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28

THE DUBLIN PENNY JOURNAL,


ANCIENT TOBACCOPIPES.

among my earliest recollections, is her giving me 'fora


plaything one of these old pipes., like that representedin
the Anthologia Hibernica, with the comment, that " such
a bit of a pipe could never have held tobacco
enough for
any decent Christian to smoke, and therefore that it could
only have belonged to a Clurcaune." What becameof
this fairy pipe, how destroyed, or how lost, I
kinownot;
but this I perfectly remember, that it was valued by
me
above all my other childish toys, and that I looked
it with a profound feeling of veneration, as the relic(tpoll
of a
race of beings whose strange freaks and grotesquepro.
infant
mind
with
ceedings filled my
inexpressible wonder
antddelight.
When I was about seven or eight years old, my regard
for a Cluricanne's tobacco pipe became changed into cu.
riosity, at seeing one in the cabinet of an old lady, whoon
my exclaiming--" Oh, there's a ftiry pipe !"-took me se.
riouslv to task about fairies, and concluded her lecture,
by assuring smethat there never were any such beingsas
fairies. This scepticism in the existence of Cluricaunes
was more than I was prepared for; and I
boldlyv ejoined,
that fairies there must have been, for who else than fairies
would have used so small a tobacco pipe? and I concluded
with an air of triumph, " You see, it has been smoked."
" My dear boy," replied the good old lady, " this pipe
! 2 ; it was given to me alter her death, an11is accu(No.
rately copied) was found by my nephew (the presentLieu.
ii the old castle of
tenant Colonel J--)
Dundanicl,
between Innishannon and Bandon, and I have
no doubt
to
a
of
soldier
when
Cromwell's
that Cas.
belonged
timne,
tie was taken and re-taken more than once by the con.
tending parties."*
J forget what followed, nor is it of any consequence;
but having a high respect for the old lady just mentioned,
I determined to investigate whether she or my nurse most
correctly appropriated these old pipes: and I now venture,
Sir, to connmunicate to you the result of five and twenty
years' inquiry on this subject, during which time I have
collected no less than thirty specimens in Englandand
Ireland ; and I send you, herewith, drawings of the most
reinarkable va ieties, all of which are made the size of the
original.
No. s. was taken out of the bed of the river Thames,
near Hampton Court. It is the smallest pipe that I have
met with, is manufactured of superior clay, and seemsas
if enamelled on the outside.
No. 4, and a quantity of similar pipes, were foundin.
crusted together with various burnt ruins i an
chalk
nold
and Kentish-rag foundation of a house, near Crooked-lane,
London, which foundation was evidently constructedbe.
fore the great fire, (1666,) and is supposed to have been
that of a tavern. I have also an unsmoked pipe, witha
stem seven inches and a half long, the bowl resembling
No. 5 in shape. It was found with some sack glassesin a
vault under the famous Boar's Head tavern in "merry
East-cheap, that ancient region of wit and
wasduwa
when the scene of Falstaff's revelry was pulled

Admiralty,June 22, 1835.


Sit-In looking over the Third Volume of your amusing work, I cannot help feeling that the character of an
antiquary given by you at page 51, is as incorrect as it is
inconsistent with the interest displayed in your Journal
towards the studies of antiquities generally, and towards
those of Ireland in particular. But I merely refer to this
article for the purpose of assuring you, that in
" to cure a small botch in an old author," fromattempting.
whom you
have quoted, I am not " as proud of it as if I had got the
philosopher's-stone, and could cure all the diseases of
mankind."
At page 1.5 of the Third Volume of the Dublin Penny
Journal there is a paragraph, which commences-'" In
1784, an ancient tobacco-pipe was found sticking between
the teeth of a human skull, at Brannockstown in the
county of Kildare." It then proceeds to state, that numerous human bones, and also some rude stone coffins were
discovered in an entrenchment of a field near the banks
of the Liffvy, and the paragraphconcludes with tile following sentence-" A battle was fought here between the
Irish and Danes in the tenth century."
What connexion exists between an old tobacco pipe
found in 1784, in the County of Kildare, and some bones
turned up from an entrenchment near the banks of the
river Liffey, the presumed scene of a battle between the
Danes and Irish, does not appear from this statement.
But on referring to the Anthologia Hibernica, for May,
from whence it is evident the pa1793, (Vol. I. p.
a5
ragraph in question has been imperfectly copied, it seems,
that among the human bones in the entrenchment near
the Lifley, " a number of these pipes were found." See
the engravingin the Anthologia Hibernica, which, to save
you the trouble of reference, I have accurately copied,
and marked No. 1.
The deduction from these two discoveries (at Brannockstown and on the banks of the Liffey) is, that the
Danes smoked tobacco at a very early period-long before
its supposed introduction by Sir Walter Raleigh; and
Hleroditus,lib. 1,see. 56, Strabo,lib. vii. 296,Pomp. Mela. 2,
and Solinus, e. 15, are referred to in support of the argument, that " all the German and northern nations, who
are the descendants of the Scythre, were early acquainted
with, and cultivated tobacco; which they smoked through
wooden and earthen tubes." It is added, that "Pipes,
similar to those now under consideration, are frequently
dug up in England, and there universally attributed to the
Danes."
In addition to these authorities, I remember,Mr. Editor,
to have seen, I think in the Northern Antiquities of Bartholinus, a representation of an old carved stone, whereon
appears, from the mouth of Odin, a pipe precisely similar
in shape to that found at Brannockstcrwn" sticking between the teeth of a human skull." And as it is only fair
to put you in possession of all that I know in favour of
the remote antiquity of tobacco pipes, I will further add
from the authority of a German periodical of December,
The followingparticularsof an attack upon DundanielCas.
1813, that in digging a new sluiceway at the upper end of
the Fairwater at Dantzig, an ancient ship was discovered tie are copied from a rare tract, orderedto be printedby the
of Commonsthe 26th April, 1;42. The comnearly twenty feet under the surface of the ground, laden English House
with blocks of stone preparedfor building, some of which municationis from Master 'Iristram Whitecmbe, Major\f
in
were highly polished. Many human bones were found in presume, Mayor) of Kinsale, to his brother,a merelant
London.
the hold of this vessel, both fore an aft, and a box of
'Theparliamunentary
garrisonof Bandon, enragedat the barbs.
tobacco pipes, all whole, with the beads about the size ofr tous
murderof two or three children, who were takingc(aeof
a thimble and stalks from four to six inches in length.
some cowsnearthat town, " set upona castle called IDondoniell,
Now, Sir, notwithstanding what I have stated', I feel wheresometimethe Iron-workstood; it wasso full of menand
that
the
ancient
tobacco
hitherto
discovered provisions,that they had made linnies withoutsie, againstthe
satisfied
pipes
in England and Ireland, belong not to the tenth, but to walls of the castle, which they filled with hutchesof cornandi
the seventeenth century, and that they were used by Eng- household-stuffe,which they had taken fromthe English. Oar
lishmen, and not by Danes. For myself, however, I am men placed musketiersround about them, in such manner,as
free to confess, that I entertain, from early associations, as none of them within durst appearupon the battlement,norpeep
great a respect for these little old tobacco pipes, as if out their nose at the loop-holes; sent in five or six menthat
so
they were of far higher antiquity; and I can trace this wereskilfull in myning, under the said linnies, who laboured
feeling to the supernatural tales which I have heard from lutstily,that in threeor four hoursthey had made a hple thorot
they put in furze and straw,whichdid thu.
my nurse respecting that artful sprite, the Cluricaune, 1the wall; where
.$ plro
of the castle on fire, so thattie rebel's,and the
lower
rooms
whom shieinvariably represented as having "a pipe stuck
wasI
what
of
were
burnt
together;
vision
tlhat
were
within,
his
in
ould jaw." She was herself a determined smoker, the linnies they saved abouttwo hundredhoue load,and
;
taid
a; a devoutbelieverin "the good
wel0i
" and it ky depen to thetownof Paandoz,"
peoples

THE DUBLIN PENNY JOURNAL.


29
It is the only ancient ornamentedone I have ever seen

to
way for the apptMdah to New London Bridge.
This
mIa.e was believed to have remained unopened since
the great
vwult
No 5. fire.
imany vsimilar ripes.
have four of them.)
itdh
I,
were rtlCgtip almong numneroushuman
in 1825, by
a sewer
at Battle bridge
bones
the
employed in
aral Petonvile,
wlcre it ismakin,
traditionia!tysaid that the per:,r :rmeo
sons
hi died of the plaguieim 1665 were buried, and it is
%l
sl)ippo.edtlhat those en.4a:ed in disposing of the (lead
0-1okedalmost constantly s a preventive against the infection, and threw their ipes into the grave as they closed

it up.

No. , which I am inclined to consider a pipe of foreign


marutictUre, was dn4 up about twenty years ago fromna
6rable depth, near Ttlomond-gate Bridge, Limerick.
cons'.

Na. 1.

N>.

No. 4

but as Limerick was garrisoned by troops of various nations, and sustained more than one siege, it is difficult to
come to any conclusion respecting the precise date of this
pipe.
I should observe, that I have several pipes like numbers
4 and 5, one of which was found at Carrigrohan Castle,
near Co:rk; three more were turned up at Claremont,
near Dublin, with the clay pi!e-stoppers, evidently appen
da-res to pipes with small bocwls,and
9, 10, and
nunibered
11, the latter marked with the letters I. H. which happen,
oddly enough, to be the initials of my oo:sthy friend Mr.
Jose[ph Humphreys, thte Head Master or the Deaf and
Dumb Institution there, to whom I amnindebted borthese
contributions to my collection.

Na. I

-.

No,

No G.

No. 8.

No. 7.

,4
6

z
No. Ii.

No. ? was dug up in an earthen mound, known as Hen- the purpose.- This part of the tradition, however, I am
ry the Eighth's Mount, in Richmond Park, and was given satisfied is not correct, the mound having every appearto me by Mr. Jesse. It is the tradition, that Henry stood ance of an ancient British barrow, of which three or four
on this mount to watch a rocket which was sent up as a are evident along the browof the hill in the Park,between
and the Kingstongates, ut thisis wall:
signal of the decapitation of one of his wives having taken the Richmond

frommyoubject.
place; andthathe hadcausedthemountto be madefor deripg

0so

THE DUBLIN PENNY JOURNAL.

No. s is the bowlof a p;pewhichI pickedup in 1812, dearwoman,an' in all that time," ill you did it,"waso
near KilereaCastle,in the Countyof Cork. What satis- betweenus. I left the ground,as I wassaying,an'took
fies uwethat numbers7 and 8 belong to the reign of Wil- a cabinon the road side, an' kept a bit of a basteatwar
liam the Third,is my havingreceivedfromMr. Jesse two on the new line that was thin carryingon by Mr.Grifith
you hard tell of him,) an' a little dhro
pipeswith large.howls of the same fashion,which were 'I supposeSir,
takeI out of the ponds at Hampton Court when re- 0'whiskeyto sell to the masonsan' boys thatworked
course o' time, I picked upmy on
centlycleared, and these ponds are knownnot to have the road. In thethat
I put a stone facingto the
so well entirely,
been clearedlout since 1770.
cra,
Wmudwa[
Amongthe old tobacco pipes in my possessionis one of my cabin,strucka bit of a pavementfromtheduro
to
the
to
road,
for
my
place
foundin Io08 in removingthe ruinsof the printingoffice
make
cumfortable thraveller.
if
a
settle-bed
an'
the
kitchen,
little
of Mr.Nichols,in RedLion Passage,Fleet-street,London, got
in the
girisdid'
afterits destructionbyfire,andgivento meby thatgentle. garnishthe new dhresserwith all kinds an' sizesofcrock.
an'
ov
man; fromwhomI haverecentlyreceivedanotherold pipe, ery-ware,'tisn't day yet!
instead buyin,mylittle
whichhas beenturnedup in his gardenat " The Chan- gallonof christenedwhiskey,at John Sullivan, inMill.
: and Mr. Nichols,Jun. lias like- street,I used to sind for it to Mr. Punch, the spiritseller,
cellor's,"Hammersmith
wisejust increasedmy collection,by presentingme with at Malla-lane,an' thin to anotherin Cork: an'at lastas
an ancientpipe,dugup at the foot of Uobs Mound,Read- I got stronger,nothing would plaze me, but to hoistf
my sails to the beautifulcity itself, for a fullcask,frons
ing, in 1792,.
The conclusionI have arrivedat, from a careful com- the fountainhead, at Murphy'sstill. So gettingShaune
the ould car, an' puttinga few good yellowboysinto
parisonof the shapesof all the old tobaccopipesI have ihto
got together,and the considerationof the situatibnsin the heel of an ould stocking, I commencedmyjourney.
On arrivingin Cork, I put up my horse at a frind's
whichthey werefound, is, that the Danes had aboutas
nluchconcernin smokingwith themas the fairies. That house, an' turned down Goulasporra,towardstheouid
the smallerthe bowl, the moreancientthe pipe, and for jail, that is, where the ould jail was, for they tookitout
this thereis a reason in the rarity and value of tobacco to the counthrysome time ago, to give the pris'nersa
on its first introduction. I thereforeventure to assign taste of freshair, I suppose. As I turned Goulasporra,
No. 3 to the reignof Elizabeth; No. 2, whichis somewhat as I was saying,who should I meet, but my gossip,
Jim
larger,to that of JamesI. or CharlesI.; Nos. 4 and 5 to Connor.
sis
Well
"I'm
a
bit
Jim,"
met,
I,
for
"
and
Charles
the Commonwealth
going
to
beyanthere,
II.'sreign, which ap-3
proofin the disco- dhropa lettherfi'omPather Foley, (whichwasthruefor
propriationI thinkthereis satisfmictory
at
a
an'
thin
sartinhouse,)
we'll take thewetting
in Crooked-lane,and in the me,
veriesmadeat Battle-bridge,
of
vaultunder the Boar'sHead Tavern;as well as in this our lips together." Jim pushed on with me,an'onour
afine
shapebeingthe one mostcommonlyfound- nineteenout return,aftherlaving the letther, we passedthrough
of mythirtypipesbelongingto this class-and thus corro. sthreet,whereall the shops were crowded withrumps
o'
boratingthe popularityof the practiceof smokingtobacco beef, an' legs o' mutton, an' beautifil fish; butthesight
about the middleof the seventeenthcentury,whereofan o' the roast beef, an' delightful parfume,knockedmeup
old balladmakersings,
entirely."
" Jim, avic,"sis I, " that's a grand sighth,I wondher
" Thoughmanymen crack,
what
soart o' people ates all that mate."
of
of
some
Some ale,
sack,
S"Thruefor ye Pad," sis he, "I supposethey mustbe
And thinktheyhave reasonto do it ;
people that haveteeth an' stummuckslike ourselves,"
Tobaccohathmore,
" 0, moresorrato ye," sis I, Jim Connor,"forEagan
That will nevergive o'er
O'Rahillywouldn'tbate you at a joke,-but I wondher
The honourthey do unto it.
would they let two cabogues(vulgarpersons)likeus,taste
Tobaccoengages
it at-all,at-all."
Both sexes, all ages,
Jist as the words left my mouth, an' I standin'
iathe
The poor as well as the wealthy;
street,a fine flahoollady cameto the dure.
Fromthe courtto the cottage,
" Walk in Pad,"sis she, "and take a bit>o'dinner,-you
From childhoodto dotage,
must have an appetiteaftheryourjourney." !
Both thosethat are sick, and the healthy."
sis
"Long life, an' a thousandthanksto yertladyship,"
The changefromthe egg or barrel-shaped
bowl of the I, takingoft'my hat, an' making a ginteel scrapewith
of CharlesII.'s reignto the largerand more my leg, that sent the gutther five yardsbeyantme,an'a
tobacco
be
form of WilliamIII.'s period, is illustratedby bow a little below my knees. " Your ladyshipmust
gracefulpipes
numbers8 and 7, from whence the transitioninto the fromDuhallow,to knowmy name,-do ye belong,madam,
to the O'Driscolls,or the grate Kelihers of thatcoun.
shapeat presentusedis obvious.
I haveto apologisefor the lengthto whichthis comma. thry?'"
nicationuponso triflinga subjecthas extended,and trust. "O ! I hardtell o' thim,"sis she, "an' many'stheD1hallowman,besidesyou, throublesme here."
ing to yourindulgence,I beg to subscribemyself,
"Walk in an'make much o' yourself,Jim," sisI, "for
Your'humbleservant,
T. CaorroNCROXER,. whatdo ye standgrinnin'there like a Kerrygoat,sureyou
know a mancan take a stocach (an attendant)withhil
To theEditoroftheDublinPennyJournal.
any wherehe's invited,--be bowldman*'
In we wint.
PADDY DOYLE'SFIRST TRIP TO CORK.
ye choose, sir," says the lady, "wouldY
"
Mn. EDIaon.-As I saw in an ould number of the' haveWhat'fll
some
beef
an' cabbage,a nice bit o' muttonan'colic
Dublin PenmyJournal,a letther from DarbyDoyle, givflower,(cauliflower,)or a porcupineo' vale, or- "
an
an
ot
his
to
as
thrip Quebee;-an' Darbywas SGo no further,madama-chree,"sis I, "as to thepor
ijo
ioumnt
Imlou0d
relation,being my firstcousin jarmin,by cupine,the sorraa wan I ever saw cooked,let aloneat
11yuVoW
tU htmfr'sslde, I said to myself,if thisDublinjantle.
--we'll pass that-the coliicflourmust be goodforth
11111prirmted
Darby'sletther,abouthisvoyageto America,'stummuck-and by the same token, I hada spiceo'th
why shouldn'tI makebouldto throublehim with an acwe'll thry that an' the mutton,wit
countof my trip to Cork; for'I'm sure an' sartin,if it gripeall day;-:-so
o' the 'beefan'ca
out fairly by the schoolmasterabove,an' if your lave, aftherwe taste a thrifle
waswritteml
bage."
take
of
yourself,
you,
the thrubble correctingit, it
%ould
sis she, "shew the gintlemen up stairs,inl
"Mholly,"
wouldbe ju.tras amuinsliuaq my cousinDarbv's.
room."
the
small
the
AltlherJdlllill M1urphly, mothero' my little grawls, Molly was a good-lookinggirl, with a mightyroguil
vuit from us, I wasforcedto give up the sod of ground
bit of an eye, an' a smile that id coax a wild plover.
:or 'v~at "help. Jillian an' I wor tied for nine years, " Molly;' sis I, ma colleen bawn, (she had fair ha
ano'we had,in that tince,as manylittle girls; for she was beautifullycurled,) "I wish I had you in the eporti
yery fond, aither a wayshe h14 iofryi ig WiyjMs
where I tRYQ a prng ,tonenl
orennyt' BIaKLUow,
poor