Anda di halaman 1dari 19

THE REPORT OF THE 19TH MEETING OF THE NATIONAL FOCAL POINT

FOR THE ASEAN COCOA CLUB (ACC) ON ASEAN COOPERATION


AND JOINT APPROACHES IN AGRICULTURE AND FOREST PRODUCTS
PROMOTION SCHEME
1920 May 2016
Hotel Santika Premiere, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

INTRODUCTION.
1.

The 19th Meeting of the National Focal Point for the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on
ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion
Scheme was held on 19-20 May 2016 at Hotel Santika Premiere, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

2.

The Meeting was attended by 23 delegates from the government and private sectors of six
ASEAN member countries namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand
and Viet Nam. The list of delegates is in Annex 1.

OPENING CEREMONY.
Opening Remarks from the Chairman of the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC).
3.

The Chairman of the ACC, Datin Norhaini Udin, the Acting Director General of the
Malaysian Cocoa Board (MCB) welcomed and thanked all delegates from Indonesia,
Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam for attending the 19th ACC
Meeting.

4.

She expressed her appreciation to the Government of Indonesia for hosting the Meeting
especially to the Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia and congratulated the ACC Secretariat
as well as the Local Organizing Committee for their hard work and support in ensuring the
preparation of this Meeting successfully undertaken.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 1

5.

In her welcoming remarks she emphasized on the formulating and finalizing the new
Strategic Plan of Action (SPA) for the period of 2016-2020.

She also urged for the full

support and commitment from the ASEAN Member States (AMS) in the true spirit of
ASEAN to take the opportunity to work collectively and closely together in formulating the
practical and effective programmes and activities, taking into account the issues and
challenges faced by the cocoa industry, the availability of resources and financial
constraints. The full text of her opening remarks is in Annex 2.

Opening Speech from the Director of Processing and Marketing of Estate Crop Products,
Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia.

6.

Mr. Dedi Junaedi, the Director of Processing and Marketing of Estate Crop Products,
Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia expressed his gratitude and warmest welcome to all
delegates from the AMS. He expressed his appreciation to the ACC for choosing Indonesia
as the venue for the 19th ACC Meeting.

7.

He highlighted the Meeting on the importance of the special region of Yogyakarta as one of
the cocoa growing region, which is given full attention from the government to develop the
integrate programme of replanting, quality improvement, processing and market expansion.
The full text of his speech is in Annex 3.

AGENDA ITEM 1: OPENING REMARKS.

8.

The Chairman of the ACC, Datin Norhaini Udin, the Acting Director General of MCB
conveyed her appreciation and congratulated the ASEAN Cocoa Club, particularly the
ASEAN Cocoa Club Technical Working Group on Food Safety (ACC TWGFS) for the
endorsement of the ASEAN Code of Practice for the Prevention and Reduction of
Ochratoxin A (OTA) Contamination in Cocoa Beans in the 37th AMAF Meeting, held on 10
September 2015 in Makati City, Philippines.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 2

9.

She also highlighted on the importance of completing the formulation of new SPA covering
the period of 2016-2020, which is in line with the new Vision and Strategic Plan for
ASEAN Cooperation in Food, Agriculture and Forestry (FAF) for the period of 2016-2025.
The new SPA has identified seven Strategic Thrusts with the details Action Programmes.
Therefore, she urged full commitment and new ideas from all the delegates to propose
practical and meaningful activities and initiatives for the benefits of all cocoa stakeholders
in the ASEAN region.

AGENDA ITEM 2: ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN AND VICECHAIRMAN.


10.

Datin Norhaini Udin, the Acting Director General of the MCB was unanimously elected as
the Chairperson of the 19th ACC Meeting and Mr. Dedi Junaedi, the Director of Processing
and Marketing of Estate Crop Products, Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia as the Vice
Chairperson.

AGENDA ITEM 3: ADOPTION OF AGENDA.


11.

The Meeting adopted the Agenda of the 19th ACC Meeting as in Annex 4.

AGENDA ITEM 4: BUSINESS ARRANGEMENTS.


12.

The Meeting was held in plenary.

AGENDA ITEM 5: COUNTRY PRESENTATION ON THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT


OF THE COCOA INDUSTRY IN INDONESIA.
13.

Dr. Soetanto Abdullah of the Indonesian Cocoa Board presented the latest development of
the cocoa industry in Indonesia covering the followings:

Report

i.

Cocoa Area and Production.

ii.

The Status of Cocoa Industry and Trade.

iii.

Policies and Programmes.

iv.

Indonesian Cocoa Regulations and Standards.

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 3

v.

Cocoa Research and Development Programmes

His slide presentation appears in Annex 5.


14.

Dr. Soetanto Abdullah further elaborated that the estimation of data on cocoa production is
based on the submission from the regional offices. The discrepancy on the estimated figure as
compared to commercial estimates is being rectified for more reliable production data.

15.

He also explained that the criteria for replanting programme are based on the age of cocoa tree
which are more than 20 years and disorder conditions of the cocoa trees which technically
impossible for side grafting due to pest and disease infestations.

AGENDA 6: MATTERS ARISING FROM THE PREPSOM37TH AMAF, 78


SEPTEMBER 2015; PREPSOM15TH AMAF PLUS THREE, 9 SEPTEMBER 2015; 37TH
AMAF, 10 SEPTEMBER 2015 AND 15TH AMAF PLUS THREE, 11 SEPTEMBER 2015
IN MAKATI CITY, PHILIPPINES.
16.

The ACC Secretariat presented the report of these Meetings provided by the ASEAN
Secretariat as follows:
i.

As reported by the ASEAN Secretariat, ASEAN Code of Practice for the Prevention
and Reduction of Ocharatoxin A (OTA) Contamination in Cocoa Beans was
endorsed in the 37th AMAF Meeting held on 10 September 2015 in Makati City,
Philippines.

ii.

The 37th AMAF Meeting held on 10 September 2015 in Makati City, Philippines also
urged all sectoral bodies and subsidiary bodies to develop the SPA following its
conclusion in December 2015.

AGENDA ITEM 7: MATTERS ARISING FROM THE 22nd MEETING OF THE JOINT
COMMITTEE ON ASEAN COOPERATION AND JOINT APPROACHES IN
AGRICULTURE AND FOREST PRODUCTS PROMOTION SCHEME, 2728 JULY
2015 in DA NANG, VIETNAM
17.

Report

The ACC Secretariat presented the report of the 22nd Meeting of the Joint Committee on

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 4

ASEAN Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme (JCM) held on
2728 July 2015 in Da Nang, Viet Nam as provided by the ASEAN Secretariat. The
ASEAN Code of Practice for the Prevention and Reduction of Ochratoxin A (OTA)
Contamination in Cocoa Beans has been endorsed by the 22nd Joint Committee on ASEAN
Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme
for further adoption at the AMAF Meeting.

AGENDA ITEM 8: ENHANCE INTRA AND EXTRAASEAN TRADE AND LONG


TERM COMPETITIVENESS OF ASEANS FOOD, AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY
PRODUCTS/COMMODITIES.
8.1

Tariff and NonTariff Barriers on Cocoa Beans and Cocoa Products.


8.1.1

18.

ASEAN Trade in Goods Agreement (ATIGA).

Indonesia reported that as of 2016, seven ASEAN member countries namely Brunei,
Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand had reduced their
import tariffs on cocoa and cocoa products to 0% except for import tariff in Cambodia,
Myanmar and Viet Nam remains between 0-5%. There was a difference in the
implementation period for Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Viet Nam (CLMV). They
were allowed to have longer period of tariff reduction up to 2018. The ATIGA tariff
reduction schedule for 2016 is in Annex 6.

8.1.2
19.

ASEAN Free Trade Area (FTA) between ASEAN and other countries.

On Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between ASEAN and other countries, the Framework
Agreement on Comprehensive Economic Cooperation for the following countries had been
concluded as follows:
i.

ASEANChina FTA
The FTA ASEANChina was signed by the ASEAN Leaders at the ASEAN
China Summit on 4th November 2002 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia and entered into
force on 1st July 2003.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 5

ii.

ASEANKorea FTA.
The FTA ASEANKorea was signed by the ASEAN Leaders at the ASEAN
Korea Summit on 13th December 2005 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and came into
force on 1st July 2006.

iii.

ASEANJapan FTA.
The FTA ASEAN-Japan was signed when the ASEAN Leaders and Japan
completed the process of signing the agreement by circulation on 14th April 2008
and came into force on 1st April 2009.

iv.

ASEANIndia FTA.
The FTA ASEANIndia was signed by the ASEAN Leaders at the ASEAN
India Summit on 13th August 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand and came into force on
1st January 2010.

v.

ASEANAustralia/New Zealand FTA.


The FTA ASEANAustralia/New Zealand was signed by the ASEAN Leaders at
the ASEANAustralia/New Zealand Summit on 27th February 2009 in Cha-am,
Thailand and came into force on 1st January 2010.
The ASEAN FTA between ASEAN and other countries appears as Annex 7.

8.1.3
20.

Most Favoured Nation (MFN) Tariffs

There is no update report on the MFN tariff rates from the AMS.

8.1.4
21.

Report

NonTariff Barriers (NTBs)

There is no update report on the NTBs from the AMS.

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 6

8.2

Technical Working Group on Good Agriculture Practices (TWGGAP)

22.

Dr. Divina M. Amalin the Chairperson of the ACC TWGGAP presented the report of the
5th Meeting of the ACC TWGGAP.

23.

Dr. Divina M. Amalin of the Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines and De La Salle
University Manila was designated as the Chairperson of the 5th Meeting of ACC
TWGGAP and Ms. Ari Agung Prihatin of the Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia was
appointed unanimously to be the Vice-Chairperson.

24.

She informed the Meeting that the 5th ACC TWGGAP Meeting was held on 18 May 2016
at Hotel Santika Premiere, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The Meeting was attended by 15
delegates and six observers from Indonesia. The ASEAN member countries present were
Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand.

25.

The Meeting was informed that Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand have
reported the current activities on GAP for cocoa in their respective countries.

26.

She also presented the draft of the ASEAN GAP for cocoa, which was drafted during the
3rd Meeting held at Kota Kinabalu, Sabah on 21st May 2015. The document was reviewed
during the 4th ACC TWGGAP for endorsement in the 18th ACC Meeting. However, due to
no quorum during the Meeting, the draft document was again presented to the 19th ACC
Meeting for adoption prior to the endorsement in the Joint Committee Meeting.

27.

She also requested the Members of ACC TWGGAP to confirm the designated members for
each AMS, which comprised of 2 technical members and 2 non-technical members. This
will facilitate the finalization of ASEAN GAP for cocoa.

28.

She further informed the Meeting on the upcoming workshop on Vascular Streak Dieback
(VSD) control to be held in the Philippines tentatively in the third week of July 2016. She
extended the invitation to all delegates from AMS.

The full report of this Meeting is in Annex 8.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 7

29.

The Meeting agreed to adopt the document ASEAN GAP as proposed by the ACC
TWGGAP for further adoption by the Joint Committee on ASEAN Cooperation and Joint
Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme (ASEAN JC AFPPS).

8.3

Technical Working Group on Food Safety (TWGFS)

30.

Dr. Sabariah Samsudin, the Chairperson of the ACC TWGFS presented the report of the 8th
Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Food Safety (ACC TWGFS) held on 18 May
2016 at Hotel Santika Premiere, Yogyakarta.

31.

The Meeting was chaired by Dr. Sabariah Samsudin, Director of the Cocoa Downstream
Technology Division, MCB and co-chaired by Mrs. Siti Marfuah Batoebara, Deputy
Director of Marketing of Estate Crop Products, Directorate of Processing and Marketing of
Estate Crop Products, Directorate General of Estate Crops, Ministry of Agriculture,
Indonesia.

32.

The Meeting was attended by 15 members and observers from Indonesia, Malaysia,
Philippines, Thailand and Secretariat of the ACC TWGFS.

33.

The highlights of the report are as follows:


i.

Indonesia reported on the Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) of pesticide residues in


cocoa beans namely clothianidin (0.02 mg/kg), endosulfan (0.2 mg/kg), hydrogen
phosphide (0.01 mg/kg), metalaxy (0.2 mg/kg), and thiamethoxam (0.02 mg/kg) in
cocoa beans based on the Ministry of Agriculture Decree No. 4/PP.340/2/2015.

ii.

Indonesia also informed the Meeting on their newly imposed regulations as follow:
a. SNI 7934-2014: Indonesia National Standard for Chocolate Products.
b. Ministry of Agriculture Decree No. 67/OT.140/5/2014: Quality and Marketing of
Cocoa Beans.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 8

c. Ministry of Agriculture Decree No. 4/PP.340/2/2015: Modified by Ministry of


Agriculture Decree No.13/KR.040/4/2016: Food Safety for Entry and Exit of
Fresh Food Derived from Plants.
iii.

Philippines informed the Meeting that the implementation rules and regulations of
Republic Act No. 10611: Food Safety Act has been published in February 2015, and
Philippines is in the process of creating the Department of Agriculture (DA) Pool of
Experts in supporting the standards development and regulations for food and feed.

iv.

Philippines informed the Meeting on the ongoing project of improving livelihood of


cacao farmers through support organization (OPTIONS) particularly the Cacao
Traceability for Sustainability-2: Making Best Practices to Work.

v.

Indonesia and Malaysia reported on the CocoaSafe: Capacity Building and


Knowledge Sharing in Sanitary and Phytosanitary in Cocoa in South East Asia.

vi.

Thailand informed the Meeting on the following initiatives related to cocoa and
chocolate products:
a. Thai revised industrial standard: TIS. 1137-2550 (2007), Cocoa Powders for
Industrial Use.
b. Notification of Ministry of Public Health, No. 83-2527 (1984), Food and Drug
Administration.

vii.

Indonesia informed the Meeting that there was no update on the progress of the
proposal on the establishment of the maximum levels for cadmium in cocoa and
chocolate products by European Union (EU).

viii. Malaysia reported on the monitoring programme of cadmium in Malaysian cocoa


beans, cocoa liquor and cocoa powder in 2015. The level of cadmium in those
products were ranged from 0.02 - 0.38 mg/kg; 0.02 - 0.73 mg/kg; and 0.06 - 0.79
mg/kg respectively which are complied with the Malaysian Food Act 1983 and Food
Regulation 1985 (maximum level: 1.0 mg/kg).

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 9

ix.

Thailand reported on the Sanitary and Phytosanitary requirements on cocoa beans


exported to Thailand.

x.

Malaysia reported the pesticide residues in cocoa beans from different regions of
Malaysia in 2015 namely metalaxyl, chlorpyrifos, ametryne, cypermethrin I, II, III,
VI, metalaxyl, triadimenol and deltamethrin. The MRLs of aforementioned residues
were complied with the Malaysian Food Act 1983 and Food Regulation 1985.

xi.

Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand had agreed to update the food safety report
database. AMS mutually agreed that the reporting country should be at least four to
maintain the food safety database.

xii.

Thailand requested the AMS to assist the training of sensory evaluation on cocoa and
cocoa products. Thailand was advised to formally write to Indonesia and Malaysia
for assistance.

xiii. The Chairperson informed that the ASEAN Code of Practice for the Prevention and
Reduction of Ochratoxin A (OTA) Contamination in Cocoa Beans was endorsed by
the 37th Meeting of the ASEAN Ministers on Agriculture and Forestry (AMAF)
which was held on 10th September 2015 in Makati City, Philippines.
xiv. Indonesia presented the Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI) as follow:
a. SNI 2323:2008 Biji Kakao.
b. SNI 3747: 2009 Kakao Bubuk.
c. SNI 3748:2009 Lemak Kakao.
d. SNI 3749:2009 Kakao Massa.
e. SNI 7934:2014 Cokelat dan Produk Cokelat.
xv.

Malaysia presented the Malaysian Food Act 1983 and Food Regulation 1985 related
to cocoa and chocolate products.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 10

xvi. Philippines informed the Meeting on the following:


a. Ongoing amendment of the Guidelines of Good Agricultural Practices for Crops.
b. Ongoing development of Philippine National Standard on Cacao Grinder:
Specifications and Methods of Test.
xvii. Thailand presented on Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) pertaining to cocoa
and cocoa products in ASEAN Consultative Committee on Standards and Quality
Prepared Foodstuff Product Working Group (ACCSQ PFPWG).
xviii. The Meeting noted the Strategic Thrust 3: Ensure Food Security, Food Safety, Better
Nutrition and Equitable Distribution under the Vision Strategic Plan for ASEAN
Cooperation in Food, Agriculture and Forestry (2016-2025) is relevant to ACC
TWGFS. The AMS discussed on the Strategy Plan of Action (SPA) for the coming
years.
The full report of the 8th ACC TWGFS Meeting appears as Annex 9.

AGENDA ITEM 9:
PROMOTE COOPERATION, JOINT APPROACHES AND
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AMONG ASEAN MEMBER COUNTRIES AND
INTERNATIONAL, REGIONAL, ORGANIZATION AND PRIVATE SECTOR
9.1.1

Trials on Selected Cocoa Progenies in Selected ASEAN Region - Progress


Report Hybrids Trial in Indonesia.

34.

The Meeting was informed that the Joint Progeny Trial Programme in Indonesia started in
December 2005. The objectives of the trial are:
i.

Clonal selection by testing some promising cocoa hybrids in Indonesia and Malaysia
using similar progenies.

ii.

To select the superior genotype for clonal material resistance to main pests and
diseases such as cocoa pod borer (CPB) and vascular streak dieback (VSD).

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 11

35.

Indonesia reported that the yield potential based on the pod number per tree during the year
of 20092015 indicated that hybrid of C 1038 x BR 25 and PBC 159 x NA 33 are having a
higher number of pods per tree.

36.

The Meeting was also informed that the hybrid combination of C 1038 x BR 25 and TSH
858 x KW 162 showed strong resistance to VSD infestation. The full report by Indonesia is
in Annex 10.

37.

In the related matter, Mr. Haya Ramba from MCB informed the Meeting that during the
Asia-Pacific Ingenic Working Group Meeting, the cocoa breeders from the representative
countries has agreed on the protocol of the Disease Sustainable Index (DSI). Determination
of Severity Index for VSD should be harmonized among the AMS.
9.1.2

Trials on Selected Cocoa Progenies in Selected ASEAN Region - Progress


Report on ASEAN Cocoa Club Progeny Trial

38.

Malaysia reported that the trial was established in April 2006 under the ASEAN Cocoa
Club Joint Project with an objective to produce hybrids population which possesses good
yield and flavor as well as acceptable bean characteristics. The two institutions involved in
the project are the MCB and Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI).

39.

Throughout 8 years of trial (2008 to 2015), top six progenies that produced higher pod
yield per tree are KW162 X KW163, KW162 X KEE2, UIT1 X NA33 (C), KW162 X
KW165, ICS60 X KW162 and TSH858 X KW162. KW162 X KW163 produced the
highest average pod yield per tree (7.33) followed by the KW162 X KEE2 (6.42), UIT1 X
NA33 (5.61), KW162 X KW165 (5.31), ICS60 X KW162 (5.30) and TSH858 X KW162
(4.12).

40.

Comparison among progenies for pods yield per tree in year 2015 showed no significant
differences at confidence level of 95% however, progeny KW162 X KW165 is the highest
pods yield per tree (14.30) and above the control of UIT1 X NA33 (11.05).

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 12

41.

Comparison among progenies for dry bean yield (DBY) in year 2015 also showed no
significant differences at confidence level of 95% however, there are three progenies above
the control, namely KW162 X KW163 (487.03), ICS60 X KW162 (352.83) and KW162 X
KW165 (301.78) (Table 2).

42.

The pod and bean characteristics analysis on 11 progenies showed that progeny KW162 X
KW163 is the best progeny with lower pod value (24.88), bigger bean size (1.17g) and
lower shell content (11.97%) (Table 3).

43.

The VSD assessment was conducted in April 2014, April 2015 and October 2015. The
statistical analysis on VSD scoring showed significant differences at 5% significant level
among the progenies in terms of level of resistance towards VSD in three assessments. For
first, second and third assessments on 11 progenies the range were 2.62-3.09, 2.13- 2.64
and 2.25-2.75, respectively (Figure 3) which were categorized as moderate resistant. Three
progenies with the lowest VSD scores were KW162 X KW163 (2.34) followed by KW162
X KEE2 (2.44) and KW162 X KW165 (2.46).

44.

Overall, the result showed that the progeny KW162 x KW163 was the most productive
with good pod and bean characteristics among those tested. This progeny also possessed
moderate resistance towards the VSD. The full report is in Annex 11.

9.2

Project on Pests and Diseases (P&D) Management

45.

Malaysia informed the Meeting that the three areas of research collaboration are as
follows:

46.

i.

Cocoa Pod Borer (CPB)

ii.

Vascular Streak Dieback (VSD)

iii.

Black Pod Rot (BPR)

Malaysia further informed that no progress on the pests and diseases research among the
AMS.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 13

9.3. Training and Exchange of Technical Expertise and Research Materials.

47.

Malaysia reported no progress on the training and exchange of expertise and cocoa hybrid
seeds among the AMS.

9.4

Enhancement of Private Sector Involvement


9.4.1 Cocoa Association of Asia (CAA)

48.

Mr. Richard Fahey, Chairman of the CAA presented the latest development on the
programmes and activities carried out by the CAA in 2015 as follows:
Existing Activities:
i.

CAANam Long University Project that provides technical training to farmers on


best agricultural practices for cocoa farming and proper fermentation techniques. It is
now in its final stage and due completion in mid-2016.

ii.

Compilation of quarterly data of Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia grinds.

iii.

Attended the 18th ASEAN Cocoa Club Meeting from 7-8th May 2015 in Bangkok,
Thailand.

New Activities:

49.

i.

Establishment of CAA Academy.

ii.

Presentation on CME Cocoa Futures Contract on 24th April 2015.

iii.

Preliminary Discussions with ICE on feasibility of having an Asian Delivery point.

iv.

CAA - Golf & Dinner 2016.

He also highlighted that the industry players welcome any effort to strengthen food safety
measures. However, any policy changes should be done in efficient manner to avoid
difficulties and disruptions on the business operations.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 14

9.4.2
50.

Cocoa Manufacturers Group (CMG), Malaysia

The Meeting noted the status development and the activities conducted by the CMG for
2015 presented by Mr. Richard Fahey, the Vice-Chairman of the CMG.

51.

He informed the Meeting that the Cocoa Manufacturers Group is one of the product
working groups under Malaysian Food Manufacturing Group (MAFMAG) comprise of
cocoa manufacturers in Malaysia. The members consist of 5 cocoa grinders and lead by
MCB and FMM-CMG as follows:

52.

Guan Chong Manufacturer Sdn. Bhd

JB Cocoa Sdn. Bhd

Koko Budi Sdn. Bhd

KL Kris Cocoa Manufacturer (M) Sdn. Bhd

Barry Callebaut Services Asia Pacific Sdn. Bhd

In 2015, CMG continues to engage with MCB by convening meeting with the MCB to
discuss and propose solution on issues affecting the development of Malaysian cocoa
industry. The meetings were held four times in 2015.

53.

He further informed the Meeting on the grinding performance in 2015, dropped to 187,695
tonnes as compared to 244,826 tonnes in 2014.

54.

He also highlighted the issues and challenges faced by the industry such as low cocoa
supply primarily due to the fragile nature of the crop as well as weather and political
conditions in the major producing countries. Local cocoa bean production could not
support the huge demand from local grinding and processing industry. Thus, industry is
keen to work with MCB in term of engagement with local farmers in improving their
farms.
His slide presentation appears in Annex 12.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 15

9.4.3

55.

Indonesia Cocoa Association (ASKINDO) and Indonesia Cocoa Industry


Association (AIKI)

AIKI estimated that the cocoa beans production in Indonesia in 2015 was 390,000 tonnes,
2.5% lower as compared to last year production of 400,687 tonnes.

56.

The utilization of cocoa processing by local industry is expected to remain stable at


460,000 tonnes as last year. However, the cocoa beans import volume in Indonesia has
been significantly declining to 51% or 53,371 tonnes compared to last year that reach up to
109,409 tonnes.

57.

Indonesia also reported the following activities carried out in 2015 as follows:
i.

The third Indonesian Cocoa Day celebration was held in Yogyakarta on 1720
September 2015. Chocolate competition and cake decorating for high school student
in Yogyakarta province, live making chocolate sculpture of Rama and Shinta, field
trip to cocoa plantation in Gunung Kidul and workshop organized by Directorate
General of Estate Crops, Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia.

ii.

The fourth celebration of Indonesian Cocoa Day will be held in Bandung in


September 2016 in order to promote awareness and increase chocolate consumption
in Indonesia.

58.

Indonesia also highlighted the higher tariff imposed by EU on Indonesian cocoa products
ranging from 2.8%-6.10% as compared to West African countries. Indonesia seeks
collective efforts from all AMS to oppose the imposition of discriminatory tariff by EU.

9.4.2 Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines (CocoaPhil)


59.

The Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines (CocoaPhil) reported that the production capacity
of the Philippines is around 12,000 tonnes annually. Cacao has been listed in the priority
crop list of the Philippines, with aims to meet the target production of 100,000 tonnes by
the year 2020. The government together with CocoaPhil and other private sectors believe

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 16

that this target is easily achievable since the potential expansion for cacao growing is huge
by utilizing the existing coconut plantation of about 2,000,000 hectares.

60.

The Philippine also reported the following ongoing activities on cacao research and
training as follows:
i.

Transfer of cacao farming technology. This activity is currently undergoing in the


Bicol Region (Region V of Luzon Archipelago). This undertaking will be echoed to
other regions of the Philippines where Gender Equality is a priority project.

ii.

Partnering with the Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and


Mechanization (PhilMech), an attached agency of the Department of Agriculture.
This research endeavor includes: Fermentation technology (enhancement of
fermentation process), Drying technology (testing of different drying equipment from
solar dryer to full mechanical dryer), and Product Development (value adding using
waste material from cacao processing to produce economically important byproducts).

iii.

CocoaPhil is also an industry partner of many academic institutions both public and
private academic institutions.

iv.

CocoaPhil is also continuing their monthly cacao training. For 2015-2016 training
sessions, there are a total of 174 participants with an average number of 16
participants per training session. Participant came from different disciplines and
vocations.

Most of them are retiring professionals, overseas Filipino workers,

agricultural technicians and business enthusiasts.

The full report of the CocoaPhil appears as Annex 13.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 17

AGENDA ITEM 10: OTHER MATTERS

10.1 ASEAN Cocoa Club National Focal Point

61.

The ACC Secretariat updated the Meeting on the current National Focal Points 2016
submitted by the member countries which is in Annex 14.

62.

The Meeting was informed that the total number of memberships of the ASEAN Cocoa
Club National Focal Points in 2016 is 29 with the inclusion of two focal points from
Philippines. Changes were also made in the focal points for Indonesia, Myanmar and
Philippines.

10.2
63.

Strategic Plan of Action on ASEAN Cooperation in Cocoa Sector 20162020


The Meeting has successfully formulated the new Strategic Plan of Action (SPA) for ACC
for the period of 2016-2020 in line with the new Vision and Strategic Plan for ASEAN
Cooperation in Food, Agriculture and Forestry (FAF), covering the following Strategic
Thrusts:

Enhance quantity and quality of production with sustainable, green technologies,


resource management systems, and minimise pre- and post-harvest losses and waste.

Enhance trade facilitation, economic integration and market access.

Ensure food security, food safety, better nutrition and equitable distribution.

Assist resource constrained small producers and SMEs to improve productivity,


technology and product quality, to meet global market standards and increase
competitiveness.

Strengthen ASEAN joint approaches on international and regional issues affecting


the FAF sector.

The details of the new SPA is in Annex 15.

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 18

AGENDA 11: DATE AND VENUE OF THE NEXT MEETING


64.

The Meeting unanimously agreed for the Philippines to host the 20th ACC Meeting on the
ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion
Scheme to be held tentatively in May 2017 as proposed by Malaysia. Philippines will
communicate with the ACC Secretariat on their agreement to host the next Meeting.

AGENDA 12: ADOPTION OF THE REPORT


65.

The Meeting unanimously adopted the Report of the 19th Meeting of the ASEAN Cocoa
Club on the ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products
Promotion Scheme held on 1920 May 2016 at Hotel Santika Premiere, Yogyakarta,
Indonesia.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
66.

In her closing remarks, the Chairperson expressed her gratitude and thanked to all
delegates for their active participation in the Meeting. It had been a fruitful two days
meeting and she was glad that progress has been made in the programmes and activities
planned last year.

She also thanked the Local Organizing Committee and the ACC

Secretariat for their support, hard work and making this Meeting happening in Indonesia.
67.

The delegation of Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam
expressed their sincere appreciation to the Indonesian Government in particular the
Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia for the warm hospitality accorded to them and the
excellent arrangements made for the Meeting as well as the ACC Secretariat and the Local
Organizing Committee of Indonesia for their hard work and team cooperation rendered in
ensuring the successful of the Meeting.

68.

The Meeting was cordially held in the traditional spirit of ASEAN solidarity.

Yogyakarta, Indonesia
20 May 2016

Report

of the 19

t h

ACC

Meeting, 19-20 May 2016, Yogyakarta,

Indonesia

Page 19