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Goals For Conference:

In many schools, instruction and time are constant--they do not vary on a


student-by-student basis. RTI was designed as a way to encourage teachers to
vary instruction and time to create a constant level of learning. A core
assumption of RTI is that all students can reach high levels of achievement if
the system is willing (and able) to vary the amount of time students have to
learn, and the type of instruction they receive. Thus, RTI builds on work done
with differentiated instruction (Tomilson, 2001) and understanding by design
(Wiggins & McTighe, 2005). This will be defined, implemented, and assessed at
Ridgecrest next year through targeted professional development from experts in
our own building.

The effectiveness of early intervention to prevent later difficulties of students


has been well documented, but it does require a commitment to personnel,
professional development, collaborative cultures, teacher leaders, and
assessment knowledge in order to be effective. Therefore, a major intent of the
response to intervention clause in IDEIA was to provide both a mechanism and
motivation for identifying and supporting students who are beginning to fall
behind their classmates. Major components of an RTI system include Data
collection, analysis and reflection, instructional planning, intervention, and
most importantly, preventing “tears” of intervention. This can be referred to as
a response to Instruction and Intervention. The premise is educators can’t wait
to determine if students respond to intervention; they have to first determine if
students respond to instruction. A key principle of where Ridgecrest is moving
in its RTI model is that any intervention is predicated on the notion that Tier 1
core instruction is responsive, standards-based, and data driven. Tier 2 and
Tier 3 interventions are ineffective when core instruction is inadequate,
unresponsive, and erratic. Ridgecrest will need to develop the capacity to ask
essential questions, and to lead our way into creating a better system of
instruction and intervention for our students. These questions include, but are
not limited to the following:

★ Is our core program sufficient?


★ If the core program is not sufficient, what led to this?
★ How will the needs identified in the core program be addressed?
★ How will the sufficiency and effectiveness of the core program be
monitored over time?
★ Have improvements to the core program been effective?
★ For which students is the core instruction sufficient or insufficient?
★ What specific supplemental and intensive instruction is needed?
★ How will specific supplemental and intensive instruction be delivered?
★ How will the effectiveness of supplemental and intensive instruction be
monitored?
★ How will we determine which students need to move to a different level of
instruction?
★ Who will lead our school in this work?
★ What will this leadership look like?
★ How do we systemically look at these problems and create solutions?
★ How do we as a school support, develop, and press one another?
★ How do we still have fun and celebrate?

There are several key points that we are looking to hone as we further evolve
our RTI model at Ridgecrest: It is imperative that teachers first consider
individual students’ responses to quality core instruction before recommending
supplemental and intensive interventions. They must also determine which
students respond to the interventions and continue adapting instructional
routines and time to achieve the desired results. RTI begins with a strong core
instruction and builds on creating a gradual release of responsibility model.
RTI relies on a strong assessment component to make intervention decision,
monitor progress, and improve instruction in all tiers. RTI emphasizes a
collaborative approach to classroom support. RTI anticipates that some
students will periodically cycle through interventions--an approach likened to
an academic booster shot. RTI needs leadership, knowledge, empathy, and the
ability to create and monitor systems to ensure student and staff needs are
being met.

The goals from attending the National Council of Staff Development (NSDC)
Summer 2010 conference is to build internal capacity to sustain and improve
the Response to Interventions (RTI) work that has begun at Ridgecrest.
Specifically, Ridgecrest hopes to more deeply understand the attributes of high-
functioning school teams and the actions they take to ensure individual
student needs can be recognized. Moreover, the RC RTI goal for the 2010-2011
is to focus specifically on math instruction, and interventions and continue to
develop and refine our reading support for struggling readers.

The conference strands the Ridgecrest team will focus on for the NSDC
conference and specifically, RTI is a) the learning gap, b) teacher leadership, c)
learning community, and d) professional learning processes. To address the
learning gap, we will be learning about the latest research-based strategies to
improve student performance in discipline areas and where and how to apply
them. Likewise, we will be learning cutting edge strategies to identify, develop,
engage and support teacher leaders to sustain and adapt RTI as our student
needs change over time. Because change is non linear, and because it takes
more than one, two, or three people to analyze trends, evaluate effectiveness,
and synthesize new courses of action, Ridgecrest attendees will also focus on
creating, sustaining, and evaluating school-based RTI learning teams. More
importantly, the Ridgecrest team will develop its skills for planning, facilitating,
presenting, advancing, and evaluating student, and staff learning.

To achieve our goals, RC team members will attend the following conferences:
B03: A multiple-layer approach to increasing student achievement.

B07: Co-teaching: advancing mathematics learning for all students

B08: Learning: is it only about the kids?

B11: Content Literacy: bridging the gaps through professional learning


communities.

B18: Increasing Math Teacher Effectiveness For Student Achievement Gain


(fifth and sixth grade team).

B21: Intervention Strategies That Work

C03: Lesson Study: Improving Mathematics Teaching and Learning

C13: The Way We Do Business: RTI and Flexible Delivery.

E06: Tools and Talk: The Power of Data and Conversation to Ignite Change.

E07: Using Authentic Problems in Mathematics Instruction

E08: Enhancing The Capacity of Teachers and School Leaders to Facilitate The
Learning of Diverse Students.

E14: “Spunk Up” RTI: Designing An Unforgettable Learning Experience

F02: Bridging The Teaching Gap: Creating Skilled Practitioners

F05: Teacher Leadership Structures To Build Capacity For Sustainability

F08: Using Depth Of Knowledge To Increase Rigor

F14: Instructional Frameworks For Student Self-Direction

F23: Ensuring Educational Equity Through Responsive Instruction

G01: Improving Student Learning By Minding The Gap

G02: Helping Teachers Learn From Student Focus Groups

G03: Superman is Dead: Distributing Leadership With Action Planning

G04: Education For All Children: Realizing Rigor, Relevance, Relationships

G13: Leading Healthy and Sustainable Cultures in Urban Schools


G18: Creating A Spark For Learning: Differentiation of Instruction For 21st
Century Learners Program

G27: Modifying and Accommodating For IEP Students

Money allocation:

3 day conference is $429.00


$5,000 total

11.7 teachers can attend. Sarah Danielson can only attend 2 days.
NATIONAL NON-PROFIT

Charting the Course


STAFF
DEVELOPMENT U.S. POSTAGE NATIONAL
COUNCIL STAFF
PAID DEVELOPMENT
504 S. Locust Street Cincinnati, OH COUNCIL
Oxford, OH 45056
PERMIT NO. 770

for School-Based Professional Learning


A Conference for Teacher Leaders
and the Administrators Who Support Them

Register now at www.nsdc.org

Make Plans to Attend!

NSDC 2010 Summer Conference


Save $50 for Teacher Leaders and the
on a 3- or 4-day Administrators Who Support Them
registration when
you register by

Charting the Course


April 30, 2010.

for School-Based Professional Learning

Seattle2010
Seattle2010
Featuring these Keynote Speakers:

Maria Goodloe-Johnson • Milton Chen


Jennifer James • Vicki Phillips • Taylor Mali

NSDC 2010 Summer Conference


July 18-21, 2010 • Sheraton Seattle hotel
Registration and hotel links through the NSDC Summer Conference page:
www.nsdc.org/summerconference10
or call 800-727-7288 for more information.
Conference Program
July 18-21, 2010 • Sheraton Seattle hotel
NSDC 2010 Summer Conference Save the Dates
for Teacher Leaders
and the Administrators Who Support Them Dec. 4-8, 2010
Atlanta, Georgia
NATIONAL
STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
COUNCIL
Charting the Course 2010 Annual Conference

Atlanta, GA

for School-Based Professional Learning


July 18-21, 2010 • Sheraton Seattle hotel

Dear The National Staff Development Council knows that


NATIONAL
STAFF
The National Staff Development Council invites you to its 42nd
Educator: DEVELOPMENT
the contribution of teacher leaders is essential if all COUNCIL Annual Conference. We are planning for 3,500 participants from
teachers in all schools are to experience high-quality
professional learning as part of their daily work. across North America to attend the conference, providing a great
Teacher leadership is at the heart of many school and district
opportunity for you to network directly with other educators, and
NSDC
Board of
Trustees
Ingrid carney improvement efforts. No matter what their job title or role — literacy form lasting relationships to support your work to improve our
2010 NSDC President or mathematics coaches, instructional coaches, or mentors, to name
just a few — we know that the work of these individuals is vitally schools.
Ingrid carney important to achieving high levels of learning for all students. That’s
NSDC’s 42nd Annual Conference: Dream.Dare.Do.
President
Carney for Kids why NSDC invites teacher leaders and those who support them to
Chicago, IL
attend its 2010 Summer Conference July 18-21 in Seattle, WA.
MARK DIAZ n General Session keynote speakers include Beverly Hall, Douglas Reeves,
President-elect With the support of local school systems and national teacher organi-
Cedars International
Academy
Austin, TX Stephanie Hirsh
zations, this conference provides teacher leaders and administrators Save $75 Andrew Hargreaves, and Ron Clark.
n Preconference and concurrent session presenters include Avis Glaze,
with valuable tools to bring the most powerful forms of professional when you register
NSDC Executive
CHARLES MASON
Director learning to all the teachers with whom they work. by May 31, 2010 Carol Ann Tomlinson, Bruce Joyce, Marcia Tate, Ian Jukes, Rita Bailey,
Past President on a 3- or 5-day
Brasfield & Gorrie registration fee.
Jon Saphier and Lucy West, Deborah Childs-Bowen, Phillip Schlechty,
Birmingham, AL At the conference, school-based staff developers will learn from both Barrie Bennett, Glenn Singleton, Jim Knight, Victoria Bernhardt, Gale
the outstanding and innovative work of their peers and the perspec- Hulme, Sally Zepeda, Margarita Calderón, Carolyn Chapman—and more!
SUE ELLIOTT
Trustee tives of national leaders. Participants will become skilled in assisting
West Vancouver School District n Over 300 concurrent and roundtable sessions in seven strands such
West Vancouver, BC, Canada their colleagues in data-driven decision making and in planning, NSDC 42nd Annual
implementing, and assessing the impact of their lessons. In addition, Conference
as leadership, examining the impact, teaching quality, technology,
CHERYL LOVE
participants will more deeply understand the attributes of high-function- Dec. 4–8, 2010 fundamentals of professional learning, equity, and advocacy.
Trustee
Hyatt Regency Atlanta
Developing Minds ing school teams and learning communities and the actions they can n More than 100 exhibitors offering valuable products and resources
Decatur, GA Atlanta, Georgia
take as leaders in their settings to make such collaboration a reality. specific to professional learning.
Amanda Rivera
Trustee
Chicago Public Schools
We look forward to meeting you in Seattle. Download the early bird registration form at
Chicago, IL www.nsdc.org/opportunities/annualconference.cfm.
Sincerely,
For conference information,
Kenneth Salim
Trustee contact the NSDC Business Office
Boston Public Schools at NSDCoffice@nsdc.org or
Boston, MA 800-727-7288
Ingrid Carney, NSDC President
For exhibit and sponsorship
ED WITTCHEN opportunities, contact Renee Taylor
Trustee
Ed Wittchen Consulting at renee.taylor@nsdc.org or
Spruce Grove, AB, Canada 800-727-7288, ext. 222
Stephanie Hirsh, NSDC Executive Director
2
800.727.7288 • www.nsdc.org 51
Welcome Our nautical crew, the 2010 host committee, Host Committee Conference
and Advisors Program Planning
to Seattle... welcomes you to Washington state. It has Committee
...where we will been a deep privilege to think of each and all Debbie Lahue
Chair and Affiliate Outreach Cathy Berlinger-Gustafson
actively engage in of you as we prepared for our time together ESD 101 Center for Facilitator
charting the course at NSDC’s 2010 Summer Conference. Instructional Services Crystal Lake, IL
for school-based Terese Emry Bergeron Harris
professional The Pacific Northwest is a region steeped Affiliate Outreach Austin, TX
learning. Center for Strengthening
in rugged history, explored, charted, and the Teaching Profession David Hill
developed through innovation and brilliance. Austin, TX
Becky Firth
From the breathtaking natural beauty of water and mountains to Registration/Operations
Jim Knight
Northwest Council for
the awe-inspiring Seattle architecture, learners coming together for Lawrence, KS
Computer Education
professional growth will be in for a treat. Anna Griebel Mike Ford
Hospitality/Publicity Clifton Springs, NY

We encourage you to join the crew, colleagues old and new, to Sumner School District
Brian Bratonia
collaborate and learn together. As we chart the course to ensure Ruth Medsker Redmond, WA
Program
“every educator engages in effective professional learning every Seattle Public Schools Joanne Robinson
day so every student achieves,” we are working to promote NSDC’s Toronto, ON
Julianne Sparks
purpose. Registration/Operations Shelley Zion
Sumner School District Denver, CO
Our crew is committed to providing all educators the opportunity to Paula Strozyk Rolf Blank
learn, map, and chart the course through support and collaboration Hospitality/Publicity Washington, DC
Sumner School District
during and after our time together in Seattle. Get to know someone Janice Ollarvia
Cathy Thompson
new in the sea of conference participants. Your individual commit- Program
Country Club, IL

ment to networking and positively contributing here and back home, Seattle Public Schools
Kathy O’Neill
leads to the student achievement all our students deserve. Linda Davin Atlanta, GA
Advisor
National Education Rhonda Baldwin
Your summer learning experience in Seattle will create waves of Association Ex Officio for the
Atlanta Host Committee
support to carry you back home and beyond. Rosalind LaRocque Douglasville, GA
Advisor
American Federation
of Teachers

Patricia Chesbro
Debbie Lahue Advisor
Alaska Staff Development
Seattle Host Committee Council

Audrey Hobbs-Johnson
Advisor
British Columbia Education
Leadership Council
3
K e y E ve n t s
FIRST-TIME CONFERENCE ATTENDEES ORIENTATION Sunday, 5:15 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
OPENING RECEPTION Sunday, 5:45 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
KNOWLEDGE CAFÉ RECEPTION Monday, 3:45 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

Conference
overview SATURDAY, JULY 17 MONDAY, JULY 19 TUESDAY, JULY 20

5:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Registration Registration Registration

5:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Presenter/Session Host Presenter/Session Host Presenter/Session Host
Check-In Check-In Check-In

7:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.


Knowledge Café Open Knowledge Café Open
SUNDAY, JULY 18
7:30 a.m.- 8:15 a.m. 7:30 a.m.- 8:15 a.m.
Continental Breakfast/ Continental Breakfast/
7:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m.
Networking Networking
Registration
8:15 a.m.- 9:15 a.m. 8:15 a.m.- 9:15 a.m.
7:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m.
General Session 1 General Session 3
Presenter/Session Host
Keynote: Keynote: Jennifer James
Check-In
Maria Goodloe-Johnson
9:30 a.m.- 11:30 a.m.
9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
9:30 a.m.- 11:30 a.m. Set D & E Sessions Meet
Preconference
Set A & B Sessions Meet
11:45 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.
Conference Overview

12:00 p.m.- 1:00 p.m.


11:45 p.m.- 12:30 p.m. Lunch/Networking
Preconference Lunch
Lunch/Networking
12:30 p.m.- 1:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m.
12:30 p.m.- 1:30 p.m. General Session 4
Knowledge Café Open
General Session 2 Keynote: Vicki Phillips
4:00 p.m.- 6:30 p.m. Keynote: Milton Chen
1:45 p.m.- 3:45 p.m.
Hospitality
1:45 p.m.- 3:45 p.m. Set D & F Sessions Meet
4:15 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Set A & C Sessions Meet Roundtable (RT2)
Learning School Alliance Roundtable (RT1) Sessions Meet
Meet and Greet Sessions Meet
4:30 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.
3:45 p.m.- 4:30 p.m. Team Time Meetings/
4:30 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.
Knowledge Café Individual Reflection
Team Time Meetings/
Reception
Individual Reflection
4:30 p.m.- 5:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. Screening of “North
5:15 p.m.- 6:00 p.m.
Screening of “Success Grand”
First-Time Conference
at the Core”
Attendees Orientation
4:30 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.
5:45 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.
Team Time Meetings/
Opening Reception
Individual Reflection

4
NATIONAL
STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
Conference Highlights
COUNCIL
SESSION PRESENTERS NSDC uses the term “teacher leaders” to include school-based
staff developers, instructional coaches and facilitators, department and grade-level chairs,
mentors, committee chairs and members, and other roles teachers assume to ensure high-
quality school-based professional learning. Due to the school-based practitioner focus of this
conference, NSDC prioritizes sessions that feature a teacher leader. Most sessions also feature
principals, central office administrators, and/or technical assistance providers who work with
teacher leaders to produce the outcomes described in their sessions.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 21
FIRST-TIME ATTENDEES ORIENTATION First-time participants will want to attend a
special session on Sunday at 5:15 p.m. with NSDC’s Board of Trustees, staff, and Host Committee
7:30 a.m.- 10:00 a.m. members. We will share information on NSDC’s purpose, member benefits, and tips on how to
Registration get the most from the conference and then escort participants to the Opening Reception.
7:30 a.m.- 10:00 a.m.
Presenter/Session Host MEALS Preconference attendees are provided with lunch on Sunday. Breakfast and lunch on
Check-In Monday and Tuesday, and brunch on Wednesday are included in the three-day registration fee.
Conference meals are selected to support a variety of dietary needs and preferences. Please be
8:00 a.m.- 10:00 a.m. aware that meals will not be served once the general session has begun.
Set G Sessions Meet
GENERAL SESSIONS AND KEYNOTE SPEAKERS General sessions are held at breakfast
10:15 a.m.- 11:00 a.m. and lunch on Monday and Tuesday, and at brunch on Wednesday. Keynote speakers address
Brunch the group during each general session. NSDC has a long-established tradition in which partici-
pants eat meals together in the spirit of camaraderie and networking. We encourage
11:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. participants to come to each general session and sit with different people.
General Session 5
Keynote: Taylor Mali CONCURRENT SESSIONS The conference offers 4-hour and 2-hour sessions. Sessions are
carefully selected to ensure participant learning on important subjects. Conference attendees
are required to register for sessions to allow presenters to prepare for the appropriate number
of attendees.

TICKET EXCHANGE A ticket exchange will be available at the conference. Tickets are required
for admittance to all sessions. This guarantees space for attendees and allows presenters to plan
appropriately for the audience. You may pick up or exchange a ticket for any open session.

ROUNDTABLES NSDC has selected approximately 30 programs to feature in two round-


table sessions. By selecting a roundtable, attendees may choose two 45-minute presentations
in a 2-hour period and also gather materials from the other presenters in the same room.
Roundtables offer access to a large number of programs in a short time period.

WIRELESS ACCESS Free wireless access will be available throughout the convention space
in the Sheraton Seattle Hotel.

TEAM TIME/REFLECTION Conference Strands: GRADE LEVELS

Skilled facilitators will 1. Learning Communities: Creating, sustaining, and Most sessions are appropriate for
be on site to help teams evaluating school-based learning teams. all attendees, but some sessions
2. Technology: Leveraging technology as a resource are more basic (for participants
make the most of this with limited background in the
valuable time. Your team for professional learning.
content) or advanced (for at-
3. Professional Learning Processes: Developing skills
can work together to tendees who have experience and
for planning, facilitating, presenting, advancing, and
create implementation knowledge of session content).
evaluating learning. These sessions are marked with
goals and strategies. Stop 4. The Learning Gap: Applying research-based strategies icons. Sessions that have content
by the registration desk to improve student performance in the discipline areas. and skills for educators serving
to make arrangements 5. New Teacher Support: Accelerating new teacher Title I populations are desig-
for a facilitator and set competence and developing mentors. nated with icons. Encore ses-
time aside to apply your 6. Teacher Leadership: Identifying, developing, engaging, sions by preconference presenters
learning as a team. and supporting teacher leaders. are also indicated with icons.
7. Administrator Development: Strengthening Basic Advanced Title 1 Encore
principal and central office instructional leadership
and professional development skills.
5
Special Features
Enhance your conference experience.
Take advantage of these special features:

Knowledge Café
The Knowledge Café is sponsored by the National Institute for School Leadership (NISL). Visit the
How to use this
Knowledge Café to meet and network with fellow attendees and our conference sponsors. Browse through
Program Book the NSDC Bookstore and get the latest professional learning resources. Check your e-mail or surf the Web at
the Internet Café. Enjoy a cup of coffee or a chair massage as you reflect on your conference experience.
The café will be open:
1 Go to the Conference
2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sunday, July 18 Don’t miss the Knowledge Café Reception
Overview on pages 4
7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday, July 19 on Monday, July 19, from 3:45 p.m.- 4:30 p.m.
and 5 for an overall
7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 20
snapshot of the
conference.
“Success at the Core”
2 Take note of the symbols Join the Washington state launch of “Success at the Core,” web-based, professional development resources
that indicate sessions that build leadership and instructional capacity in middle schools. Materials feature quality videos of high-
that are basic, advanced, performing teams and teachers, along with activities, readings, classroom artifacts, and facilitator guides.
Title I, or encore. Produced by investor and philanthropist Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions and Education Development
Center, “Success at the Core” is free of charge. Learn about and discuss these resources and how to access
3 Use the presenter, audi- them in a special screening on Monday, July 19 from 4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m. and in related concurrent sessions
ence, and topic indices C09 and E15.
on pages 45–46 to locate
sessions that appeal to
you. ”North Grand“
Funded by The Wallace Foundation, “North Grand” is a Nomadic Pictures’ film, produced and directed by
4 Use the session Oscar nominated filmmaker Tod Lending and award-winning filmmaker David Mrazek, about school leader-
registration form on ship. Participants will view the mini-documentary and engage in discussion about it with North Grand
page 50 as a tool to High School principal, Asuncion Ayala. The screening of the documentary and discussion that follows is on
plan your conference Tuesday, July 20 from 4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Concurrent session C21 will also provide an opportunity to engage
experience. with the principal and view the documentary.

5

Note the times and dates
of each of the session
What makes this conference special?
sets. Be careful not to • Sessions conducted by school-based practitioners to provide a peer perspective.
sign up for sessions with • Communal, sit-down meals to promote relationship building.
conflicting times. For • Keynotes and session presenters carefully screened to ensure high quality.
instance, sessions in Set • Special conference tracks (basic, advanced, encore, and Title I) to address your priority issues.
A are all-day, so you • No need to rush to a session to ensure a seat. Your session ticket will reserve your spot. The session
would not register for a presenter will expect you and will have materials ready.
session in Set B (morn- • Special receptions in your honor to ensure you have time for one-on-one networking.
ing), or Set C (afternoon), • Top-quality facility provides a setting that allows participants to optimize their learning.
which take place the
same day as Set A. CONSENT TO USE OF PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGES Registration and attendance at, or participation in, NSDC’s
Summer Conference and other activities, constitutes an agreement by the registrant to NSDC’s use and distribution
(both now and in the future) of the registrant’s or attendee’s image or voice in photographs, videotapes, electronic
6 The strands listed at
reproductions, and/or audiotapes of such events and activities.
the end of each session
description will help


you identify sessions of
specific interest to you. Thank you to our generous sponsors
7 Fill out pages 49 and Platinum Gold Silver
50 and send to NSDC
along with your payment
to complete your
registration.
Bronze

6
Chart Your Course with Stellar Travel
Call for special discounts on airfare for individuals and groups
of 10 or more travelling together

FOR RESERVATIONS:
Call Kay at the NSDC Travel Desk at 800.445.3265 or email your
request to Kay@stellartravel.com. Include the following
information in your email:
Visit these local landmarks suggested by
the Host Committee… 1. Name(s)
2. Departure City
5th Ave Theatre 3. Departure Date & Preferred Time
www.5thavenue.org 4. Airline Preference
5. Return Date & Preferred Time
Chittenden Locks in Ballard and
When buying ticket(s) on American or United Airlines,
Fish Ladder please include the NSDC identification number. The
(Chinook and Sockeye Salmon run in July) numbers will benefit NSDC future contract negotiations.
www.nws.usace.army.mil
American Airlines Business ExtraAA account number 789086
Chateau St. Michelle United Airlines Perks Plus account number 065NS
www.ste-michelle.com STELLAR TRAVEL is located in Bellevue WA, is a travel agency specializing
in exceptional personal care to each traveler. Under the same local ownership
Seattle Duck Tours for twenty years, the company is recognized as one of the top travel businesses
in the Pacific Northwest. Stellar Travel is a proud member of the Virtuoso
www.ridetheducksofseattle.com network of travel agencies with expert travel-planning travel consultants that
specialize in connecting travelers to the world’s destinations - in the best ways
possible. All Virtuoso travel specialists take the time to get to know you so your
Ghost Tour travel requirements and expectations really do become reality.
www.seattleghost.com/
NSDC 2010 Summer Conference• July 18–21, 2010 • Sheraton Seattle Hotel

Pacific Science Center and I-Max


www.pacsci.org

Pike Place Market the official travel agency for the 2010 NSDC Summer Conference
www.pikeplacemarket.org
TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SECURE FLIGHT
Pioneer Square INITIAL PUBLIC PHASE IMPLEMENTATION
www.pioneersquaredistrict.org/contact/ The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), as part of the Secure Flight passenger
vetting program, requires passengers to enter their full name as it appears on their
Seattle Art Museum
government issued identification used when making airline reservations for travel.
www.seattleartmuseum.org

Seattle Center Airport Transportation Guide in Seattle


www.seattlecenter.com Shuttle Express - Reservations from the airport are highly recommended.
Reservations to the airport are required. Call 425-981-7000 or
Underground Tours visit www.shuttleexpress.com/airportTransfers.html.
www.undergroundtour.com
Sound Transit – Central Link Light Rail Service from Seattle-Tacoma International
Seattle Aquarium Airport and downtown Seattle, runs 20 hours/day 7 days a week and stops at the
www.seattleaquarium.org Convention Center behind the Sheraton Seattle Hotel. For more information, visit
www.soundtransit.org.

Mark these Dates for 2010

April 1: Deadline for submitting nominations for 2010 NSDC Awards / www.nsdc.org/getinvolved/awards.cfm
April 15: Deadline for submitting manuscripts for December 2010 JSD. Theme: Content-Specific Professional Learning.
April 30: Deadline for early registration for NSDC 2010 Summer Conference for Teacher Leaders and the Administrators Who Support Them.
June 15: Deadline for submitting manuscripts for January 2011 JSD. Theme: Working with External Partners.
July 18-21: NSDC 2010 Summer Conference for Teacher Leaders and the Administrators Who Support Them, Seattle, WA.
October 4: Deadline for submitting proposals for NSDC 2011 Summer Conference in Indianapolis, IN.
December 4-8: NSDC 2010 Annual Conference in Atlanta, GA
7
Maria Goodloe-Johnson Milton Chen Jennifer James
Maria Goodloe-Johnson has served Milton Chen is the executive director Jennifer James is an urban cultural
as superintendent of Seattle Public of The George Lucas Educational anthropologist, researcher, writer,
Schools since 2007. She is the Foundation (GLEF), a non-profit and commentator who presents
former superintendent of Charleston foundation that utilizes media, worldwide. She is a specialist in the
County School District in South especially its multimedia web site, cultural elements of technological
Carolina and assistant superinten- Edutopia.org, its award-winning change and marketing intelligence.
dent of Corpus Christi Independent magazine, Edutopia: The New World Formerly at the University of
School District in Texas. Goodloe- of Learning, and documentary Washington School of Medicine,
Johnson began her career as a high film to communicate a new vision James has published seven books,
school special education teacher for 21st century schools. Before numerous academic articles, and
and coach in Colorado. She serves joining GLEF in 1998, Chen was wrote a newspaper column for the
on a variety of non-profit boards the founding director of the KQED Seattle Times for 18 years. Her most
advancing public education and Center for Education (PBS) in San recent book is Thinking In The Future
supporting families and children. Francisco. He has been a director of Tense. She is currently completing
Goodloe-Johnson currently serves research at Sesame Workshop in New a new book, Cultural Intelligence.
on the Broad Advisory Board and York, working on “Sesame Street,” James has filmed two PBS specials
recently accepted invitations to “The Electric Company,” and “3-2-1 titled, “Thinking in the Future Tense”
join the boards of Seattle United Contact,” and an assistant professor and “A Workout for your Mind.” She
Way and the Northwest Evaluation at the Harvard Graduate School of was chosen as the top speaker of
Association. She also participates in Education. Chen chairs the advisory the year by the Young Presidents’
the Aspen Urban Superintendents council for the Fred Rogers Center for Organization. James is the founder
Network and the Aspen Institute - Early Learning and Children’s Media of the Committee for Children, a
NewSchools Entrepreneurial Leaders at St. Vincent College in Pennsylvania. non-profit organization that for 25
for Public Education Program. She In 2007-08, he joined a group of years has developed curricula for the
is a former trustee of the National 35 Fulbright New Century Scholars protection of children and alternatives
Staff Development Council. working on innovation, access, and to violence.
Goodloe-Johnson is the recipient of diversity issues in education, spending
The Superintendent of Education three months in the United Kingdom
Excellence award from Mt. Pleasant at University of Edinburgh.
District AME Hall of Fame in 2006.

8
Vicki Phillips Taylor Mali Jane Pollock
Backup Keynote Speaker
Vicki Phillips serves as director Taylor Mali is a well-known poet
of education, College Ready in who emerged from the poetry slam Jane Pollock is the director of Learning
the United States Program of the movement. Mali studied drama in Horizon. Pollock works with schools
Gates Foundation. Phillips oversees Oxford with members of The Royal worldwide to improve student
work to improve early learning in Shakespeare Company and has put learning, teaching and supervision
Washington state, ensure U.S. high those  presentation skills to work practices. She is the co-author of
school students graduate ready for in his performances. He was one Dimensions of Learning Teacher and
success in college, career, and life, and of the original poets to appear on Training Manuals (1996), Assessment,
to improve college access. Prior to the HBO series “Russell Simmons Grading and Record Keeping (1999),
joining the Gates Foundation, Phillips Presents Def Poetry” and was featured and Classroom Instruction That Works
was superintendent of Portland in Paul Devlin’s 1997 documentary (2001). Pollock authored Improving
Public Schools in Portland, Oregon. film “SlamNation.” Mali is a vocal Student Learning One Teacher at a Time
Earlier, Phillips served as secretary advocate of teachers, with nine years (2007) and co-authored Improving
of education and chief state school experience in the classroom teaching Student Learning One Principal at a
officer for the state of Pennsylvania. everything from English and history to Time (2009). Her current projects
Born in Kentucky, Phillips was the first math and SAT test preparation. Mali is include two new publications about
member of her family to go to college the author of two books of poetry, The using technology in the classroom,
before going on to help implement Last Time As We Are (Write Bloody i5, and improving learning for
sweeping changes demanded by Books, 2009) and What Learning Leaves English language learners and
the Kentucky Education Reform (Hanover, 2002), and four CDs of special education students, Minding
Act of 1990. spoken word. the Gap. She is adjunct faculty for
ASCD and various universities.
Pollock can be reached at www.
improvestudentlearning.com.

Keynote Speakers 9
Preconference Sessions
PC101 PC102
Grassroots A Brief Introduction to
Advocacy for Courage to Teach®:
Teacher Leaders Reconnecting Who You Are
Teacher leaders are These are challenging times to teach,
passionate about ensuring lead school improvement efforts, and
that all students have bring passion and commitment day after
what they need to learn every day and have tremendous knowl- day to our chosen work. Good teaching and effective leader-
edge about what would create the ideal learning conditions in ship flow from the identity and integrity of the individual. Learn
schools. That expertise often goes untapped when important and practice the Circle of Trust® approach developed by Parker
policy decisions are made. Learn how to amplify the voices of Palmer and the Center for Courage & Renewal to help educa-
teacher leaders in the policy arena. tors renew and sustain their own vocational commitment and
Gain the knowledge and skills needed to advocate for positive personal integrity. Make use of personal stories, reflect on educa-
change at the local, state, and national levels. Learn how to trans- tion practice, and consider insights from poets, storytellers, and
form advocacy goals into strong, cohesive messages. Develop various wisdom traditions through large group, small group, and
communication skills to speak so others listen. Strategize about solitary settings. Explore the intersections of personal selves and
logical entry points in the system to introduce teacher voice into professional lives. Experience the Courage to Teach approach.
policy dialogue. Craft a plan to meet context-specific advocacy
Participants will be able to:
goals that support effective teaching and student learning.
• Reflect on the value of slowing down and listening deeply to
Participants will be able to: oneself and others.
• Write clear, focused advocacy goals to create positive change • Discuss the benefits of an approach proven effective at
for students and teachers in the local, state, or national creating a safe and trustworthy space for reflection and
context. dialogue.
• Learn the elements of effective messaging and think strategi- • Make connections with other educators.
cally to identify the right audiences to deliver them. • Seek clarity on complex personal and professional issues.
• Craft and practice delivering strong, cohesive, and jargon-free
messages. Terry Chadsey is co-director of the Center for Courage & Renewal. He has
• Create a plan to amplify teacher voice in the local, state, worked in public education as a teacher and administrator for more than
and/or national dialogue. 30 years, teaching grades K-8 in Chicago, Australia, and Washington. For the last
20 years, he has provided professional and organizational development support
to districts and schools, principals and teachers. He is a lead trainer for Positive
Terese Emry is a National Board Certified Teacher and the associate director at Discipline and is a Circle of Trust facilitator.
the Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession (CSTP). She designs and Terry Chadsey, Center for Courage & Renewal, Bainbridge Island, WA,
presents specialized professional learning opportunities for teacher leaders terry@couragerenewal.org
in Washington state including the annual NBCT Leadership Conference and
advocacy, speaker and writer training. Emry works with teacher leaders through Debbie Stanley is a kindergarten and mentor teacher. A former early childhood
a statewide network designed to amplify the voices of accomplished teachers professor at the University of South Carolina and Coastal Carolina University, she
and to connect teacher leaders and policymakers. has served as the Horry County chair of the First Steps State Initiative. She has
Terese Emry, Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession, written and presented various articles on diversity in the public school class-
Tacoma, WA, terese@cstp-wa.org room. Stanley is a founding facilitator of the Center for Courage and Renewal
and has led Courage to Teach retreats for educators in South Carolina.
Beth McGibbon teaches ninth-grade social studies at Shadle Park High School Debbie Stanley, Caroline Forest Elementary, Myrtle Beach, SC,
in Spokane, WA. She began teaching in 1990 and has worked as an instructional DStanley@horrycountyschools.net
leader in many roles in her school and beyond. McGibbon, a National Board
Certified Teacher, has been a literacy instructional coach in her school, an
Understanding by Design trainer in her district, and a committee member
involved with various regional and state educational reform movements.
Beth McGibbon, Spokane Public Schools, Spokane, WA,
bethm@spokaneschools.org

John Hellwich is an elementary principal and professional development direc-


tor in the White River School District. He taught secondary language arts for 20
years and earned National Board Certification in 2002. Hellwich served in various
teacher leader roles such as certification facilitator and consultant with the
Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession, for which he has presented

Save $50
at state and national conferences on the importance of supporting teacher
leadership.
John Hellwich, White River School District, Buckley, WA,
on a 3- or 4-day
jhellwic@whiteriver.wednet.edu
registration when
you register by
April 30, 2010.

10
PC103 PC104
Professional Learning 101: WHAT TEACHERS OF ENGLISH LEARNERS
Getting Ready for Effective NEED TO KNOW AND BE ABLE TO DO
Collaborative Learning What are ways in which classroom teachers can
Current research has identified intensive, simultaneously increase the English language
sustained, collaborative strategies as proficiency and academic achievement of English
the most powerful forms of professional learners in their classrooms? Focus on how grade-level academic
development. These strategies use educators’ knowledge and ex- standards and expectations can be used to get this work done.
periences as the foundation for building new classroom practices
that improve student learning. Acquire the knowledge, skills, and Participants will be able to:
attitudes effective collaborative teams require of new administra- • Plan for the inclusion of English learners in grade-level units.
tors and teachers. Focus on the knowledge and skills needed • Develop academic literacy through a genre-based approach.
to get results from collaborative learning teams within a school • Provide access to content without lowering expectations.
or district. Review current professional development research • Use standards to equitably assess and grade English learners.
findings that identify how to create a culture of collaboration,
form powerful collaborative teams, use data to identify a focus Virginia Rojas is an ASCD faculty member and independent consultant who
conducts professional training on effective programs and strategies for English
for learning teams, design for collaborative professional learning, language learners. Rojas works with American International schools throughout
and produce team planning and reporting strategies. the world as well as with school districts in the U.S. and Canada. She is recog-
nized for her leadership and her commitment to the development of second
Participants will be able to: language proficiency among school populations, especially within an inclusion-
• Provide a rationale for using collaborative professional learning ary and collaborative context. Rojas is the author of Strategies for Success with
based on current research. English Language Learners: An Action Toolkit for Classroom and ESL Teachers
(ASCD, 2007).
• Describe the elements of a culture of collaboration.
Virginia Rojas, ASCD, North Brunswick, NJ, VPRojas@aol.com
• Outline the components of an effective collaborative team.
• Understand how to use student learning data to identify the
focus of the teams’ work.
• Select appropriate learning designs or protocols for
collaborative teams.
• Choose an appropriate team reporting format.

Saundra Rowell was an educator with the Minneapolis Public Schools for
30 years as a language arts teacher and district coordinator of professional
development. She was also the director of professional development for the
Minnesota Dept. of Education. Rowell has worked on numerous NSDC projects
including NSDC’s standards (revised 2001), Assessing Impact with Joellen Killion,
and has been a contributor to JSD. She currently works as an independent
consultant with the Minneapolis Public Schools on various professional
development projects.
Saundra Rowell, Eden Prairie, MN, srowell40@aol.com

Patricia Roy is an independent educational consultant from Arizona. She serves


as faculty with the Professional Development Leadership Academy, a three-year
professional development program focused on planning, diagnosing, and
evaluating professional development. Roy was the founding director of the
Delaware Professional Development Center, which focused on school improve-
ment and effective professional development resulting in improved student
learning. She has authored many articles and chapters on cooperative learning,
effective professional development, and school improvement. Most recently, she
co-authored with Joellen Killion, Becoming a Learning School (NSDC, 2009). She
also wrote a training manual for NSDC’s standards and earlier co-authored with
Shirley Hord Moving NSDC’s Staff Development Standards into Practice: Innovation
Configurations (NSDC, 2003). Roy writes a monthly column on standards for two
NSDC newsletters, The Learning Principal and The Learning System.
Patricia Roy, Chandler, AZ, cooppat@cox.net

Register online
at www.nsdc.org 11
Preconference Sessions
PC105 PC106
SEVEN STRATEGIES FOR BECOMING A LEARNING SCHOOL
ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING Becoming a Learning School is a tool kit
Gain an understanding of how assessment for implementing NSDC’s definition of
for learning can be woven into daily teaching professional development in schools.
based on the content of Seven Strategies Collaborative professional learning
of Assessment for Learning. teams meet regularly to advance teaching quality and student
Help students develop a clear vision of the intended learning. learning. Examine structures and process for successful
Teach students to self-assess and set goals. Provide descriptive collaboration, responsibilities of principals, teachers, teacher
feedback effectively and efficiently. Learn to lead others in their leaders, and central office staff, and strategies for evaluating team
study of these practices. effectiveness.
Participants will be able to: Gain strategies and tools to develop understanding of
• Gain an understanding of the seven strategies of assessment collaborative professional learning, strengthen school and district
for learning. culture, establish focus on common goals, clarify roles of the
• Develop concrete examples of classroom applications of the stakeholders in the school, troubleshoot issues that are perceived
strategies. as barriers to professional learning, and build a strong evaluation
• Learn to lead others in studying assessment for learning. system that ensures revisions are based on needs.

Each participant will receive a copy of the book, Seven Strategies Participants will be able to:
of Assessment for Learning, a facilitator’s guide to using the book, • Identify the components of collaborative learning that focus
and a CD of related materials as the focus of learning-team study. on student outcomes.
• Identify the major decision areas that impact effective
Jan Chappuis has been with Assessment Training Institute for the last nine collaborative professional learning.
years. Her experience as an educator includes teaching grades four through • Assess a school’s or district’s needs and readiness for
nine, developing curriculum, and working in professional development at the
district and state levels. Chappuis has served on the publications board and as
implementing collaborative, team-based professional learning.
editor of the Washington English Journal, helped draft Washington’s Essential • Understand how the tool kit supports team development and
Academic Learning Requirements for Writing, and has been an assessment trainer its focus on student learning.
for the state of Washington’s Regional Learning and Assessment Centers. She has
• Develop an initial plan for initiating and improving
written numerous journal articles and the books Seven Strategies of Assessment
for Learning (Assessment Training Institute, 2009) and Learning Team Facilitator collaborative professional learning within your school.
Handbook (Assessment Training Institute, 2007).
Participants are encouraged to bring a copy of Becoming a
Jan Chappuis, Pearson Assessment Training Institute, Portland, OR,
Learning School to the session. Books may be ordered from the
jan.chappuis@pearson.com
NSDC Online Bookstore at www.nsdcstore.org.

Joellen Killion is deputy executive director of the National Staff Development


Council. Her book, Becoming a Learning School, co-authored with Patricia Roy,
focuses on implementing NSDC’s definition of professional development. She
is author of Assessing Impact: Evaluating Staff Development, 2nd Edition, and
co-author with Cindy Harrison of Taking the Lead: New Roles for Teacher Leaders
and School Based Coaches. Collaborative Professional Learning in School and
Beyond: A Tool Kit for New Jersey Educators, published in partnership with the
New Jersey Dept. of Education in 2006, is being used by schools throughout
that state to support the implementation of school-based staff development.
Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council, Arvada, CO,
joellen.killion@nsdc.org

Victoria Duff is the teacher quality coordinator in the Office of Professional


Standards for the New Jersey Dept. of Education. She is responsible for
supporting the development and implementation of local district and school
professional development plans, overseeing the National Board for Professional
Teaching Standards state subsidy program, and coaching school districts
in developing strategic improvement plans. She facilitated the publication
of the Mentoring for Quality Induction tool kit for statewide distribution

Save $50
and was involved in the editing of the Collaborative Professional Learning in
School and Beyond tool kit that was written in partnership with the National
Staff Development Council, the New Jersey Mentoring Task Force, and the
on a 3- or 4-day Professional Teaching Standards Board. Duff is a former chair of the New
registration when Jersey Professional Teaching Standards Board.
you register by
Victoria Duff, New Jersey Dept. of Education, Trenton, NJ,
April 30, 2010.
victoria.duff@doe.state.nj.us

12
PC107 PC108
IMPLICATIONS AND APPLICATIONS OF UNDERSTANDING DIFFERENCE:
RESEARCH ON THE BRAIN THE ELEMENTS OF CULTURE
The more educators know about how the brain One of the biggest challenges facing
learns, the more effective they can be. Review some educators today is the gap between the
of the fascinating research about the brain. Explore cultural norms of the adults in schools
the latest information on attention, working memory, long-term and the students we teach. Explore the elements of culture: the
memory, creativity, and learning language and reading. Examine system of shared beliefs, values, customs, behaviors, and artifacts
the implications and applications of this research to educational that the members of various groups use to understand their
practice and working with diverse learners. world and one another. Recognize each of the 12 elements of
culture and develop a rich understanding of how each element
Participants will be able to: plays out in everyday life. Learn how to modify classroom
• Understand how the brain of today’s student is changing and practices and school policies to bridge the gap.
what teachers can do about it.
Participants will be able to:
• Explore the latest research on how the brain learns, including
• Define the elements of culture.
what can go wrong, and how we deal with it.
• Recognize personal values and beliefs around each element.
• Assess strategies that apply this knowledge to the teaching
• Distinguish differences in the ways that other groups view
and learning process.
each element.
David Sousa is an international consultant in educational neuroscience and
• Identify ways that these differences create conflicts in school
author of a dozen books suggesting ways of translating brain research into class- and classroom settings.
room practice. Sousa taught high school chemistry and has served in administra-
tive positions, including superintendent of schools. He was an adjunct professor
Shelley Zion is the executive director for Continuing and Professional Education
at Seton Hall University and a visiting lecturer at Rutgers University. Sousa is past
for the School of Education at the University of Colorado Denver. She teaches
president of NSDC. He has received honorary degrees and numerous awards from
graduate level courses in the teacher education program and doctoral program,
professional associations, school districts, and educational foundations for his
conducts research on topics related to school reform and equity, and serves as
commitment to research, staff development, and science education. He has been
the executive director of the CRUE center at the University of Colorado Denver,
interviewed by Matt Lauer on the “Today Show” and by National Public Radio
which provides technical assistance and training to schools and districts working
about his work on brain research and strategies for improving learning.
to address issues of equity in their schools.
David Sousa, Palm Beach, FL, Davidsnj@aol.com
Shelley Zion, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO,
Shelley.Zion@ucdenver.edu

Binta Cross is a author, social activist, educator, and psychotherapist at Highline


Academy Charter School, a Denver public school, in Colorado. While earning her
master’s in social work in New York, Cross worked with foster and adopted chil-
dren, honing her clinical skills with patients at the Training Institute for Mental
Health, one of Manhattan’s psychoanalytic institutes.
Binta Cross, Highline Academy Charter School, Denver, CO,
bintacross@gmail.com

Register online
at www.nsdc.org 13
Preconference Sessions
PC109 PC110
A TOOLBOX FOR TRANSFORMATIONAL Developing “Leader-ful”
CONVERSATIONS IN EDUCATIONAL LEARNING Schools: A Formula for
COMMUNITIES Growing Leadership
Learning communities need to be more than a Throughout the School
mechanical switching yard for railcars of knowl- Community
edge. Explore models and a toolbox for developing, Education leaders at all levels are being
sustaining, and enhancing transformational conversations in challenged to improve teaching and learning results for students
educational learning communities. Develop the skills that will as- and adults. Examine the question of whether it is better to invest
sist in building the genuine relationships required for a successful in identifying and growing maverick leaders or to create more
learning community and an academically achieving classroom. “leader-ful” organizations where roles and responsibilities are
Hear about a foundational role-renegotiation model to develop diversely distributed. Develop a formula that serves schools in
and maintain the long-term relationships required for an effec- bringing about desired results. Explore the knowledge base, skills,
tive learning community. Experience a toolbox of story-listening and perspectives needed to enhance individual growth while
skills that will not only enhance the conversations of the learning learning specific strategies for transforming groups into highly
community, but the academic conversations that will advance effective, results-driven teams. Engage in activities requiring
student achievement. the exploration of relevant research, self-assessment, reflection,
analysis, design, and dialogue.
Participants will be able to:
• Develop and maintain long-term relationships in both the Participants will be able to:
classroom and professional learning communities. • Leave with skills and perspectives important for individual
• Structure conversations that will create crucibles for safe and leadership success.
effective conversations. • Develop an understanding of the leader’s role in structuring
• Gain skills in story listening that enable effective hearing and high-performing teams.
response to colleagues’ needs. • Use self-assessment data to look at approaches to help shape
• Disarm verbal anger and conflict that might occur as a and manage perceptions.
learning community develops. • Explore relational leadership as a strategy for enhancing the
effectiveness of a learning community working towards
common goals.
Ernest Izard is president of The Aurora Network, a non-profit organization that
designs, develops, and delivers custom training using listening skills and the • Investigate the pitfalls that derail the work of individuals and
latest brain research. He has held certification in presentation skills and brain- teams.
based learning from Jensen Learning Corporation for over 10 years. Izard is an • Compile strategies for empowering individuals and teams.
approved provider of services for the Texas Education Agency’s High School
Redesign and Restructuring Program. He holds the rank of master professor
with LeTourneau University where he has taught for 15 years. Izard has also Karen Dyer is the group director for the education and non-profit sector for
worked as a training specialist in the Professional Development Dept. of the the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL). Before serving in her current position,
Dallas Independent School District and in one of its restructured high schools as Dyer was the executive director of the Chicago Academy for School Leadership.
a special education inclusion teacher. Izard is the author of two articles for Texas She has also served as the executive director of the Bay Area and North Bay
Study, “What You Are Missing When You Are Not Listening” and “Ghostbusting School Leadership Centers. Dyer has been a principal, Title l program manager,
Your Campus.” reading/language arts specialist, teacher of regular and gifted education at
both elementary and middle grades, and an adjunct professor at California State
Ernest Izard, The Aurora Network, Plano, TX, epizard@verizon.net
University, Hayward, and Nova University. Dyer is the co-author of the book
The Intuitive Principal and author of several articles and numerous modules on
instructional leadership. She is also a featured expert on ASCD’s video series,
The Principal and Instructional Leadership Guide, Volume 3. She is a member of
several boards, and was past president of NSDC’s Board of Trustees.
Karen Dyer, Center for Creative Leadership, Greensboro, NC, DYERK@ccl.org

Pam Misher is the principal of a K-5 school in Guilford County Schools. With
11 years experience as principal in four different elementary schools, all with
varying student and community demographics, Misher also serves as a mentor
for principals in the area of curriculum and instruction and school management.
Her current school, Pearce Elementary, is a North Carolina A&T State University
Professional Development School. Teaming with Karen Dyer and the Center
for Creative Leadership, Misher works towards achieving NSDC’s purpose by

Save $50
focusing on strengthening school culture and increasing opportunities for
teachers to lead.
Pam Misher, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC, misherp@gcsnc.com
on a 3- or 4-day
registration when
you register by
April 30, 2010.

14
PC111 PC112
EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING STRATEGIES THAT
Teacher leaders are assuming new roles in many ENGAGE THE ADULT BRAIN
schools and school systems to support teachers in Cross your arms. Look down and see which one is
the classroom. Some of these teacher leaders are on top. Now reverse the positions of your arms. How
in full-time positions, such as instructional coach, does that feel? Awkward? Unnatural? Impossible?
literacy coach, or professional development leader, while oth- Those are some of the same adjectives used by
ers are assuming these roles in addition to their regular duties. teachers when other people are trying to change their behaviors.
Explore the roles teacher leaders take, from data coaches to Adult learning theory tells us that teachers do not learn solely by
mentors to catalysts for change. Learn and practice contracting listening to a presenter any more than students learn when the
strategies, facilitate data conversations, and work with principals teacher is doing all the talking. Attend this session and learn not
and teachers as part of any change initiative. only how to give an unforgettable presentation, but also how
to ensure that educators have the desire to continue practicing
Participants will be able to: what you taught long after the workshop is over.
• Describe the focus and benefits associated with 10 roles
for coaches. Participants will be able to:
• Utilize a continuum of coaching stances to align teacher • Apply six principles of adult learning theory in their
needs with appropriate support. professional development activities.
• Apply components of effective contracting conversations. • Incorporate 20 brain-compatible strategies (i.e. music,
• Diagnose teachers’ responses to change and design effective storytelling, role-play) when delivering presentations to adult
interventions. audiences.
• Facilitate data conversations. • Create a brain-compatible workshop or course.
• Analyze ways evaluation, supervision, and coaching are • Develop a plan for professional learning by asking relevant
different. questions.
• Use follow-up strategies that result in sustained adult behavior
Cindy Harrison has worked in education for more than 30 years as a teacher, change.
district staff development director, and middle school principal. Currently, she
works with schools in the areas of instructional coaching, organizational change
Marcia Tate is an educational consultant who has presented at state, national,
initiatives, professional learning communities, professional development, leader-
and international conferences. Previously, she was executive director of profes-
ship teams, and facilitation. She co-authored the book Taking the Lead: New Roles
sional development for the DeKalb County School System in Decatur, GA.
for Teachers and School-Based Coaches (NSDC, 2006) with Joellen Killion.
During her 30-year career with the district, she was a classroom teacher, reading
Cindy Harrison, Instructional Improvement Group, Broomfield, CO, specialist, language arts coordinator, and staff development director. Tate is the
harrison.cindy@gmail.com
author of the bestsellers Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Instructional Strate-
gies that Engage the Brain, Sit & Get Won’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Professional Learning
Strategies that Engage the Adult Brain, Reading and Language Arts Worksheets
Don’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Literacy Strategies that Engage the Brain, Shouting Won’t
Grow Dendrites: 20 Techniques for Managing a Brain-compatible Classroom, and
Mathematics Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Numeracy Strategies that Help
Engage the Brain.
Marcia Tate, Conyers, GA, marciata@bellsouth.net

Register online
at www.nsdc.org 15
Preconference Sessions
PC113 PC114
USING TECHNOLOGY TO CREATE FIERCE CONVERSATIONS: TRANSFORM THE
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONVERSATIONS CENTRAL TO YOUR SUCCESS
OPPORTUNITIES Develop the foundational skills that change the way
Bringing Learning Environments in New people connect with each other, shift perceptions
Directions (BLEND) is a way to analyze of what it means to lead, and propel individuals and
and plan for the use of technology so teams toward success. Learn and practice intuitive,
21st-century educators can transform educational practice and effective frameworks for coaching and confrontation models.
opportunities. Learn to establish a process for the use of technol- Acquire tools to significantly differentiate the graduates of
ogy to facilitate and model the creation of 21st-century learning schools by enlivening classrooms, improving learning outcomes,
communities using contemporary instructional technology tools. and enhancing students’ abilities to navigate their lives, now
Discover how to BLEND technologies across educational settings and in the future, one conversation at a time. Learn to provide
and instructional venues and seek new ways to capitalize on educators and students with lifelong skills and tools to transform
e-learning, multimedia, and educational technology. Explore the conversations, and ultimately the relationships, central to
diverse virtual learning environments and how web-based tools their success. The premise is that: “While no single conversation
can be used to extend learning opportunities, reinforce content, is guaranteed to change the trajectory of a career, a company, a
and engage in authentic learning and assessment. relationship, or a life, any single conversation can.”
Participants will be able to: Participants will be able to:
• Learn how multiple technologies can be blended with face- • Understand transformational ideas and models that will shift
to-face meetings to create powerful learning opportunities. the basic understanding of “conversations” and the power they
• Explore both two- and three-dimensional virtual learning hold in leadership, achieving results, and building relationships.
environments. • Learn cornerstone leadership development: how to possess
• Engage in a learning process for the use of technology that the skill and the will to tackle and resolve an organization’s
brings learners from awareness building to skill transfer and toughest challenges and develop an open, direct, respectful
fluency. culture.
Bring your own laptop to access online resources and participate • Learn two robust Fierce Conversations models that build
in online activities. emotional capital, increase productivity, innovation, and
bottom-line results.
Andrea Tejedor is a consultant and presents on education, instructional
technology, and professional development. Tejedor has worked as both a Susan Scott is founder and CEO of Fierce, a company committed to large-
teacher and administrator in public and private schools, is a coordinator for scale and individual transformation through challenging conversations in the
New York State Model Schools and Distance Learning Initiatives, and is an workplace. Previously a high school English teacher, Scott works with schools
adjunct professor at Marist College and Mercy College. and youth agencies to provide educators and students with practical, actionable
lifelong skills that transform the conversations central to their success. Scott is
Andrea Tejedor, Educo21, Monroe, NY, andrea@educo21.com
the author of Fierce Leadership: A Bold Alternative to the Worst “Best” Practices of
Business Today and Fierce Conversations: Achieving
Andrew Taylor is a consultant who presents on education, instructional
Success at Work and in Life, One Conversation at a Time.
technology, and professional development and is a coordinator for New York
State Model Schools and Distance Learning Initiatives. Taylor has worked as both Susan Scott, Fierce, Seattle, WA, deli@fierceinc.com
a teacher and administrator in public and private schools. He is the co-founder
of Learner First (LF), an education support company that utilizes 21st-century
learning tools to provide Supplemental Education Services to more than 1,500
low-income students throughout New York state.
Andrew Taylor, Educo21, Kingston, NY, Andrew@educo21.com

Save $50
on a 3- or 4-day
registration when
you register by
April 30, 2010.

16
The National Education Association is a proud sponsor of the

National Staff Development Council’s


2010 Summer Conference

America’s public school educators provide


opportunities for students to be challenged
and inspired—to discover their potential
and find success.

America’s
public schools,
America’s
future

Everyday, all across America, the 3.2 million


members of the National Education Association
create enthusiasm for learning. We know that
caring and qualified teachers inspire students
and help to make great public schools.
Successful students and great public schools
will prepare us to meet the challenges of the
21st century and a global society.

Visit www.nea.org to learn more about


how you can help make great public
schools for every student.

Dennis Van Roekel


President
National Education Association
17
monday A concurrent sessions
4 hr | 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. continues at 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

A01 A04
GOT VISION? INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING: LEARNING ABOUT
EFFECTIVE COACHING PRACTICES
Exercise your leadership skills. Connect staff with a

A common purpose, an essential part of building a foundation Researchers at the Kansas Coaching Project at The University
for student success. Identify your goals and articulate a of Kansas have conducted studies to identify what and how
compelling vision, understand how strategic goals connect coaches should act to have maximum positive impact on
to school goals, articulate a compelling vision, teaching and learning. Learn about this research and about
and ultimately turn your vision into action steps. the nuts and bolts of instructional coaching. Find out what
an instructional coach is and learn about the philosophy
Heather Peterson, Hampton City Schools, Hampton, VA,
hpeterson@sbo.hampton.k12.va.us and components of coaching. Explore how coaches
Strand: Administrator Development enroll teachers, identify coaching goals, model, observe,
discuss data, and reflect on their practices. Discuss video
recordings of instructional coaches working in their schools
A02 collaborating with teachers.
BUILDING LEADERSHIP SKILLS THROUGH
Jim Knight, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, jimknight@mac.com
A DISTRIBUTIVE MODEL
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
Discover how to put NSDC’s Standards for Staff
Development into practice. Explore powerful learning
structures that help build collaborative cultures and A05
distribute leadership throughout the system. Determine THE CRITICAL ROLE OF THE PRINCIPAL IN SUPPORTING
MENTOR AND NEW TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS
your own plan for building leadership skills through a
distributive model. At the center of a beginning teacher’s induction to the
Jenni Donohoo, Greater Essex County District School Board, teaching profession, is their relationship with a skilled,
Windsor, ON, Canada, jenni.donohoo@sdco.ca trained mentor teacher and a caring, conscientious
Clara Howitt, Greater Essex County District School Board, principal. Explore the intricacies and intersections of the
Windsor, ON, clara.howitt@gecdsb.on.ca
relationship between the principal, mentor teacher, and
Debbie Price, Greater Essex County District School Board,
beginning teacher. Understand the role and importance of
Windsor, ON, debbie.price@sdco.ca
the principal in high-quality teacher induction programs.
Shelly Duben, Greater Essex County District School Board,
Windsor, ON, shelly.duben@sdco.ca Consider the role of formative assessment in teacher
Strand: Teacher Leadership induction and its relationship to supervision. Assess current
practices and set next steps. Develop guidelines for mentor-
principal relationships and communications.
A03 Jan Miles, New Teacher Center, Santa Cruz, CA,
INTEGRATING LANGUAGE AND CONTENT jmiles@newteachercenter.org
INSTRUCTION TO INCREASE ACHIEVEMENT Karen Hendricks, New Teacher Center, Santa Cruz, CA,
Concurrent Sessions

khendricks@newteachercenter.org
All school staff need to be able to work effectively with a
Strand: New Teacher Support
linguistically and culturally diverse student body. Explore a
research-based instructional model that integrates English
language development and content. Learn the components
and features of a protocol to help school-based teams
implement sheltered instruction lessons in mainstream
classrooms. Take away research-based tools to observe and
evaluate learning teams’ use of sheltered instruction at the
elementary and secondary levels.
Judith O’Loughlin, Language Matters Education Consultants,
San Ramon, CA, joeslteach@aol.com
Amy King, Kansas City Regional Professional Development Center,
Kansas City, MO, kingas@umkc.edu Basic Advanced Title 1 Encore
icons

Strand: The Learning Gap

18
monday B concurrent sessions
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. | 2 hr

B01 B04
21ST-CENTURY TEACHING: PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
A TEACHER LEADERSHIP MODEL AND 21ST-CENTURY SKILLS

B
Create opportunities to increase leadership capacity in Learn about leading practices that help educators teach
schools to improve student learning through an extended and learn 21st-century skills. Integrate skills such as critical
12-month teacher contract that allows for distributed thinking, problem solving, and creativity into core academic
leadership. Review a model that created time for subjects. Use a 21st-century skills self-assessment tool and
professional learning, mentoring of new teachers, vertical other resources in an interactive, hands-on session to plan,
K-12 alignment, student transition, and school improvement implement, evaluate, and/or enhance 21st-century skills.
by reinventing the approach to school leadership. Identify Valerie Greenhill, Partnership for 21st Century Skills,
Tucson, AZ, vgreenhill@eluminategroup.com
roles for teacher leaders.
Ray Pecheone, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA,
Phyllis Pajardo, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA, pecheone@suse.stanford.edu
phyllis.pajardo@fcps.edu
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
Strand: Teacher Leadership

B05
B02 LESSONS LEARNED FROM A 30-YEAR JOURNEY
COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AND STATE POLICY
IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Join NSDC Past-President Charles Mason as he reflects on
the many lessons he learned over a 30-year career in public
NSDC, in cooperation with the American Federation of
education. Mason has been given opportunities to lead and
Teachers, the National Education Association, and the
learn from the role of staff developer in one of our nation’s
Council of Chief State School Officers, examined local
largest school systems to superintendent in a small high SES
school district collective bargaining agreements and community. Throughout the last five years he has also been
state policies to identify language that supports effective an advocate for NSDC goals and actively worked to advance
professional development. A national task force identified them not only in his district but also in other districts that
model agreement and policy language and developed are part of his leadership network. Use this time to reflect on
recommendations for local districts, teacher associations, your own leadership path and the strategies you are taking
and states. Engage with members who took part in the to demonstrate your own commitment to your goals as well
study, discuss the results, and learn how the findings can as the purpose of NSDC.
advance professional development in your organization. Charles Mason, Brasfield & Gorrie, Birmingham, AL,
Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council, Arvada, CO, cmason.557@gmail.com
joellen.killion@nsdc.org Strand: Administrator Development
Linda Davin, National Education Association, Washington, DC,
ldavin@nea.org
Rosalind LaRocque, American Federation of Teachers, Washington, DC,
B06
rlarocqu@aft.org
STRENGTHENING MOTIVATION AND LEARNING
IN DIVERSE CLASSROOMS
Strand: Professional Learning Processes

B03
A MULTI-LAYERED APPROACH TO INCREASING
Connect student motivation, teaching, and student
learning. Learn from examples of successful low-income
schools how to implement a cycle of action and inquiry
Concurrent Sessions
STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT that leads to ongoing instructional improvement. Follow
the action cycle of mini-conferences, strategic visits to other
Deepen your understanding of how to use disaggregated classrooms, collaborative lesson design, and systematic
student, teacher, department, school, and district data to examination of student learning data to help teachers
determine learning priorities. Examine four levels of district create relevant, challenging, and results-oriented lessons
support for exploring data to enhance the quality of adult that motivate students.
learning. Evaluate and reflect on a systemic approach to Jocelyn Co, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, jcco@seattleschools.org
using data to sustain continuous improvement. Amy Baeder, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
abaeder@seattleschools.org
Jada Askew, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, askewjada@mcsk12.net
Catherine Brown, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
Roderick Richmond, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, cbrown@seattleschools.org
richmondr@mcsk12.net
Andrew Cain, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, acain@seattleschools.org
Monica Jordan, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, Anthony Craig, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
jordanmonicaw@mcsk12.net acraig@seattleschools.org
Daphne Jones, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, jonesd@mcsk12.net Paul Robb, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, probb@seattleschools.org
Michael Bates, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN, batesm@mcsk12.net Margery Ginsberg, University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
Strand: Administrator Development ginsbm@u.washington.edu
Strand: The Learning Gap 19
monday B concurrent sessions
2 hr | 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

B07 B10
CO-TEACHING: ADVANCING MATHEMATICS COACHING FOR 21ST-CENTURY TEACHING
LEARNING FOR ALL STUDENTS AND LEARNING

B
Improve teachers’ knowledge of co-teaching practices Learn coaching techniques and strategies to guide
and co-planning approaches. View video models of co- conversations about improving teaching and learning,
teaching designed to strengthen collaboration between and practice communications that are the foundation for
math and special education teachers. Identify roles for co- building a trusting relationship. Use the Learning Activity
teaching and clarify expectations for collaborative teaching Checklist to critique learning activities and propose ways
relationships. to improve lessons so that they reflect best practices. Use
Anna McTigue, Education Development Center, Newton, MA, protocols for facilitating shared understanding of 21st-
amctigue@edc.org century learning activities. Identify possible actions to
Emily Fagan, Education Development Center, Newton, MA, implement or share with others.
EFagan@edc.org
Karen Meyer, Puget Sound Center, Lynnwood, WA, kmeyer@psctlt.org
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
Shelee King George, Puget Sound Center for Teaching, Learning, and
Technology, Lynnwood, WA, skgeorge@psctlt.org
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
B08
LEARNING: IS IT ONLY ABOUT THE KIDS?
B11
Experience a system where student achievement is linked to CONTENT LITERACY: BRIDGING THE GAPS THROUGH
adult learning. Discover how to build the capacity of leaders PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
at every level of your system. Identify and understand Get inspired to create a plan to improve children’s literacy
the unique opportunities and challenges embedded in a by using instructional rounds, action research, and student
program to develop leaders. data to improve colleagues’ knowledge. Improve your own
Mary-Anne Smirle, Chilliwack School District, Chilliwack, BC, Canada, content knowledge in literacy. Share one school’s journey
mary-anne_smirle@sd33.bc.ca of incorporating content literacy over two years through
Steve Klassen, Chilliwack School District, Chilliwack, BC, Canada, existing professional learning communities.
steve_klassen@sd33.bc.ca
Michael Audet, Chilliwack School District, Chilliwack, BC, Canada, Stephanie Cox, La Porte Independent School District, La Porte, TX,
michael_audet@sd33.bc.ca coxs@lpisd.org

Audrey Hobbs-Johnson, British Columbia Educational Leadership Dolly Liburd, La Porte Independent School District, La Porte, TX,
Council, Vancouver, BC, Canada, audrey.hobbs-johnson@bcelc.ca liburdd@lpisd.org

Strand: Administrator Development Melissa Terrebonne, La Porte Independent School District, La Porte, TX,
terrebonnem@lpisd.org
Sharon Clausen, La Porte Independent School District, La Porte, TX,
clausens@lpisd.org
B09
LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES FOR Strand: The Learning Gap
EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
Concurrent Sessions

Experience a professional learning model that applies B12


research-based instructional strategies designed to engage BUILDING A COMMUNITY WITH TEACHER LEADERS
adult learners and encourage collaboration. Learn to deliver
site-based, cost-effective professional development. Access Apply the lessons of one elementary school that lifted
video tutorials, PowerPoint presentations, and all printable itself out of failing status by empowering teachers through
materials needed to duplicate this session. job-embedded professional learning. Identify professional
learning strategies that fit your own school context.
Margie Johnson, Metro Nashville Public Schools, Nashville, TN,
margie.johnson@mnps.org Michelle Jacott, Miami Unified School District, Miami, AZ,
Richard Frank, Metro Nashville Public Schools, Nashville, TN, mkjacott@yahoo.com
richard.frank@mnps.org Molly Hearn, Miami Unified School District, Miami, AZ,
Norman Merrifield, Metro Nashville Public Schools, Nashville, TN, molly.hearn@hotmail.com
nmerrifield@mac.com Diane Busch, Arizona Dept. of Education, Phoenix, AZ,
Strand: Technology buschtoo@cox.net
Ann Mangold, Miami Unified School District, Miami, AZ,
amangold@cableone.net
Strand: Learning Communities

Register online
20 at www.nsdc.org
monday B concurrent sessions
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. | 2 hr

B13 content areas. Learn how teacher leaders become invested


POSITIVE PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN in the program as content liaisons.
P12 SCHOOLS AND UNIVERSITIES
Maria Ward, Community High School District 99, Downers Grove, IL,

B
Learn to use data to drive decision making. Discover how a mward@csd99.org
Melissa Hampton, Community High School District 99, Downers Grove, IL,
partnership between local public schools and a university
mhampton@csd99.org
resulted in ongoing learning for potential school leaders Kathryn Baal, Community High School District 99, Downers Grove, IL,
that focused on understanding data. See how partnership kbaal@csd99.org
schools and the instructional leadership students Jill Rose, Community High School District 99, Downers Grove, IL,
conducted data meetings. jrose@csd99.org
Lisa Lichtman, Community High School District 99, Downers Grove, IL,
Jan Miller, University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL, jmiller@uwa.edu llichtman@csd99.org
Denise Knight, University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL, Strand: Teacher Leadership
dknight@uwa.edu
Strand: Administrator Development
B17
JOURNEY TO EXCELLENCE: STANDARDS-BASED
MENTORING AND INDUCTION
B14
NEW ROLES, NEW TOOLS: TEACHER LEADERSHIP Identify ways to retain and nurture new teachers through
FRAMEWORK a tested model that relies on state standards to provide
valuable learning experiences for new teachers. Learn
Identify the knowledge, skills, and dispositions teachers
protocols that help in developing meaningful action
need to positively impact student achievement. Use a
research projects based on local teaching standards.
framework for professional learning to help teachers learn
Recognize and avoid common mistakes in mentoring and
the skills needed to assume new leadership roles. Leave
induction programs.
with a tool and a plan for using it to support teacher leaders
in roles beyond the classroom. David Wilkinson, Iowa State Education Association, Des Moines, IA,
dwilkinson@isea.org
Beth McGibbon, Spokane Public Schools, Spokane, WA, Connie Richardson, Loess Hills Area Education Agency, Shenandoah, IA,
bethmcgibbon@comcast.net crichardson@aea13.org
Christina Carlson, Yakima School District, Yakima, WA, Pat Shipley, Iowa State Education Association, Red Oak, IA,
ccarlson@yakimaschools.org pshipley@isea.org
Tom White, Edmonds School District, Edmonds, WA, whitetj@comcast.net Christi Gochenour, Loess Hills Area Education Agency,
Strand: Teacher Leadership Missouri Valley, IA, cgochenour@aea13.org
Mary Beth Schroeder Fracek, Iowa Dept. of Education, Des Moines, IA,
marybeth.schroederfracek@iowa.gov
Strand: New Teacher Support
B15
EMERGING TECHNOLOGICAL TRENDS FOR
21ST-CENTURY LEARNERS B18
INCREASING MATH TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS
Explore emerging trends in technology that have the
potential to transform education within the next five years.
Find out how mobile technology can help with formative
assessments. Learn about a framework for imagining
FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT GAIN
Identify achievement strategies to boost high school math
performance. Hear from the principals and teachers at two
Concurrent Sessions
possible new uses for technology, and discuss the benefits schools, which strategies they used to increase test scores
of technology in professional learning. among the lowest-performing students in algebra I, algebra
II, and geometry. Leave with a blueprint of the model, video
Andrea Tejedor, Educo21, Monroe, NY, andrea@educo21.com
case studies, and ideas for implementing achievement
Andrew Taylor, Educo21, Kingston, NY, andrew@educo21.com
strategies in your school.
Strand: Technology
Amy Holcombe, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC,
holcoma@gcsnc.com
Lisa Sonricker, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC,
B16 sonricl@gcsnc.com
EMBEDDING CONTENT LITERACY COACHING Rodney Wilds, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC,
TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT wildsr@gcsnc.com
Garriot Rose, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC, roset@gcsnc.com
Understand how to implement a literacy coaching
Miller Jonathan, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC,
model that promotes schoolwide growth and student millerj9@gcsnc.com
achievement. Find out how book study, collaborative Tracey Howell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro,
coaching, sharing of student data, literacy lunches, and Greensboro, NC, thhowell@uncg.edu
technology can help embed literacy instruction into all Strand: The Learning Gap

21
monday B concurrent sessions
2 hr | 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

B19 B22
COACHING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT TEAMS EXPANDING BEGINNING TEACHER SUPPORT
TO INCLUDE VIRTUAL SUPPORT
Learn how successful coaches work with the challenges

B of coaching a school improvement team. Develop a set of Discover new ways to support today’s beginning
strategies, including team building, decision making, and teachers who have grown up in an online world. Learn
goal setting, to create or maintain a school improvement about a system that incorporates an online portal for
team. Learn strategies for energizing the team and develop comprehensive support with on-site learning from trained
skills to effectively coach a school improvement team. mentors. Identify the key components of a successful
induction program.
Kathy Tucker, Insights for Learning, Flagstaff, AZ,
kt@insightsforlearning.com Linda Wurzbach, Resources for Learning, Austin, TX,
Elizabeth Morris, Casa Grande Elementary School District, lindaw@resourcesforlearning.net
Casa Grande, AZ, liz.morris@cgelem.k12.az.us Strand: Technology
LeRoy Shingotewa, Moencopi Day School, Tuba City, AZ,
leroyshingoi@yahoo.com
Eric Brooks, Arizona Dept. of Education, Phoenix, AZ, B23
Eric.brooks@azed.gov BUILDING A MODEL FOR ARTS INTEGRATION
Strand: Learning Communities
Understand how the arts can be used to increase student
learning across disciplines. Learn about a professional
B20 development program aimed at increasing arts and literacy
TRANSFORMING SCHOOLS THROUGH integrated teaching. Identify key components of a plan that
JOB-EMBEDDED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT can be transferred to individual contexts.
Build capacity in your schools for 21st-century learning Carri Campbell, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
cjcampbell@seattleschools.org
communities based on free, open source tools that help
Sibyl Barnum, Puget Sound Educational Service District,
create greater communication and collaboration. Identify Fife, WA, sbarnum@psesd.org
the elements of a successful whole-school innovation Strand: The Learning Gap
plan and how technology can help teachers develop the
knowledge they need to effectively implement it.
Victor Aluise, AUSSIE, New York, NY, victor@aussiesnow.com B24
Daniel Storchan, AUSSIE, New York, NY, daniel@aussiesnow.com WRITING FOR PROFESSIONAL GROWTH
Strand: Technology Share your challenges, perspectives, and successes through
writing, and gain valuable skills to advocate for education
and promote professional growth. Learn how to shape your
B21 message and to become the most effective writer you can
INTERVENTION STRATEGIES THAT WORK!
be. Collect tips on how to identify potential topics and find
Concurrent Sessions

Bridge the language, literacy, and learning gaps that your voice for publication.
create educational inequities by developing teachers’ Tracy Crow, National Staff Development Council, Columbus, OH,
capacity to help students learn the academic language of tracy.crow@nsdc.org
rigorous textbooks and effective writing. Learn instructional Tom Manning, National Staff Development Council, Dallas, TX,
tom.manning@nsdc.org
strategies that develop academic literacy through speaking,
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
listening, reading, and writing. Improve
classroom instruction across the curriculum.
Eli Johnson, Gateway Community Charter Schools,
Cameron Park, CA, eli65@sbcglobal.net
Strand: The Learning Gap

Basic Advanced Title 1 Encore


icons

22
monday C concurrent sessions
1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. | 2 hr

C01 C04
MENTORING THROUGH CONTENT READING SKILLS MAKE EFFECTIVE
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER (ELL) READERS

Develop and grow your own school-based mentoring and


support system at middle and high schools after reviewing
Enable classroom teachers to help their English language
learner students improve reading ability. Find proven C
this district case study. See how a system of support content strategies that lead to an increase in ELL reading
around novice teachers, built on professional collaboration, achievement. Take home activities and strategies that will
mentoring, and shared leadership, led to increased help teachers increase students’ ability to learn English more
retention. Prepare more teachers to mentor and change quickly.
your school culture. Carol Burgess, CB Consulting Services, Plymouth, MN,
Jane Chadsey, Renton School District, Renton, WA, burge003@umn.edu
jane.chadsey@rentonschools.us Donna Gogas, Methuen Public Schools, Methuen, MA,
Esther Rich, Renton, WA, esther.rich@rentonschools.us donna.blanchard@verizon.net

Pat Moriarty, T and L Services, Edmonds, WA, pamoriart@msn.com Strand: The Learning Gap

Strand: New Teacher Support

C05
GROWING ACCOMPLISHED TEACHERS
C02 IN HIGH-NEED SCHOOLS
TEACHER LEADER STANDARDS:
A MODEL FOR THE NATION Apply the lessons of three high-need schools that used a
Learn about the model standards for teacher leaders standards-based professional learning model to develop
developed by ETS in partnership with states and vibrant professional learning communities. Find out
professional associations. Identify the essential knowledge how Take One! can be integrated with National Board
and skills teacher leaders use in their various roles. Find Certification. Understand how to better link teaching
out how various states are using standards for teacher practice, student learning, and student achievement.
leaders, and how the standards influence the roles and Stephen Helgeson, National Board for Professional Teaching Standards,
responsibilities of teacher leaders. Arlington, VA, shelgeson@nbpts.org
Pamela Shetley, Prince George’s County Public Schools, Oxon Hill, MD,
Katherine Bassett, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ, pamela.shetley@pgcps.org
KBassett@ets.org
Michaela Miller, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction,
Strand: The Learning Gap Olympia, WA, michaela.miller@k12.wa.us
Kiela Bonelli, Palm Springs Unified School District,
Desert Hot Springs, CA, kbonelli@psusd.us
C03 Strand: Professional Learning Processes
LESSON STUDY: IMPROVING MATHEMATICS
TEACHING AND LEARNING

Investigate the impact of instructional decisions on student


understanding. Understand the lesson study process and
its essential elements, benefits, and intended outcomes.
C06
ACTIVE LEADERSHIP FOR ADAPTIVE CHANGE

Explore the implications for educator learning when a


Concurrent Sessions
Learn how to support and guide lesson study teams as
student body undergoes rapid change and becomes more
they establish goals, explore the content they are teaching,
diverse. Use the example of a large comprehensive high
analyze instructional strategies, and examine student
school that implemented smaller learning communities
thinking and learning.
and recultured the school to increase teacher collaboration,
Melinda Leong, Education Northwest, Portland, OR, student engagement, and student achievement. Find out
Melinda.Leong@educationnorthwest.org
how to plan strategically for system change.
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
David Holden, American Alliance for Innovative Schools,
Chula Vista, CA, david.holden@mac.com
Robin Shrode, American Alliance for Innovative Schools,
Irving, TX, impact_shrode@msn.com
Paula Barkley, Metro Nashville Public Schools, Nashville, TN,
paula.barkley@mnps.org
Robbin Wall, Metro Nashville Public Schools, Nashville, TN,
robbin.wall@mnps.org
Strand: Learning Communities

23
monday C concurrent sessions
2 hr | 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

C07 C10
TEACHER LEADERS INFLUENCE POLICY OUR JOURNEY OF SCHOOL-BASED COACHING
Explore what teacher leaders can do to influence and Improve student achievement, teacher collaboration, and
C leverage policy for better teaching and learning. Gain an
overview of the federal policy development process. Learn
teacher leadership through coaching strategies that have
transformed this diverse, urban, Title 1 school. Examine
ways that teacher leaders can inform policy and move from what the strategies look like in action and consider how to
mere compliance to innovation. Follow NSDC’s journey to implement them in your own setting. Develop a plan to
improve the definition of professional development in ESEA. build coaching capacity throughout your district.
René Islas, B & D Consulting, Washington, DC, Rene.Islas@bakerd.com Lori Ritz, Washington Elementary School District, Phoenix, AZ,
Mitchell London, B&D Consulting, Washington, DC, lori.ritz@wesdschools.org
Mitchell.London@bakerd.com Joylyn McCain, Washington Elementary School District, Phoenix, AZ,
Strand: Professional Learning Processes joylyn.mccain@wesdschools.org
Karla Trestrail, Washington Elementary School District, Phoenix, AZ,
Karla.trestrail@wesdschools.org

C08 Cindy Harrison, Broomfield, CO, harrison.cindy@gmail.com


CLASSROOM WALK-THROUGHS TO ADVANCE Strand: Learning Communities
TEACHING AND LEARNING

Add classroom walk-throughs to your toolbox by


C11
reviewing a range of models, identifying factors in each, MOTIVATING BLACK MALES TO EXCEL IN YOUR
and designing a model that best fits your school’s needs. CLASSROOM
Explore numerous models of walk-throughs, with emphasis
on purpose, who is involved, look-fors, frequency, amount The plight of black males continues to pose a major
of time for visits, what is recorded, and how observation challenge for educators at all levels. Gain specific strategies
feedback is given. that can be implemented to effectively motivate and inspire
black male learners to strive to achieve academic excellence.
Donald Kachur, Illinois State University, Bloomington, IL,
dskachu@ilstu.edu
Explore how to develop a “Young Men’s Empowerment
Judy Stout, Adams County School District 14, Loveland, CO,
Program” for your school or district.
jstout@lpbroadband.net Baruti Kafele, Essex County Vocational-Technical Schools,
Claudia Edwards, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Jersey City, NJ, bkafele@earthlink.net
cedwards@cameron.edu Strand: The Learning Gap
Strand: Administrator Development

C12
C09 DEVELOPING EXTRAORDINARY LEADERSHIP:
WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM VIDEOTAPING BUILDING ON STRENGTHS
INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE?
Concurrent Sessions

Reach the next level of leadership performance. Learn six


Consider how videotaping instruction can benefit both insights research has shown assist in developing leadership
the teachers being filmed and those who view the finished skills and take away a tool to help create an action plan that
product. View videos of instructional practice and examine will help leaders improve their own skills and develop those
the materials that support the videos. Explore how some skills in others.
individuals and school communities felt about using video
Alison Olzendam, Leadership Innovations Team, Issaquah, WA,
for professional learning, and obtain resources that convey alison@leadershipinnovationsteam.com
the benefits and limits of learning about instruction from Marcia Woehlbrandt, Kent School District, Kent, WA,
video. Marcia.Woehlbrandt@kent.k12.wa.us

Wendy Sauer, Education Development Center, Newton, MA, Melanie Strey, Kent School District, Kent, WA,
mwsauer@comcast.net Melanie.Strey@kent.k12.wa.us

Strand: Technology Strand: Administrator Development

Register online
24 at www.nsdc.org
monday C concurrent sessions
1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. | 2 hr

C13 C16
THE WAY WE DO BUSINESS: RTI & FLEXIBLE DELIVERY POSITIVE = EFFECTIVE: CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
TRAINING FOR TEACHERS AND MENTORS
Find out how Response to Intervention changed the
culture of a middle school, raising student achievement,
empowering teacher leaders, and helping students believe
Use positive behavior reinforcement to better manage
your classroom. Identify the reasons for misbehavior, and C
they could achieve regardless of race, socioeconomic create classroom routines and expectations that reward
status, and/or disability. Learn how data are key to and reinforce more appropriate behavior. Assess your own
building momentum for continuous school improvement. practice, and take away tools to help change your classroom
Understand how to apply RtI through job-embedded climate.
professional learning. Kathy Schaeflein, Valley View School District, Romeoviille, IL,
schaeflekm@vvsd.org
Jennifer Nonnemacher, Indian Prairie School District, Aurora, IL,
jennifer_nonnemacher@ipsd.org Judie Nash, Valley View School District, Romeoviille, IL, nashja@vvsd.org

Scott Dart, Indian Prairie School District, Aurora, IL, scott_dart@ipsd.org Carrie Stange, Valley View School District, Romeoviille, IL,
stangecm@vvsd.org
Jake Rebus, Indian Prairie School District, Aurora, IL, jake_rebus@ipsd.org
Strand: New Teacher Support
Melissa Tragos, Indian Prairie School District, Aurora, IL,
melissa_tragos@ipsd.org
Kevin Cox, Indian Prairie School District, Aurora, IL, kevin_cox@ipsd.org
Strand: The Learning Gap
C17
DESIGNING PRACTICE-BASED DEVELOPMENT
FOR EDUCATION LEADERSHIP
C14 Learn to design a leadership development program that
ALIGNING FOR LEARNER SUCCESS: is job embedded and results focused. Analyze and define
SYSTEM AND SCHOOL COLLABORATION what tasks leaders perform to achieve results and how to
Determine how to create and sustain effective, systemwide determine whether leaders have the knowledge they need
professional learning that encourages collaboration and to reach required levels.
focuses on 21st-century learning. Consider the lessons of a Gale Hulme, GA Leadership Institute for School Improvement,
diverse system that includes both urban and rural schools in Atlanta, GA, gale.hulme@galeaders.org
transforming their model of professional development. Deb Page, GA Leadership Institute for School Improvement,
Atlanta, GA, deb.page@glisi.org
Peggy Graham, Rocky View Schools, Airdrie, AB, Canada,
Strand: Administrator Development
pgraham@rockyview.ab.ca
Dawn Rife, Rocky View Schools, Airdrie, AB, Canada, drife@rockyview.ab.ca
Kim Agnew, Rocky View Schools, Airdrie, AB, Canada,
kagnew@rockyview.ab.ca
C18
TEACHER LEADERS CREATING A CULTURE
Strand: Learning Communities
OF CULTURAL COMPETENCE

C15
LENDING TEACHER VOICES TO POLICY DISCUSSIONS
Build cultural competence using five basic principles and
seven culturally responsive teaching practices. Implement
a framework, through teacher leaders, to apply the lessons
of cultural competence in all content areas throughout
Concurrent Sessions
See how teachers found their voices and participated in
policy conversations about education. Learn to develop all classroom lessons. Learn the role of teacher leaders
a teacher policy network, select discussion topics, and in creating a culturally responsive environment, and find
structure conversations. Find out how to communicate out how central office and school administrators support
teachers’ perspectives from the field to help the public teacher leader development.
sector and policy makers understand the effects of Patricia McDonald, Highline Community College,
Des Moines, WA, pmcdonal@highline.edu
well-designed policies for the classroom
Kim Shoup, Puyallup School District, Puyallup, WA,
Sandra Dean, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, sdean1@stanford.edu shoupkdm@puyallup.k12.wa.us
Anthony Cody, Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, CA, Susan Tripp, The REACH Center, Arlington, WA,
anthony.cody@ousd.k12.ca.us skytripp@comcast.net
David Cohen, Palo Alto Unified School District, Stanford, CA, Strand: The Learning Gap
dcohen@pausd.org
Strand: Teacher Leadership

25
monday C concurrent sessions
2 hr | 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

C19 C22
ENSURING ALIGNMENT: DEVELOPING EXPERTISE THROUGH
THE DC PUBLIC SCHOOLS REFORM STRATEGY COLLABORATION AND CLASSROOM LABS

C See how a major urban district is working to align


professional development with district initiatives. Explore
Learn how a large urban district created coaching institutes
to enhance literacy coaches’ expertise. Hear how the
three integrated frameworks (program evaluation and district has created a skilled group of literacy coaches using
strategic planning, instructional leadership development, collaboration, adult writing sessions, and lab classrooms.
and instructional coaching) as a means to thoughtfully Embed best practices in reading and writing instruction
and systematically achieve academic reform. Develop across your district by developing coaches as instructional
strategies to align your district practices and professional leaders.
development with your philosophy of curriculum and Dan Coles, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, djcoles@seattleschools.org
instruction. Andrea Smith, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
Michael Moody, Insight Education Group, Encino, CA, arsmith@seattleschools.org
moody@insighteducationgroup.com Jesse Harrison, Seattle Public Schools, Bothell, WA,
Strand: Administrator Development jwharrison@seattleschools.org
Strand: The Learning Gap

C20
INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP: WALKING THE TALK C23
THE CRAFT OF LEADERSHIP: DEVELOPING
Learn how one school district has focused the leadership PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES THAT WORK
conversation on instructional issues. Share one district’s
Hear how a school’s capacity to Collaborate, Reflect, Adapt,
vision and resources for walking the instructional leadership
and Focus (CRAFT) leads to thoughtful teaching, learning,
talk focused on classroom visibility, reflection, strengths-
and leadership for all. Explore each capacity in CRAFT,
based leadership, and staff recognition.
demonstrate how schools are building these capacities to
Deb Clemens, Cheney Public Schools, Cheney, WA,
create and sustain improvement and provide administrators
dclemens@cheneysd.org
with a set of ready-to-use tools for collecting meaningful
Erika Burden, Cheney Public Schools, Cheney, WA,
eburden@cheneysd.org data about teaching and learning. Leave with a set of tools
Carol Mahoney, Cheney Public Schools, Cheney, WA, you can use in your school to build learning clubs, observe
cmahoney@cheneysd.org classroom instruction, and collect meaningful data on
Strand: Teacher Leadership student learning.
Harvey Silver, Silver Strong & Associates, Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ,
aconnor@thoughtfuled.com
C21 Strand: Administrator Development
NORTH GRAND: SUCCESSES AND CHALLENGES
OF HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPALS
Concurrent Sessions

Principal leadership matters in both teaching quality and


student learning. Principals often struggle with balancing
the multiple responsibilities to place their highest priority
on instructional leadership. In NORTH GRAND, a mini-
Basic Advanced Title 1 Encore
icons

documentary supported by the Wallace Foundation, the


North Grand High School principal outlines the successes
and challenges high school principals and their leadership
teams face each day in achieving their vision. View the
30-minute documentary and engage with the principal
as she describes North Grand High School’s whole child
approach that resulted in a 98% graduation rate for the
school’s first graduating class.
Frederick Brown, National Staff Development Council,
Dallas, TX, frederick.brown@nsdc.org
Asuncion Ayala, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL,
aaayala@cps.k12.il.us
Strand: Administrator Development

26
monday RT1 roundtable sessions
1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. | 2 hr

Participants selecting Roundtable 1 will have the opportunity to attend two of the presentations listed in this section.
Simply write RT1 on your session registration form and choose any two sessions when you arrive.

RT1 RT1
USING WEB 2.0 TOOLS TO ENHANCE
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
DISTRIBUTING LEADERSHIP:
LESSONS LEARNED AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL
RT1
Examine how NSDC uses social media tools and web 2.0 Find out how to structure a system to maximize teacher
technologies to create effective e-learning focused on rich, leadership through the example of a middle school that
interactive content and developing online communities of allowed teachers to collaborate during common planning
practice. Take a tour of NSDC’s Learning Exchange platform, time and make key decisions about student interventions,
preview e-learning programs and webinars, and discuss resulting in improved student learning.
how technology can be used to enhance the effectiveness Dan Lysne, Sumner School District, Bonney Lake, WA,
of professional learning. dan_lysne@sumner.wednet.edu

Tom Manning, National Staff Development Council, Dallas, TX, Toby Udager, Sumner School District, Bonney Lake, WA,
tom.manning@nsdc.org toby_udager@sumner.wednet.edu

Strand: Technology Strand: Teacher Leadership

RT1 RT1
NSDC ACADEMY PREVIEW K-12 ADMINISTRATOR PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING COMMUNITIES
Find out how the NSDC Academy can enhance your
professional learning and help you experience effective Learn how developing administrator learning communities
teamwork through a cohesive group whose members work that focus on common goals and continually monitor
collaboratively to understand and solve student learning progress can support K-12 articulation and increase student
problems. achievement.
Rebecca Baenig, Fairfax County Public Schools, Vienna, VA,
Lea Arnau, Grayson, GA, leaarnau@yahoo.com
rgbaenig@fcps.edu
Strand: Learning Communities
Mark Greenfelder, Fairfax County Public Schools, Vienna, VA,
Mark.Greenfelder@fcps.edu
Mark Merrell, Fairfax County Public Schools, Vienna, VA,
RT1 Mark.Merrell@fcps.edu
BROWARD’S URBAN LEADER SUCCESSION PLAN Strand: Administrator Development

Learn to develop quality leaders ready to take charge


of high-need urban schools through an individualized,
competency-based professional internship program.
RT1
LICENSE TO TEACH: ADDING CREDIBILITY
Sherry Rose, School Board of Broward County, Davie, FL,
sherry.rose@browardschools.com
Gary Corbitt, School Board of Broward County, Davie, FL,
gary.corbitt@browardschools.com
TO OUR CREDENTIALS

Raise the standing of the teaching profession by becoming


an informed advocate for teacher quality as you review
Concurrent Sessions
Strand: Administrator Development current licensure models, determine elements for reform
that would lead to greater teacher quality and effectiveness,
and determine how to advocate effectively for these
reforms at the state and national levels.
Maria Fenwick, Teach Plus, Boston, MA, mfenwick@teach-plus.org
Caitlin Hollister, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA,
chollister@boston.k12.ma.us
Celine Coggins, Teach Plus, Boston, MA, ccoggins@teach-plus.org
Strand: Teacher Leadership

Register online
at www.nsdc.org 27
monday RT1 roundtable sessions
2 hr | 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Participants selecting Roundtable 1 will have the opportunity to attend two of the presentations listed in this section.
Simply write RT1 on your session registration form and choose any two sessions when you arrive.

RT1 RT1
RT1 MULTI-MODAL STRATEGIES
TO CLOSE THE LEARNING GAP
PROJECT FOLD: FOLDING WITH ORIGAMI
FOR LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Discover how multi-modal instruction through the arts Use a hands-on approach to increase understanding and
enriches learning and the research behind auditory, visual, support struggling math students by developing teaching
kinesthetic, and linguistic problem-solving strategies that strategies that use origami (Japanese paper folding).
engage students, enhancing both student performance Barbara Pearl, La Salle University, Yardley, PA, info1@mathinmotion.com
and teacher growth. Strand: The Learning Gap
Allison Logan, arts education IDEAS, Plantsville, CT, allisonlogan@cox.net
Strand: The Learning Gap
RT1
SUPPORTING STUDENT SUCCESS GUIDE
RT1 Use research on successful schools to understand the
NEW TEACHER STORIES OF SCHOOL-BASED SUPPORT
behaviors and attitudes that contribute to student
Consider the findings of a recent North Carolina study of achievement and identify actions that will help ensure
induction support to learn how teachers perceive support, each student achieves.
how to conduct your own needs assessment for new Shannon Warren, Western Washington University,
teachers, and how to build a framework of support for Sedro Woolley, WA, shannon.warren@wwu.edu
beginning teachers. Adrienne Somera, Northwest Educational Service District,
Anacortes, WA, asomera@nwesd.org
Heather Higgins, University of North Carolina at Pembroke,
Aberdeen, NC, heather.higgins@uncp.edu Strand: The Learning Gap

Ashley Weinkle, Guilford County School District, Greensboro, NC,


weinkle@gcsnc.com
Strand: New Teacher Support RT1
THE RHYTHM OF COGNITION:
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT AND MOTIVATION
RT1 Hear how to engage students in the learning process using
NSDC STANDARDS THROUGH ARTS-INFUSED the music and rhythm of today’s youth.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Norman Merrifield, Metro Nashville Public Schools,
Apply the lessons of a nationally recognized program Nashville, TN, nmerrifield@me.com
to infuse dance, theater, and visual arts into students’ Strand: The Learning Gap
classroom experiences to provide new pathways for
Concurrent Sessions

learning.
Sibyl Barnum, Puget Sound Educational Service District,
RT1
Fife, WA, sbarnum@psesd.org IVDL ROCKS: INTRODUCTION TO INTERACTIVE
VIDEO DISTANCE LEARNING
Susy Watts, Arts Impact, Fife, WA, susywatts@psesd.org
Lydia Brown, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, Discover new ways to enrich student learning through
lmbrown@seattleschools.org
Interactive Video Distance Learning, which lets students
Strand: The Learning Gap travel virtually to any part of the world and learn from
professionals in all fields. Find out where to access this
content.
Gerald Holton, Licking Heights School District, Pataskala, OH,
gholton@laca.org
Strand: Technology

Register online
28 at www.nsdc.org
tuesday D concurrent sessions
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. continues at 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. | 4 hr

D01 D04
GROUP COACHING COLLABORATION ABCs
Support planning, reflection, and problem solving in Collaboration has played a central role in transforming
professional groups through the cutting-edge process
of group coaching. Develop skills to help groups think
school cultures across the country. Develop the building
blocks to set up and support effective collaboration in D
deeply about their practices and become self-managing, schools. Learn basic, straightforward, essential steps to be
self-monitoring, and self-modifying. Explore how a group successful and confident in implementing collaboration.
coach thinks and understand the difference between group Write a purpose statement and create an action plan,
coaching and facilitation. with necessary supporting documents, to efficiently
Carolee Hayes, Center for Cognitive Coaching, Highlands Ranch, CO, implement collaboration.
ccscarolee@aol.com
Nina Henson, Optimize: Professional Development,
Karen Tackmann, Cedar Springs Public Schools, Cedar Springs, MI, Boise, ID, ninahenson@optimizepd.com
Karen.Tackmann@csredhawks.org
Brian Whitney, Optimize: Professional Development,
Strand: Professional Learning Processes Boise, ID, brianwhitney@optimizepd.com
Jenny Gibbons, Boise School District, Boise, ID,
jenny.gibbons@boiseschools.org
D02 Strand: Learning Communities
FIERCE CONVERSATIONS: TRANSFORMATIVE
COACHING CONVERSATION MODEL
Fierce conversations provide educators and students with D05
life-long skills that transform the conversations central to CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP
their success. Learn and practice a powerful coaching/ THROUGH CULTURAL COMPETENCY
mentoring framework to transform the conversations Explore ways to close the achievement gap by examining
and the relationships central to your success. Understand how cultural factors affect students’ self-esteem, motivation,
transformational ideas and models that will shift your basic and academic success. Learn multicultural teaching
understanding of conversations and the power they hold techniques and tools to become more culturally competent.
in leadership, achieving results, and building relationships. Find out the 59 statements that prevent diversity
Learn to possess the skill and the will to tackle and resolve conversations and how to self-assess cultural biases and
the toughest challenges and to develop an open, direct, attitudes.
respectful culture.
Mun Wah Lee, StirFry Seminars & Consulting, Berkeley, CA,
Deli Moussavi-Bock, Fierce, Seattle, WA, deli@fierceinc.com barbaraharp@hotmail.com
Strand: Teacher Leadership John Lenssen, StirFry Seminars & Consulting, Berkeley, CA,
barbaraharp@hotmail.com
Strand: The Learning Gap
D03
THE CHOREOGRAPHY OF PRESENTING: SEVEN
ESSENTIAL ABILITIES OF EFFECTIVE PRESENTERS
A good presentation can aid in lessons for both students
and adult learners. Improve how you present your message
Concurrent Sessions
by exploring seven essential abilities that help create
credibility and establish rapport. Learn to be a more
effective communicator, and practice the skills in order to
cement your learning. Learn how to promote positive group
dynamics, acknowledge and respond to participants, and
recover from gaffes with grace.
Kendall Zoller, Sierra Training Associates, Foresthill, CA,
kvzoller@ftcnet.net
Claudette Landry, Merryhill Elementary School, Davis, CA,
Claudette.Landry@nlcinc.com
Karen Yoon, Merryhill Elementary School, Davis, CA,
Karen.Yoon@nlcinc.com
Strand: Professional Learning Processes

29
tuesday E concurrent sessions
2 hr | 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

E01 E04
IMPROVING STUDENT LEARNING VIDEO STUDY GROUPS: THE FOCUS
ONE PRINCIPAL AT A TIME IS ON STUDENTS’ MATHEMATICS LEARNING

E
Change classroom observations from a perfunctory task Make each teacher’s classroom a lab for professional
to a rich source of dialogue on ways to improve teaching learning. Use video of students at work to launch
through observation and research. Learn to focus on professional discussions about student interactions,
student learning as the central factor in an observation. questions, and responses to instruction. Share lessons
Gain practical strategies to frame pre- and post-conference learned, as well as protocols and sample video from
conversations. experienced facilitators of video study groups.
Jane Pollock, Learning Horizon, Centennial, CO, Lisa Lavelle, Education Northwest, Portland, OR,
learninghorizon@msn.com Lisa.Lavelle@educationnorthwest.org
Linda Law, Baldwinsville School District, Baldwinsville, NY, Strand: Technology
lindalaw2009@gmail.com
Strand: Administrator Development
E05
USING COLLABORATIVE LEARNING VISITS
E02 TO BUILD LEARNING COMMUNITIES
USING INNOVATION CONFIGURATIONS
TO DOCUMENT IMPACT Advance teacher practice through collaborative learning
visits that provide participants with non-evaluative
Translate the NSDC standards into actions for a variety feedback. Learn how these visits yield valuable information
of role groups using Innovation Configurations. Learn about student engagement that teachers can use with
how IC maps can help schools and districts redefine staff one another in reflective conversations. Understand how
development and how responsibilities must change to the process empowers teachers to be more responsive to
implement the standards with quality and consistency. student learning needs.
Examine a vision of professional development standards
Patricia Dimetres, Fairfax County Public Schools, Dunn Loring, VA,
in operation and apply precision and meaning to what pfdimetres@fcps.edu
the standards look like in practice. Lynnette Harris, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA,
Shirley Hord, National Staff Development Council, Boerne, TX, clharris@fcps.edu
Shirley.hord@nsdc.org Richard Culp, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, riculp@fcps.edu
Strand: Professional Learning Processes August Frattali, Fairfax County Public Schools, Herndon, VA,
affrattali@fcps.edu
Marti Jo Jackson, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA,
E03 mjjackson@fcps.edu

HELPING NEW TEACHERS THRIVE: Scott Phillips, Fairfax County Public Schools, Centreville, VA,
A MODULE FOR PRINCIPALS sfphillips@fcps.edu
Strand: Learning Communities
Address the principal’s essential leadership role in assisting
Concurrent Sessions

new teachers. Identify crucial elements of effective new


teacher induction programs (including a culture of support, E06
necessary support systems, the law, and a continuum of TOOLS AND TALK: THE POWER OF DATA
support). Learn key actions principals take and instructional AND CONVERSATION TO IGNITE CHANGE
leadership roles that best assist new teachers. Ignite and sustain classroom and school improvement
Mindy Meyer, Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession, with explicit tools that data coaches and teachers can share
College Place, WA, mindy@cstp-wa.org and explore in side-by-side exchanges. Align the work of
Sue Anderson, Tumwater School District, Tumwater, WA, classroom coaches or specialists with building leaders and
sanderson@tumwater.k12.wa.us
leadership teams by examining the data. Experience case
Strand: New Teacher Support
studies, practice using the tools, and discuss how these
tools can accelerate schoolwide improvement.
Michael Murphy, Educational Success Systems, Richardson, TX,
mmurphy170@gmail.com
Strand: Professional Learning Processes

Register online
30 at www.nsdc.org
tuesday E concurrent sessions
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. | 2 hr

E07 E10
USING AUTHENTIC PROBLEMS SECONDARY SCHOOLS ON TARGET FOR
IN MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION GRADUATING STUDENTS COLLEGE READY

E
Effective learning environments center on critical thinking Learn four elements critical to successfully preparing
and problem solving of complex and realistic problems. students for college, knowledge that can make a difference,
Explore examples of an authentic problem-based learning especially for those students who are typically underserved.
experience that required preservice teachers to work in Discuss the concept of rigor as understood and
learning teams. Hear how preservice teachers changed demonstrated by schools focused on the goal of having all
their attitudes and beliefs about teaching and learning in students ready for college. Delve into practices developed
problem-based learning environments. over six years by College Board schools in city schools in
New York.
Jacqueline Coomes, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA,
jcoomes@ewu.edu Helen Santiago, College Board, New York, NY,
Kevin Pyatt, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, hsantiago@collegeboard.org
Kevin.pyatt@mail.ewu.edu Strand: The Learning Gap
Strand: Learning Communities

E11
BETTER PRACTICE VISITS: LEADERSHIP
E08 THAT INCREASES STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
ENHANCING THE CAPACITY OF TEACHERS AND
SCHOOL LEADERS TO FACILITATE THE LEARNING Raise student achievement by continuously improving
OF DIVERSE STUDENTS teaching and supporting teachers through collaborative
Focus on ways to improve the learning opportunities professional development. Use classroom visits to raise
and outcomes of students of color using multimedia tools teachers’ awareness of research-based instructional
developed in collaboration with the Southern Poverty strategies. Find out how dialogue and examining student
Law Center, leading scholars and educators, and national work in professional learning communities after practice
associations. Address misconceptions and gaps that impede visits helped improve students’ reading.
teachers’ ability to ensure that all students learn at high Brandon Payne, Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL,
levels, and learn how to create conditions that support bpayne@ccboe.org

effective teaching and student learning in racially and Denise Schuman, Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL,
dschuman@ccboe.org
ethnically diverse schools.
Vicky Spear, Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL, vspear@ccboe.org
Willis Hawley, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, wdh@umd.edu Strand: Administrator Development
Strand: The Learning Gap

E12
E09 ARTS INTEGRATION: A TEACHING STRATEGY
CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF THE METLIFE SURVEY REACHING ALL LEARNERS
OF THE AMERICAN TEACHER

MetLife has conducted The Survey of the American Teacher


for more than 25 years to share the voice of those closest
Expand teacher confidence in using theatre, dance, music,
and art across elementary classrooms to teach literacy,
math, social studies, and science. Learn active strategies
Concurrent Sessions
to the classroom with leaders and the general public. that engage students and develop their skills. Find out how
Engage in conversation on how the survey can be used to systematic professional learning led to an entire faculty
leverage support for and understanding of key professional implementing arts integration strategies into their core
development issues. Explore NSDC’s spring newsletters that curriculum.
focus on these topics and bring your own perspective on Linda Tylka, Palm Beach County School District, West Palm Beach, FL,
these questions. Tylkal@palmbeach.k12.fl.us
Terrion Nelson, Palm Beach County School District, West Palm Beach, FL,
Tracy Crow, National Staff Development Council, Nelsont@palmbeach.k12.fl.us
Columbus, OH, tracy.crow@nsdc.org
Shari Snyder, Palm Beach County School District, West Palm Beach, FL,
Strand: Professional Learning Processes Snyders@palmbeach.k12.fl.us
Dionne Rich, Palm Beach County School District, West Palm Beach, FL,
RichD@palmbeach.k12.fl.us
Strand: The Learning Gap

31
tuesday E concurrent sessions
2 hr | 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

E13 E16
WASHINGTON EDUCATION ASSOCIATION RESULTS SOAR WHEN TEACHERS TEAM
NATIONAL BOARD JUMP START SEMINAR
Discover how a group of teachers worked together to

E
Provide National Board Certification candidates the challenge their students to learn at a higher level. Learn
information they need to successfully pursue certification what their challenges were and how they met them.
at the time when they most need that information. Create Hear how they obtained grants to promote their work,
your own support program based on the content of this implemented new technology in their classrooms, and
successful statewide model. Network with others pursuing inspired other teachers to join them in sharing student
ways to better help teachers reach their goal of national success within their district.
certification from the National Board for Professional
Kathy Klock-Persing, Redmond, OR, kathy.klock@bendbroadband.com
Teaching Standards.
Linda O’Shea, Sherwood School District, Tigard, OR,
Tom White, Edmonds School District, Edmonds, WA, whitetj@comcast.net loshea@sherwood.k12.or.us
James Meadows, Washington Education Association, Federal Way, WA, Strand: Learning Communities
jmeadows@washingtonea.org
Christina Carlson, Yakima School District, Edmonds, WA,
ccarlson@yakimaschools.org E17
Anne Walker, Richland School District, Edmonds, WA, STRENGTHENING ELEMENTARY SCIENCE:
anne@teachercrossing.com LESSONS FROM WASHINGTON TEACHER LEADERS
Strand: Teacher Leadership
Use the results of a statewide study of teacher leaders’
perspectives to improve K-5 science instruction. Apply the
E14 lessons learned about school, district, and state conditions
“SPUNK UP” RTI: DESIGNING AN that support the strengthening of elementary science
UNFORGETTABLE LEARNING EXPERIENCE teaching. Identify specific strategies or actions to implement
Improve student learning using the Response to in the classroom.
Intervention tiered approach. Find out how to transfer Jeanne Harmon, Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession,
Tacoma, WA, jeanne@cstp-wa.org
this framework from a districtwide administrative level
Laura Stokes, Inverness Research, Inverness, CA,
to campus-based staff development by replicating the
lstokes@inverness-research.org
interactive training model. Learn how teachers integrated
Pamela Castori, Inverness Research, Fair Oaks, CA,
interventions into core instruction, leading to fewer Tier II pcastori@inverness-research.org
interventions and greater student achievement. Strand: Teacher Leadership
Peggy Dickerson, Rockwall Independent School District,
Rockwall, TX, pdickerson@rockwallisd.org
Teresa Thacker, Rockwall Independent School District, E18
Rockwall, TX, tthacker@rockwallisd.org ENGAGING PARTNERS, DEEPENING DIALOGUE,
Strand: The Learning Gap ENHANCING PRACTICE, IMPROVING INSTRUCTION
Concurrent Sessions

Deepen your professional dialogue using a four-component


framework that will help you engage with others to
E15
DEEPENING THE IMPACT OF MIDDLE SCHOOL enhance shared practice. Access practical tools and
LEADERSHIP TEAMS resources designed to engage colleagues in meaningful
dialogue. Learn to improve your communication, consensus
Explore a professional development resource featuring
building, conflict resolution, and co-teaching using various
videos of school-based teams at work. Use web-based
models and situations.
materials to help school-based leadership teams analyze
Cate Hart, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, camhart@indiana.edu
and deepen their instructional impact. Examine the range
Carrie Chapman, Minnesota State University at Mankato, Mankato, MN,
of materials, practice using video clips, and reflect on how
carrie.chapman@mnsu.edu
to use Success at the Core modules at your school.
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
Sonia Caus Gleason, Boston, MA, sonia@soniacausgleason.org
Strand: Technology

Basic Advanced Title 1 Encore


icons

32
tuesday E concurrent sessions
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. | 2 hr

E19 E22
READY FOR ANYTHING: TRANSFORMING INSTRUCTION AND LEARNING
SUPPORTING NEW TEACHERS FOR SUCCESS THROUGH HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEACHING

Change new teacher retention in your school with


this framework for support. Build beginning teachers’
Implement and facilitate professional learning communities
that greatly impact teacher effectiveness and student E
confidence and skills through monthly sessions focused achievement. Learn about a model that helps professional
on tasks from beginning and ending school to instructional learning communities focus their time strategically on
planning and design in an era of high-stakes testing. Create research-based content that makes a difference for
an effective, research-based program that will enable struggling students and underperforming schools. Gain
coaches and mentors to motivate and sustain new teachers. tried and true ideas for teaching, coaching, and leadership
Lynn Howard, The Leadership and Learning Center, Huntersville, NC, strategies and actions that lead to sustainable, schoolwide
bocat@roadrunner.com change.
Catherine Koontz, Forsyth County Schools, Winston-Salem, NC, Regie Routman, Seattle, WA, regier@comcast.net
cckoontz@gmail.com
Sandra Figueroa, Santa Cruz Valley Unified School District, Rio Rico, AZ,
Strand: New Teacher Support sandfigueroa@mac.com
Strand: Professional Learning Processes

E20
CRITICAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TEACHERS
THROUGH ACTION RESEARCH E23
FINDING THE RIGHT FIT: INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY
Learn how action research effectively re-engages teachers
and administrators in sustainable, empowering inquiry Understand web 2.0 tools to engage and motivate students
focused on school improvement. Discover the steps while addressing critical thinking skills and creativity. Find
necessary to engage teachers in action research for greater the right tools to match your classroom learning targets
learning, engagement, and advocacy. Receive tested, and technological comfort level. Develop an action plan
user-friendly templates and references to implement and to integrate technology into the classroom, and learn to
evaluate this systematic, reflective, and collaborative process connect with other teachers using social networking tools.
that can be applied in diverse settings. Bring your own laptop.

Virginia Kelsen, Chaffey Joint Union High School District, Theresa Gray, Erie 2-Chautauqua-Cattaraugus BOCES,
Rancho Cucamonga, CA, virginia_kelsen@cjuhsd.k12.ca.us Fredonia, NY, tgray@e2ccb.org

Susan Warren, Azusa Pacific University, Upland, swarren@apu.edu Strand: Technology

Raffi Martinian, La Canada Unified School District, La Canada, CA,


ramartini77@yahoo.com
Strand: Professional Learning Processes E24
FACILITATING COLLABORATION AND LEARNING
WITH DIVERSE ADULT LEARNERS
E21
TRANSFORMING EDUCATIONAL LEADERS
FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

Ensure that leaders have the skills and knowledge


Deepen your understanding of adult learning principles
and improve the quality and effectiveness of your school’s
or district’s professional learning. Improve your ability to
Concurrent Sessions
facilitate challenging meetings, and take home practical
to transform their schools to meet higher standards tools to use in interactive sessions. Experience strategies
and requirements for progress. Understand the core that will boost the quality and effectiveness of your own
competencies of school improvement research essential to facilitation.
leading change. Learn to use an integrated system to get
Paul Robb, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
the most from data to align curriculum and assessments, probb@seattleschools.org
and to build a structure that supports increased student Strand: Professional Learning Processes
achievement.
Deborah Jackson, Fairfax County Public Schools, McLean, VA,
debbie.jackson@fcps.edu
Roberto Pamas, Fairfax County Public Schools, McLean, VA,
Roberto.Pamas@fcps.edu
Strand: Teacher Leadership

Register online
at www.nsdc.org 33
tuesday F concurrent sessions
2 hr | 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

F01 F04
BECOMING A LEARNING SCHOOL THE KEY INGREDIENTS FOR SCHOOL-BASED
COACHING: TRUST AND COMMUNICATION
When schools decide to engage in collaborative

F professional learning to increase teaching and student Change teacher attitudes, practices, knowledge, and
learning, they commit to use a process of continuous skills through a coaching model that builds trust through
improvement that aligns with NSDC’s definition of effective communication. Learn about a district’s approach
professional learning. Learn the core elements of a learning to coaching based on research-based best practices. Find
school, strategies for transforming a school into one, and ways to apply best practices to your own context.
examine tools to assess a school’s progress. Michael Murphy, Educational Success Systems, Richardson, TX,
mmurphy170@gmail.com
Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council, Arvada, CO,
joellen.killion@nsdc.org Stacy King, Greeneville City School District, Greeneville, TN,
kings@gcschools.net
Victoria Duff, New Jersey Dept. of Education, Trenton, NJ,
Pat Donaldson, Greeneville City School District, Greeneville, TN,
victoria.duff@doe.state.nj.us
donaldsonp@gcschools.net
Strand: Learning Communities
Robbie Mitchell, Greeneville City School District, Greeneville, TN,
mitchellr@gcschools.net

F02 Strand: Professional Learning Processes

BRIDGING THE TEACHING GAP:


CREATING SKILLED PRACTITIONERS F05
Practice designing professional development experiences TEACHER LEADERSHIP STRUCTURES
that go beyond raising awareness and bring best practices TO BUILD CAPACITY FOR SUSTAINABILITY
into the classroom. Examine learning theory, practice new Build teachers’ leadership capacity by establishing
concepts, and share your experiences from your school/ multi-leveled, collaborative structures that lead to greater
classroom. Build on what you learn by redesigning a profes- professional growth as teachers disseminate their learning
sional learning experience to accomplish an identified goal. to colleagues. Understand how tiered leadership structures
Nancy Frey, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, facilitate teachers’ continual professional development.
nfrey@mail.sdsu.edu Sustain change initiatives by extending teachers’ knowledge,
Sandi Everlove, TeachFirst, San Diego, CA, severlove@teachfirst.com shaping attitudes, and enhancing leadership skills.
Strand: Professional Learning Processes Sue Brady, Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township,
Indianapolis, IN, sue.brady@wayne.k12.in.us
Karen Carter, Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township,
F03 Indianapolis, IN, karen.carter@wayne.k12.in.us
TRANSFORMING TEACHERS AND STUDENTS:
Lisa Lantrip, Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township,
WRITERS WORKSHOP IN MIDDLE SCHOOL Indianapolis, IN, lisa.lantrip@wayne.k12.in.us
Follow a large urban district’s journey of change as Nicole Law, Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township,
Indianapolis, IN, nicole.law@wayne.k12.in.us
teachers implemented the writers’ workshop. See how
Anne Olson, Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township,
students became engaged in writing personal narratives,
Concurrent Sessions

Indianapolis, IN, anne.olson@wayne.k12.in.us


examine student work, and learn how to practice effective Strand: Teacher Leadership
teaching strategies to support student growth in inclusion
classrooms. Build and expand your understanding of a
process that will empower teachers and students as writers. F06
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY
Janine King, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, OBSERVATION GUIDE
jaking@seattleschools.org
Build a vision for effective collaboration in your professional
Natalie Ward, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
ncbowers@seattleschools.org learning community. Use an observation guide tool and
Strand: The Learning Gap supporting resources to evaluate current work and to create
a plan to move your team from supportive practices to
developmental practices likely to impact student learning.
Increase the power of your professional learning as you
share your understanding of the elements of effective
professional learning communities.
Adrienne Somera, Northwest Educational Service District,
Anacortes, WA, asomera@nwesd.org
Shannon Warren, Western Washington University,
Bellingham, WA, shannon.warren@wwu.edu
Strand: Learning Communities
34
tuesday F concurrent sessions
1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. | 2 hr

F07 F10
TEACHER LEADERSHIP THAT SUPPORTS ROUNDING UP READING STRATEGIES
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLs) THROUGH COLLABORATION

F
Address the achievement gap between ELLs and Address the learning gap in reading for 2nd-6th grade
mainstream American students by developing teacher students using classroom-tested literacy strategies. Learn
leaders to act as coaches, mentors, facilitators, and how a dynamic group of teachers collaborated around data
principals. Use as a model this one-year program that to identify and use reading strategies that increased student
involves graduate college coursework, fieldwork, achievement. Learn and practice engaging and authentic
advisement, and leadership development to form a teaching methods to improve student literacy skills.
network of teacher leaders. Laura Moore, Wylie Independent School District, Wylie, TX,
laura.moore@wylieisd.net
Candido DeJesus, Bank Street College of Education, New York, NY,
Sherry Betts, Wylie Independent School District, Wylie, TX,
cdejesus@bankstreet.edu
sherry.betts@wylieisd.net
Strand: The Learning Gap Whitney Sellars, Wylie Independent School District, Wylie, TX,
whitney.sellars@wylieisd.net
Lisa Felthous, Wylie Independent School District, Wylie, TX,
F08 lisa.felthous@wylieisd.net
USING DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE TO INCREASE RIGOR Tracy Baskeyfield, Wylie Independent School District, Wylie, TX,
tracy.baskeyfield@wylieisd.net
Explore methods for increasing rigor in district classrooms Strand: The Learning Gap
by developing skills for planning, facilitating, presenting,
advancing, and evaluating learning in the classroom using
the Depth of Knowledge model, developed by Norman F11
OBSERVING FOR EVIDENCE OF LEARNING (OEL):
Webb. A PROCESS TO IMPROVE STUDENT UNDERSTANDING
Myra Collins, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO, IN SCIENCE
mcollins@truman.edu
Learn how urban science teachers used common
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
instructional materials and were empowered to improve
student understanding. Explore the elements that helped
them incorporate best practices into daily lessons more
F09 effectively, focus on big ideas, and use varied instructional
CHANGE WE CAN BELIEVE IN
strategies to reach every student. Review test data
Understand the changes in professionaldevelopment demonstrating higher achievement for students of
that are making learning more effective than ever. Identify participating teachers.
the bureaucratic and other barriers educators encounter in Kathryn Kelsey, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
creating meaningful professional learning. Actively explore kkelsey@seattleschools.org
strategies for overcoming identified barriers, and stop those Caroline Kiehle, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA,
traditional staff development practices that do not ckiehle@systemsbiology.org

produce results.
Hayes Mizell, National Staff Development Council,
Columbia, SC, hmizell@gmail.com
Dave Weaver, RMC Research Corporation, Portland, OR,
dweaver@rmccorp.com
Emilie Mosko, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
ecmosko@seattleschools.org
Concurrent Sessions
Strand: Learning Communities Strand: Learning Communities

F12
SCHOOL LEADERSHIP: SCHOOLWIDE IMPROVEMENT
THROUGH INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP
Explore and identify leadership skills needed to successfully
implement a schoolwide adolescent literacy initiative.
Identify barriers and solutions to implementation and
sustainability of schoolwide initiatives. Learn from the
experiences of a site and district administrator attempting
to engage and support teachers across departments in
ongoing staff development and instructional coaching.

Register online
Ken Geisick, Riverbank Unified School District, Riverbank, CA,
kgeisick@sbcglobal.net
Strand: Administrator Development
at www.nsdc.org 35
tuesday F concurrent sessions
2 hr | 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

F13 F16
TEACHER LEADERSHIP: TEACHER TALK: COLLABORATING AND
PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER REFLECTING ON STUDENT LEARNING

F Practice and hone the skills that effective teacher


leaders need. Learn how to plan and facilitate small and
Improve the practice of small group professional
development through improving dialogue. Identify
large groups for measureable results, build and sustain characteristics of high-performing learning communities.
relationships, and communicate with clarity. Leave with the Hone conversation skills and gain tools that will help in
confidence to be able to support and facilitate change in designing and implementing purposeful, data-driven
your school. dialogue among colleagues.
Sandy Nobles, Salesmanship Club Youth and Family Centers, Angie Neville, Federal Way Public Schools, Tacoma, WA, aneville@fwps.org
Dallas, TX, snobles@salesmanshipclub.org Pamela Schaff, Federal Way Public Schools, Auburn, WA, pschaff@fwps.org
Strand: Teacher Leadership Strand: Learning Communities

F14 F17
INSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORKS WALK-THROUGHS THAT PROMOTE HIGH SCHOOL
FOR STUDENT SELF-DIRECTION RIGOR AND ENGAGEMENT
Help students become self-directed learners. Learn how to Delve into your school data and school improvement plan
design teaching plans that incorporate essential questions, to figure out where best to focus attention during walk-
standards, learning process and content goals, assessments, throughs. Create a metric to use during the walk-through,
tiered learning activities, and reflection. Examine effective and find protocols that work in different contexts. Interpret
frameworks for teaching and learning that have led to the data and help teachers create learning plans based on
achievement gains for students with diverse needs in student need.
grades 4-12 across content areas.
Maureen Nichols, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
Debra Franciosi, Project CRISS, Kalispell, MT, dfranciosi@projectcriss.com mrnichols@philasd.org
Donna Duval, Salem-Keizer School District, Salem, OR, Strand: Teacher Leadership
duval_donna@salkeiz.k12.or.us
Strand: The Learning Gap
F18
IMPROVING THE MANAGEMENT
F15 OF EDUCATOR TALENT: PILOT STUDY
GET INSPIRED: FACILITATING GREAT PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT FOR MENTORS Investigate eight research-based components of a
framework to address teacher quality. Identify how
Implement a new teacher induction program that will preparation, recruitment, hiring, induction, professional
dramatically decrease teacher turnover. Learn to identify development, compensation, working conditions, and
Concurrent Sessions

activities conducive to both mentoring and high-quality performance management are interconnected. Consider
professional learning, and how to facilitate and sustain the findings of a study of three Ohio districts (one urban,
quality learning activities throughout the induction one suburban, and one rural) on how this framework can
program. Use best practices, including reflection, improve recruitment and retention.
mentoring, walk-throughs, book studies, collaborative
Dawn Dolby, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL,
learning, coaching, modeling, and others. dawn.dolby@learningpt.org
Mara Lee Moats, Edinburg Consolidated Independent School District, Gretchen Weber, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL,
Edinburg, TX, m.moats@ecisd.us gretchen.weber@learningpt.org
Ron Cavazos, Edinburg Consolidated Independent School District, Strand: Administrator Development
Edinburg, TX, r.cavazos@ecisd.us
Strand: New Teacher Support

Basic Advanced Title 1 Encore


icons

36
tuesday F concurrent sessions
1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. | 2 hr

F19 F22
YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT IMPROVING LEARNING WITH TECHNOLOGY AND
PROGRAM FOR NEW TEACHERS PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

Build early career teachers’ understanding and support of


their professional growth through just-in-time support.
Increase student and teacher engagement in the learning
process with innovative digital teaching and learning F
Follow the structure of a successful program that creates models. Share the power of teacher leadership and
more confident, thoughtful, and skilled teachers. Learn to collaboration, integrating technology as a model for teacher
build on existing mentoring programs to economically and student empowerment, and transforming school
develop a similar program. culture through participatory inquiry. Transform the culture
Ray Myrtle, Provincial Intermediate Teachers’ Association,
and climate of the middle school into one of focus, purpose,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, president@pita.ca and increased student achievement.
Anne MacLean, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Cristina Alvarez, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
Kelowna, BC, Canada, anne.e.maclean@ubc.ca ccalvarez@philasd.org
Strand: New Teacher Support Strand: Technology

F20 F23
ADOLESCENT LITERACY IMPROVEMENT: ENSURING EDUCATIONAL EQUITY
A CROSS-CURRICULAR APPROACH THROUGH RESPONSIVE INSTRUCTION
Develop teachers’ capacity as literacy instructors with a Address gaps among student subgroups by exploring
research-based, schoolwide literacy improvement program instructional practices based on educational equity and
that crosses content areas. Help teachers learn to identify diversity. Identify the characteristics of diversity-based
underlying causes of adolescent literacy deficiencies responsive instruction and learn to incorporate equity
and design instruction to meet learners’ needs. Create practices in intervention programs. Find out how to plan
ownership for the program and determine the time and and deliver lessons that will help all students succeed.
costs involved for sustained implementation.
Suzy Cutbirth, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO,
Margaret Carroll, Maryland State Dept. of Education, scutbirth@missouristate.edu
Baltimore, MD, margaretkcarroll@comcast.net Marsha Lay, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO,
Strand: The Learning Gap marshalay@missouristate.edu
Strand: The Learning Gap

F21
ENHANCING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT F24
THROUGH EMBEDDED INQUIRY ESSENTIAL 21ST-CENTURY PRESENTATIONS
Find out how to engage teachers and instructional leaders Learn to rethink slideware including PowerPoint and
in rigorous professional development through project-
based learning. Use an inquiry method that incorporates
input from teachers, site administrators, district staff, and
Keynote. Understand how to prepare, design, and deliver
slide shows in keeping with 21st-century skills. Explore
how to find and craft the story. Create simple designs that
Concurrent Sessions
students to improve teacher practice. Apply the lessons connect with the audience. Leave with actionable ideas to
of a large, urban district that improved curriculum and improve your presentations.
instructional design.
Lawrence Faulkner, Adams 12 Five Star Schools, Broomfield, CO,
David Ross, Buck Institute for Education, Novato, CA, david@bie.org lfaulkner@adams12.org
Rody Boonchouy, Davis Joint Unified School District, Davis, CA, Strand: Professional Learning Processes
rody@novelapproachpbl.com
Strand: Professional Learning Processes

Register online
at www.nsdc.org 37
tuesday RT2 roundtable sessions
2 hr | 1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Participants selecting Roundtable 2 will have the opportunity to attend two of the presentations listed in this section.
Simply write RT2 on your session registration form and choose any two sessions when you arrive.

RT2 RT2
RT2 BEYOND MEMBERSHIP: GETTING MORE INVOLVED
WITH NSDC
DYNAMIC LEADERSHIP-FOLLOWERSHIP:
KEY TO STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Are you an NSDC member looking to get more involved in Learn to effectively distribute leadership responsibilities
the organization? Learn about 35+ ways you can get more to employees who demonstrate exemplary leadership/
involved with NSDC. followership, and create an environment where
every member on the team, from the janitor to the
Frederick Brown, National Staff Development Council,
Dallas, TX, frederick.brown@nsdc.org superintendent, is valued and able to use his or her
Strand: Teacher Leadership
talents to contribute to student achievement.
Jeffrey Williams, JCW Team Consultants, O’Fallon, IL,
jcw@jcwteamconsultants.com
RT2 Strand: Administrator Development
USING WEB 2.0 TOOLS TO ENHANCE
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
Examine how NSDC uses social media tools and web 2.0
RT2
EXCELLENCE COLLABORATIVE: A TEACHER-CREATED
technologies to create effective e-learning focused on rich, SCHOOL TURN-AROUND MODEL
interactive content and developing online communities of
Explore a teacher-created, research-based model that
practice. Take a tour of NSDC’s Learning Exchange platform,
improves the retention and distribution of excellent
preview e-learning programs and webinars, and discuss
teachers in urban schools, and offers an innovative structure
how technology can be used to enhance the effectiveness for teacher compensation and career growth.
of professional learning.
Maria Fenwick, Teach Plus, Boston, MA, mfenwick@teach-plus.org
Tom Manning, National Staff Development Council, Jessie Gerson-Nieder, Somerville Public Schools, Boston, MA,
Dallas, TX, tom.manning@nsdc.org jessie.gerson@gmail.com
Strand: Technology Celine Coggins, Teach Plus, Boston, MA, ccoggins@teach-plus.org
Strand: Teacher Leadership
RT2
ADVOCATE FOR NSDC’S DEFINITION RT2
OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FLUENCY INSTRUCTION CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Ensure that every teacher engages in effective professional Understand what current research says about the
development every day so that every student achieves. theoretical and practical framework needed to establish
Meet with NSDC’s policy professionals and get personalized and monitor a fluency development program that helps
support in advocating for NSDC’s definition of professional struggling readers.
development.
Concurrent Sessions

Heather Baptie, Central Okanagan School District 23,


René Islas, B & D Consulting, Washington, DC, Rene.Islas@bakerd.com Kelowna, BC, Canada, literacycentre@sd23.bc.ca
Terry Dobson, Central Okanagan School District 23,
Mitchell London, B&D Consulting, Washington, DC,
Kelowna, BC, Canada, literacycentre@sd23.bc.ca
Mitchell.London@bakerd.com
Strand: The Learning Gap
Strand: Professional Learning Processes

RT2 RT2
GUEST (SUBSTITUTE) TEACHERS NEED
COACHING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
SUPPORT AND TRAINING TOO
AS CATALYSTS FOR CHANGE
Understand the importance of substitute teacher
Explore how the literacy, numeracy, technology, English
training for student learning, and find out how to structure
learner, and data coaches at a major urban comprehensive
a program that provides guest teachers with skills in
high school improved teacher practices and developed
classroom management, professionalism, following lesson
teachers’ leadership capacity by effectively facilitating
plans, filling in educational activities, and understanding the
learning teams.
legal aspects of the job.
David Holden, Sweetwater Union High School District,
Kathleen Schaeflein, Valley View School District,
Chula Vista, CA, david.holden@mac.com Romeoviille, IL, schaeflekm@vvsd.org
Jill Flaherty, Metro Nashville Public Schools, Antioch, TN, Judie Nash, Valley View School District, Romeoviille, IL,
jill.flaherty@mnps.org nashja@vvsd.org
Strand: Learning Communities Strand: Professional Learning Processes
38
tuesday RT2 roundtable sessions
1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. | 2 hr

RT2 RT2
IMPROVING ACADEMIC LITERACY THE FOUR COACH APPROACH:
IN THE CONTENT AREAS STAFF DEVELOPERS SUPPORTING LEARNING

RT2
Receive practical tools to share with colleagues in grade and Build a strong, supportive school environment from the
department teams that will help them support struggling example of this school’s four staff developers, one in each
secondary students in content-area reading and acquiring major content area, and the content and processes they
academic vocabulary. have used to create a culture of learning for both teachers
Jennifer Brenneman, Kaplan K12 Learning Services, New York, NY,
and students.
jennifer.brenneman@kaplan.com Krista Purnell, New Heights Academy Charter School, New York, NY,
Strand: The Learning Gap kpurnell@newheightsacademy.org
Jennifer Gowers, New Heights Academy Charter School, New York, NY,
jlgowers@hotmail.com
RT2 Jessica Hinsch Raba, New Heights Academy Charter School, New York, NY,
MAKING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT jhinschraba@newheightsacademy.org
A REALITY THROUGH UNIT DESIGN Tanya Johnson, tjohnson@newheightsacademy.org, New York, NY

Use concrete strategies to organize, design, and deliver Strand: Teacher Leadership

engaging lessons that inspire students to think more deeply


and participate in high-level discussions, increasing their
learning.
RT2
THE NEED TO FEED
Valerie Braimah, Insight Education Group, Encino, CA,
braimah@insighteducationgroup.com
Change school culture through cooperative work between
teacher leaders and administrators using common sense
Jason Stricker, Insight Education Group, Encino, CA,
stricker@insighteducationgroup.com practices from the book, If You Don’t Feed The Teachers, They
Strand: Professional Learning Processes Eat The Students, as well as relevant data that demonstrate
impact on working conditions.
Brian Whitson, North Carolina Association of Educators, Charlotte, NC,
RT2 brian.whitson@ncae.org
MATH IMPROVEMENT TOOLKIT WORKSHOPS: Lina Drinkard, North Carolina Association of Educators, Salisbury, NC,
LANGUAGE IN MATHEMATICS lina.drinkard@ncae.org

Help teachers make the language of mathematics Strand: Teacher Leadership


accessible to students, particularly those who are English
language learners or those with learning disabilities,
through research-based instructional strategies and hands- RT2
TEACHING AND STRESS
on activities.
Understand how stress affects the learning of both teachers
Emily Fagan, Education Development Center, Newton, MA,
efagan@edc.org and students. Learn to recognize factors that increase stress
Anna McTigue, Newton, MA, amctigue@edc.org
Strand: Professional Learning Processes
in the classroom, and identify research-based techniques for
mitigating its negative effects.
Donna Glee Williams, NC Center for the Advancement of Teaching,
Concurrent Sessions
Cullowhee, NC, williadg@nccat.org
RT2 Strand: Learning Communities
STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN MATHEMATICS:
THE POWER OF K-16 COLLABORATION
Learn about the creation of ongoing professional
development for teachers of mathematics in both
preservice and certified teachers. Explore how a university
professor, high school math teacher, and high school
administrator experienced the power of collaboration that
has strengthened classroom practice and directly impacted
student achievement in mathematics.
Ray Picicci, Cheney Public Schools, Cheney, WA, rpicicci@cheneysd.org
Adam Marsh, Cheney Public Schools, Cheney, WA, amarsh@cheneysd.org
Jacqueline Coomes, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA,
Jacqueline.coomes@mail.ewu.edu
Strand: The Learning Gap
Register online
at www.nsdc.org 39
wednesday G concurrent sessions
2 hr | 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

G01 G04
IMPROVING STUDENT LEARNING EDUCATION FOR ALL CHILDREN:
BY MINDING THE GAP REALIZING RIGOR, RELEVANCE, RELATIONSHIPS

G Advance the learning of special education, English language Create a multicultural experience and bring integrated
learner, at-risk, and gifted students by applying high-yield curriculum to life for students. Learn how to establish
research to daily instruction and assessment. Identify rigor, relevance, and relationships in your classroom while
strategies to use to improve classroom instruction and raising awareness about education around the world. Use
assessment for all learners. Learn about research that shows standards, explore ways to create leadership skills, and
classroom teachers can effectively close the achievement enhance global awareness through personal interactions
gap among their own students. with students from Kenya (made possible by Education for
All Children).
Jane Pollock, Learning Horizon, Centennial, CO,
learninghorizon@msn.com Ryanne Van Sciver, Education For All Children, Burney, CA,
Strand: The Learning Gap ryannevansciver@gmail.com
Lory Courtney, Adams 12 Five Star Schools, Thornton, CO,
lory.courtney@adams12.org

G02 Strand: The Learning Gap


HELPING TEACHERS LEARN
FROM STUDENT FOCUS GROUPS
G05
Learn how a district engaged students in focus groups USING INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY TO
to understand their experiences as math learners and FACILITATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
hear their observations about effective instruction and Change the way you design and implement professional
how teacher leaders helped teachers respond. Review development. Identify the resources within your school
the pros and cons of capturing student voice on school that can help you create and sustain professional learning
and instructional issues for changing school culture and communities. Empower teachers to collaborate using free,
student-staff relations. Identify ways to use student focus web-based resources inside and outside of the classroom
groups to gather data related to your own challenges. to support professional development and increase student
Edie Holcomb, Bellingham, WA, elholcomb@aol.com achievement.
Jane Chadsey, Renton School District, Renton, WA, Chip Buckwell, Kannapolis City Schools, Kannapolis, NC,
jane.chadsey@rentonschools.us buckchip@kannapolis.k12.nc.us
Michele Rennie, Renton School District, Renton, WA, Kelly Burgess, Kannapolis City School, Kannapolis, NC,
michele.rennie@rentonschools.us burgessk@kannapolis.k12.nc.us
Strand: Professional Learning Processes Josh Clemmons, Kannapolis City Schools, Kannapolis, NC,
clemmonj@kannapolis.k12.nc.us
Strand: Technology
G03
SUPERMAN IS DEAD: DISTRIBUTING LEADERSHIP
Concurrent Sessions

WITH ACTION PLANNING G06


COACHES: DEFINING ROLES AND MEASURING IMPACT
Professional learning community research affirms the
Learn from action research which coaching roles most affect
success of schoolwide responses, as popularized recently
student achievement. Identify coaching roles, determine
by Response-to-Intervention models. The principal is often
how to distribute time across roles, and compare time
responsible for developing schoolwide responses, adding
allocations with data gathered from school and district
yet another task to their ever-growing list of responsibilities.
coaches. Reflect on coaches’ perceptions of their roles and
Examine an action-planning model that involves the
the perceptions of teachers and principals.
establishment of collaborative staff structures and
processes focused on professional development, distributed Michael Schwei, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX,
mschwei@nisdtx.org
leadership, and school improvement.
Elita Driskill, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX,
Kurtis Hewson, Livingstone Range School Division, Claresholm, AB, edriskill@nisdtx.org
Canada, hewsonk@lrsd.ab.ca
Courtney Foreman, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX,
Lorna Adrian, Livingstone Range School Division, Claresholm, AB, cforeman@nisdtx.org
Canada, adrianl@lrsd.ab.ca
Michelle Pawski, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX,
Strand: Learning Communities mpawski@nisdtx.org
Carrie Pierce, Northwest Independent School District, Justin, TX,
cpierce@nisdtx.org
Strand: Teacher Leadership
40
wednesday G concurrent sessions
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. | 2 hr

G07 G10
SCALE UP: DIFFERENTIATED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPING AND SUSTAINING
DEVELOPMENT FOR TEACHERS OF ENGLISH K-12 LEARNING COMMUNITIES
LANGUAGE LEARNERS

Ensure that classroom teachers have the knowledge and


Drive systemwide change by creating a culture of
collaboration. Learn how high-performing professional G
skills they need to scaffold instruction for English language learning communities focused on creating formative
learners. Learn the key components of a professional assessments can result in improved student achievement.
development model that promotes meaningful interaction: Gain practical strategies for helping teachers understand
rigorous, standards-based instruction, and cultural the process, importance, and application of assessing
relevance. Encourage teachers to delve deeper through student learning.
differentiation.
Mark Merrell, Fairfax County Public Schools, Vienna, VA,
Bonnie English, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, Mark.Merrell@fcps.edu
boenglish@seattleschools.org Rebecca Baenig, Fairfax County Public Schools, Vienna, VA,
Daniel Golosman, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA, rgbaenig@fcps.edu
dpgolosman@seattleschools.org Mark Greenfelder, Fairfax County Public Schools, Vienna, VA,
Strand: The Learning Gap Mark.Greenfelder@fcps.edu
Strand: Learning Communities

G08
CREATING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
G11
Learn how high-performing, collaborative teams can work USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT
together to implement reflective practices that raise student COLLABORATION: AN OPEN FORUM
achievement. Hear how the social studies department at Explore and access the power of technology in
a highly diverse high school successfully implemented implementing and sustaining efficient and effective
professional learning communities. Create a list of teacher collaboration. Examine what technology is
strategies to take back to implement professional learning currently available and being used to support collaboration
communities. in order to tap into potential resources. Move beyond
Keith Adams, Montgomery County Public Schools, Silver Spring, MD, using technology only for attendance and grading to
keith_g_adams@mcpsmd.org empowering improved teacher collaboration.
Strand: Learning Communities
Brian Whitney, Optimize: Professional Development, Boise, ID,
brianwhitney@optimizepd.com
Nina Henson, Optimize: Professional Development, Boise, ID,
G09 ninahenson@optimizepd.com
AUTHENTIC DISCUSSION AS A TOOL FOR INQUIRY Jenny Gibbons, Boise School District, Boise, ID,
jenny.gibbons@boiseschools.org
Find ways to encourage academic discourse in every
Strand: Technology
content area, including mathematics, and learn effective
methods for managing the discussion. Practice scaffolding
discussion questions to move students up Bloom’s
Taxonomy. Acquire a toolkit of instructional strategies to
G12
Concurrent Sessions
YAKIMA SCHOOL DISTRICT INSTRUCTIONAL
promote authentic discussion and inquiry. LEADERSHIP SUPPORT INITIATIVE
Jennifer Brenneman, Kaplan K12 Learning Services, New York, NY, Transform teaching and learning based on a real-life case
jennifer.brenneman@kaplan.com
study of effective professional learning that improved
Strand: The Learning Gap
instructional leadership. Improve school administrators’
and central office staff members’ abilities to provide more
effective support for changing classroom practice. Learn
about a systemic approach to developing instructional
leadership.
Heather Knight, Leadership Innovations Team, East Olympia, WA,
heather@leadershipinnovationsteam.com
Cece Mahre, Yakima School District, Yakima, Washington,
mahre.cece@yakimaschools.org
Strand: Administrator Development
Register online
at www.nsdc.org 41
wednesday G concurrent sessions
2 hr | 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

G13 G16
LEADING HEALTHY AND SUSTAINABLE BUILDING A STRONGER K-12 SYSTEM:
CULTURES IN URBAN SCHOOLS A MODEL FOR LITERACY IMPLEMENTATION
ALONG A DEVELOPMENTAL CONTINUUM
G Develop strategies to support learning communities and
create a successful school. Find tools that work in an urban Hear how an urban school district strengthened their
setting to empower staff and lead them to appreciate system by investing in the teaching expertise of their pre-K,
the positive attributes of the school. Create a welcoming, kindergarten and first grade teachers by visiting laboratory
cooperative, energized school climate. classrooms, observing and reflecting on model lessons, and
coaching. Apply these strategies to your own classroom.
Suszanne Hawthorne-Clay, ECCS, Hudson, OH, susuwoo@aol.com
Strand: Learning Communities Susan Enfield, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,
saenfield@seattleschools.org
Cathy Feldman, Reach, Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ, cathy.feldman@reachassoc.com

G14 Laurie Morrison, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA,


lemorrison@seattleschools.org
KANSAS TEACHER LEADERSHIP “UNWRAPPED”
Strand: The Learning Gap
Explore the structure of one state’s approach to
empowering teachers through a teacher leadership
endorsement. Review modules that support the work of G17
teacher leaders. Discuss teacher leadership regulations, WHY GREAT TEACHERS QUIT: WHAT WE CAN DO
licensure standards, and evidence-based ways to assess
Identify the primary reasons for teacher attrition, learning
qualified candidates for the position of teacher leader.
from interviews with teachers who recently left the field.
Kathy Boyer, Kansas Dept. of Education, Topeka, KS, kboyer@ksde.org Develop strategies and possible actions to retain teachers.
Lynn Bechtel, Kansas Dept. of Education, Topeka, KS, lbechtel@ksde.org Plan supports for new teachers within existing mentoring
Strand: Teacher Leadership programs.
Katy Farber, Washington Central Supervisory Union, Middlesex, VT,
farbud@comcast.net
G15 Strand: New Teacher Support
BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE CULTURE FOR CHANGE

Cultural change that results in increased student


achievement is most likely when it is the result of internally
G18
CREATING A SPARK FOR LEARNING:
driven collaborative efforts. Explore how one ethnically DIFFERENTIATION OF INSTRUCTION FOR
diverse, urban Title I elementary school increased academic 21ST-CENTURY LEARNERS PROGRAM
achievement through the process of successful on-going
Examine the use of data at classroom, school, and
collaboration. Gain insight into how to establish an effective
district levels to plan for differentiation and Response to
collaborative process and overcome potentially daunting
Intervention programming. Develop instructional resources
Concurrent Sessions

challenges.
for maximizing and evaluating student achievement.
Trudy Grafton, Ft. Wayne Community Schools, Ft. Wayne, IN, Identify technology resources that will support and
Trudy.Grafton@fwcs.k12.in.us
maximize all levels of learning. Evaluate strategies and
Gina White, Ft. Wayne Community Schools, Ft. Wayne, IN,
gina.white@fwcs.k12.in.us
techniques for active student engagement and levels of
Kay Macke, Ft. Wayne Community Schools, Ft. Wayne, IN,
learning. Consider school instructional programming and
kay.macke@fwcs.k12.in.us teacher/student success.
Jeanne Tritch, Ft. Wayne Community Schools, Ft. Wayne, IN, Suzanne Witmer, Pinal County Education Service Agency,
jeanne.tritch@fwcs.k12.in.us Florence, AZ, switmer@pinalesa.org
Strand: Professional Learning Processes Arlynn Godinez, Pinal County Education Service Agency,
Florence, AZ, agodinez@pinalesa.org
Strand: The Learning Gap

Basic Advanced Title 1 Encore


icons

42
wednesday G concurrent sessions
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. | 2 hr

G19 G22
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY FOR ACHIEVEMENT GAP STRATEGIES FOR
AN INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING NETWORK CULTURALLY LINGUISTIC DIVERSE STUDENTS

G
Develop a network that supports instructional coaches Hear about teaching strategies and gain resources designed
and allows them to prosper. Plan opportunities for coaches to close the achievement gap. Focus on English language
to connect with one another to share best practices and learner (ELL) achievement in literacy across the curriculum.
discuss how NSDC’s Standards for Staff Development are Explore instructional practices and strategies. Identify
being met. Learn about a regional approach to learning cultural and equity assumptions and develop culturally and
communities that meets the needs of coaches, the teachers linguistically relevant instruction to create classroom and
they serve, and, ultimately, the students. school environments that facilitate language learning. Learn
Kate Davern, Eastern Suffolk BOCES, Holbrook, NY, kdavern@esboces.org about NEA’s English Language Learner Culture, Equity, and
Marilyn Adsitt, Eastern Suffolk BOCES, Holbrook, NY, madsitt@esboces.org Academic Language Project Initiative.
Strand: Learning Communities Linda Cabral, National Education Association, Washington, DC,
lcabral@nea.org

G20 Strand: The Learning Gap


STATEWIDE FRAMEWORK FOR PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: OREGON OR BUST
Provide teachers with the tools to effectively understand
G23
LEARNING FROM EACH OTHERS’ SUCCESSES:
and use data. Create a system of sustainable, measurable COACHES TALKING
professional development around data use that works at
a district, school, and classroom level in large and small Share experiences and expertise with coaching colleagues
districts and in urban and rural areas, to improve instruction in a collaborative setting. Brainstorm solutions to common
for students. Practice identifying data, and see how teachers problems and learn from one another’s successes. Use a
influence student learning outcomes. research-based protocol to connect with peers, and gain
practical tools and ideas that will work in your setting.
Mickey Garrison, Oregon Dept. of Education, Roseburg, OR,
mickey@oregoneesc.org Janet Regge, Renton School District, Renton, WA, reggemj@comcast.net
Denise Airola, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, dairola@uark.edu Karen Soine, Renton School District, Renton, WA,
Peggy Blair, Linn-Benton-Lincoln Education Service District, Albany, OR, karen.soine@rentonschools.us
Peggy.Blair@lblesd.k12.or.us Strand: Learning Communities
Susie Garrison, Grant School District, 329 North Humbolt, OR,
garrisons@grantesd.k12.or.us
Strand: The Learning Gap G24
DISTRICT AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT
AND 21ST-CENTURY SKILLS
G21 Evaluate your approach to 21st-century skills using a
EMBEDDED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:
A PATH TO SUSTAINABLE CHANGE

Develop a sustainable system of job-embedded


hands-on, tactical tool, and chart a path for specific action.
Learn how to use the new self-assessment tool from the
Partnership for 21st Century Skills to enhance district and
Concurrent Sessions
professional learning that goes beyond traditional one-day school improvement initiatives. Receive free access to the
workshops. Follow a system model of coaching and learn online version of the MILE Guide: Milestones for Improving
about the research that supports this proven method. Learning and Education.
Actively engage in role playing coaching experiences.
Valerie Greenhill, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Tucson, AZ,
Patricia Bogart, arts education IDEAS, West Haven, CT, vgreenhill@eluminategroup.com
bogarta111@aol.com Beth Ratway, Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison, WI,
Strand: Professional Learning Processes beth.ratway@dpi.state.wi
Julie Walker, American Association of School Librarians, Chicago, IL,
jwalker@ala.org
Paul Sandrock, Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison, WI,
s.paul.sandrock@dpi.state.wi.us
Strand: Administrator Development

43
wednesday G concurrent sessions
2 hr | 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

G25 G28
BUILDING CAPACITY WITH A A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO DISTRICTWIDE
TEACHER LEADER PROGRAM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

G Mobilize and empower teachers by identifying and


removing barriers to creating an effective teacher leadership
Find out how to improve professional learning using
a before, during, and after approach that increases
program. Design a teacher leader program that will develop classroom teachers’ knowledge and skills. Consider a
teachers’ capacity to facilitate team meetings, to gain new systemwide method of planning, executing, and providing
skills in collaboration, and to become more effective team implementation support. Use student performance
members. Extend teachers’ capacity to create schoolwide data and teacher input to determine the most effective
improvement. components of your professional development.
Laurie VanSteenkiste, Macomb Intermediate School District, Tonya Almeida, Victor Elementary School District,
Clinton Township, MI, lvansteenkiste@misd.net Victorville, CA, talmeida@vesd.net
Lisa Asaro, Macomb Intermediate School District, Melissa Timko-Miller, Victor Elementary School District,
Clinton Township, MI, lasaro@misd.net Victorville, CA, MTimko-Miller@vesd.net
Grace Velchansky, Macomb Intermediate School District, Mark Staggs, Victor Elementary School District,
Clinton Township, MI, gvelchansky@misd.net Victorville, CA, Mstaggs@vesd.net
Strand: Teacher Leadership Strand: Professional Learning Processes

G26 G29
DEVELOPING AND SUSTAINING EFFECTIVE SCHOOL-BASED LEADERSHIP TEAMS
A TEACHER INQUIRY COMMUNITY
Implement a model for an effective leadership team that
Create, sustain, and evaluate a teacher-inquiry community engages teachers in school improvement. Identify the
(school-based learning team) to ensure high-quality elements of an effective school-based leadership team.
professional learning. Identify structures that are practical Learn how to develop strong relationships between an
and empowering for improving instruction. administrator, coach, and teacher leaders. Take away
Margery Ginsberg, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, protocols and processes to engage teacher leaders and
ginsbm@u.washington.edu all staff in professional learning and reflection.
Strand: Learning Communities
Judi Kahoun, Spring Lake Park Schools,
Fridley, MN, jkahou@district16.org
Amy Bjurlin, Spring Lake Park Schools,
G27 Fridley, MN, abjurl@district16.org
MODIFYING AND ACCOMMODATING Steve Brady, Fridley, MN,
FOR IEP STUDENTS sbrady@district16.org
Strand: Teacher Leadership
Gain practical ideas, methods, and suggestions to better
Concurrent Sessions

reach struggling students and those with Individualized


Education Plans (IEP). Learn to teach to different learning
styles with modifications and accommodations that can be
used with different types of assignments. Help all children
learn material presented in general education classes.
Joan Bright, Mukilteo Schools, Mukilteo, WA,
brightjm@mukilteo.wednet.edu
Punkie Bagdon, Mukilteo Schools, Everett, WA,
bagdonwl@mukilteo.wednet.edu
Strand: The Learning Gap

Register online
44 at www.nsdc.org
Topic Index
Adult Development/Learning Effective Teaching and Instruction Presentation and Facilitation Skills
B08, B24, C08, C17, D03, E14, E24, F16 A03, B07, B09, C04, C09, C13, C16, C18, D03, E01, B24, D03, E24, F24, G28
E08, E11, E13, E22, E23, F08, F14, F20, F21, F23, G04,
Assessment/Evaluation of Students G09, G27 Race, Class, and Culture
E21, F16, G01, G10, G18 C04, C11, C18, D05, E08, F14, F23, G07, G15
English Language Learners/Linguistic Diversity
Career Paths for Teachers A03, C04, F07, G01, G07 School Reform/Improvement Process
B01, B08, C05, F05, G14 C08, C10, C14, C15, C19, E06, E10, E16, E20, E21, E22,
Evaluating Technology-Based Professional F05, F17, F23, G03, G20, G21, G24
Case Studies of Successful Schools Learning
B08, B18, B20, C01, C06, F18, F21, G12, G15 B09, B15, E04, E23, G05, G11 School-Based Professional Development
Planning
Central Office Responsibilities Leadership Development and Skills B04, B09, C12, E12, E14, F02, F06, F11, F21, G29
A01, A02, B05, C17, C19, F18 A01, A02, B05, B06, B08, B12, B13, B14, C02, C12,
C17, C20, C21, D01, D02, D04, D05, E01, E11, E17, Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Coaching and School Coaches
E21, F05, F07, F12, F13, F15, F19, G08, G12, G24, Mathematics (STEM)
A04, B10, B16, B19, C10, C22, D01, E19, F04, G06,
G25, G29 B18, E07, E17, F11, G02
G19
Literacy Serving Remote Professional Learners
Collaboration/Team Building
B11, B16, B21, C22, E12, F03, F10, F20 B22, E15, G04
A01, B01, B07, B10, B19, C05, D02, D03, D04, E18,
F06, F16, F22, G05, G08, G11, G13, G18, G23 Mentoring and Induction Teacher Recruitment, Support, and Retention
A05, B17, B22, C01, E03, F15, F19, G17 A05, B17, E03, E07, E19, F18, G17
Curriculum Alignment/Development
C23, E04, E07, E17, F03, F08 Models of Professional Learning Title 1 School Improvement
B04, B20, C01, C03, C06, C14, C23, E13, E18, F01, F11, A01, B03, B06, B12, B21, C04, C05, C10, C11, C13,
Data-Driven Decision Making
G10, G15, G21, G23, G26, G28 C19, C21, E24, F11, F14, F17, F21, F22, G01, G07,
B03, B13, C13, C23, E06, E21, F10, F17, G02, G03,
G08, G13, G15
G18, G20 Online Learning Communities
B22, C09, E15 Urban Issues and Settings
Demonstrating Impact of Professional Learning
B06, B12, C11, C19, C21, C22, E10, E24, F11, F14, F17,
B01, B11, E02, E05, E16, E20, F02, F11, G05, G06, G12 Policy Development and Advocacy Efforts F18, F21, F22, G07, G13, G15
B02, C07, C15, E10, F09
Distributive Leadership
A02, B03, B08, B14, E05, G14, G25

Audience Index
Monday Tuesday Wednesday

District office personnel (directors/consultants District office personnel (directors/consultants District office personnel (directors/consultants
for instruction, technology, curriculum, human for instruction, technology, curriculum, human for instruction, technology, curriculum, human
resources and assessment) resources and assessment) resources and assessment)
B08, B10, B13, B18, B21, B22, C01, C08, C10, C14, E03, E05, E09, E10, E11, E13, E14, E23, F05, F06, F07, G01, G02, G03, G20, G25, G28
C17, C18, C19 F08, F12, F15, F18, F19, F20
District-level staff developers
District-level staff developers District-level staff developers G01, G05, G11, G12, G13, G19, G21, G26, G28
A01, A03, B06, B07, B09, B10, B12, B13, B14, B20, F02, F05, F08, F11, F14, F15, F16, F24
C04, C14, C16, C17, C19, C22, C23 Policy makers and community stakeholders
Policy makers and community stakeholders G14, G22, G24
Policy makers and community stakeholders F09
B02, B08, C07, C15 Principals/assistant principals
Principals/assistant principals G02, G03, G05, G06, G07, G08, G09, G10, G11, G12,
Principals/assistant principals D01, D03, D04, D05, E01, E02, E03, E05, E07, E10, G13, G14, G15, G17, G18, G19, G24, G25, G26, G29
A01, A02, A05, B01, B03, B04, B05, B09, B11, B13, E11, E12, E14, E15, E16, E19, E20, E21, E22, E24, F02,
B14, B15, B16, B17, B18, B20, B24, C01, C02, C04, F05, F07, F09, F10, F11, F12, F13, F17, F18, F20, F21, Rural Educators
C05, C06, C08, C10, C12, C13, C16, C18, C22, C23 F22, F23, F24 G04, G27

Rural Educators School-based staff developers/coaches School-based staff developers/coaches


B08, B19, C09 D01, D03, D04, E01, E02, E04, E06, E07, E11, E12, E16, G01, G06, G08, G09, G18, G23, G26, G28, G29
E17, E18, E19, E20, E23, E24, F03, F04, F06, F08, F10,
School-based staff developers/coaches Superintendent/assistant superintendent
F11, F14, F16, F20, F21
A02, A03, A04, A05, B01, B03, B05, B06, B07, B10, G12, G17, G19, G20, G24
B11, B12, B15, B16, B17, B19, B20, B24, C01, C03, C04, Superintendent/assistant superintendent
Teacher leaders/coaches/mentors/team leaders
C06, C09, C10, C13, C14, C20, C22 F01, F02, F12, F17, F18, F23
G02, G03, G05, G06, G07, G08, G09, G10, G14, G15,
Superintendent/assistant superintendent Teacher leaders/coaches/mentors/team leaders G17, G18, G20, G21, G22, G23, G25, G27, G29
A01, B02, B03, B04, B08, B09, B22, C07, C12, C17, C19 F03, F06, F07, F09, F10, F13, F14, F15, F16, F17, F19,
Title I School Staff
F21, F22, F23, F24
Teacher leaders/coaches/mentors/team leaders G01, G04, G07, G08, G13, G15
A02, A03, A04, A05, B01, B04, B05, B06, B07, B11, Title I School Staff
Urban Educators
B12, B14, B15, B16, B17, B18, B19, B21, B22, B24, C02, F11, F17, F21, F22, F23
G04, G07, G13, G15, G21, G27
C03, C05, C06, C08, C11, C12, C13, C15, C16, C18,
C20, C21, C23 Urban Educators
F03, F11, F17, F21, F22
Title I School Staff
B03, B06, B12, B21, C04, C05, C11, C13, C19, C21

Urban Educators
B03, B06, B12, C04, C09, C11, C19, C21, C22

45
Presenter Index
Adams, Keith...........................G08 Cox, Stephanie.......................B11 Hewson, Kurtis......................G03 Meadows, James...................E13 Schaff, Pamela.........................F16
Adrian, Lorna..........................G03 Craig, Anthony........................B06 Higgins, Heather...................RT1 Merrell, Mark................ G10, RT1 Schroeder Fracek, Mary Beth......
Adsitt, Marilyn........................G19 Cross, Binta.........................PC108 Hinsch Raba, Jessica...........RT2 Merrifield, Norman....B09, RT1 ................................................................B17
Agnew, Kim............................. C14 Crow, Tracy..................... B24, E09 Hobbs-Johnson, Audrey.......B08 Meyer, Karen............................B10 Schuman, Denise..................E11
Airola, Denise.........................G20 Culp, Richard...........................E05 Holcomb, Edie.......................G02 Meyer, Mindy...........................E03 Schwei, Michael....................G06
Almeida, Tonya......................G28 Cutbirth, Suzy.........................F23 Holcombe, Amy.....................B18 Miles, Jan................................... A05 Scott, Susan........................PC114
Aluise, Victor.............................B20 Holden, David..............C06, RT2 Miller, Jan...................................B13 Sellars, Whitney......................F10
Alvarez, Cristina......................F22 Dart, Scott................................ C13 Hollister, Caitlin......................RT1 Miller, Michaela..................... C05 Shetley, Pamela..................... C05
Anderson, Sue........................E03 Davern, Kate............................G19 Holton, Gerald........................RT1 Misher, Pam........................PC110 Shingotewa, LeRoy..............B19
Anna, McTigue.......................RT2 Davin, Linda.............................B02 Hord, Shirley.............................E02 Mitchell, Robbie.....................F04 Shipley, Pat................................B17
Arnau, Lea..................................RT1 DeJesus, Candido.................F07 Howard, Lynn..........................E19 Mizell, Hayes............................F09 Shoup, Kim.............................. C18
Asaro, Lisa.................................G25 Dean, Sandra.......................... C15 Howell, Tracey.........................B18 Moats, Mara Lee....................F15 Shrode, Robin......................... C06
Askew, Jada..............................B03 Dickerson, Peggy..................E14 Howitt, Clara........................... A02 Moody, Michael.................... C19 Silver, Harvey.......................... C23
Audet, Michael.......................B08 Dimetres, Patricia..................E05 Hulme, Gale............................. C17 Moore, Laura............................F10 Smirle, Mary-Anne...............B08
Asuncion, Ayala ................... C21 Dobson, Terry..........................RT2 Moriarty, Pat............................ C01 Smith, Andrea........................ C22
Dolby, Dawn............................F18 Islas, René.......................C07, RT2 Morris, Elizabeth....................B19 Snyder, Shari............................E12
Baal, Kathryn............................B16 Donohoo, Jenni.................... A02 Izard, Ernest........................PC109 Morrison, Laurie....................G16 Soine, Karen............................G23
Baeder, Amy.............................B06 Drinkard, Lina..........................RT2 Mosko, Emilie..........................F11 Somera, Adrienne...... F06, RT1
Baenig, Rebecca........ G10, RT1 Driskill, Elita..............................G06 Jackson, Deborah.................E21 Moussavi-Bock, Deli...........D02 Sonricker, Lisa..........................B18
Bagdon, Punkie.....................G27 Duben, Shelly......................... A02 Jackson, Marti Jo...................E05 Murphy, Michael........ E06, F04 Sousa, David......................PC107
Baptie, Heather......................RT2 Duff, Victoria............ PC106, F01 Jacott, Michelle......................B12 Myrtle, Ray.................................F19 Spear, Vicky...............................E11
Barkley, Paula.......................... C06 Duval, Donna...........................F14 Jenny, Gibbons......................G11 Staggs, Mark............................G28
Barnum, Sibyl...............B23, RT1 Dyer, Karen..........................PC110 Johnson, Eli...............................B21 Nash, Judie.....................C16, RT2 Stange, Carrie......................... C16
Baskeyfield, Tracy..................F10 Johnson, Margie....................B09 Nelson, Terrion........................E12 Stanley, Debbie................PC102
Bassett, Katherine................ C02 Edwards, Claudia.................. C08 Johnson, Tanya.......................RT2 Neville, Angie..........................F16 Stokes, Laura............................E17
Bates, Michael.........................B03 Emry, Terese.......................PC101 Jonathan, Miller.....................B18 Nichols, Maureen..................F17 Storchan, Daniel....................B20
Bechtel, Lynn..........................G14 Enfield, Susan.........................G16 Jones, Daphne........................B03 Nobles, Sandy.........................F13 Stout, Judy............................... C08
Betts, Sherry.............................F10 English, Bonnie......................G07 Jordan, Monica.......................B03 Nonnemacher, Jennifer.....C13 Strey, Melanie......................... C12
Bjurlin, Amy.............................G29 Everlove, Sandi.......................F02 Stricker, Jason..........................RT2
Blair, Peggy...............................G20 Kachur, Donald...................... C08 O’Loughlin, Judith............... A03
Bogart, Patricia.......................G21 Fagan, Emily..................B07, RT2 Kafele, Baruti........................... C11 O’Shea, Linda...........................E16 Tackmann, Karen..................D01
Bonelli, Kiela............................ C05 Farber, Katy..............................G17 Kahoun, Judi...........................G29 Olson, Anne..............................F05 Tate, Marcia.........................PC112
Boonchouy, Rody.................F21 Faulkner, Lawrence..............F24 Kelsen, Virginia........................E20 Olzendam, Alison................. C12 Taylor, Andrew.......PC113, B15
Boyer, Kathy.............................G14 Feldman, Cathy.....................G16 Kelsey, Kathryn.......................F11 Tejedor, Andrea.....PC113, B15
Brady, Steve.............................G29 Felthous, Lisa...........................F10 Kiehle, Caroline......................F11 Page, Deb................................. C17 Terrebonne, Melissa............B11
Brady, Sue..................................F05 Fenwick, Maria.............RT1, RT2 Killion, Joellen...PC106, B02, F01 Pajardo, Phyllis........................B01 Thacker, Teresa........................E14
Braimah, Valerie......................RT2 Figueroa, Sandra....................E22 King George, Shelee...........B10 Pamas, Roberto......................E21 Timko-Miller, Melissa.........G28
Brenneman, Jennifer.......G09, RT2 Flaherty, Jill...............................RT2 King, Amy................................. A03 Pat, Donaldson.......................F04 Tragos, Melissa....................... C13
Bright, Joan..............................G27 Foreman, Courtney.............G06 King, Janine..............................F03 Pawski, Michelle...................G06 Trestrail, Karla.......................... C10
Brooks, Eric................................B19 Franciosi, Debra.....................F14 King, Stacy.................................F04 Payne, Brandon......................E11 Tripp, Susan............................. C18
Brown, Catherine..................B06 Frank, Richard..........................B09 Klassen, Steve..........................B08 Pearl, Barbara...........................RT1 Tritch, Jeanne.........................G15
Brown, Frederick.........C21, RT2 Frattali, August.......................E05 Klock-Persing, Kathy............E16 Pecheone, Ray........................B04 Tucker, Kathy............................B19
Brown, Lydia.............................RT1 Frey, Nancy...............................F02 Knight, Denise........................B13 Peterson, Heather................ A01 Tylka, Linda...............................E12
Buckwell, Chip.......................G05 Knight, Heather.....................G12 Phillips, Scott...........................E05
Burden, Erika........................... C20 Garrison, Mickey...................G20 Knight, Jim............................... A04 Picicci, Ray.................................RT2 Udager, Toby............................RT1
Burgess, Carol......................... C04 Garrison, Susie.......................G20 Pierce, Carrie...........................G06
Burgess, Kelly..........................G05 Geisick, Ken..............................F12 LaRocque, Rosalind.............B02 Pollock, Jane.................E01, G01 Van Sciver, Ryanne..............G04
Busch, Diane............................B12 Gerson-Nieder, Jessie.........RT2 Landry, Claudette................D03 Price, Debbie.......................... A02 VanSteenkiste, Laurie........G25
Gibbons, Jenny.....................D04 Lantrip, Lisa...............................F05 Purnell, Krista...........................RT2 Velchansky, Grace................G25
Cabral, Linda...........................G22 Ginsberg, Margery...............B06 Lavelle, Lisa...............................E04 Pyatt, Kevin...............................E07 Walker, Anne............................E13
Cain, Andrew...........................B06 Gochenour, Christi...............B17 Law, Nicole................................F05 Walker, Julie.............................G24
Campbell, Carri.......................B23 Godinez, Arlynn....................G18 Lay, Marsha...............................F23 Ratway, Beth...........................G24 Wall, Robbin............................ C06
Carlson, Christina....... B14, E13 Gogas, Donna........................ C04 Lee, Mun Wah........................D05 Rebus, Jake.............................. C13 Ward, Maria...............................B16
Carroll, Margaret....................F20 Golosman, Daniel................G07 Lenssen, John.........................D05 Regge, Janet...........................G23 Ward, Natalie............................F03
Carter, Karen............................F05 Gowers, Jennifer....................RT2 Leong, Melinda..................... C03 Rennie, Michele....................G02 Warren, Shannon....... F06, RT1
Castori, Pamela.......................E17 Grafton, Trudy........................G15 Liburd, Dolly.............................B11 Rich, Dionne.............................E12 Warren, Susan.........................E20
Catherine, Koontz.................E19 Graham, Peggy...................... C14 Lichtman, Lisa.........................B16 Rich, Esther.............................. C01 Watts, Susy................................RT1
Caus Gleason, Sonia............E15 Gray, Theresa............................E23 Linda, Law.................................E01 Richardson, Connie.............B17 Weaver, Dave...........................F11
Cavazos, Ron............................F15 Greenfelder, Mark..... G10, RT1 Logan, Allison..........................RT1 Richmond, Roderick............B03 Weber, Gretchen...................F18
Chadsey, Jane.............C01, G02 Greenhill, Valerie........ B04, G24 London, Mitchell........C07, RT2 Rife, Dawn................................ C14 Weinkle, Ashley......................RT1
Chadsey, Terry...................PC102 Lysne, Dan.................................RT1 Ritz, Lori...................................... C10 White, Gina..............................G15
Chapman, Carrie...................E18 Hampton, Melissa.................B16 Robb, Paul...................... B06, E24 White, Tom..................... B14, E13
Chappius, Jan....................PC105 Harmon, Jeanne....................E17 MacLean, Anne......................F19 Rojas, Virginia.....................PC104 Whitney, Brian............ D04, G11
Clausen, Sharon.....................B11 Harris, Lynnette......................E05 Macke, Kay...............................G15 Rose, Garriot.............................B18 Whitson, Brian.........................RT2
Clemens, Deb......................... C20 Harrison, Cindy......PC111, C10 Mahoney, Carol..................... C20 Rose, Jill.......................................B16 Wilds, Rodney.........................B18
Clemmons, Josh...................G05 Harrison, Jesse....................... C22 Mahre, Cece............................G12 Rose, Sherry..............................RT1 Wilkinson, David....................B17
Co, Jocelyn................................B06 Hart, Cate...................................E18 Mangold, Ann.........................B12 Ross, David................................F21 Williams, Donna Glee.........RT2
Cody, Anthony....................... C15 Hawley, Willis...........................E08 Manning, Tom... B24, RT1, RT2 Routman, Regie.....................E22 Williams, Jeffrey.....................RT2
Coggins, Celine...........RT1, RT2 Hawthorne-Clay, Suszanne.... Marich, Holly...........................G26 Rowell, Saundra...............PC103 Witmer, Suzanne..................G18
Cohen, David.......................... C15 ........................................................G13 Marsh, Adam...........................RT2 Roy, Pat..................................PC103 Woehlbrandt, Marcia......... C12
Coles, Dan................................ C22 Hayes, Carolee.......................D01 Martinian, Raffi.......................E20 Wurzbach, Linda...................B22
Collins, Myra.............................F08 Hearn, Molly.............................B12 Mason, Charles.......................B05 Sandrock, Paul.......................G24
Coomes, Jacqueline......E07, RT2 Helgeson, Stephen............. C05 McCain, Joylyn....................... C10 Santiago, Helen......................E10 Yoon, Karen.............................D03
Corbitt, Gary.............................RT1 Hellwich, John..................PC101 McDonald, Patricia.............. C18 Sauer, Wendy.......................... C09
Courtney, Lory.......................G04 Hendricks, Karen.................. A05 McGibbon, Beth...PC101, B14 Schaeflein, Kathleen...........RT2 Zion, Shelley......................PC108
Cox, Kevin................................. C13 Henson, Nina.............. D04, G11 McTigue, Anna.......................B07 Schaeflein, Kathy.................. C16 Zoller, Kendall.........................D03

46
EARN GRADUATE CREDIT foR ThE CoNfERENCE
The National Institute for Professional Practice in partnership with Wilkes University is excited to offer you
the opportunity to earn graduate credit for attending the NSDC 2010 Summer Conference.

SESSION
CREDITS ASSIGNMENT TUITION
HOURS For more information visit our
1 5 $185 booth at the Knowledge Café
2 10 Visit or contact us $370 or contact us:
for details on course work
3 15 $555
• 1-888-235-6555
• www.professionalpractice.org/NSDC

in partnership with

NS DC
Institute Calgary, Alberta, Canada — M a y 1 2 – 1 3 , 2 0 1 0

Becoming a Learning School


Becoming a Learning School is a two-day learning
experience that focuses on developing a school’s
capacity to implement NSDC’s definition of professional Carol François

learning and a model of continuous improvement


that emphasizes teacher collaborative learning as a
significant vehicle for improving teaching quality
and student learning.
For more information, call 800-727-7288 or Joellen Killion

visit www.nsdc.org/opportunities/institutes.cfm Presenters are senior staff


members of the National
Staff Development Council.
NATIONAL Carol François is director of
Space is Limited STAFF learning. Joellen Killion is deputy
executive director and co-author
DEVELOPMENT
Register today! COUNCIL
with Patricia Roy of Becoming
a Learning School.

47
Registration Information
Registration Policies and Procedures due. Each registrant may take 10% off their materials, and a nametag can be picked
To register to attend the conference, please registration fees only, if they meet the criteria up at the conference. Please call the NSDC
complete the Registration form and Session above. Business Office (800-727-7288) if you have
Registration Form on pages 49–50. Registra- NOT received confirmation within two
tion forms may also be downloaded from Cancellation Policy weeks of registering.
the NSDC web site at www.nsdc.org, or you Cancellations must be sent in writing to
may register online. the NSDC Business Office by June 15, 2010 Registration Form
to receive a full refund. A 50% refund will SECTION 1 must be filled out completely.
Fees for Sunday include materials, lunch, be given to written requests received by Make sure we have your current e-mail
and program attendance. Fees for July 2, 2010. A processing fee of $50 will be address. Your NSDC membership number
Monday and Tuesday include breakfasts, deducted from all refunds. No refunds will appears on the address labels of your NSDC
lunches, materials, and program
be issued for cancellations received after July publications. If you are not a current NSDC,
attendance. Wednesday’s fee includes
2, 2010. NSDC reserves the right to process NEA, or AFT member see section 3.
brunch, materials, and program
refunds after the conference concludes.
attendance. SECTION 2 - Select the fees for the day(s)
Confirmation your want to attend.
If you are not a current NSDC, NEA, or AFT
member, you must add a non-member fee You will receive registration confirmation SECTION 3 - Renew your NSDC membership
or become a member. “Taste Test” Trial Mem- by e-mail. Session tickets, conference at special conference rates! If you are an NEA
berships do not apply. or AFT member, put your member number
Three Ways to Register and you will receive a one-year T3 member-
Registration Deadline ship at no charge. If you are not an NSDC,
Space is limited for the Summer Conference. 1. By Mail: NEA, or AFT member, you must select and
Please check www.nsdc.org for conference NSDC Summer pay for a one-year membership or pay the
availability. Conference Registration
non-member fee.
504 S. Locust Street
Early Registration Discount Oxford, OH 45056 SECTION 4 - Fill in the amounts of discounts
Save $50 on your 2010 Summer Conference 2. By Fax: that apply. Only the presenter discount may
3- or 4-day registration fee when you register 513-523-0638 be taken on 1-day registrations. The 10%
by April 30, 2010. 3. online at: discount is only available if 10 or more forms
www.nsdc.org are mailed together with one check paying
Group Discount all fees in full. This discount is not available if
A 10% discount on registration fees for 10 All registrations require payment
for processing. Registrations will be
you pay with a credit card or use a purchase
or more persons will be granted to school order.
accepted online or via mail or fax. If you
districts if 10 or more registrations are register by fax, do not mail the registration
completed and are included in one envelope form. If you mail the form, do not fax.
SECTION 5 - Your registration will not be
with a school district check (no purchase This can cause duplicate charges! entered until fees are received by check,
orders or credit cards) for the total amount QUESTIONS:
Visa, MasterCard, or purchase order.
800-727-7288 • www.nsdc.org

NSDC 2010 Summer Conference Hotel Information


Sheraton Guest room rates:
Single: $199.00
Seattle Hotel Double: $199.00
Triple: $199.00
1400 Sixth Avenue Quad: $199.00
Seattle, WA 98101 Room rates are per night and subject to a 15.6% tax.
(206) 621-9000
Make your hotel reservations online
Conference Rates through the NSDC web site.
Available For: Go to www.nsdc.org/summerconference10 where you’ll
July 13 - July 23, 2010 find a link to the conference hotel or call 206-621-9000
and identify yourself as an NSDC attendee.
48
Registration Form Save $50
on a 3- or 4-day
NSDC 2010 Summer Conference for Teacher Leaders registration when
you register by
and the Administrators Who Support Them April 30, 2010.
REGISTRATION DATA:

1
Your membership number appears on your address label, or add a membership in 3 .
Three people can attend using one organizational membership number. “Taste Test”
NSDC Member # _______________________________ trial memberships do not apply.

First Name________________________________________ Last Name___________________________________________ Please Check (3)


(for your nametag) This is my first NSDC Summer
Conference.
School Dist./Organization________________________________________________ Position_________________________ I am willing to host a session(s)
I am attending. Be eligible to
win a free conference
Address / Street________________________________________________________________________________________ registration! Hosts will be
contacted with details.
City / State / Province / Zip _______________________________________________________________________________ I am willing to volunteer for
3 hours during the conference.
Is this address: business home (All membership materials will be sent to this address) Special diet required:
_________________________
Business Phone___________________________________ Home Phone__________________________________________
_________________________
E-mail________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________
Please print your e-mail address legibly—your conference confirmation will be e-mailed to you.

2
REGISTRATION FEES: Check (3) each fee that applies and fill in amount

3
Special Conference/Introductory
member options and renewal prices
1-Day Preconference...................................................................$239 ______
You may skip 3 if you are a current NSDC member. All nonmembers MUST
Sunday 7/18 includes lunch (No Discount Applicable) add the fee for one of the options below. These are one-year memberships.
Go to www.nsdc.org/join for complete membership benefits.
1-Day Regular Conference (indicate day attending)...... $199 ______
Monday 7/19, Tuesday 7/20, OR Wednesday 7/21 I am an NEA AFT member number ________________
includes breakfast and lunch Mon. & Tues. and brunch Wed. NEA/AFT members will receive a free Teachers Teaching Teachers Membership if
(No Discount Applicable except presenter) not a current NSDC member.
Three people can attend using one organizational membership number.
3-Day Regular Conference........................................................$429 ______ “Taste Test” trial memberships do not apply.
Monday 7/19, Tuesday 7/20, Wednesday 7/21 Check (3)
5 meals, Sunday Reception, and Knowledge Café Reception included Teachers Teaching Teachers Introductory Membership........ $ 49 _____

H 4–Day BEST DEAL.........................................................................$599 ______


Sunday 7/18 through Wednesday (a.m.) 7/21


Teacher Leader Membership........................................................... $ 99 _____
Principal Leader Membership......................................................... $ 99 _____
6 meals, Sunday Reception, and Knowledge Café Reception included System Leader Membership............................................................ $ 99 _____
Comprehensive Membership.........................................................$129 _____
Organizational Membership...........................................................$179 _____
Subtotal $ ___________
(OR)
Non–member fee.................................................................................. $50 _____

4
DISCOUNTS: Check (3) if applicable and fill in amount Subtotal $ ____________
Deduct $50 early discount . .......................................................... – $ _______

5
(on 3– or 4–Day registration only) if postmarked before April 30, 2010 TOTAL AND PAYMENT: Add 2 and 3 and subtract 4

Presenters or current 2011/2012 Academy members......... – $ _______ Subtotal Registration 2.................................................................. $___________
deduct $50. Presenter Session #_______ or Academy Class ______ Subtotal Membership 3................................................................ $___________
Presenters must register for the day they are presenting. Subtotal Discount 4..................................................................... – $___________
My registration is part of a group of 10 or more, mailed TOTAL $ ___________
together, and paid with a check. Deduct 10% of your
Registration fees made payable to NSDC must accompany this form. Invoice(s)
subtotal from 2 here. ................................................................... – $ _______ issued on purchase order(s) must be paid prior to the conference.

Subtotal $ __________ Fees are payable by:


MasterCard Visa Check Purchase order (must accompany form)
Billing Address _______________________________________________________
Conference fees include free wireless throughout the conference ____________________________________________________________________
area AND lunch on Sunday, breakfast and lunch on Monday and Card No. ____________________________________________________________
Tuesday, and brunch on Wednesday. Exp. Date ____________________ 3-Digit Security Code ____________________
CANCELLATION POLICY: Cancellations must be sent in writing to the NSDC Signature ___________________________________________________________
Business Office by June 15, 2010 to receive a full refund. A 50% refund will
be given to written requests received by July 2, 2010. A processing fee of $50 3 ways to Mail: Fax:
will be deducted from all refunds. No refunds will be issued for cancellations Register: NSDC Summer Conference Registration 513-523-0638
504 S. Locust Street, Oxford, OH 45056
received after July 2, 2010. NSDC reserves the right to process refunds after the
conference concludes. Online: www.nsdc.org/summerconference10

Please go to page 50 and complete and send your Session Registration with your Registration. Questions? Phone…800-727-7288
49
Session Registration Form Save $50
on a 3- or 4-day
NSDC 2010 Summer Conference for Teacher Leaders (Name) registration when
you register by
and the Administrators Who Support Them April 30, 2010.

Preconference Workshop Selections Concurrent Session Selections


SUNDAY JULY 18 JULY 19, 20, AND 21
Please indicate three choices (mark 1st, 2nd, and 3rd) Please indicate three choices (mark 1st, 2nd, and 3rd)

___ PC101 Terese Emry, Beth McGibbon, and John Hellwich MONDAY JULY 19, 2010
Grassroots Advocacy for Teacher Leaders
Morning Concurrent Session Choice
___ PC102 Terry Chadsey, Debbie Stanley (Set A & B 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.)
A Brief Introduction to Courage to Teach®:
Identify your top three choices for this time period from Set A & B.
Reconnecting Who You Are
Remember: Session A takes the entire day and should also be
___ PC103 Saundra Rowell, Patricia Roy marked in the same order in your afternoon schedule.
Professional Learning 101: Getting Ready for Effective
Collaborative Learning 1.____________ 2.____________ 3.____________
___ PC104 Virginia Rojas
What Teachers of English Learners Need to Know Afternoon Concurrent Session Choice
and Be Able to Do (Set A, C, & Roundtables 1 (RT1) 1:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.)

___ PC105 Jan Chappuis Identify your top three choices from Set A, C, & RT1.
Seven Strategies for Assessment for Learning Remember: If you previously chose sessions from Set A, you need
to list them in the same order below as they are all-day.
___ PC106 Joellen Killion, Victoria Duff
Becoming a Learning School
1.____________ 2.____________ 3.____________
___ PC107 David Sousa
Implications and Applications of Research on the Brain
TUESDAY JULY 20, 2010
___ PC108 Shelley Zion, Binta Cross
Understanding Difference: The Elements of Culture Morning Concurrent Session Choice
(Set D & E 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.)
___ PC109 Ernest Izard
A Toolbox for Transformational Conversations in Educational Identify your top three choices for this time period from Set D & E.
Learning Communities Remember: Session D takes the entire day and should be marked
in the same order in your afternoon schedule.
___ PC110 Karen Dyer, Pam Misher
Developing “Leader-ful” Schools: A Formula for Growing 1.____________ 2.____________ 3.____________
Leadership Throughout the School Community
___ PC111 Cindy Harrison Afternoon Concurrent Session Choice
Effective Instructional Coaching (Set D, F & Roundtables 2 (RT2) 1:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.)

___ PC112 Marcia Tate Identify your top three choices from Set D, F, and RT2.
Professional Learning Strategies that Engage the Adult Brain Remember: If you previously chose sessions from Set D, you need
to list them in the same order below as they are all-day.
___ PC113 Andrea Tejedor, Andrew Taylor
Using Technology to Create Professional Development
Opportunities 1.____________ 2.____________ 3.____________

___ PC114 Susan Scott


Fierce Conversations: Transform the Conversations Central WEDNESDAY JULY 21, 2010
to Your Success
Morning Concurrent Session Choice
(Set G 8–10 a.m.)
How did you hear about this conference? _____________________
Identify your top three choices from Set G.
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________ 1.____________ 2.____________ 3.____________

Send this page and the registration page to:


By Mail: NSDC Conference Registration, 504 S. Locust Street, Oxford, OH 45056
Consent to Use of Photographic Images
On-line: www.nsdc.org/summerconference10 Registration and attendance at, or participation in, NSDC’s Summer Conference
By Fax: 513-523-0638 and other activities, constitutes an agreement by the registrant to NSDC’s use
NATIONAL and distribution (both now and in the future) of the registrant’s or attendee’s
Questions: Phone (800) 727-7288 STAFF
DEVELOPMENT image or voice in photographs, videotapes, electronic reproductions, and/or
NSDCOffice@nsdc.org
COUNCIL audiotapes of such events and activities.
www.nsdc.org

50
NSDC 2010 Summer Conference Save the Dates
for Teacher Leaders
and the Administrators Who Support Them Dec. 4-8, 2010
Atlanta, Georgia
NATIONAL
STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
COUNCIL
Charting the Course 2010 Annual Conference

Atlanta, GA

for School-Based Professional Learning


July 18-21, 2010 • Sheraton Seattle hotel

Dear The National Staff Development Council knows that


NATIONAL
STAFF
The National Staff Development Council invites you to its 42nd
Educator: DEVELOPMENT
the contribution of teacher leaders is essential if all COUNCIL Annual Conference. We are planning for 3,500 participants from
teachers in all schools are to experience high-quality
professional learning as part of their daily work. across North America to attend the conference, providing a great
Teacher leadership is at the heart of many school and district
opportunity for you to network directly with other educators, and
NSDC
Board of
Trustees
Ingrid carney improvement efforts. No matter what their job title or role — literacy form lasting relationships to support your work to improve our
2010 NSDC President or mathematics coaches, instructional coaches, or mentors, to name
just a few — we know that the work of these individuals is vitally schools.
Ingrid carney important to achieving high levels of learning for all students. That’s
NSDC’s 42nd Annual Conference: Dream.Dare.Do.
President
Carney for Kids why NSDC invites teacher leaders and those who support them to
Chicago, IL
attend its 2010 Summer Conference July 18-21 in Seattle, WA.
MARK DIAZ n General Session keynote speakers include Beverly Hall, Douglas Reeves,
President-elect With the support of local school systems and national teacher organi-
Cedars International
Academy
Austin, TX Stephanie Hirsh
zations, this conference provides teacher leaders and administrators Save $75 Andrew Hargreaves, and Ron Clark.
n Preconference and concurrent session presenters include Avis Glaze,
with valuable tools to bring the most powerful forms of professional when you register
NSDC Executive
CHARLES MASON
Director learning to all the teachers with whom they work. by May 31, 2010 Carol Ann Tomlinson, Bruce Joyce, Marcia Tate, Ian Jukes, Rita Bailey,
Past President on a 3- or 5-day
Brasfield & Gorrie registration fee.
Jon Saphier and Lucy West, Deborah Childs-Bowen, Phillip Schlechty,
Birmingham, AL At the conference, school-based staff developers will learn from both Barrie Bennett, Glenn Singleton, Jim Knight, Victoria Bernhardt, Gale
the outstanding and innovative work of their peers and the perspec- Hulme, Sally Zepeda, Margarita Calderón, Carolyn Chapman—and more!
SUE ELLIOTT
Trustee tives of national leaders. Participants will become skilled in assisting
West Vancouver School District n Over 300 concurrent and roundtable sessions in seven strands such
West Vancouver, BC, Canada their colleagues in data-driven decision making and in planning, NSDC 42nd Annual
implementing, and assessing the impact of their lessons. In addition, Conference
as leadership, examining the impact, teaching quality, technology,
CHERYL LOVE
participants will more deeply understand the attributes of high-function- Dec. 4–8, 2010 fundamentals of professional learning, equity, and advocacy.
Trustee
Hyatt Regency Atlanta
Developing Minds ing school teams and learning communities and the actions they can n More than 100 exhibitors offering valuable products and resources
Decatur, GA Atlanta, Georgia
take as leaders in their settings to make such collaboration a reality. specific to professional learning.
Amanda Rivera
Trustee
Chicago Public Schools
We look forward to meeting you in Seattle. Download the early bird registration form at
Chicago, IL www.nsdc.org/opportunities/annualconference.cfm.
Sincerely,
For conference information,
Kenneth Salim
Trustee contact the NSDC Business Office
Boston Public Schools at NSDCoffice@nsdc.org or
Boston, MA 800-727-7288
Ingrid Carney, NSDC President
For exhibit and sponsorship
ED WITTCHEN opportunities, contact Renee Taylor
Trustee
Ed Wittchen Consulting at renee.taylor@nsdc.org or
Spruce Grove, AB, Canada 800-727-7288, ext. 222
Stephanie Hirsh, NSDC Executive Director
2
800.727.7288 • www.nsdc.org 51
NATIONAL NON-PROFIT

Charting the Course


STAFF
DEVELOPMENT U.S. POSTAGE NATIONAL
COUNCIL STAFF
PAID DEVELOPMENT
504 S. Locust Street Cincinnati, OH COUNCIL
Oxford, OH 45056
PERMIT NO. 770

for School-Based Professional Learning


A Conference for Teacher Leaders
and the Administrators Who Support Them

Register now at www.nsdc.org

Make Plans to Attend!

NSDC 2010 Summer Conference


Save $50 for Teacher Leaders and the
on a 3- or 4-day Administrators Who Support Them
registration when
you register by

Charting the Course


April 30, 2010.

for School-Based Professional Learning

Seattle2010
Seattle2010
Featuring these Keynote Speakers:

Maria Goodloe-Johnson • Milton Chen


Jennifer James • Vicki Phillips • Taylor Mali

NSDC 2010 Summer Conference


July 18-21, 2010 • Sheraton Seattle hotel
Registration and hotel links through the NSDC Summer Conference page:
www.nsdc.org/summerconference10
or call 800-727-7288 for more information.
Conference Program
July 18-21, 2010 • Sheraton Seattle hotel