT 108
This course provides an overview of the core functions of business, including product
development, marketing, operations, human resource management, accounting, finance,
and international business. This will be accomplished primarily by managing an on-line
simulated business where students will learn to make fundamental management decisions
required to effectively run a $50 million corporation. This course is designed to provide
students exposure to the various career opportunities in business and also recommended
for non-business students interested in gaining an overview of business management,
leadership and small business entrepreneurship.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 298R Beginning Internship

155

(1-5:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 10 credits


Course Fees: $7.00
Prerequisite: Department Authorization Required
Students must be registered for this course within the first two weeks of the semester they
are completing the internship. For more information on how to register for an internship
see the Business Management homepage. Designed for students working full or part-time
in business-related employment to gain introductory experience and understanding of the
functions of a successful company. Students must complete application and approval
through the College of Business and Communication Career Services, contract with their
employer to work for college credits, and work a minimum of 15 hours per week for a
minimum of seven weeks. Other requirements include writing reports, submitting self- and
supervisor evaluations, and adhering to BYU-Idaho standards and policies.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
B 301 Financial Management

B 361 Production and Operations Management

(3:3:0)

B 302 Financial Management IBC

B 362 Operations IBC

(3:3:0)

B 370 Human Resource Management

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

B 375 Non-Government Organization (NGO) Management

Course Fees: $51.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Course Fee: $25 Online Materials Course Fee: Class Fee $26
Part of the 12-credit Integrated Business Core (IBC) program. Not for Accounting Majors
doing a Business Minor. Required for all other majors doing a Business Minor or Business
Emphasis. Organizational Effectiveness at three levels: individual, group, and organizations. Examination of areas: motivation, team, group behavior, organizational design,
structure, culture, communication, leadership, decision making, and managing change.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 341 Marketing Management

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisites: ECON 150, ECON 151, and FDCNC 350
The course will familiarize students with the structure of non-governmental organizations
(NGOs) and the legal, social, political, and economic environment in which they operate.
Students will learn the basic tools of managing and operating a NGO. Emphasis will be
on NGOs operating in an international environment, applying the principles of self reliance
and sustainability.
(Winter, Fall)

B 380 Introduction to International Business

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $17.00


An overview of international business designed to provide a global perspective on international trade and direct investment. Reviews international cultural, political, legal and
economic environments and their effect on marketing, production, and human resource
management strategy.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Not for Majors 405, 410, 411, 415, or 615, and Minors 189 or 190. Not for Economic
or CIT majors doing a Business Minor. This course is a comprehensive introduction to
the principles of marketing. Course will cover marketing essentials such as consumer research, consumer segmentation, segment targeting and product positioning, new product
development and introduction, marketing strategy, branding, marketing communications,
pricing and distribution.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 342 Marketing Management IBC

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


An overview of human resource management topics such as diversity, EEOC laws,
recruiting, training, performance management, compensation and benefits, motivation,
workplace organizational design, difficult interactions, employee relations, and safety. The
course also considers organizational behavior topics in the context of human resource
management such as teamwork, power dynamics, innovation, and groupthink. The course
leverages case studies and professional/scholarly articles to gain a better understanding
of real-life workplace challenges.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: varies ($16.00 - $25.00)


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Not for Majors 405, 410, 411, 415, or 615, and Minors 189 or 190. Not for Economic or
CIT majors doing a Business Minor. Organizational Effectiveness at three levels: individual,
group, and organizations. Examination of areas: motivation, team, group behavior,
organizational design, structure, culture, communication, leadership, decision making,
and managing change.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 322 Organizational Effectiveness IBC

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $41.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the 12-credit Integrated Business Core (IBC) program. Not for Accounting Majors
doing a Business Minor or Business Emphasis. Required for all other majors doing a
Business Minor or Business Emphasis. This is an introductory course in Production and
Operations Management and is the gateway for entry into BYU-Idaho's Integrated Supply
Chain Management Emphasis. Topics covered include operations strategy, project
management, forecasting, process analysis, sourcing, and distribution management. Excel
tutorials, web-based simulations, and case studies will play an important and significant
role throughout the course.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the 12-credit Integrated Business Core (IBC) program. This introductory course
in financial management provides a basic foundation for other courses in finance and
business management. Topics covered in this course include financial statement analysis,
financial forecasting, leverage, working capital management, capital structure, capital
budgeting, short and long-term financial management, sources of financing, time value
of money, and cost of capital. Required for all other majors doing a Business Minor or
Business Emphasis.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 321 Organizational Effectiveness

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $41.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Not for Majors 405, 410, 411, 415, or 615, and Minors 189 or 190. Not for Economic or
CIT majors doing a Business Minor or Business Emphasis. This is an introductory course
in Production and Operations Management. Topics covered include operations strategy,
project management, forecasting, process analysis, sourcing, and distribution management. Excel tutorials, web-based simulations, and case studies will play an important and
significant role throughout the course.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Not for Majors 405, 410, 411, 415, or 615, and Minors 189 or 190. Not for Economic or
CIT majors doing a Business Minor. This introductory course in financial management
provides a basic foundation for other courses in finance and business management.
Topics covered in this course include financial statement analysis, financial forecasting,
leverage, working capital management, capital structure, capital budgeting, short and
long-term financial management, sources of financing, time value of money, and cost of
capital.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 383 Large Business Creation

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: varies ($15.00 - $25.00)


Ideally, a student will have completed B 283 before moving on to B 383. Designed as
an introduction to the process of perceiving an opportunity and creating an organization to pursue it. Working alone and in teams you will learn to plan, finance, launch,
manage, and harvest a new venture. In order to integrate ideas across departments and
colleges, this course will be open to students in engineering, computer science, and
business management. All students who desire to lead a business plan team will have
an opportunity to describe their ventures in the early class sessions to facilitate team
member recruiting. Class discussion, readings, lectures, and projects are learning tools.
Your project is developed throughout this course and involves completing a new venture
plan and financial forecast. Each team business plan also becomes a live case for the
purposes of class discussion.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the 12-credit Integrated Business Core (IBC) program. Not for Accounting Majors
doing a Business Minor or Business Emphasis. Required for all other majors doing a Business Minor. This course is a comprehensive introduction to the principles of marketing.
Course will cover marketing essentials such as consumer research, consumer segmentation, segment targeting and product positioning, new product development and introduction, marketing strategy, branding, marketing communications, pricing and distribution.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

156
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
B 398 Advanced Business Internship

(1-3:1-3:0)

B 424D Legal Aspects Finance-New Venture

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Required of all Business Management students. Students must be registered for this
course within the first two weeks of the semester they are completing the internship. For
more information on how register for an internship see the Business Management homepage. Students will find a professional business management internship in an approved
business, complete the application and obtain approval through the College of Business
and Communication Career Services, be enrolled in the course, write reports, submit
evaluations, and complete at least 270 hours of work in seven weeks or more. During
their internship students will gain a greater vision of becoming a business professional
and establish career networking links. Students will earn three credits and may receive
compensation from the employer and letters of recommendation from both the employer
and BYU-Idaho.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 399 Special Projects

(1-3:3:0)

Course Fees: varies ($8.00-$24.00)


Prerequisite: Department Authorization Required
An arranged research or special project course.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 428 Real Estate and Financial Management

B 401 Advanced Financial Management

(3:3:0)

B 432 Corporate Finance and Banking

(3:3:0)

B 433 Personal Finance

(3:3:0)

B 439 Project Management for Marketers

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Marketing Emphasis program. A hands-on,
case-based simulation that introduces students to the principles of project management
from the perspective of a marketing manager.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: B 225
Builds on the prior learning of students. It is intended to be a second course in real estate
principles and practices, and is aimed at preparing students to enter the real estate
business.
(Winter)

B 424 Finance Law for Corporate and Advanced Investments

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. The primary
purpose of this course is for students to learn to apply personal financial management
tools to their own and their clients' lives. The content covers advanced time value of
money, retirement planning strategies, tax-deferred retirement planning vehicles, asset allocation, specific investment products, insurance, estate planning, and financial planning
strategies. Students broaden their understanding and develop skills through problem
solving using Excel, through case studies, and through application to existing personal
financial management situations.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. An advanced
investments course that covers topics in financial markets, investments, portfolio theory,
real estate, hedging, fixed-income securities, structured finance, security analysis, and
derivative assets. This course will take a practical approach to investing and place strong
emphasis on the development of advanced spreadsheet models.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 413 Advanced Real Estate

(3:3:0)

Course Fee: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. The course
covers the basic issues involved in working with or managing financial institutions. The
course explores the differences in institutions, management of interest rate risk, regulation, credit analysis, loan policy, and types of credit facilities. Students are required to
have a laptop computer with Excel available in class.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. Covers topics in
the financial markets, including portfolio theory, real estate, fixed-income securities, security analysis, mutual funds, and derivative assets, financial markets, investment vehicles,
asset allocation, risk analysis, evaluating performance, global considerations, buying and
selling securities, and tax implications of investing.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 411 Advanced Investments

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. This course
covers topics, skills, and vocabulary used in the real estate arena.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. Financial management in the corporate setting, asset valuation, risk analysis capital decision making,
financial controls, applications of financial principles to the corporate organization, indepth coverage of securities structure and pricing, capital generation and dividend policy.
Also includes working capital management, leasing, and international corporate finance.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 410 Investments

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Provides a focused look at the primary legal issues you will encounter in a new business
venture. This course builds on a general understanding of business law concepts to focus
on areas of law most relevant to New Ventures including employees stock option plans,
executive compensation and employment contracts, non-disclosure agreements, choice
and creation of business entities, business licensing, statutory requirements for corporations, securities law that apply to private financing, mergers and acquisitions, review of
contracts, torts, and employment laws. New Ventures Law is part of the Business Management New Ventures emphasis. If you are a business major and change your emphasis, you
must transfer into the appropriate law course, for instance Marketing Law or Finance Law.
Non-business majors are welcome to take this course. We believe that governments
were instituted of God for the benefit of man, and that he holds men accountable for their
acts in relation to them, both in making laws and administering them, for the good and
safety of society. (Doctrine and Covenants 134:1)
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 443 Marketing Research Skills

(2:2:0)

Course Fees: $17.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Marketing Emphasis program.
Concepts and methodology for conducting quantitative marketing research will be
discussed. Emphasis on solving problems faced by marketing manager. There will be a
consulting research project required, involving the use of statistical database software.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Provides a focused look at the laws and regulations that impact finance professionals.
The course builds on a general understanding of business law concepts to focus on areas
of law most relevant to finance including corporate governance, shareholder rights, securities regulation, bankruptcy, and secured transactions.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 446 Consumer Behavior and Customer Service

(2:2:0)

Course Fees: $17.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Marketing Emphasis experience. This course
explores how the consumer's culture and psychological make-up affect buying decisions.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

157
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Business Management
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
B 448 Marketing Law

(1:1:0)

B 468 Logistics Management

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Provides a focused look at the laws and regulation that impact marketing professionals.
This course builds on a general understanding of business law concepts to focus on areas
of law most relevant to marketing including intellectual property, antitrust, contracts,
product liability, and advertising regulation.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 451 Internet Marketing

(2:2:0)

Course Fees: $17.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Marketing Emphasis program.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 452 Sales and Negotiations

B 475 Financing New Ventures

(2:2:0)

B 478 Supply Chain Analysis and Modeling

(2:2:0)

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Marketing Emphasis program.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 458 Principles of Supply Chain Management

B 483 Entrepreneurial Management

(1:1:0)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Supply Chain Management Emphasis. Supply Chain
Risk and Flexibility Management is one of the four core courses of the Integrated Supply
Chain Emphasis (ISCE). It involves the study of supply chain related activities, decisions,
and concepts that help an organization to effectively manage risks and maintain responsiveness and flexibility in the face of demand and supply uncertainty. Given the high
degree of uncertainty that many supply chains face today, it is important to know how to
help companies understand those uncertainties and make cost effective decisions that
will result in increased flexibility throughout a supply chain.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 466 Global Sourcing

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


The Entrepreneurial Management course was created to help students learn how to integrate the functional analysis of management (financial, operational, organizational, and
marketing) into decisions that lead to action. The entrepreneurial context then becomes
a powerful setting for developing these skills because a new venture will not move forward
without managers making decisions that lead to action. Students should be able to a)
understand the decision making process, b) develop good analysis, and c) communicate
and define a solid recommendation to key stake holders (senior management, team
members, or investors).
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $8.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
(Not currently offered.)

B 461 Supply Chain Risk and Flex Management

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Supply Chain Management Emphasis. Supply Chain
Analysis and Modeling is one of the four core courses of the Integrated Supply Chain
Emphasis (ISCE). It is focused on the use of computer tools and modeling techniques
to support supply chain analysis and decision-making. The ability to collect, organize,
interpret, and effectively communicate the right information is an important skill that is
much needed in today's complex realm of supply chain management. This course will give
students the opportunity to strengthen supply chain analysis skills using the Microsoft
Excel spreadsheet application.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $17.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Marketing Emphasis program. Focuses on
marketing's role in gaining a sustainable competitive advantage. Covers some of the
steps in developing a strategic marketing plan including situation analysis, objectives,
and strategies. Includes use of current case studies.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 457 Retail Management

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. An overview of
all the options available to successfully finance new ventures. Financing alternatives are
explored including debt financing from venture banks, commercial banks, and SBICs, and
equity financing from angels, private placements, venture capitalists, and public equity
markets.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $17.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Integrated Marketing Emphasis program. This is
an introductory and highly-participatory course, with the goal of introducing students
to fundamental principles of effective business-to-business professional selling and
negotiations. Through the use of case studies, other assigned readings, class discussion,
role-plays, and a simulation students will recognize the importance of the sales process in
an enterprise, and the value of negotiating skills in business and in life.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 453 Marketing Strategy Research

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $44.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Supply Chain Management Emphasis. This course will
help students gain an understanding of supply chain-wide materials and information flows
with a particular focus on outbound logistics: warehouse management, transportation
management, and distribution network design. Learning methods will include simulations,
in-class games/activities, readings, lectures, case discussions, and team presentations.
Students will also be encouraged to join relevant professional supply chain associations
including ISM (The Institute for Supply Management), APICS (The Association for Operations Management), and the BYU-Idaho Supply Chain LinkedIn group.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

B 499A Principles of Business Strategy

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: varies ($24.00 - $25.00)


Prerequisites: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
A business strategy capstone experience focusing on theory of strategy and problem
solving using the case method and projects. Students form cross-disciplinary teams to
participate in an online business simulation and to provide consulting services to local
businesses. Consulting services require attendance at regular meetings outside of class
during business hours for both online and on-campus students. Emphasis on problemframing, analysis, and strategic recommendations, both quantitative and qualitative.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

B 499B Business Writing Capstone

Course Fees: $25.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
Part of the Business Management Supply Chain Management Emphasis. This course will
focus on the buy-side aspects of supply chain management. Students will learn through
case studies, scholarly articles, textbooks, and interaction with supply-chain professionals. Significant emphasis will be placed on learning through real-world application.
Focus topics include supplier management strategies, supplier relationship management, procurement processes, vendor selection, negotiations, supplier development,
E-procurement, and ethics.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(1:1:0)

Course Fees: $17.00


Prerequisite: See Dept. Website at www.byui.edu/business-management for prerequisites
B 499B is a business writing capstone course that focuses on the writing required for
employment in each business emphasis. Students will conduct a personal writing SWOT
analysis, speak with mentors in their profession, determine the four documents they
will create, teach one another to edit and revise to professional standards, and gain
confidence in their wiring abilities for future employment opportunities.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

158
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Chemistry
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Introduction

Department of

Chemistry

Chemistry is the study of matter, energy, and their transformations.


The principles of this discipline serve as a theoretical basis for a wide
variety of elds such as agriculture, biology, dentistry, engineering,
geology, medicine, nutrition, and physics. In addition, chemistrys
analytical and logical approach to the world is excellent training for
elds such as law and government.
The Department of Chemistry offers three degrees:
A Bachelors of Science in Chemistry.
A Bachelors of Science in Biochemistry.
A Bachelors of Science in Chemistry Education.
In addition to the courses offered for chemistry majors, the department offers service courses to support students in technical majors
to meet their requirements for graduation. Introductory courses are
offered on several skill levels to meet the needs of incoming students
with a variety of backgrounds in math and science.
Studying chemistry at Brigham Young UniversityIdaho is a unique
and rewarding experience. The faculty is experienced and well
trained. Their commitment to students and teaching, coupled with
small class sizes, provide an excellent learning environment.
Further information regarding the department programs and degrees
can be obtained by visiting the department web page:
http://www.byui.edu/chemistry/

Les Manner, Department Chair


Hector A. Becerril-Garcia, Jared Bowden, David Collins, Ryan
DaBell, Amy Hanks, Matthew Heywood, Aaron Johnson, Brian
Lemon, Les Manner, Stephen Ott, Kendall Peck, Mark Pugh,
Shane Ruebush, Ryan Sargeant, Kerensa Sorensen-Stowel, Susan
Ward
Bradi Schriever, Stockroom Supervisor (208) 496-7711
Brenda Pincock, Department Secretary (208) 496-7700
http://www.byui.edu/chemistry/

159

Chemistry
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Biochemistry (705)
Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Introductory Chemistry
Core
Take these courses:
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
CHEM 351
4
12

Take these courses:


CHEM 220
CHEM 352
CHEM 391
CHEM 468
CHEM 481
CHEM 482
CHEM 485
CHEM 498
BIO 180
BIO 321
MATH 113
PH 121
PH 150
PH 220
PH 250

5
4
2
3
3
3
1
1-3
4
4
3
3
1
3
1
41

Biology Cluster
Take these courses:
BIO 181
BIO 375
BIO 376
BIO 377

Program Notes:
4
3
3
3
13

For a recommended sequence of courses, please refer to the


advising information on the department website:
www.byui.edu/chemistry/advising
Double Counting allowed in major and minor courses.
Double Counting NOT allowed in major and cluster
courses.
Biochemistry majors may need to request a track adjustment for the Fall/Winter track upon beginning their
junior-level chemistry courses. Please consult with faculty
advisor.

Total Major Credits=66


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 14
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Chemistry (710)
Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Introductory Chemistry
Core
Take these courses:
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
CHEM 351
4
12

Take these courses:


CHEM 220
CHEM 352
CHEM 391
CHEM 420
CHEM 421
CHEM 461
CHEM 462
CHEM 464
CHEM 470
CHEM 471
CHEM 481
CHEM 498
PH 220
PH 250

5
4
2
2
2
3
3
2
3
2
3
1-3
3
1
36

Take this Physics and Math


Cluster:
MATH 215
4
MATH 316
4
PH 121
3
PH 150
1
12

Program Notes:
For a recommended sequence of courses, please refer to the
advising information on the department website:
www.byui.edu/chemistry/advising
Double Counting allowed in major and minor courses.
Double Counting NOT allowed in major and cluster
courses.
Chemistry majors may need to request a track adjustment
for the Fall/Winter track upon beginning their junior
level chemistry courses. Please consult with faculty advisor.

Total Major Credits=60


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation - 20
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

160

Spring-Fall---- YES

Chemistry
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Chemistry Education (810)


Take required Foundation courses
Major Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Education:
Take these courses:
ED 200
ED 304
ED 461
ED 492
SPED 360

2
3
3
10
2
20

Introductory Core
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
CHEM 105
4
CHEM 106
4
PH 121
3
PH 150
1
12
Chemistry
Take these courses:
BIO 305
2
CHEM 220
5
CHEM 351
4
CHEM 405
2
13
Take 1 course:
CHEM 461
3
CHEM 468
3
3

Chemistry Electives
Take 7 credits:
CHEM 352
CHEM 420
CHEM 421
CHEM 462
CHEM 464
CHEM 470
CHEM 471
CHEM 481
Mathematics
Take 1 course:
MATH 113
MATH 215

4
2
2
3
2
3
2
3
7

Physics
Take this course:
PH 220
Physics Electives
Take 1 course:
PH 123
PH 250
PH 311

3
3

3
1
3
1

Program Notes:
It is recommended that
students minor in either Math
Ed, Physics Ed, or Physical Science Ed to stay within the 120
credit limit.
Double Counting allowed in
major and minor courses.

3
4
3

Total Major Credits=42


Education Core Credits=20
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor in Chemistry (146)


Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Minor Courses
Chemistry Courses
Take these courses:
CHEM 105
CHEM 106

4
4
8

Chemistry Electives
Take 12 credits:
CHEM 220
CHEM 351
CHEM 352
CHEM 461 or 468
CHEM 462
CHEM 464
CHEM 470
CHEM 471
CHEM 481
CHEM 482

Program Notes:
5
4
4
3
3
2
3
2
3
3
12

Total Minor Credits=20


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

161

Spring-Fall---- YES

Chemistry
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Minor in Chemistry Education (172)


Minor Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Minor Courses
Chemistry Courses
Take these courses:
CHEM 105
CHEM 106

4
4
8

Chemistry Electives
Take 12 credits:
CHEM 220
CHEM 351
CHEM 352
CHEM 405
CHEM 461 or 468
CHEM 462
CHEM 464
CHEM 470
CHEM 471
CHEM 481
CHEM 482

Program Notes:
5
4
4
2
3
3
2
3
2
3
3
12

Total Minor Credits=20


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Biochemistry Concentration (D 112)


Concentration Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- in Concentration Courses
Introductory Module
Take these courses:
CHEM 105
CHEM 106
CHEM 351
Take these courses:
BIO 180
BIO 377
CHEM 220
CHEM 481

4
4
4
12

Chemistry Electives
Take 1 course:
BIO 321
CHEM 352
CHEM 482

4
4
3
3

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Program Notes:

4
3
5
3
15

Total Concentration Credits=33


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

162

Spring-Fall---- YES

Chemistry
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Chemistry Pre-approved Cluster
Chemistry
Take 12 credits:
CHEM 105
CHEM 106
CHEM 150*
CHEM 220
OR
Take 12 credits:
CHEM 105
CHEM 106
CHEM 220
CHEM 351*
CHEM 352*

Physical Science and Mathematics


Take 12 credits from at least 2 of the following areas:
Chemistry
Take any Chemistry class numbered 105 or higher
(Chem 150 and Chem 153 cannot be taken with
Chem 351 and/or Chem 352)

6500
General Chemistry
General Chemistry
Introductory Organic and Biochemistry
Quantitative Analysis
Total Credits

4
4
5
5
12

Physics
Take any Physics class numbered 105 or higher
General Chemistry
General Chemistry
Quantitative Analysis
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Total Credits

4
4
5
4
4
12

6800
0-10

0-10

Geology
Take any Geology class numbered 111 and 111L or higher 0-10
Mathematics
Take any Mathematics class numbered 111 or higher
Total Credits

0-10
12

*Chem 150 cannot count with Chem 351 and/or Chem 352
Animal Health Chemistry
Take at least 12 credits:
CHEM 105
General Chemistry
CHEM 106
General Chemistry
CHEM 351
Organic Chemistry
CHEM 481
Biochemistry 1
CHEM 482
Biochemistry 2
Total Credits

Course Descriptions
CHEM 101 Introductory General Chemistry

6502
4
4
4
3
3
12

Credits*

CHEM 153 Introduction Organic and Biochemistry Lab

(3:3:0)

Co-requisites: FDMAT 108, FDMAT 108T, FDMAT 110, FDMAT 112, MATH 113, MATH 119, or
MATH 109,
An introductory course covering basic concepts in general chemistry. The course is
designed for students in home economics, nursing, agriculture, biology, and other areas
that require a broad introduction to general and inorganic chemistry. It serves as a
preparation for CHEM 150.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CHEM 101L Introductory General Chemistry Lab

CHEM 220 Quantitative Analysis

(1:0:3)

CHEM 351 Organic Chemistry I

(4:3:4)

CHEM 352 Organic Chemistry II

(4:3:4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 351


The second semester of a year-long course presenting the principles and theories
of organic chemistry including the properties, preparation and reactions of organic
compounds. The course is designed for students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering,
Pre-medicine, Pre-dentistry, Pre-veterinary and Biology. This course includes a lecture and
laboratory experience.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(4:3:4)

Prerequisites: CHEM 105; One of the following: FDMAT 110, FDMAT 112, MATH 113, MATH
119, or MATH 109
The second semester of a two-semester course designed to meet the general chemistry
requirements in engineering, science, and pre-professional majors. This course includes a
lecture and laboratory experience.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CHEM 150 Introduction Organic and Biochemistry

(4:3:4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 106


The first semester of a year-long course that studies the principles and theories of organic
chemistry including the properties, preparation, and reactions of organic compounds.
The course is designed for students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Pre-medicine,
Pre-dentistry, Pre-pharmacy, Pre-veterinary, and Biology. This course includes a lecture
and laboratory experience.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Co-requisites: MATH 109, FDMAT 110, FDMAT 112, MATH 113, or MATH 119,
The first semester of a two-semester course designed to meet the general chemistry
requirements in engineering, science, and pre-professional majors. This course includes a
lecture and laboratory experience.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CHEM 106 General Chemistry II

(5:3:6)

Prerequisite: CHEM 106


A one-semester course that introduces quantitative analytical techniques, instrumental
analysis, and associated chemical principles. This course includes a lecture and
laboratory experience.
(Spring, Fall)

Co-requisite: CHEM 101


Chemistry 101L is an online introduction to chemistry lab that illustrates principles
of chemistry and laboratory techniques. Participation in the course requires reading
pre-lab materials, completion of a pre-lab quiz, watching videos demonstrating laboratory
procedures, recording data and observations in electronic format, and completing a
post-lab quiz.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CHEM 105 General Chemistry I

(1:0:2)

Concurrent requisite: CHEM 150


Laboratory experience that provides an introduction to basic techniques in organic
chemistry and introduces the physical and chemical properties of some organic
molecules.
(Winter -even years, Spring- odd years)

CHEM 391 Technical Writing in Chemical Literature

(2:2:0)

Prerequisites: FDENG 201 and CHEM 106


This course provides instruction and experience in advanced writing techniques for
students planning careers in chemistry or related scientific disciplines. The course will
help students:
1) Prepare for further chemistry courses that require scientific writing as a part of their
curriculum.
2) Search the chemical literature using relevant database tools.
3) Develop practical experience in writing for a professional, technical audience.
4) Become more effective written communicators in their future scientific careers.
This course is a prerequisite for: CHEM 220, CHEM 464, and CHEM 471.
(Winter, Fall)

(5:5:0)

Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or CHEM 105


A one-semester introduction to organic and biochemistry that is a continuation of Chemistry 101 and is designed for students pursuing degrees or advanced training in nursing,
dental hygiene, exercise and sports science, or health science. Students who also need an
organic and biochemistry laboratory should concurrently register for Chemistry 153. This
course is not preparatory for advanced organic and biochemistry courses.
(Winter, Spring)

163
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Chemistry
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
CHEM 405 Chemistry Teaching Methods

(2:1:2)

CHEM 471 Advanced Laboratory

Prerequisites: ED 361; and CHEM 352 or CHEM 461


This course will focus heavily on preparing students to be competent in laboratory procedures, including lab safety issues. Students will learn how to set up labs, order supplies,
and prepare and design laboratory experiments in the sciences. In addition, students
will become familiar with how demonstrations can be effectively used in the classroom.
Ample opportunity will be given to each student to practice the skills needed to effectively
teach chemistry in the secondary schools. Students will become familiar with and learn
to apply the national and state science and chemistry standards for teaching chemistry at
the secondary level.
(Fall)

CHEM 420 Instrumental Analysis

CHEM 481 Biochemistry I

(2:2:0)

CHEM 482 Biochemistry II

(2:0:6)

CHEM 485 Introduction to Biochemistry Lit

CHEM 490 Special Topics in Chemistry

(3:3:0)

CHEM 492R Student Research

(3:3:0)

CHEM 498 Chemistry Internship

(1-3:0:0)

All chemistry majors must find and experience a work internship. This would generally
occur the semester after their junior year or during their senior year. The experience
could involve working for a government agency, industry, an academic institution, or any
organization that employs laboratory chemists on their staff. The credit for the internship
would count as the capstone experience required for graduation. The student will have a
contract agreement with the employer and be responsible to a faculty supervisor. Upon
completion of the internship, a written report and a technical presentation will be made
to the BYU-Idaho chemistry department as part of the requirement.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(2:0:6)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: CHEM 481 and PH 220


This course will provide an introduction to physical biochemistry: the application of
physical laws of the chemistry to biological systems.
(Winter)

CHEM 470 Inorganic Chemistry

(1-2:0:)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


A laboratory and/or field experience in which the student performs meaningful research
under the mentorship of a faculty member.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: CHEM 220, CHEM 461, and PH 250


Co-requisite: CHEM 462
Laboratory experience with modern instrumentation in performing physical and analytical
chemistry experiments, and practice scientific writing.
(Winter)

CHEM 468 Physical Biochemistry

(1-3:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 9 credits


Prerequisite: CHEM 351
A one-semester course emphasizing current topics in chemistry. Each class participant
will select a faculty supervisor who will oversee the design and implementation of a
curriculum within a specific field of chemistry.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: CHEM 461 and MATH 316


Second semester of a course covering the fundamental concepts of physical chemistry.
This course provides a theoretical and mathematical description of the physical behavior
of chemical systems. The second semester covers statistical mechanics, thermodynamics,
and kinetics.
(Winter)

CHEM 464 Physical/Instrumental Chemistry Lab

(1:1:0)

Prerequisite: CHEM 481


An introduction to literature databases and scholarly articles published in peer-reviewed
journals. Students will develop a portfolio and give an oral presentation of their work.
(Winter)

Prerequisites: CHEM 351 and PH 220; or CHEM 351, PH 220, and MATH 215
First semester of a course covering the fundamental concepts of physical chemistry. This
course provides a theoretical and mathematical description of the physical behavior of
chemical systems. The first semester covers quantum mechanics and spectroscopy.
(Fall)

CHEM 462 Physical Chemistry II

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CHEM 481


The second course in a two-semester series in which students explore the metabolic
pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. The course is intended
for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry, or biology and those preparing for
advanced studies in graduate or professional schools.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: CHEM 220, CHEM 352, and PH 250


Concurrent requisite: CHEM 420
This course will serve as the accompanying lab to Instrumental Analysis (CHEM 420).
Students will gain hands-on experience using a selection of instruments to solve chemical
problems. Laboratory experiments will include the use of the following: flame atomic
absorption spectrometer, ultraviolet/visible light spectrophotometer, spectrofluorometer,
Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, gas
chromatograph mass spectrometer, liquid chromatograph, capillary electrophoresis
instrument, and a potentiostat.
(Fall)

CHEM 461 Physical Chemistry

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CHEM 351


The first course in a two-semester series in which students explore the structure and
function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. The course is intended for
students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry, or biology and those preparing for advanced
studies in graduate or professional schools.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: CHEM 220, CHEM 352, and PH 250


Concurrent requisite: CHEM 421
A second semester analytical chemistry course building upon, and reinforcing, principles
and concepts introduced in CHEM 220 Quantitative Analysis (e.g., the analytical process,
data collection, and data analysis). Emphasis will be placed on the theories and
applications of modern chemical instrumentation. The correct use and selection of
chemical instrumentation for the purpose of solving chemical problems will be
investigated.
(Fall)

CHEM 421 Instrumental Analysis Lab

(2:0:6)

Co-requisite: CHEM 470


This laboratory course includes exercises in the preparation and purification of inorganic
compounds utilizing modern synthetic techniques and equipment. Characterization of
inorganic compounds will be performed by modern spectroscopic techniques such as
nuclear magnetic resonance, UV-vis, infrared, and magnetic susceptibility.
(Winter)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CHEM 461


This course involves a study of structure, physical and chemical behavior, and bond theory
as applied to inorganic chemistry. Using concepts, models, and experimental data, a
variety of inorganic systems will be analyzed in a systematic and detailed fashion.
Underlying trends in both the elements and also their compounds will be explored and
identified.
(Winter)

164
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Civil Engineering
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Civil Engineering

Students in the BSCE program are required to take the Fundamentals


of Engineering (FE) exam before they graduate. This is an important
milestone of achievement for each civil engineering student in
preparing him/her for future licensing as a Professional Engineer.
Students will also be required to pass a competency exam in order to
register for any 300 and 400 level courses.

(A Division of the Mechanical Engineering Department)

This program is designed to provide students with the competencies


necessary to work in a variety of exciting elds within Civil
Engineering. This program offers excellent placement potential,
professional job satisfaction, and substantial salaries. Students
entering this program can expect a well-designed and rigorous
curriculum based on industry standards.
The bachelor of science program in Civil Engineering (465) is
available to students entering Brigham Young University-Idaho on
any admission track.

Program Educational Objectives


Program Educational Objectives for the baccalaureate degree in Civil
Engineering are to produce engineering graduates who:

Greg Roach, Department Chair


Bill Cooley, Russell Daines, Nathan Harris, David Johnson, Jim
Lawrence, Garth Miller

1. Demonstrate and maintain faith in God, and exhibit high standards


of personal integrity and professional ethics through lifelong
service to family, church, profession, and community. [Service]
2. Provide leadership in their chosen eld of endeavor through
the application of effective interpersonal, communication, and
teamwork skills. [Leadership]
3. Apply fundamental principles of design and analysis to develop
innovative solutions in an industrial and societal context. [Design]
4. Maintain currency in their eld through continued learning and
education. [Lifelong Learning]

Kenna Carter, Department Secretary (208) 496-7630


http://www.byui.edu/MechEngr/

Civil Engineering
The program of Civil Engineering has one engineering program:
4-Year Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, BSCE (465)
The Bachelor of Science degree program in Civil Engineering has
been developed in accordance with ABET standards. The Civil
Engineering program will apply for formal ABET accreditation at
the earliest possible time in conjunction with ABET accreditation
requirements. Accreditation is anticipated to be granted retroactively
to the rst graduating class.

Student Outcomes
To achieve the educational objectives, the following outcomes will
be measured during the course of study within the BSCE program.
Assessment methods consistent with accreditation recommendations
will be used to determine how each student meets these outcomes.

Using techniques, skills, and modern engineering modeling tools,


students must demonstrate their abilities to apply mathematics,
engineering science, and technology principles necessary for
analyzing, modeling, and solving engineering problems. Students
must communicate effectively in written and oral presentation. Each
student must gain an understanding of professional and ethical
behavior in the workplace. Finally, students should understand that
learning is a life-long process and develop a desire to continue to
enhance their abilities as a professional engineer.

The Civil Engineering program at BYU-Idaho is designed to give


students the ability to:
1. Apply knowledge of fundamental math, science, and engineering
principles. (Fundamentals)
2. Design and conduct experiments and analyze the resulting data.
(Experiments)
3. Design components, systems, or processes necessary to meet
product specications and design constraints. (Engineering
Design)
4. Function well within a multidisciplinary team. (Team Work)
5. Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. (Model &
Solve)
6. Maintain high ethical, moral, and professional standards. (Ethics)
7. Communicate effectively in both oral and written format.
(Communication)
8. Understand the impact engineering has on the world. (Global
Impact)
9. Recognize the need for, and engage in life-long learning.
(Continued Learning)
10. Understand contemporary issues. (Contemporary Issues)
11. Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice. (Engineering Tools)

The Civil Engineering program prepares students for professional


careers in a wide range of areas including structures, water resources,
environmental, transportation and geotechnical engineering. Civil
engineers are involved in a variety of activities such as the design and
analysis of buildings, bridges, air frames, highways, airports, pipeline
systems, dams, ood control structures, and waste water treatment
plants.
The 4-year Bachelor of Science program in Civil Engineering (BSCE
- 465) provides students with a solid foundation in mathematics,
engineering science, solid mechanics, structural, geotechnical,
transportation and water resources engineering. In addition, students
choose a focus area in computer aided engineering, systems design,
engineering management, engineering mechanics, environmental/
water resources, construction, geotechnical, material science, mining/
petroleum, pre-medical, or general engineering.

165

Civil Engineering
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
12. Apply knowledge in environmental, geotechnical, structural,
transportation, and water resources engineering. (Technical
Breadth)
13. Explain basic concepts in management, business, public policy,
leadership, and the importance of professional licensure.
(Professional Breadth)

the civil engineering program is Calculus (FDMAT 112). Entering


freshman students should consult with their advisor to ensure
they are beginning with the mathematics course for which they
are prepared. Students with weak mathematics skills are advised to
enroll in a preparatory mathematics course to strengthen their skills.
It is imperative that students develop and follow a plan of study that
will allow them to complete all the required courses within the credit
hour limits. Students should consult with their advisor/mentor early
to make sure their educational plan is correct. Sample curriculum
ow charts can be found at http://www2.byui.edu/MechEngr/

General Information
Mathematics and physical sciences are critical components of any
engineering curriculum. The normal entry-level mathematics class for

BS in Civil Engineering (465)


Take required Foundations courses**
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - Students must maintain a minimum grade of C- in their major courses
Entry Courses
Take these courses your rst 2
semesters:
CHEM 105
4
ME 101
1
ME 142
3
ME 172
3
11
Core Courses
Take these courses:
CE 321
CE 341
CE 351
CE 361
CE 424
CE 433
CE 470
CONST 340
MATH 215
MATH 316
MATH 330
ME 201
ME 202
ME 204
ME 250
ME 250L
ME 360
PH 123
Take 1 option:
GEOL 111
GEOL 111L
or
BIO 221
Experiential Learning
Take 1 credit:
ME 299
ME 398R
ME 490R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
2
3
3
3
1
3
3
53
3
1
3
3

Choose a 12 credit emphasis from the following list


Computer Aided Engineering
Take these courses:
ME 342
3
ME 425
3
ME 438
3
ME 460
3
*Construction
Take 12 credits:
ARCH 300
ARCH 120
CONST 320
CONST 330
CONST 380
CONST 420

3
3
2
3
3
3

Engineering Management
Take these courses:
B 101
3
B 301
3
B 321
3
Take 3 credits:
B 361
3
B 383
3
CIT 380
3
Engineering Mechanics
Take this course:
ME 425
Take 9 credits:
ME 337
ME 370
ME 445
ME 460

3
3
3
3
3

*Environmental/Water
Resources
Take these courses:
GEOL 111
GEOL 111L
CE 370
Take 5 credits:
ARCH 300
GEOL 140
GEOL 340
GEOL 404
GEOL 435
*Geotechnical
Take this course:
CE 441
Take 9 credits:
GEOL 111
GEOL 111L
GEOL 140
GEOL 340
GEOL 351
GEOL 404
Material Science
Take 12 credits:
CHEM 106
CHEM 220
CHEM 351
CHEM 352
CHEM 461
CHEM 462
ME 445
PH 220

3
1
3
3
1
3
3
3

3
3
1
1
3
3
3

4
5
4
4
3
3
3
3

*Mining Engineering
Take these courses:
GEOL 111
GEOL 111L
Take 8 credits:
GEOL 140
GEOL 351
GEOL 352
ME 465
CE 441

3
1
1
3
3
3
3

*Petroleum Engineering
Take these courses:
GEOL 111
3
GEOL 111L
1
Take 8 credits:
CE 441
3
GEOL 140
1
GEOL 340
3
GEOL 370
4
GEOL 404
3
GEOL 425
3
GEOL 435
3
ME 465
3
Structural
Take these courses:
CE 421
ME 460
Take 6 credits:
CE 441
MATH 411
ME 342
ME 445

Transportation
Take this course:
CE 461
Take 9 credits:
GEOL 340
CONST 330
MATH 423
POLSC 330

3
3
3
3

General
Take 12 credits:
CE 370
CE 421
CE 441
CE 461
CIT 380
GEOL 340
ME 337
ME 342
ME 370
ME 410
ME 425
ME 438
ME 445
ME 460
ME 465
ME 495R

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
3

1
1
1
1

Program Notes:
COMPETENCY EXAM Students must complete the Mechanical Engineering Competency Exam.
FE EXAM Students must take the FE Exam prior to graduation.
*Per discussion with applicable departments, ME core satises other imbedded prerequisites.
**See list of specic Foundations courses for Civil Engineering in this section of the catalog.

Total Major Credits=80


This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

166

Spring-Fall---- YES

Civil Engineering
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Foundation Requirements for BS in Civil Engineering


Major Requirements
Students must maintain a minimum grade of C- in their major courses
Academic Fundamentals

Science

Cultural Awareness

Eternal Truths

Quantitative Reasoning
Take these courses:
FDMAT 112
4
FDMAT 108T
1
5

Science Foundations
Take this course:
FDSCI 101

American Foundations
Take this course:
FDAMF
3
3

Family Foundations
Take this course:
FDREL 200

Choose 1 option

Book of Mormon
Take these courses:
FDREL 121
FDREL 122

Reading and Writing


Take these courses:
FDENG 101
FDENG 201

Science Issues
Take this course:
PH 121
3
3
6

2
2

3
3

Humanities Foundations
Take this course:
FDCA 101
3
3
AND
International Foundations
Take 1 course:
FDCA 201
2
FDCA 202
2
FDCA 203
2
FDCA 204
2
FDCA 205
2
FDCA 206
2
2
Connections
Take this course:
FDCNC 350

2
2

2
2
4

Scripture Based Courses


Take 4 credits:
FDREL 211
2
FDREL 212
2
FDREL 301
2
FDREL 302
2
FDREL 324
2
FDREL 325
2
FDREL 327
2
FDREL 404
2
4

Other Religion Courses


Take 4 credits:
FDREL 100
2
FDREL 130
2
FDREL 150
2
FDREL 190
1-3
FDREL 215
2
FDREL 234
2
FDREL 235
2
FDREL 261
2
FDREL 333
2
FDREL 341
2
FDREL 342
3
FDREL 343
3
FDREL 351
2
FDREL 352
2
FDREL 431
2
FDREL 471
2
FDREL 475
2
4

2
2

Total Foundation Credits for Civil Engineering=40

Course Descriptions

Credits*

CE 321 Structural Analysis

(3:3:0)

CE 421 Structural Steel Design

Prerequisites: ME 142 and ME 202


Co-requisite: MATH 316
Deflection analysis by the method of virtual work. Analysis of statically indeterminate
structures by the flexibility method, the stiffness method, and moment distribution.
Computer analysis of structures.
(Fall)

CE 341 Elementary Soil Mechanics

CE 424 Reinforced Concrete Design

(3:2:2)

CE 433 Hydraulic Engineering

(3:3:0)

CE 441 Geotechnical Engineering Design

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CE 341
Application of principles and theories learned in soil mechanics. Evaluation of slope
stability. Design consideration for various foundations, including shallow foundations,
piles, drilled-shafts, and retaining walls.
(Fall)

(3:3:2)

Prerequisites: ME 142, ME 172, MATH 330, and CONST 340


Transportation system characteristics, traffic engineering, traffic operations, transportation
planning, highway geometric design, pavement design, highway safety, public transport.
(Fall)

CE 370 Hydrology

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ME 360 and CE 351


Application of fluid mechanics principles to analysis and design of hydraulic structures
and systems.
(Fall)

Prerequisites: CHEM 105 and MATH 330


Environmental concerns, problems, and evaluation methodology; pollution control, and
engineering management approaches.
(Winter)

CE 361 Introduction to Transport Engineering

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ME 250, CE 321, and CE 341


Theory and design of reinforced concrete, including columns, beams, slabs, and footings;
elastic and ultimate-strength methods of analysis.
(Fall)

Prerequisite: ME 202
Determination of stresses in soils, soil strength, consolidation, and settlement. Applications in fluid flow, lateral earth pressure, bearing pressure, and slope stability.
(Winter)

CE 351 Environmental Engineering

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: ME 250, CE 321, and CE 341


Compression and tension of steel members, beams, and beam-columns. Elastic and
inelastic lateral-torsional buckling. Structural fasteners. Emphasizes LFRD. Consideration
of seismic conditions.
(Winter)

CE 461 Geometric Design of Highways

(3:2:2)

Prerequisite: CE 361
Design of highway systems including classification, design criteria and controls, horizontal
and vertical alignment, cross-sections, clear zone, signing and striping, and capacity.
(Winter)

(3:2:2)

Prerequisites: MATH 330 and ME 360


Explores the principles and processes governing the movement of water through the
hydrologic cycle. Hydrologic statistics and frequency analysis techniques supplemented
with current software will be applied to problems of engineering hydrologic design.
(Fall)

CE 470 Civil Engineering Practice and Design

(3:2:2)

Prerequisites: CE 424 and CE 433


Engineering economic analysis, professional practice issues, and experience in completion
of a civil engineering design project by applying appropriate engineering standards and
multiple realistic constraints.
(Winter)

167
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Department of

Students majoring in Communication can choose from ve areas


of emphasis: advertising, public relations, news/journalism, video
production, and visual communication. Then they will increase their
versatility by selecting a complementary module in the following areas: advertising, public relations, news/journalism, video, visual communication, communication management, media sales, new ventures,
or anchor and reporter performance.

Communication

Major Requirements
1. Complete Communication core courses (31 credits).
2. Complete courses in one Communication emphasis (15 credits):
advertising, public relations, news/journalism, video production,
or visual communication.
3. Complete courses in one Communication module (9 credits):
advertising, public relations, news/journalism, video, visual
communication, communication management, media sales, new
ventures, or anchor and reporter performance. Courses cannot
count for both emphasis and module credit.
4. Earn grades of C-minus or higher in all Communication courses.

Recommendations for New Communication Majors

Mike Cannon, Department Chair


Melissa Bair, Brent Bean, Robyn Bergstrom, Mike Cannon, Eric
Embree, Caryn Esplin, Andra Hansen, Beth Hendricks, Ward
Hicks, Jeff Hochstrasser, Brian Howard, Joel Judkins, Cory Kerr,
Eric Lybbert, Mark Orchard, Marc Skinner, John Thompson, Lee
Warnick, Ron Weekes, Lane Williams

COMM 100, Introduction to Communication Major and Professions, should be completed in a students rst semester as a Communication major. Additionally, it is recommended that a student
complete COMM 102 (Public Speaking) and COMM 111 (Writing
for Communication Careers) in the rst semester. These three courses
should be enrolled in or completed before students can proceed to
other Communication courses.

Delaina Scholes, Department Secretary (208) 496-3691


http://www.byui.edu/Comm/

Introduction
In a world where information is more readily available from more
sources and more rapidly disseminated than ever before, the ability
to communicate correctly, clearly, precisely and persuasively has
never been more important. Students trained in communication are
prepared to work in exciting, wide-ranging, fast-changing, cuttingedge careers. With a recently revamped program, our departments
aim is to better prepare students to become skilled, knowledgeable,
versatile, progressive, ethical practitioners through courses and programs addressing todays professional requirements while anticipating
tomorrows developments.
We believe all future communication professionals should develop a
solid, broad foundation of knowledge and skills. Students should be
able to write and speak condently to a wide range of audiences; to
research and analyze scenarios and develop sound ideas and solutions;
to get along and work with diverse people in many kinds of situations; to serve in groups constructively or lead them productively;
and to produce targeted and effective written, spoken and visual messages in media, group and interpersonal settings.
Additionally, we believe students best learn by doing. From a students rst semester as a Communication major at BYU-Idaho, we
encourage him or her to get involved with our hands-on practicums.
These professionally oriented, student-managed organizations are
designed to reinforce, enhance and expand upon what is learned in
class. Our innovative I~Comm student media organization puts students to work for the Scroll campus newspaper, Scroll Digital broadcast organization, Soapbox Creative Agency, video production unit,
copy editing team, web development crew, or visual design agency.
Students who take full advantage of the training and opportunities
in I~Comm are well on their way toward being ready to meet the
demands of tomorrows ever-changing communication careers. The
same professors they learn within the classroom roll up their sleeves in
I~Comm and other practicums, thus completing an integrated learning experience.

168

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Communication
Advertising Emphasis (675-160)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Requirements
Take these courses:
COMM 100
COMM 102
COMM 111
COMM 130

1
3
3
3
10

Take these required core


courses:
COMM 140
3
COMM 150
3
COMM 273
3
COMM 280
3
COMM 289
1
COMM 307
3
COMM 498R
1-2
COMM 499
1
18
Take 3 credits:
(All may be repeated)
COMM 297R
COMM 397R
COMM 497R

1
1
1
3

Advertising Emphasis
Take these courses:
COMM 230
COMM 330
COMM 430
Take 6 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385

MODULES
Choose one 9 credit module:
3
3
3
9
3
3
3
6

Advertising Module
Take these courses:
COMM 230
COMM 330
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
6
3
3
3
3

Public Relations Module


Take these courses:
COMM 235
3
COMM 335
3
6
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 339
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
3
3
3

News/Journalism Module
Take this course:
COMM 240
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 340
COMM 342
COMM 360
COMM 440

Video Module
Take this course:
COMM 265
Take 6 credits:
COMM 260
COMM 360
COMM 365
COMM 375
COMM 465

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Visual Communication
Module
Take these courses:
COMM 300
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 462
3
9
Digital Media Module
Take these courses:
COMM 320
COMM 322
Take 3 credits:
B 250
CIT 230

3
3
3
3
6

3
3
6
3
3
3

Media Sales Module


Take these courses:
COMM 332
COMM 352
Take 3 credits:
COMM 385
COMM 450

3
3
6
3
3
3

Anchor and Reporter Performance Module


Take this course:
COMM 362
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 240
COMM 360
COMM 397R
TA 121
TA 123M
TA 123W

3
3
1
2
3
3
6

Communication Management Module


Take these courses:
COMM 250
3
COMM 350
3
COMM 450
3
9

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

169

Spring-Fall---- YES

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Communication
Public Relations Emphasis (675-161)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Requirements
Take these courses:
COMM 100
COMM 102
COMM 111
COMM 130

1
3
3
3
10

Take these required core


courses:
COMM 140
3
COMM 150
3
COMM 273
3
COMM 280
3
COMM 289
1
COMM 307
3
COMM 498R
1-2
COMM 499
1
18
Take 3 credits:
(All may be repeated)
COMM 297R
COMM 397R
COMM 497R

1
1
1
3

Public Relations Emphasis


Take these courses:
COMM 235
3
COMM 335
3
6
Take 6 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385
Take 1 course:
COMM 430
COMM 435

3
3
3
6
3
3
3

MODULES
Choose one 9 credit module:
Advertising Module
Take these courses:
COMM 230
COMM 330
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
6
3
3
3
3

Public Relations Module


Take these courses:
COMM 235
3
COMM 335
3
6
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 339
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
3
3
3

News/Journalism Module
Take this course:
COMM 240
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 340
COMM 342
COMM 360
COMM 440

Video Module
Take this course:
COMM 265
Take 6 credits:
COMM 260
COMM 360
COMM 365
COMM 375
COMM 465

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Visual Communication
Module
Take these courses:
COMM 300
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 462
3
9
Communication Management Module
Take these courses:
COMM 250
3
COMM 350
3
COMM 450
3
9

3
3
3
3
6

Media Sales Module


Take these courses:
COMM 332
COMM 352
Take 3 credits:
COMM 385
COMM 450
Digital Media Module
Take these courses:
COMM 320
COMM 322
Take 3 credits:
B 250
CIT 230

3
3
6
3
3
3

3
3
6
3
3
3

Anchor and Reporter Performance Module


Take this course:
COMM 362
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 240
COMM 360
COMM 397R
TA 121
TA 123M
TA 123W

3
3
1
2
3
3
6

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

170

Spring-Fall---- YES

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Communication
News/Journalism Emphasis (675-162)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Requirements
Take these courses:
COMM 100
COMM 102
COMM 111
COMM 130

1
3
3
3
10

Take these required core


courses:
COMM 140
3
COMM 150
3
COMM 273
3
COMM 280
3
COMM 289
1
COMM 307
3
COMM 498R
1-2
COMM 499
1
18
Take 3 credits:
(All may be repeated)
COMM 297R
COMM 397R
COMM 497R

1
1
1
3

News/Journalism Emphasis
Take these courses:
COMM 240
3
COMM 340
3
COMM 342
3
COMM 360
3
COMM 440
3
15

MODULES
Choose one 9 credit module:
Advertising Module
Take these courses:
COMM 230
COMM 330
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
6
3
3
3
3

Public Relations Module


Take these courses:
COMM 235
3
COMM 335
3
6
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 339
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
3
3
3

News/Journalism Module
Take this course:
COMM 240
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 340
COMM 342
COMM 360
COMM 440

Video Module
Take this course:
COMM 265
Take 6 credits:
COMM 260
COMM 360
COMM 365
COMM 375
COMM 465

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Visual Communication
Module
Take these courses:
COMM 300
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 462
3
9
Communication Management Module
Take these courses:
COMM 250
3
COMM 350
3
COMM 450
3
9

3
3
3
3
6

Media Sales Module


Take these courses:
COMM 332
COMM 352
Take 3 credits:
COMM 385
COMM 450
Digital Media Module
Take these courses:
COMM 320
COMM 322
Take 3 credits:
B 250
CIT 230

3
3
6
3
3
3

3
3
6
3
3
3

Anchor and Reporter Performance Module


Take this course:
COMM 362
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 240
COMM 360
COMM 397R
TA 121
TA 123M
TA 123W

3
3
1
2
3
3
6

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

171

Spring-Fall---- YES

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Communication
Video Production Emphasis (675-163)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Requirements
Take these courses:
COMM 100
COMM 102
COMM 111
COMM 130

1
3
3
3
10

Take these required core


courses:
COMM 140
3
COMM 150
3
COMM 273
3
COMM 280
3
COMM 289
1
COMM 307
3
COMM 498R
1-2
COMM 499
1
18
Take 3 credits:
(All may be repeated)
COMM 297R
COMM 397R
COMM 497R

1
1
1
3

Video Production Emphasis


Take these courses:
COMM 260
3
COMM 265
3
COMM 360
3
COMM 365
3
COMM 465
3
15

MODULES
Choose one 9 credit module:
Advertising Module
Take these courses:
COMM 230
COMM 330
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
6
3
3
3
3

Public Relations Module


Take these courses:
COMM 235
3
COMM 335
3
6
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 339
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
3
3
3

News/Journalism Module
Take this course:
COMM 240
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 340
COMM 342
COMM 360
COMM 440

Video Module
Take this course:
COMM 265
Take 6 credits:
COMM 260
COMM 360
COMM 365
COMM 375
COMM 465

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Visual Communication
Module
Take these courses:
COMM 300
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 462
3
9
Communication Management Module
Take these courses:
COMM 250
3
COMM 350
3
COMM 450
3
9

3
3
3
3
6

Media Sales Module


Take these courses:
COMM 332
COMM 352
Take 3 credits:
COMM 385
COMM 450
Digital Media Module
Take these courses:
COMM 320
COMM 322
Take 3 credits:
B 250
CIT 230

3
3
6
3
3
3

3
3
6
3
3
3

Anchor and Reporter Performance Module


Take this course:
COMM 362
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 240
COMM 360
COMM 397R
TA 121
TA 123M
TA 123W

3
3
1
2
3
3
6

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

172

Spring-Fall---- YES

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Communication
Visual Communication Emphasis (675-164)
Take required Foundations courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Requirements
Take these courses:
COMM 100
COMM 102
COMM 111
COMM 130

1
3
3
3
10

Take these required core


courses:
COMM 140
3
COMM 150
3
COMM 273
3
COMM 280
3
COMM 289
1
COMM 307
3
COMM 498R
1-2
COMM 499
1
18
Take 3 credits:
(All may be repeated)
COMM 297R
COMM 397R
COMM 497R

1
1
1
3

Visual Communication
Emphasis
Take these courses:
COMM 300
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 462
3
9
Take 6 credits:
COMM 316
COMM 322
COMM 360

3
3
3
6

MODULES
Choose one 9 credit module:
Advertising Module
Take these courses:
COMM 230
COMM 330
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
6
3
3
3
3

Public Relations Module


Take these courses:
COMM 235
3
COMM 335
3
6
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 339
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
3
3
3

News/Journalism Module
Take this course:
COMM 240
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 340
COMM 342
COMM 360
COMM 440

Video Module
Take this course:
COMM 265
Take 6 credits:
COMM 260
COMM 360
COMM 365
COMM 375
COMM 465

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Visual Communication
Module
Take these courses:
COMM 300
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 462
3
9
Communication Management Module
Take these courses:
COMM 250
3
COMM 350
3
COMM 450
3
9

3
3
3
3
6

Media Sales Module


Take these courses:
COMM 332
COMM 352
Take 3 credits:
COMM 385
COMM 450
Digital Media Module
Take these courses:
COMM 320
COMM 322
Take 3 credits:
B 250
CIT 230

3
3
6
3
3
3

3
3
6
3
3
3

Anchor and Reporter Performance Module


Take this course:
COMM 362
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 240
COMM 360
COMM 397R
TA 121
TA 123M
TA 123W

3
3
1
2
3
3
6

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

173

Spring-Fall---- YES

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Minor in Communication (221)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Core Requirements
Take these courses:
COMM 102
COMM 111
COMM 130
Core Selection
Take 3 credits:
COMM 140
COMM 150
COMM 273
COMM 280
COMM 307
Practicum
Take 1 credit:
COMM 397R

MODULES
Choose one 9 credit module:
3
3
3
9

3
3
3
3
3
3

1
1

Program Notes:

Advertising Module
Take these courses:
COMM 230
COMM 330
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
COMM 380
COMM 385

3
3
6
3
3
3
3

Public Relations Module


Take these courses:
COMM 235
3
COMM 335
3
6
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
3
COMM 339
3
COMM 380
3
COMM 385
3
3

News/Journalism Module
Take this course:
COMM 240
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 340
COMM 342
COMM 360
COMM 440
Video Module
Take this course:
COMM 265
Take 6 credits:
COMM 260
COMM 360
COMM 365
COMM 375
COMM 465

3
3
3
3
6

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Visual Communication
Module
Take these courses:
COMM 300
3
COMM 310
3
COMM 462
3
9
Communication Management Module
Take these courses:
COMM 250
3
COMM 350
3
COMM 450
3
9
Media Sales Module
Take these courses:
COMM 332
COMM 352
Take 3 credits:
COMM 385
COMM 450

3
3
6
3
3
3

Digital Media Module


Take these courses:
COMM 320
COMM 322
Take 3 credits:
B 250
CIT 230

3
3
6
3
3
3

Anchor and Reporter Performance Module


Take this course:
COMM 362
3
3
Take 6 credits:
COMM 240
COMM 360
COMM 397R
TA 121
TA 123M
TA 123W

3
3
1
2
3
3
6

Total Minor Credits=22


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Media and Professional Writing Concentration (D 126)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Take these courses:
COMM 111
COMM 130
COMM 342
ENG 151
ENG 321
ENG 325
ENG 326
ENG 450
ENG 452
IDS 398R
IDS 499

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
2
30

Take 1 course:
COMM 335
COMM 340
Take 1 course:
COMM 397R
COMM 499

Program Notes:
3
3
3
1
1
1

Total Concentration Credits=34


This Concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

174

Spring-Fall---- YES

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Writing Creatively for Fiction and Film Concentration (D 127)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses
Take these courses:
COMM 111
COMM 130
COMM 297R*
COMM 342
COMM 365
ENG 218
ENG 318R
ENG 325
ENG 351
ENG 373
ENG 418R
IDS 398R
IDS 499

3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
2
34

Take 1 course:
COMM 397R
COMM 499

Program Notes:
1
1
1

Total Concentration Credits=35


This Concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Visual Communication/Business Concentration (D 136)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses
Take these courses:
B 250
B 483
CIT 160
CIT 230
COMM 130
COMM 300
COMM 397R
COMM 462
COMM 497R*
IDS 398R
IDS 499

3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
1
1-3
2
26

Take 6 credits:
COMM 316
COMM 322
COMM 360

Program Notes:
3
3
3
6

*Select the Wordpress Websites option

Total Concentration Credits=32


This Concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

175

Spring-Fall---- YES

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Communication Pre-approved Clusters
Advertising
Take these courses:
COMM 130
Visual Media
3
COMM 230
Advertising Principles and Practices
3
COMM 330
Advertising Creative Development and Writing 3
Take 3 credits:
COMM 322
New Media Strategies and Tactics
3
COMM 380
Media Research Methods
3
COMM 385
Media Strategy and Planning
3
Total Credits
12

2200

Public Relations
Take these courses:
COMM 235
Public Relations Principles and Practices
COMM 335
Public Relations Writing and Production
Take 6 credits:
COMM 322
New Media Strategies and Tactics
COMM 339
Events Management
COMM 380
Media Research Methods
COMM 385
Media Strategy and Planning
Total Credits

2205

Media Sales and Digital Media


Take these courses:
COMM 320
Digital Media Content Creation
COMM 322
Digital Media Strategies and Tactics
COMM 332
Media Sales and Account Management
Take 3 credits:
COMM 273
Professional Presentations
COMM 280
Communication Research Fundamentals
COMM 352
Persuasion
Total Credits
Professional Presentations
Take these courses:
COMM 102
Public Speaking
COMM 130
Visual Media
COMM 273
Professional Presentations
COMM 352
Persuasion
Total Credits

Course Descriptions
COMM 100 Introduction to Communication

Visual Communication
Take these courses:
COMM 130
Visual Media
COMM 300
Digital Imaging
COMM 310
Creating Online Media
COMM 462
Advanced Visual Media
Total Credits
Communication Management
Take these courses:
COMM 150
Interpersonal Theory and Practice
COMM 250
Organizational Principles and Practices
COMM 350
Group Dynamics
COMM 450
Conict Management and Negotiation
Total Credits

3
3
3
3
3
3
12
2207
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
2208
3
3
3
3
12

Credits*
(1:1:0)

3
3
3
3
12
2212

News/Journalism
Take these courses:
COMM 111
Writing for Communication Careers
COMM 240
Newsgathering Principles and Practices
Take 6 credits:
COMM 340
Advanced Media Writing
COMM 342
Editing Essentials
COMM 360
Multimedia Video Journalism
COMM 440
News in the 21st Century
Total Credits

2213

COMM 150 Interpersonal Theory & Practice

3
3
3
3
3
3
12

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Examines basic elements and theory of human communication in a practical, relevant


setting. Explores varied facets of interpersonal process, with emphasis on improving
communication skills and interpersonal relationships.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

COMM 175 Communication Essentials

(2:2:0)

For Non-Communication majors, this course helps give a basic foundation in


interpersonal communication and public speaking skills and principles. Through a
combination of exercises and class discussions, students develop the tools to continually
work toward more effective communication.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $38.00


Builds basic writing competence and other skills needed for today's media and communication careers.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 130 Visual Media

2211

Surveys historical and contemporary mass media and examines their current situation
and trends, with particular emphasis on concurrent impacts between the media and
society. Principal media theory is explored.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

An exploration of the fundamental principles and practices of effective informative and


persuasive speeches. Examines basic elements of public speaking including increasing
speaker confidence, ethics of speaking, audience analysis and adaptation, appropriate
methods of delivery, researching supporting materials, effective use of presentational aids,
effective outlining and delivery of speeches.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 111 Writing for Communication Career

3
3
3
3
12

Video
Take these courses:
COMM 297R Communication Practicum 1/AVID
1
COMM 265
Video and Film Production Essentials
3
Take 9 credits:
COMM 260
Broadcast Media Principles and Practice
3
COMM 360
Multimedia Video Journalism
3
COMM 365
Short Film and Web-Video Producing
3
COMM 375
The Business of Video Production
3
COMM 465
Documentary and Corporate Video Production3
Total Credits
13

COMM 140 Mass Media and Society

Provides information about different areas of study in the Department of Communication.


Practicum options are discussed as well as department requirements, general advising,
resume planning and faculty mentor services.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 102 Public Speaking

2210

COMM 230 Advertising Principles

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 111


Co-requisites: COMM 130 and COMM 140
Covers fundamentals and principles of effective advertising and promotion and the integration of advertising with other elements of marketing communication. Related projects
are provided for individuals to demonstrate and apply these principles using various
media. Associated economic, social and ethical issues are also discussed.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

A practical application of the design principles and rules of typography to produce effective visual media. This is a hybrid course with a blend of in-class and online learning to
explore the diverse skills and technologies involved in the visual design process. Students
produce a portfolio of projects including fliers, ads, edited images, logos, stationery,
and brochures to demonstrate design proficiency and expertise using industry-standard
technology.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

176
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
COMM 231A Basic Advertising Skills: Creative Development

(1:1:0)

COMM 280 Communication Research Fundamentals

Course Fees: $15.00


Prerequisites: B 301, B 321, B 341, and B 361; or B 302, B 322, B 342, and B 362; or
ECON 215, ACCTG 201, ACCTG 202, ECON 150, ECON 15, and either FDMAT 112 or MATH
119; or ECON 215, ECON 150, ECON 151, and ACCTG 201; or ACCTG 201, ACCTG 202, ACCTG
301, ECON 150, and ECON 151
For Non-communication majors. The student will learn how to develop creative concepts
that accomplish advertising objectives and convey brand positions to the target audience
through various media. This course is part of the Business Management Integrated
Emphasis program. Students must apply for the program via the Business Management
homepage. If they are accepted to the program, the department will register the student
for the class.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 235 Public Relations Principles and Practices

COMM 289 Communication Career Workshop

(3:3:0)

COMM 297R Communication Practicum I

(3:3:0)

COMM 300 Digital Imaging

(3:3:0)

COMM 307 Ethics and Legal Issues

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: COMM 260 and COMM 297R


Course requirements: Avid or Adobe Premiere
Study and practice of intermediate video production techniques. Involves operation of
field and studio equipment to enhance video production skills.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 273 Professional Presentations

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: COMM 140 and COMM 111


Requires students to recognize and practice legal reasoning in relation to issues of
relevance to communication professionals. Students will learn to identify elements
present in cases concerning libel, privacy, and intellectual property. Additionally, students
will consider the legal constraints associated with commercial expression. Finally,
students will explore ethical questions likely to arise within the field of professional
communication, which cannot be adequately answered by legal means. Students will
develop strategies for answering those questions and learn to apply relevant ethical
principles as they do so.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Introduction to today's disciplines and skills in broadcasting and allied fields. Theoretical
explanations and hands-on lab assignments provide students with career preparation
skills.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 265 Video and Film Production Essentials

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $45.00


Prerequisite: COMM 130
An exploration of principles and skills used in digital image capture, image editing, image
sizing, and image optimization for professional online and print presentation. This is
a hybrid course with a blend of in-class and online learning. Projects include a weekly
photo blog portfolio and a large-format framed print for display. Students use the latest
technologies and skills to create and teach an advanced custom tutorial. The course
highlight is a ghost town photo excursion for hands-on-application of theory and skills.
A variety of case study situations are analyzed and discussed in small and large group
settings to apply problem-solving skills.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: COMM 150


Analysis of communication principles and practices in organizations from a theoretical
perspective, methods to improve communication practices and review of career opportunities in the field.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 260 Broadcast Media Principles and Practice

(1:1:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 12 credits


Gives students experience in communication by applying lessons/knowledge learned in
class to real-life projects. Projects will be self-directed with minimal supervision.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: COMM 111


Co-requisites: COMM 130 and COMM 140
Introduces the basics of newsgathering, reporting and traditional journalism for print,
broadcast and the Internet. It teaches how to make money as an independent journalist
through blogging and free-lance writing. It focuses on the ethics and culture of professional journalism. Reporting techniques including interviewing, beat reporting and basic
research are included. Blogging is covered. In essence, this course teaches students how
to write, think and research as a reporter would.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 250 Organizational Principles

(1:1:0)

Prerequisites: One of the following: COMM 230, COMM 235, COMM 240, COMM 250, or
COMM 260
Students research internship, career and other post-graduation opportunities in their
chosen field and strategize how to position themselves and successfully apply for these
opportunities. Class members attend campus career events and workshops, and develop
a resume and portfolio and professional network database that will aid them in their
post-graduation objectives, as well as learn about professional expectations and conduct.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: COMM 111


Co-requisites: COMM 130 and COMM 140
Explores the history, principles and practices of effective public relations. Students learn
how to develop public relations campaigns and address public relations problems in a
variety of industries. In addition, students learn to recognize and emulate quality public
relations efforts. The importance of ethics and credibility are discussed. Related
assignments are provided for students to demonstrate these principles.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 240 Newsgathering Principles and Practices

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $5.00


Prerequisites: COMM 111 and one of the following: FDMAT 108, MATH 109, FDMAT 110,
FDMAT 112, MATH 221A, MATH 221B, MATH 221C, or MATH 325
An exploration of the methodological and mathematical tools and principles used in
evaluating, designing, and executing communication and media research. A variety
of projects and assignments explore the fundamentals of research such as sampling,
research design, appropriate statistical tests, focus groups, surveys, polls, and appropriate
use of secondary research sources. Additionally, students will develop proficiency in data
collection and analysis tools of Microsoft Excel.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 310 Creating Online Media

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 130


Technical introduction to search-engine optimized and standards-based web design and
production. Training in semantic HTML markup, CSS-based design and dynamic PHP
scripting, overview of the history, current status and future possibilities of HTML.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: COMM 102 and COMM 130


Explores key principles and skills that will facilitate a student's move from competency
in classroom presentations to excellence in professional presentations. Emphasizes
audience-centered strategies in the planning, creating, slide design and delivery of a
variety of realistic presentations in a range of professional environments, including conference room, lecture hall, and local business settings.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

177
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
COMM 316 Professional Imaging

(3:3:0)

COMM 340 Advanced Media Writing

Course Fees: $150.00


Prerequisites: COMM 130, COMM 300, and COMM 310
This advanced digital imaging, lighting and portraiture course focuses on the latest
professional techniques to prepare experienced photographers and designers for a career,
studio or related visual communication professions. Students create a customized,
professional website using WordPress templates or hand-coding to market their own
photographic work, complete with video training, weekly blog posts, and related
photodesign content. Students publish a hardbound photobook portfolio and display
their work for professional critique and competition. Training in entrepreneurial business
practices will prepare students to set up their own companies or work for companies specializing in online and print visual media careers from online Web magazines to photography and image-editing instruction. This hybrid course blends in-class and online learning,
so students interact in a variety of technology-rich environments. Students will participate
in several class photo excursions and studio and natural lighting contests and shootouts.
Formative feedback and group critique provides ample opportunity for professional
portfolio growth. Students acquire advanced skill experience in current photography
trends such as manual HDR, cinemagraphs, advanced light painting, speedlighting, studio
lighting and other accessories. Students acquire advanced skills in industry-standard
applications such as Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Bridge, Photoshop Camera Raw.

COMM 320 Digital Media Content Creation

COMM 342 Editing Essentials

COMM 350 Group Dynamics

(3:3:0)

COMM 352 Persuasion

(3:3:0)

COMM 360 Multimedia Video Journalism

COMM 362 Broadcast Performance

(3:3:0)

Principles and skills of broadcast presentation to various mass media audiences, including radio, television, video, and online. Students learn to use the voice as a tool on air
or in video narration. Classes also focus on non-verbal communication skills, including
facial expressions and gestures. This course helps develop skills for broadcast assignment reporters or anchors, as well as having application for public speaking and other
presentational venues.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

COMM 365 Short Film and Web-Video Producing

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 297R


Course requirements: Avid or Adobe Premiere
Focuses on producing video content targeted primarily for internet distribution. Students
conceptualize, plan, write, storyboard, budget, shoot, edit, and promote scripted video
content.
(Alternating semesters)

(3:3:0)

COMM 375 Business of Video Production

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 265


A hands-on experience in brainstorming, planning, creating, and running an independent
video production business. Students will make a business plan for a video production
company that will include product descriptions, marketing strategies,
competitive analysis, and financial information.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 235


Emphasis is on developing the understanding and skills needed to produce professionalcaliber public relations work across a variety of styles and platforms. Students will
demonstrate these skills by producing various forms of written and visual assignments.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 339 Events Management

(3:3:0)

Introduces students to the principles and techniques of visual storytelling for multimedia
distribution. Students learn skills in information gathering, interviewing, and writing.
Students use HD video and digital audio equipment to produce a variety of stories for
blogs and the i~Comm website.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: Take one of the following: COMM 230, COMM 235, COMM 240, COMM 250, or
COMM 260
This interdisciplinary media sales class explores the responsibilities and the associated
sales activities of an account executive, the individual who directs and oversees promotional programs for client companies or agencies. Students learn effective analytical,
creative, media sales, management, negotiation, media-planning and buying, financial,
and strategic skills. Media sales in traditional and nontraditional media is also explored.
(Winter, Fall)

COMM 335 Public Relations Writing and Production

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 102


Encourages students to use logos, pathos, and ethos to extend their reach of influence,
explores means of achieving common ground among competing interests, emphasizes the
critical thinking skills necessary to understand and communicate about complex, controversial issues in non-confrontational ways, includes oral and written communication, and
culminates in a team-community-action project.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: COMM 230


Examines and provides practice of how advertisers must condense all that can be said
about a product into a few, pertinent, succinct, compelling points. Studies historic cases
of advertising copywriting issues and challenges confronting business, government, education, for-profit and not-for-profit entities. The responsibilities of an account planner will
also be examined.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 332 Media Sales and Account Management

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $63.00


Prerequisite: COMM 150
Analysis of theory and practice of human communication in a small-group setting,
focusing on leadership, participation and evaluation, with emphasis in group norms, roles,
cohesion and conflict.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: COMM 140


Co-requisite: COMM 320
Hands-on experience in measurement, analysis, and improvement of existing content in
currently influential new media platforms. Students will learn how to work with Google
Analytics and internal measurement systems and functions of their platforms of choice,
with search engine optimization and/or marketing, with online advertisement placement
systems. With this information, students will gain practice in applying strategic decisionmaking to new media content.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 330 Advertising Creative Development Writing

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 111


Co-requisite: COMM 240
Teaches principles of improving the quality of language in written stories and scripts,
including sentence structure, agreement, case, voice, punctuation, spelling, clarity,
conciseness, coherence, accuracy, sensitivity and style. Both micro- and macro-editing will
be considered.
(Alternating semesters)

Prerequisite: COMM 140


Co-requisite: COMM 322
Hands-on experience in how to work in, effectively use, and produce content in currently
influential new media platforms. Students will learn how to identify potential market
niches, how to analyze their potential, and then how to develop and carry out a plan to
produce high-quality public content in multiple venues.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 322 Digital Media Strategies Tactics

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: COMM 111 and COMM 130


Co-requisite: COMM 240
Teaches journalistic modes of media writing beyond skills taught in COMM 111, including
magazine writing, advocacy journalism and public documents research and writing.
(Alternating semesters)

(3:3:0)

Explores the theory or phenomenon of events in society as well as management fundamentals.


(Winter, Spring, Fall)

178
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Communication
Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
COMM 380 Media Research Methods

(3:3:0)

COMM 462 Advanced Visual Media

Prerequisites: Take one of the following: COMM 230, COMM 235, COMM 240, COMM 250,
or COMM 260
Development and design of comprehensive research programs for advertising, public relations, journalism and mass media or social media professionals, including data sources
and collections, design of questionnaires, field investigations, audience analyses and
surveys (including focus groups), and content analyses. Basic statistical functions are
explained and utilized. Computer-assisted data analysis is also included in the course.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 385 Media Strategy and Planning

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: Take one of the following: COMM 230, COMM 235, COMM 240, COMM 250,
or COMM 260
Students learn how to strategically plan media campaigns and how to use media to
effectively accomplish and implement objectives, strategies, and tactics. Understanding
basic communication research is a prerequisite.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 397R Communication Practicum II

COMM 465 Documentary and Corporate Video Production

(1:0:3)

COMM 490 Directed Studies/Projects

(3:3:0)

COMM 497R Special Topics Practicum

COMM 498R Communication Internship

(1-2:0:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits


Consists of an extended or full-time experience in a professional media or communication
organization. Proposed internship must be approved by designated department faculty
member before going to the university internship office for final approval and registration.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

COMM 499 Communication Senior Project

(1:1:0)

Creation of an approved capstone project or paper to showcase the skills and competencies developed in the communication major. Senior students will work closely with a
professional mentor, faculty adviser, and peers to develop a project or research paper that
demonstrates the fusion of their undergraduate coursework and experiences. Projects
and papers should be significant and relevant to the student's academic or career
objectives. Students in this course will demonstrate senior-level proficiency in research,
visual communication, writing, and presentation skills. Senior projects will be presented
to faculty and peers in an open house fashion.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $55.00


Prerequisites: Take one of the following: COMM 230, COMM 235, COMM 240, COMM 250,
COMM 260, or COMM 340
Provides deep learning in modern newsgathering trends and techniques, notably
computer-assisted reporting. The class studies the latest in reporting and news investigative techniques. The class demonstrates competence with creating and disseminating
journalism through mobile technologies. The class studies in-depth the latest trends in
news, including the non-profit, online, hyperlocal, and converged models emerging in the
field today. The future of the career - entrepreneurial journalism - is discussed.
(Alternating semesters)

COMM 450 Conflict Management and Negotiation

(1:1:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 6 credits


Specialized practicum to give students experience in targeted skill and knowledge areas.
Practicum topics vary by semester.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $50.00


Prerequisites: COMM 235 and COMM 335; and COMM 380 or COMM 385
A capstone experience designed for students in public relations, pulling together and
drawing upon all previous academic and practical learning experiences to create a
professional-level communication campaign. Research, creative concepting, public
relations and advertising writing, promotional activities, and media planning and strategy
are all involved.
(Winter, Fall)

COMM 440 News in the 21st Century

(1-2:2:0)

Individual communication projects or research as arranged with instructor.


(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Course Fees: $20.00


Prerequisites: COMM 330 and COMM 385; or COMM 335 and COMM 385; or COMM 330,
and COMM 380
A capstone experience designed for students in advertising or public relations, pulling
together and drawing upon all previous academic and practical learning experiences to
create a professional-level, integrated-marketing communication campaign. Research,
creative concepting, public relations and advertising writing, promotional activities and
media planning, and strategy are all involved.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 435 Public Relation Campaigns

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: COMM 265


Theories and techniques of documentary and corporate video production, including
budgeting, script writing, shooting, and post-production. Students will be required to
produce broadcast-quality projects.
(Alternating semesters)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 12 credits


Course Fees: $20.00
Specialized, department-sponsored practicum gives students experience in communication by applying lessons/knowledge learned in class to real-life projects.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

COMM 430 IMC Capstone Campaign

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: COMM 300, COMM 130, and COMM 310


As the culminating course for the Visual Communication emphasis, this course covers
the advanced application of design principles and skills to create multi-level projects
including a self-portrait, self-branding, info graphic, product redesign, video podcast,
and portfolio website. As the final project, the website showcases projects created in
this course, best work from previous courses, and internship and work experience. This
hybrid course blends in-class and online learning so students interact in a variety of
technology-rich environments. Students critique work in small groups at each stage of
project development. Formative feedback provides many opportunities for students to
teach, analyze and perfect their work. Students acquire advanced skill experience in
Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, WordPress, Garage Band, and iMovie. The application of skills and concepts cover effective Web design, print design, timeline-video editing,
branding, product advertising, presentations and vector and raster graphics.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Co-requisite: COMM 150


Theory and hands-on experience in managing conflict and using principled negotiation in
a variety of personal and professional contexts. Topics include conflict management strategies, negotiation, third-party intervention, and relevant strategies for effective leadership
in the workplace, in interpersonal relationships, and with families.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

179
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Computer Information Technology


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
Department of

Careers in CIT are dynamic. New challenges and opportunities await


you every day. Working in a team, you will interact cooperatively
with the management, customers, clients, and other information
technology professionals to determine what the solution needs to do,
what it needs to look like, and how it should work. One day you may
be meeting with customers and clients, the next designing software,
and the next designing a database. The day after that you may be
involved in designing a complex network to allow your organization
to communicate more effectively using the web, mobile devices, and
computers. The next day you may be setting up a clustered set of web
servers. CIT is a very interactive and interesting career in which to
work.

Computer Information
Technology

General Advisement questions should be directed to the College


of Business and Communication Advisement Center, Smith 227,
(208) 496-9840.
A minimum GPA of 1.7 (C-) is required in all major courses to
graduate.

Accessibility of Computer Information Technology Courses


CIT 110, CIT 111, CIT 160, CIT 240, CIT 370, and CIT 380 are
available to all students.
Steven Rigby, Department Chair
Bradley Armstrong, Lee Barney, Rex Barzee, Art Ericson, Kory
Godfrey, Kent Jackson, Michael McLaughlin, Mark Olaveson,
Steven Rigby, Blaine Robertson, Randy Somsen
Amy Staiger, Department Secretary (208) 496-3620
http://www.byui.edu/CIT/

Introduction to Computer Information Technology


Take a look at Computer Information Technology (CIT). It includes
the design, development and management of systems within an
organization to solve real world problems. A world of opportunity
awaits you.
A career in CIT allows you to create solutions for real problems that
effect real people. As you help solve these problems with your team,
you may be creating new and exciting solutions that change the
everyday lives of individuals. You will be making a real difference that
impacts the growth and success of an organization.
There is high demand for BYUIdaho CIT graduates all over
the world in all segments of the economy in both small and large
companies. Careers in CIT pay higher than average salaries. You
can work in major nancial, accounting, agriculture, manufacturing,
medicine, retailing, or software companies, in education or
government agencies, or for non-prot organizations.

180

Computer Information Technology


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Computer Information Technology (681)


Take Required Foundations Courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
CIT Core
Take these courses:
CIT 160
CIT 225
CIT 230
CIT 240
CIT 241
CIT 260
CIT 262
CIT 325
CIT 352
CIT 353
CIT 360
CIT 370
CIT 380
COMM 175

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
41

CIT Electives
Take 2 courses:
CIT 261
CIT 336
CIT 341
CIT 345
CIT 381
CIT 425
CIT 460
CIT 465
CIT 470
CIT 485

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

CIT Capstone
Take 1 course:
CIT 490
CIT 498
Take this course:
CIT 495

Program Notes:
3
3
3
1
1

Total Major Credits=51


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=29
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Business Analytics (686)


Take Required Foundations Courses (40 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Information Systems Core
Courses
Take these courses:
CIT 111
3
CIT 160
3
CIT 225
3
CIT 380
3
CIT 381
3
CIT 425
3
CIT 499R
1
cont. in next column

cont. from previous column


ECON 150
3
ECON 215
4
ECON 255
3
ECON 278
3
ECON 388
3
ACCTG 201
3
ACCTG 202
3
B 211
4
B 212
4
B 410
3
CIT 498
3
55

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

181

Spring-Fall---- YES

Computer Information Technology


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Minor in Computer Information Technology (202)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
CIT 111
CIT 160
CIT 230
CIT 240
CIT 260
CIT 380

Elective Courses
Take 2 courses:
CIT 225
CIT 241
CIT 262
CIT 336
CIT 341
CIT 352
CIT 353
CIT 360
CIT 370
CIT 381
CIT 425
CIT 465
CIT 470
CIT 485

3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

Total Minor Credits=24


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Minor in Business Analytics (246)


Minor Requirements
No Double Counting of Minor Courses - No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
CIT 111
CIT 160
CIT 225
CIT 381
ECON 150
ECON 255

Take 1 course:
ECON 215
FDMAT 112

3
3
3
3
3
3
18

Take 1 course:
ECON 278
MATH 221A

Program Notes:
4
4
4
3
3
3

Total Minor Credits=25


This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Computer Information Technology Concentration (D 122)


Concentration Requirements
No Double Counting of Concentration Courses - No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses
Required Courses
Take these courses:
CIT 110
CIT 111
CIT 160
CIT 230
CIT 240
CIT 261
CIT 336
CIT 370
CIT 380
CIT 381

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
30

Interdisciplinary Courses
Take these courses:
IDS 398R
1-3
IDS 499
2
3

Program Notes:

Total Concentration Credits=33


This concentration is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

182

Spring-Fall---- YES

Computer Information Technology


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

Computer Information Technology Certicate (C 108)


Certicate Requirements
No Grade Less Than C- for Certicate Courses
Take 5 courses:
CIT 110
CIT 111
CIT 160
CIT 230
CIT 240
CIT 260

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
3
15

Total Certicate Credits=15

Computer Information Technology Pre-approved Clusters


Generic CIT
Take these courses:
CIT 160
CIT Fundamentals
CIT 230
Web Frontend Development
CIT 240
Networking
CIT 336
Web Backend Development
Total Credits

3
3
3
3
12

Programming
Take these courses:
CIT 111
Introduction to Databases
CIT 160
CIT Fundamentals
CIT 230
Web Frontend Development
CIT 260
Object Oriented Programming I
Total Credits

3
3
3
3
12

Networking
Take these courses:
CIT 240
Networking
CIT 241
Network Design
CIT 353
Operating Systems 2
CIT 370
Systems Security
Total Credits

3
3
3
3
12

Course Descriptions
CIT 110 Introduction to Excel

2500

2501

Web
Take these courses:
CIT 111
Introduction to Databases
CIT 230
Web Frontend Development
CIT 336
Web Backend Development
Take 1 course:
COMM 130
Visual Media
CS 371
Human-Computer Interaction
Total Credits

2502

Project Lifecycle
Take these courses:
CIT 111
Introduction to Databases
CIT 160
CIT Fundamentals
CIT 225
Database Design and Development
CIT 380
Project Management
Total Credits

Credits*

CIT 225 Database Design and Development

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

This course covers the basic elements of database management systems. It introduces
students to the concepts of logical and physical relationships in a data model and the
concepts of inner and outer joins. Students will use a computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool to design, create, and query a database.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 160 Introduction to Programming

3
3
12
2504
3
3
3
3
12

(3:2:3)

Prerequisites: CIT 160 or CS 124


This course covers the physical and logical design elements of relational and objectrelational databases, including the definition of and organization of structures into a
database catalog. It explores symbolic drawing methodologies, like Information Engineering and UML. It teaches SQL language semantics, including DDL, DML, and DQL structures.
It exposes students to database configuration and tuning. It demonstrates and explores
using external programming languages as access points to the database server, using Java
and PHP programming languages.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Introduction to the use of spreadsheets in business. Emphasis is on learning spreadsheet


literacy concepts and a popular spreadsheet application to solve business problems.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 111 Introduction to Databases

2503
3
3
3

CIT 230 Web Frontend Development

(3:3:0)

This course prepares students to develop web sites through a study of Hypertext Markup
Language (HTML5), Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), Usability principles, and User Interface
(UI) principles.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

An introduction to the basic concepts of computers and information technology. Learn


the basics of computer hardware and the binary and hexadecimal number systems.
Design algorithms to solve simple computing problems and will write computer programs
using Boolean logic, control structures, and functions. Read and draw UML use case and
class diagrams and will learn basic set and join theory.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 240 Networking

(3:3:0)

This course teaches general networking principles to provide an understanding of data


communication protocols, transmission systems, media, and software.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 241 Network Design I

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CIT 240


Principles of network design standards and architectures. Configuration of use and
networking devices including repeaters, hubs, bridges, switches, and routers to create
enterprise networks.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

183

Computer Information Technology


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
CIT 260 Object Oriented Programming I

(3:2:3)

CIT 353 Operating Systems II

Prerequisite: CIT 160


An introduction to object oriented programming using the Java programming language.
Students will write computer programs using primitive data types, control structures, Java
Swing classes, and objects. Students will read and draw UML class diagrams and will use
Java swing to write programs with a graphical user interface.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 261 Mobile Application Development

CIT 360 Object Oriented Programming II

(3:3:0)

CIT 370 Systems Security I

(3:3:0)

(1-3:0:0)

Prerequisites: CIT 110, CIT 240, and CIT 260


This course is designed as a CIT sophomore-level capstone experience where a student
applies the skills previously learned in computer information technology/information
systems in a real-world environment.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 325 Database Administration

CIT 380 Project Management

(3:3:0)

CIT 381 Business Intel and Analytics

(3:3:0)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CIT 240


Teaches general networking principles to provide an understanding of the basic switching,
WAN technologies, and intermediate routing skills. Learn how to install and configure
switches and routers in multiprotocol inter-networks using LAN and WAN interfaces, improve network performance and security, perform entry-level tasks in the planning, design,
installation, operations, and troubleshooting of Ethernet and TCP/IP networks.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 345 Wireless Networking

CIT 425 Data Warehousing

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CIT 225


This course defines the theory and practice of data analysis. The course will compare
and contrast the operational and analytical database models. Students will learn how to
define, implement and query a database warehouse by levraging sample data warehouses
built from Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Customer Resource Management
(CRM) solutions.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CIT 240


An introductory course in Wireless Networking. The course encompasses the design,
planning implementation, operation, and troubleshooting of wireless communication. The
material covers a comprehensive overview of technologies, security, and design practices.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 352 Operating Systems I

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CIT 160


Introduces business intelligence and analytic software and applications. It introduces
students to the architecture, design, development, and deployment of frameworks for
analysis within decision-making lifecycles. It introduces students to the principles and
characteristics of Business Intelligence Systems, Decision Support Systems (DSS), Executive Information Systems (EIS), Expert Systems (ES), Management Information Systems
(MIS), Artificial Intelligence, and Game Theory. Students will build analytical models using
non-procedural development environments like Microsoft Excel, SQL Server Analysis
Services (SSAS), R programming language, and similar platforms. Topics include learning
how to build multidimensional data cubes, tabular BI semantic models, data mining,
decision trees, linear and logistic regression, Naive Bayes, cluster, association rules, time
series, and neural network analysis techniques.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: CIT 230


This course prepares students to develop web sites by continuing the implementation of
concepts from the Web Frontend development course and adding backend components
(MySQL databases, PHP, SQL, and the MVC design pattern) to create dynamic web sites.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 341 Network Design II

(3:3:0)

Course Fees: $6.00


Designed to help students learn to use project management knowledge, tools, and
techniques to plan, implement, and manage coordinated work efforts and solve business
problems. Provides an opportunity to organize and plan the elements of one-time, unique
endeavors that add value to an organization. Emphasis is on developing the people skills
as well as the tools, techniques, and methods of professional project managers such as
Microsoft Project Professional.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisites: CIT 225 and CIT 260


This course is a continuation of CIT 320 and focuses on the development of stored
functions, libraries, objects, procedures and packages. Students will design and write
stored database program units in PL/SQL. Students will us an Integrated Development
Environment (IDE) to write and test programs against database.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 336 Web Backend Development

(3:3:0)

Provides students with an overview of the field of Information Security and Assurance.
Students will be exposed to the spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies,
and procedures. Offers a comprehensive guide for anyone wishing to take the CompTIA
Security SY0-301 Certification Exam. Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of
network security, including compliance and operational security; threats and vulnerabilities; application, data, and host security; access control and identity management;
and cryptography. Covers new topics in network security as well, including psychological
approaches to social engineering attacks, web application attacks, penetration testing,
data loss prevention, cloud computing security, and application programming development security.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

Prerequisite: CIT 260


This course teaches the concepts of systems analysis and design for those desiring to
work in the field of information technology. Initially, an overview of an information system
and the software development life cycle (SDLC) processes are covered. Each phase of the
SDLC process is then examined in depth and real experience gained through an actual
project. Computer aided Software (CASE) tools will be used to design and document an
information system/project.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 298 Introductory Internship

(3:2:3)

Prerequisite: CIT 262


Designed to allow students to experience a work-like environment. It pulls together
Software Engineering and Object Oriented Programming techniques learned in previous
courses. Based on customer requirements, you will learn to find, evaluate, and select solutions to problems that have many right solutions. You will also learn new Object Oriented
and software production techniques.
(Winter Spring Fall)

Prerequisite: CIT 160 and CIT 230


This course is designed to begin to give you the skills required to create mobile device
applications for modern mobile devices. Because of this, the course focuses on how to
solve larger, ill-structured business problems by designing and creating applications using
a framework that lets you install cross platform JavaScript applications on the devices.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 262 System Analysis and Design

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CIT 240


Provides students with the administration skills to plan, install/configure, and manage
Windows 2008 servers in a corporate environment.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 460 Enterprise Development

(3:2:3)

Prerequisites: CIT 225 and CIT 360


An overview of the architecture for N-tier applications is covered with a focus on the use
of effective design patterns. Different technologies to implement the MVC control pattern
will be explored. The J2EE architecture will be covered in depth including Servlets, Java
Server Pages, and Enterprise Java Beans. Applications that implement all parts of the MVC
pattern will be designed, implemented, and deployed.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

(3:3:0)

Prerequisite: CIT 240


Provides a fundamental understanding of computer operating systems focusing on Linux.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

184
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Computer Information Technology


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015
CIT 465 iOS Application Development

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: CIT 260 or CS 165


This course is designed to give you experience with syntactical and advanced development techniques within the iOS development ecosystem. These techniques are used to
solve ill-structured problems like those encountered in businesses and consulting firms.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 470 System Security II

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: CIT 240, CIT 352, and CIT 370


The purpose of this lab based course is to teach students techniques for securing the
entire network architecture both internally and externally. Students will learn how to configure and use firewalls and intrusion detection/prevention systems. In addition students
will learn how to harden operating systems and secure remote access.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 485 Enterprise Applications

(3:3:0)

Prerequisites: CIT 225 and CIT 352


This course is a capstone class that integrates design, analysis, database concepts, and
programming. The course will present product integration, configuration management,
and implementation concepts. Students will learn how to install, maintain, and integrate
a suite of products to deliver complex Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Customer
Resource Management (CRM) solution.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 490 Senior Project

(3:3:0)

The course is designed to allow each student to design, build, and implement a project of
their own choosing to further individual learning and career goals. Students will identify
an area of interest and propose a project plan to pursue and achieve those goals primarily through the analysis, design, development, and implementation of a fully functional
information system or completion of a professional-level certification. Students will work
with faculty mentors on an individual basis for project approval and achieving the project
objectives.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 495 Senior Practicum

(1:1:0)

This is a capstone experience for the Computer Information Technology major. There are
two options available: A research paper on a relevant Information Technology topic or
participate in service learning. The purpose of this course is to build on the knowledge
you have learned in the Computer Information Technology major.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 498 Internship

(3:0:0)

This is designed to be a capstone experience where a student applies the skills they have
learned in information system in a real world environment.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

CIT 499R Special Topics

(1-3:1-3:0)

Repeatable Course: may take a maximum of 4 times


This is a special topics course to address the latest advancements in information
technology.
(Winter, Spring, Fall)

185
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

A.A.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Department of

Computer Science &


Electrical Engineering

The A.A.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering provides a solid


foundation in basic computer and electronic systems. This includes
knowledge and skills in computer programming, computer system
design, and analog electronics. Students will be taught problem
solving skills that will allow them to debug and correct electronic
system errors. The primary target audience for this degree is Pathway
and online degree students.

A.A.S. in Computer Programming


The A.A.S. in Computer Programming provides a solid foundation
in both the breadth and depth of computer programming. This includes knowledge and skills in several programming languages as well
as the principles and practices of software development. Students will
be taught problem solving skills that will allow them to debug and
correct software system errors. The primary target audience for this
degree is Pathway and online degree students.

B.S. in Computer Science


As a computer scientist, imagine creating the next search engine, the
next social web site, or even the next must have mobile app. The
Computer Science program at BYU-Idaho offers a solid background
in computer science by providing experiences in algorithm development, procedural and object-oriented design and programming,
software engineering practices, computer security, web engineering,
technical communication, and theoretical foundations of computing. Graduates are prepared for high paying employment as software
engineers or to continue their education at graduate school.

Richard Grimmett, Department Chair


Scott Burton, Scott Ercanbrack, Rex Fisher, Richard Grimmett,
James Helfrich, Ron Jones, Eric Karl, Rick Neff, Kevin Smith,
Kevin Twitchell

B.S. in Software Engineering


The B.S. Software Engineering Degree is a subset of the B.S.
Computer Science Degree. This program provides students with a
solid foundation in both the breadth and depth of the principles and
practices of software engineering as well as skills in computer programming. In this program of study, students learn and practice the
industry standard approach to the design, development and implementation of complex software systems. The B.S. Software Engineering Degree is designed for students who want a strong background
in software development coupled with a minor or two clusters in
another subject (CS majors are not allowed to declare a minor).

Merlynn Price, Department Secretary (208) 496-7600


http://www.byui.edu/CSEE/

Introduction
The curricula in the Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering are designed to provide a broad background in the
theory and practice of computer software, computer hardware, and
electrical systems. Students learn how to combine scientic knowledge and engineering methods with practical technical skills to help
prepare them for life-long learning and rewarding employment.

B.S. in Electrical Engineering


Six degree programs are offered:
1. A.A.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering
2. A.A.S. in Computer Programming
3. B.S. in Computer Science
4. B.S. in Software Engineering
5. B.S. in Electrical Engineering
6. B.S. in Computer Engineering

As an electrical engineer, imagine creating the next generation of


consumer electronic devices, the next generation of robotics, or the
next electronic medical device that saves lives. The Electrical Engineering program at BYU-Idaho prepares you to use electricity and
electronics in novel ways to help solve some of the worlds greatest
scientic challenges. The program balances scientic and engineering theory with technical laboratory experiences in order to develop
practical knowledge and skills that working electrical engineers need.
Graduates are prepared for high paying employment as electrical
engineers or to continue their education at graduate school.

Graduates in the Department of Computer Science and Electrical


Engineering will:
1. Have a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles and
practices of their respective degree programs
2. Have learned how to learn
3. Be prepared for a successful career
4. Be ethical and responsible employees who make a difference

The Program Educational Objectives for the Electrical Engineering


program are that graduates of this program will:
1. Be disciple leaders with a strong testimony
2. Maintain a broad and rigorous understanding of the fundamentals of electrical engineering
3. Possess well developed design and problem solving skills
4. Continually develop and learn
5. Possess strong communication and interpersonal skills
6. Make a positive difference in their family, their workplace, and
their community

The Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering


continually strives to evaluate, improve, and modernize its curricula to keep pace with todays technological innovations. Advisors
can help students determine the best sequence of courses to meet
all graduation requirements within eight semesters. To qualify for
graduation, students must achieve at least a C- grade in all major
required classes.

The Electrical Engineering Program is fully accredited by the EAC


Accreditation Commission of ABET.

186

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

B.S. in Computer Engineering

The Program Educational Objectives for the Computer Engineering


program are that graduates of this program will:
1. Be disciple leaders with a strong testimony
2. Maintain a broad and rigorous understanding of the fundamentals
of computer engineering
3. Possess well developed design and problem solving skills
4. Continually develop and learn
5. Possess strong communication and interpersonal skills
6. Make a positive difference in their family, their workplace, and
their community

As a computer engineer, imagine creating the next super computer,


the next revolutionary tablet computer, or even the next control
system for the latest Air Force ghter jet. The Computer Engineering
program at BYU-Idaho balances scientic and engineering theory
with technical laboratory experiences in order to develop practical
knowledge and skills that working computer engineers need.
The curriculum is balanced to make you adept at designing and
developing both computer hardware and computer software. In addition, throughout your computer engineering education, you will
gain in-depth knowledge and skills in the design and development of
many different types of computer systems: from small MP3 players to large parallel computer systems. Graduates are prepared for
high paying employment as computer engineers or to continue their
education at graduate school.

The Computer Engineering Program is fully accredited by the EAC


Accreditation Commission of ABET.

AAS in Electrical and Computer Engineering (384)


Take required Foundations courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
CHEM 105
CS 124
CS 165
CS 235
CS 237
cont. in next column

4
3
3
3
3

cont. from previous column


ECEN 150
3
ECEN 160
3
ECEN 250
4
ECEN 260
3
MATH 215
4
MATH 316
4
PH 121
3
PH 220
3
43

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=43


Total Credits=60
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

AAS in Computer Programming (385)


Take required Foundations courses (17 credits)
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
CS 124
CS 165
CS 235
ECEN 160

3
3
3
3
12

Take these courses:


CS 213
CS 246
CS 308
CS 313
CS 364
CS 371
CS 499

3
3
3
3
4
3
3
22

Elective Courses
Take 8 credits:
CIT 225
CIT 261
CIT 370
CIT 380
CS 416
CS 432
CS 470
ECEN 324

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
8

Total Major Credits=42


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=1
Total Credits=60
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

187

Spring-Fall---- YES

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Computer Science (440)


Take required Foundations courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 3 semesters:
CS 124
3
CS 165
3
CS 235
3
ECEN 160
3
12
Take these courses:
CS 213
CS 237
CS 238
CS 246
CS 306
CS 308
CS 345
CS 364
CS 416
CS 432
CS 470
ECEN 324
MATH 330
MATH 341

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
42

Supplemental Courses
Take 15 credits:
CIT 225
CS 312
CS 313
CS 371
CS 450
CS 460
CS 480
CS 490R
ECEN 260
ECEN 361
Take 1 course:
CS 398
CS 498R
Take 3 credits:
CS 499
or
CS 499A
CS 499B

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15

Math and Science Courses


Take 1 course:
BIO 240
4
CHEM 106
4
MATH 113
3
MATH 411
3
PH 220
3
3

Science Courses
Take this course:
CHEM 105

Program Notes:
4
4

OR
Take these courses:
PH 121
PH 150

3
1
4

1-4
1-4
1
3
2
1
3

Total Major Credits=80


Total Credits=120
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

BS in Software Engineering (443)


Take required Foundations courses
Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses:
CS 124
CS 165
CS 235
ECEN 160

3
3
3
3
12

Take these courses:


CS 213
CS 246
CS 308
CS 364
CS 371
CS 398
CS 416
CS 432
CS 470
CS 499

3
3
3
4
3
1-4
2
3
3
3
28

Elective Courses
Take 15 credits:
CS 237
CS 313
CS 345
CS 460
CS 490R
ECEN 324
ECEN 361
MATH 221A
CIT 225
CIT 261
CIT 370
CIT 380

Program Notes:
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15

Total Major Credits=55


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=25
Total Credits=120
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

188

Spring-Fall---- YES

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Electrical Engineering (445)


Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
CS 124
3
CS 241
4
ECEN 150
3
ECEN 160
3
13

Take these courses:


CHEM 105
CS 237
CS 308
ECEN 250
ECEN 260
ECEN 340
ECEN 350
ECEN 380
ECEN 390
ECEN 398R
ECEN 499
MATH 215
MATH 316
MATH 330
PH 220

4
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
1-7
3
4
4
3
3
47

Supplemental Courses
Take 6 courses:
ECEN 324
ECEN 351
ECEN 361
ECEN 410
ECEN 420
ECEN 430
ECEN 440
ECEN 451
ECEN 461
ECEN 470
ECEN 480
ECEN 490R
ME 310

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
17

Math and Science Courses


Take 1 course:
BIO 221
3
BIO 240
4
BIO 264 & 264L
4
CHEM 106
4
CS 238
3
MATH 341
3
MATH 411
3
MATH 423
3
PH 123
3
PH 127
3
3

Program Notes:

Total Major Credits=80


Total Credits=120
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Foundation Requirements for BS in Electrical Engineering


Major Requirements
Students must maintain a minimum grade of C- in their major courses
Academic Fundamentals

Science

Cultural Awareness

Eternal Truths

Quantitative Reasoning
Take these courses:
FDMAT 112
4
FDMAT 108T
1
5

Science Foundations
Take this course:
FDSCI 101

American Foundations
Take this course:
FDAMF 101
3
3

Family Foundations
Take this course:
FDREL 200

Humanities Foundations
Take this course:
FDCA 101
3
3
AND
International Foundations
Take 1 course:
FDCA 201
2
FDCA 202
2
FDCA 203
2
FDCA 204
2
FDCA 205
2
FDCA 206
2
2
OR
World Foundations
Take these courses:
FDWLD 101
2
FDWLD 201
3
5

Book of Mormon
Take these courses:
FDREL 122
FDREL 121

Reading and Writing


Take these courses:
FDENG 101
FDENG 201

Science Issues
Take this course:
PH 121
3
3
6

2
2

3
3

Connections
Take this course:
FDCNC 350

2
2
4

Scripture Based Courses


Take 4 credits:
FDREL 211
2
FDREL 212
2
FDREL 301
2
FDREL 302
2
FDREL 324
2
FDREL 325
2
FDREL 327
2
FDREL 404
2
4

2
2

Total Foundation Credits for Mechanical Engineering=40

189

2
2

Other Religion Courses


Take 4 credits:
FDREL 100
2
FDREL 130
2
FDREL 150
2
FDREL 190
1-3
FDREL 215
2
FDREL 234
2
FDREL 235
2
FDREL 261
2
FDREL 333
2
FDREL 341
2
FDREL 342
3
FDREL 343
3
FDREL 351
2
FDREL 352
2
FDREL 431
2
FDREL 471
2
FDREL 475
2
4

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering


Brigham Young UniversityIdaho 2014-2015

BS in Computer Engineering (450)


Major Requirements
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Core Courses
Take these courses during
your rst 2 semesters:
CS 124
3
CS 165
3
ECEN 150
3
ECEN 160
3
12

Take these courses:


CHEM 105
CS 235
CS 237
CS 246
CS 308
CS 345
ECEN 250
ECEN 260
ECEN 324
ECEN 340
ECEN 350
ECEN 361
ECEN 398R
ECEN 499
MATH 215
MATH 316
MATH 330
PH 220

4
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
1-7
3
4
4
3
3
56

Supplemental Courses
Take 3 courses:
ECEN 351
ECEN 380
ECEN 390
ECEN 410
ECEN 420
ECEN 430
ECEN 440
ECEN 451
ECEN 461
ECEN 470
ECEN 480
ECEN 490R
CS 313
CS 364
CS 371
CS 416
CS 432
CS 460
CS 470
CS 480
CS 490R

Program Notes:

Math and Science Courses


Take 1 course:
BIO 221
3
BIO 240
4
BIO 264 & 264L
4
CHEM 106
4
CS 238
3
MATH 341
3
MATH 411
3
MATH 423
3
PH 123
3
PH 127
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
8

Total Major Credits=79


Additional Elective Credits Required for Graduation=1
This major is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter---- YES

Winter-Spring---- YES

Spring-Fall---- YES

Foundation Requirements for BS in Computer Engineering


Major Requirements
Students must maintain a minimum grade of C- in their maj