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DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT D. Distribution authorized to the Department of Defense and U.S.

DoD contractors only (Administrative or Operational Use) (31 JAN 09). Other requests shall be
referred to (Product Manager Command Posts).
DESTRUCTION NOTICE. Destroy by any method that will prevent disclosure of contents or
reconstruction of the document.

Acknowledgements
Many individuals from various programs and organizations across the
Army contributed to the content and creation of this Command Post
Handbook.
Melisia Anderson
Douglas Babb
MAJ Marco Barrera
Lisa Bellamy
George Beishir
COL Cris Boyd
John Brayley
MarkCarwise
William Doug Chaney
Sharon Clifton
William Christopher
MAJ Todd Curtis
Donna Eastman
Alan Davis
Daniel Dodd
Rebekah Dutton
Michael Flynn
James Ganley
Terry Garrison
Mark Guillemette
Jay Hall
Tim Heath

Randy Heidt
Wlliam Hibbard
Steve Jones
MG Nick Justice
Kevin Lade
Steve Levy
Rosemary Matura
Shawn McCumber
Mark Denton Mitcham
Robert Mitchell
Robert Nutter
Damion Peters
Santo Porpiglia
CW3 Wesley Postol
Stan Richards
Lynn Rolf
Jose Santos
Rene Seigh
Bill Taylor
Paul Terzulli
Norman Usher
LTC Terry Wilson

Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
1-1
Chapter 2: Command Post Organization
2-1
2.1
People
2-1
2.2
Commanders
2-1
2.3
Seconds in Command
2-2
2.4
Command Sergeant Major (CSM)
2-3
2.5
Staffs
2-3
2.6
Chief of Staff (Executive Officer)
2-4
2.7
Coordinating Staff
2-4
2.8
Special Staff
2-5
2.9
Personal Staff
2-7
2.10
Staff Augmentation
2-7
2.11
Facilities
2-8
2.12
CP Cells and Staff Sections
2-11
Integrating Cells
2-14
2.13
2.14
Staff Sections
2-16
2.15
Meetings, Working Groups, and Boards
2-18
2.16
Meetings
2-18
2.17
Working Groups, and Boards
2-19
Chapter 3: Characteristics of the CP
3-1
3.1
CP Components
3-1
3.2
Initial CP Setup and Configuration
3-3
3.3
Power Distribution
3-85
3.4
Combat Net Radios (CNR) and CP Communication System
(CPCS)
3-93
3.5
Network Cabling
3-96
3.6
Network Operations and System Architecture
3-97
3.7
Information Systems
3-113
3.8
Configuration Customization
3-123
3.9
Network Services Architecture
3-124
Chapter 4: Establishing the Command Post
4-1
4.1
Order of Setup
4-1
4.2
Establish the BCT Tactical CP
4-3
4.3
Establish the Battalion CP (BN CP)
4-6
4.4
Establish the BCT Main CP
4-6
4.5
Standing Operating Procedures (SOPs)
4-8
4.6
Displace the CP
4-9
4.7
Select CP Location
4-9
4.8
Occupy CP Location
4-10
4.9
TransferC2 Between CPs
4-10
4.10
Deploy CP at the Quick Halt (ATQH)
4-12
4.11
System Validation
4-14
4.12
Common Operational Picture (COP)
4-15
4.13
Battle Drills
4-26
i

Chapter 5: Transportability
5-1
5.1
Dimensions and Weights
5-1
5.2
Load Plans
5-2
5.3
Movement Plans
5-12
Chapter 6: Sustaining Operations
6-1
6.1
Daily Operations
6-1
6.2
Safety
6-2
6.3
Information Systems (INFOSYS)
6-6
Chapter7: Fielding and Training Support
7-1
7.1
Unit Set Fielding (USF)
7-1
7.2
BCSoSIT Overview
7-9
7.3.
Digital Systems Engineer (DSE) Roles and Responsibilities ..7-11
7.4
Army Field Support Brigade (AFSB) & POCs
7-17
7.5
Battle Command as a Weapons System
7-19
Chapter 8: Equipment and Maintenance
8-1
8.1
Troubleshooting Support
8-1
8.2
TQGs and PDISE Support
8-4
Appendix A: References
A-1
Appendix B: Acronyms
B-1
Appendix C: Composite Equipment Listing: Dimensions and Weight. C-1

List of Tables and Figures


Figure 2-1 Basic Staff Structure and Coordinating Authorities
Figure 2-2 Functional and Integrating Cells in a Division or Corps
MainCP
Figure 2-3 Corps and Division Plans and Operations
Synchronization
Figure 2-4 Sample SOP for a Civil Affairs Operations Working
Group
Figure 3-1 BCT Main Command Post (Isometric View)
Table 3-1 CP Initial Setup Tasks
Table 3-2 Required Supplies for CP Setup
Figure 3-2 Brigade Combat Team (BCT) Main CP
(Top-Down View)
Figure 3-3 Main CP Power Distribution
Figure 3-4 Main CP Grounding
Figure 3-5 Main CP Fiber Distribution
Figure 3-6 Main CP Communication System (CPCS) Distribution
Figure 3-7 Current Operations Cell Modified Table of
Organization and Equipment (MTOE) Positions
Figure 3-8 Current Operations Cell Power Distribution
Figure 3-9 Current Operations Cell SIPR Network Distribution
Figure 3-10 Current Operations NIPR Network Distribution
Figure 3-11 Current Operations Cell CPCS Cable Distribution
Figure 3-12 Network Operations Cell MTOE Positions
Figure 3-13 Network Operations Cell Power Distribution
Figure 3-14 Network Operations Cell SIPR Network Distribution
Figure 3-15 Network Operations NIPR Network Distribution
Figure 3-16 Network Operations CPCS Cable Distribution
Figure 3-17 Fires Cell MTOE Positions
Figure 3-18 Fires Cell Power Distribution
Figure 3-19 Fires Cell SIPR Network Distribution
Figure 3-20 Fires Cell NIPR Network Distribution
Figure 3-21 Fires Depicting CPCS Cable Distribution
Figure 3-22 ADAM CPP Tent Layout of MTOE Positions
Figure 3-23 ADAM CPP Power Distribution
Figure 3-24 Intelligence Cell MTOE Positions
Figure 3-25 Intelligence Cell Power Distribution
Figure 3-26 Intelligence Cell SIPR Layout
Figure 3-27 Intelligence Cell CPCS Cable Distribution
Figure 3-28 Movement and Maneuver MTOE Positions
Figure 3-29 Movement and Maneuver Power Distribution
Figure 3-30 Movement and Maneuver SIPR Distribution
Figure 3-31 Movement and Maneuver NIPR Distribution
Figure 3-32 Movement and Maneuver CPCS Cable Distribution

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Sustainment Cell MTOE Positions
Sustainment Cell Power Distribution
3-37
Sustainment Cell SIPR Distribution
3-38
Sustainment Cell NIPR Distribution
3-39
Sustainment Cell CPCS Distribution
3-40
Plans Cell MTOE Positions
3-41
Plans Cell Power Distribution
3-42
Plans Cell SIPR Distribution
3-43
Plans Cell NIPR Distribution
3-44
Plans Cell CPCS Distribution
3-45
Stryker Brigade Combat Team Tactical (SBCTTAC) ....3-46
SBCTTAC Power and Grounding
3-47
SBCT TAC Fiber Distribution
3-48
SBCT TAC CPCS Distribution
3-49
SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell MTOE Positions
3-50
SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell Power Distribution
3-51
SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell SIPR Distribution
3-52
SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell CPCS Distribution
3-53
SBCTTAC OPS 2 Cell MTOE Positions
3-54
SBCT TAC OPS 2 Cell Power Distribution
3-55
SBCTTAC OPS 2 Cell SIPR Distribution
3-56
SBCTTAC OPS 2 Cell NIPR Distribution
3-57
SBCTTAC OPS 2 Cell CPCS Distribution
3-58
SBCT Battalion (BN) CP Fire Exits
3-59
SBCT BN CP Power and Grounding Distribution
3-60
SBCT BN CP SIPR and NIPR Distribution
3-61
SBCT BN CPCS Distribution
3-62
SBCT BN Current Ops Cell MTOE Positions
3-63
SBCT BN Current Ops Cell Power Distribution
3-64
SBCT BN Current Ops SIPR Distribution
3-65
SBCT BN Current OPs Cell NIPR Distribution
3-66
SBCT BN Current Ops Cell CPCS Distribution
3-67
SBCT BN Sustainment Cell MTOE Positions
3-68
SBCT BN Sustainment Cell Power Distribution
3-69
SBCT BN Sustainment Cell SIPR Distribution
3-70
SBCT BN Sustainment Cell NIPR Distribution
3-71
SBCT BN Sustainment Cell CPCS Distribution
3-72
Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT CP
3-73
Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT CP Grounding
3-74
Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT CP Power and Fiber
3-75
Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT Current Operations Tent
3-76
Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT Sustainment Tent
3-77
Brigade Support Battalion (BSB) CP
3-78
BSB Current Operations Tent
3-79
BSB Support Operations Tent
3-80

Figure 3-78 BSB Sustainment Tent


Figure 3-79 Brigade Special Troops Battalion (BSTB) CP
Figure 3-80 BSTB Current Operations Tent
Figure 3-81 BSTB Sustainment Tent
Figure 3-82 M100 Pigtail Connection to TQG
Figure 3-83 M100 Connections
Figure 3-84 M40 Connections
Figure 3-85 CNR Deployment Example
Figure 3-86 NetOps
Figure 3-87 BCT Hierarchy
Figure 3-88 Current NetOps Capability
Figure 3-89 Controlling Bandwidth
Figure 3-90 NetViz Diagram
Table 3-3 Information Systems
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
Figure 4-1 Establish Command Post Operations
Figure 4-2 Steps 1 Through 5 of TAC CP (BN CP) Setup
Figure 4-3 Steps 6 Through 7 ofTACCP (BN CP) Setup
Table 4-1 Setup Procedure of BCT TAC CP (Modified BN CP)
Table 4-2 Setup Procedure of BCT Main CP
Table 4-2 Setup Procedure of BCT Main CP (Continued)
Table 4-3 Data Transfer Between Main CP and TAC CP
Table 4-4 Deploy CPATQH
Table 4-4 Deploy CPATQH (Continued)
Table 4-4 Deploy CPATQH (Continued)
Figure 4-4 COP
Table 4-5 Parts of the COP
Table 4-6 AO Information
Table 4-7 Information Comprising and Contributing to COP
Table 4-7 Information Comprising and Contributing to COP
(Continued)
Table 4-7 Information Comprising and Contributing to COP
(Continued)
Figure 4-5 Battle Drill Flowchart
Table 5-1 Battalion CP Equipment List
Table 5-1 Battalion CP Equipment List (Continued)
Figure 5-1 20-Foot ISO Container
Figure 5-2 Load Plan - Side View
Figure 5-3 Load Plan - Isometric View

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Figure 5-4 BN Container-Top Down View


Figure 5-5 Load Plan - End View
Figure 5-6 ISO Container Center of Gravity
Figure 5-7 Example of Equipment to be Transferred
Table 5-2 Aircraft Transport Requirements
Figure 5-8 Air Transport C-130
Figure 5-9 Air Transport C-5 Side Views
Figure 5-10 Air Transport C-5 Top Down View
Figure 5-11 Air Transport C-17 Loading Sequence
Figure 5-12 Air Transport C-17 Top Down View Loading
Sequence
Figure 5-13 Air Transport C-19 Loading Sequence
Figure 5-14 Additional Transport Options
Table 6-1 Daily Duties
Figure 7-1 Phase V Unit Set Fielding and Reset
Figure 7-2 ARFORGEN Phases
Table 7-1 Key DSE Interfaces
Figure 7-3 Typical Sequencing of BCSoSIT
Figure 7-4 Key DSE Interfaces
Table 7-2 DSE Tasks by Phase
Table 7-2 DSE Tasks by Phase (Continued)
Figure 7-5 Regional Leads/RCS
Figure 8-1 SIF Login Pag

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Chapter 1: Introduction
1.0.1 The Vice Chief of Staff Army provided guidance advising
Program Executive Officer Command, Control, Communications
Tactical (PEO-C3T) to standardize Command Post (CP) variants
at each echelon. Lack of a standard set of processes and
procedures to develop, field, setup, and operate a CP have led
to a proliferation of many effective, but different, unit-developed
methodologies. Differences in approaches have resulted in
unnecessary complexity in training, operations, and sustainment.
1.0.2

The intended audience for this book is commanders and staff


who will set up, operate, and maintain CPs at the Brigade and
Battalion, as well as those who train them. While this guide
is not intended to replace or supersede existing doctrine, it is
designed to provide additional Details, Techniques, Procedures
(DTPs), and Best Practices (BP) developed during TOCFEST
2008. CP stakeholders will expand this handbook to include
other CP variants with input from the user and materiel developer
communities. Future CP Handbooks will include all components
of the System of Systems known as the CP, including those
external to PEO-C3T

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Chapter 2: Command Post Organization


2.0.1

During the development of this handbook, it was important to


consider changing doctrine regarding Command and Control
(C2). Before looking at the components of the Command Post
(CP), staff members should understand the broader picture
and concepts. This chapter is an excerpt from FM 5-0, The
Operations Process, Chapter 2, Command Post Organization.
The FM is still in the review process and is subject to change
before its scheduled publication date in September 2009.
Although this handbook focuses on the BCT and BN level, FM
5-0 includes staff concepts up through Division and Corps.
Other relevant doctrine related to the BCT and BN CPs is in
FM 3-90.5, The Combined Arms Battalion, April 2008, and
FM 3-90.6, The Brigade Combat Team, August 2006. All
staff members should be familiar with these publications to
understand the components of C2 at various echelons.

2.0.2

Commanders organize headquarters into CPs to enhance the


ability to exercise C2. This chapter describes the following:
Operational roles and relationships of the commander,
deputy commanders, and staff
Types and structures of CPs
Staff integration for specific purposes via cross-functional
organization into CP cells, working groups, boards, etc.

2.0.3

For specific guidance on CP organization by echelon or type, see


the corresponding FM. For Army service component commands
or joint task forces headquarters, see FM 3-93 (when published)
or JP 3-33, respectively.

2.1
2.1.1

People
The C2 system consists of people and equipment organized into
CPs. Personnel dedicated to C2 include seconds in command,
command sergeants major, and staffs.

2.2
2.2.1

Commanders
Where the commander locates within the Area of Operations
(AO), and at what time, are important considerations for effective
C2. Commanders provide purpose, direction, and motivation to
subordinate commanders, staff, and warfighters. No standard
pattern or simple prescription exists for command presence;
different commanders lead differently. Commanders balance
time among CP and staff, subordinate commanders, forces, and
other organizations to make the greatest contribution to success.

2-1

2.2.2

CPs serve as the focus for information exchange, planning, and


analysis. They provide commanders direct access to staff and
allow them to communicate with other commanders through
high-capacity information systems. By moving to the locations
of subordinates or to critical points in the AO, commanders can
assess the state of operations. They can personally gauge the
condition of their units and leaders and consult directly with
subordinate commanders performing critical tasks. By being
forward, the commander can also motivate other leaders and
warfighters of the command.

2.3
2.3.1

Seconds in Command
At all levels, the second in command is the commander's
principal assistant. The second in command may be a deputy
commander, an assistant commander, or the executive officer. A
deputy commander is assigned to regiments, separate brigades,
brigade combat teams, and corps. Theater armies have two
deputy commanders. The theater army commander designates
which deputy commander is second in command. Army divisions
have two assistant commandersan assistant commander for
maneuver and assistant commander for support. The division
commander designates which assistant division commander is
second in command. At company through battalion and support
brigades, the executive officer is the second in command.

2.3.2

The relationship between the deputy or assistant commanders


and the staff is unique to each command. Staff members do
not work for the deputy or assistant commanders unless the
commander directs it. Commanders describe the roles and
responsibilities of their deputy or assistant commanders and
their relationships with respect to the chief of staff, staff, and
subordinate commanders.

2.3.3

The second in command has important responsibilities during


the commander's temporary absence or when the commander
is killed, wounded, or medically incapacitated. Seconds in
command assume duties as delegated, either explicitly or by
standing operating procedures (SOPs), when the commander is
temporarily absent or is resting.

2.3.4

Delegating authority to seconds in command reduces the burden


on commanders and allows them to focus on particular areas
or concerns while seconds in command concentrate on others.
Normally, commanders delegate authority to seconds in command
to act in their name for specific functions and responsibilities.

2.4
Command Sergeant Major (CSM)
2.4.1 The CSM is the senior non-commissioned officer of the command
at battalion or higher levels. CSMs carry out policies and standards
on performance, training, and conduct. They give advice and
recommendations to the commander and staff regarding enlisted
personnel. In operations, commanders employ a CSM throughout the
AOto extend command influence, assess morale, and assist with C2.
2.5
2.5.1

Staffs
Commanders cannot exercise control alone except in the
simplest and smallest of units. Staffs support commanders
in making and implementing decisions and in integrating
and synchronizing combat power. Effective staffs multiply
a unit's effectiveness substantially. They provide timely,
relevant information and analysis, make estimates and
recommendations, prepare plans and orders, assist in controlling
operations, and assess the progress of operations for the
commander. The staff operates the commander's C2 system
based around three primary functions:
Support the commander
Assist subordinate units
Keep higher, subordinate, and adjacent headquarters informed

2.5.2

A staff acts on behalf of and derives its authority from the


commander. Although commanders are the principal decision
makers, they must train and require their staffs to make
timely decisions based on broad guidance and commanderapproved SOP. Commanders must insist on frank dialog
between themselves and their staff leaders. Staff members
must give commanders honest, independent thoughts and
recommendations so the commander can make the best
possible decisions. Once the commander has made a decision,
staff leaders must implement that decision energetically even if it
differs from staff recommendations.

2.5.3

Staffs at every echelon and type of unit are structured differently;


however, all staffs are similar. The basic staff structure includes
a Chief of Staff (COS), or Executive Officer (XO), and various
staff sections. A staff section is a grouping of staff members
by area of expertise. Each staff section is led by a principal
staff officer, who may be a coordinating, special, or personal
staff officer for the commander. The number of coordinating,
special, and personal staff principals and their corresponding
staff sections varies with different command levels. See FM 5-1
(when published) for staff responsibilities and duties.
2-3

2.6
2.6.1

Chief of Staff (Executive Officer)


The COS orXO is the commander's principal assistant for
directing, coordinating, supervising, and training the staff, at
the commander's discretion. Commanders normally delegate
executive management authority to the COS. As the key staff
integrator, the COS frees the commander from routine details of
staff operations and the management of the headquarters.

2.6.2

Division and higher units are assigned a COS. Brigade and


battalions are assigned an XO. The COS orXO directs staff
tasks, oversees staff coordination, and ensures efficient and
prompt staff actions. The COS or XO establishes and manages
staff processes and procedures that support the commander's
decision making. The COS orXO duties include the following:
Coordinate and direct the work of the staff
Establish/monitor the headquarters battle rhythm, ensure it
effectively supports critical functions
Represent the commander when authorized
Formulate and disseminate staff policies
Ensure effective liaison is exchanged with higher, lower,
supported, and adjacent units, and other organizations
Supervise headquarters sustainment, activities, and
battalions or companies
Supervise staff training and integration programs

2.6.3

In division through Army Service component command


headquarters, the COS personally supervises knowledge
management, red team, and operational research/system
analysis special staff sections.

2.7
2.7.1

Coordinating Staff
Coordinating staff officers are the commander's principal
assistants for an area of expertise or a warfighting function.
Collectively, through the COS orXO, coordinating staff officers
are accountable to the commander for their responsibilities. The
coordinating staff consists of the following positions:
Assistant Chief of Staff (ACOS), G-1/AG (S-1) - personnel
ACOS, G-2 (S-2) - intelligence
ACOS, G-3 (S-3) - operations
ACOS, G-4 (S-4) - logistics
ACOS, G-5 - plans
ACOS, G-6 (S-6) - signal

ACOS, G-7 (S-7) - information engagement


ACOS, G-8 - financial management
ACOS, G-9 (S-9) - civil affairs operations
Chief of Fires
Chief of Protection
Chief of Sustainment
Note. The commanding officer's rank determines whether the staff is
a G staff or an S staff. Organizations commanded by a general officer
have G staffs. Other organizations have S staffs. Joint headquarters
have J staffs. Most battalions and brigades do not have plans or financial
management staff sections. In battalions and brigades, the operations
staff section is responsible for planning and the logistic staff section is
responsible for financial management.
Note. Chiefs of fires, protection, and sustainment are authorized
at division through theater Army. They coordinate their respective
warfighting function for the commander through functional cells within the
main CP.
2.7.2

Coordinating staff officers advise, plan, and coordinate actions


within their areas of expertise. They also exercise planning and
supervisory authority over designated special staff officers.

2.7.3

The operations officer's responsibilities are unique within


the coordinating staff. The G-3, as the operations officer, is
responsible for coordinating the activities of the movement and
maneuver warfighting function, as well as integrating all the
warfighting functions in current and future operations.

2.8
2.8.1

Special Staff
Special staff officers help the commander and other staff
members perform their functional responsibilities. The number
of special staff officers and their duties vary with the level of
command. Special staff sections are organized according to
professional or technical responsibilities. For example, the fire
support coordinator is the staff officer responsible for fires.

2.8.2

Commanders normally delegate planning and supervisory


authority to a coordinating staff officer, as in Figure 2-1. Though
special staff sections may not be integral to a coordinating
staff section, there are usually areas of common interest and
association. For example, the operations officer coordinates
matters relating to fires with the fire support coordinator.

CO CD

6 6 5:

CN

CO " 3 "

IT)

CD N -

666666

Figure 2-1 Basic Staff Structure and Coordinating Authorities

2.9
2.9.1

Personal Staff
Personal staff members work under the commander's
immediate control. They also serve as special staff officers when
coordinating with other staff members. As special staff officers,
they may work through the COS or XO or a coordinating staff
officer. Members of the personal staff include the following:
Personal assistants, such as aides-de-camp
Personnel the commander desires to supervise directly
Personnel who, by law or regulation, have a special
relationship to the commander (e.g., chaplain, inspector
general, staff judge advocate, public affairs officer)

2.10
Staff Augmentation
2.10.1 Depending on the situation, Army headquarters are augmented
to assist with C2. Commanders integrate teams and
detachments into their CPs. For example, divisions commonly
receive a civil affairs battalion when deployed. Wthin that
battalion is a civil affairs planning team that augments the
civil affairs staff section and plans cell. In other instances,
commanders may request staff augmentation. A brigade
headquarters may request a human terrain analysis team to
assist with socio-cultural research and analysis. Augmentation
teams may include the following:
Army space support team
Civil affairs planning team
Combat camera team
Human terrain analysis team
Legal support teams
Mobile public affairs team
Military history team
Psychological operations detachment
Individual augmentation by specialty
2.10.2

Army headquarters serving as a joint or multinational force


headquarters organize for operations based on their situations
and mission. The operations of a joint task force differ from those
of an Army headquarters. Divisions and corps serving as a joint
task force require considerable training, staff reorganization, and
augmentation. JP 3-33 provides considerations for organizing a
joint task force headquarters. JP 3-16 provides considerations
for organizing a multinational force headquarters.

2.11
2.11.0

Facilities
The second component of the C2 system is equipment and
facilities. In garrison, members of each staff section typically
work in the same location in the headquarters. In operations,
however, effective C2 requires continuous, and often immediate,
close coordination, synchronization, and information sharing
across staff sections. To promote this, commanders organize
people and equipment into CPs and CP cells during operations.

2.11.1

Command Posts

2.11.1.1 A CP is a unit headquarters where the commander and staff


perform their activities (FM 6-0). Organizing the staff into CPs
expands the commander's ability to exercise C2 and makes the
C2 system more survivable. Dividing elements of staff sections
into various CP cells facilitates cross-functional coordination,
synchronization, and information sharing within the staff.
Additional staff integration occurs within and between CP cells
through cross-functional working groups and boards.
2.11.12 Commanders determine the sequence, timing of the deployment
or movement, initial locations, and exact organization of CPs
based on the situation. Each CP performs specific functions
by design as well as tasks the commander assigns. Activities
common in all CPs include the following:
Maintaining running estimates and the common operational
picture
Controlling operations
Assessing operations
Developing and disseminating orders
Coordinating with higher, lower, and adjacent units
Conducting knowledge management and information
management (see FM 6-01.1)
Performing CP administration
2.11.2

MainCP

2.11.2.1 The main CP is a C2 facility that contains most of the unit


headquarters, in which the majority of planning, analysis, and
coordination occurs. The main CP is the unit's principal CP.
It includes representatives of all staff sections and a full suite
of information systems to plan, prepare, execute, and assess
operations. It is larger in size and staffing and less mobile than
the Tactical CP (TAC CP). The COS orXO leads and provides
staff supervision of the main CP. Functions of the main CP
include the following:

Control and synchronize current operations


Monitor and assess current operations (including higher and
adjacent units) for their impact on future operations
Plan future operations, including branches and sequels
Assess the overall progress of operations
Prepare reports required by higher heads and receive
reports for subordinate units
Provide a facility for the commander to control operations,
issue orders, and conduct rehearsals
2.11.22 Main CPs are organized into a mix of staff sections and
functional and integrating CP cells. Each staff section and CP
cell is designed to perform specific functions. Commanders
adjust their CP organization to fit the situation and their C2
concept for an operation.
2.11.3

Tactical Command Post

2.11.3.1 The TAC CP is a C2 facility containing a tailored portion of a unit


headquarters designed to control portions of an operation for a
limited time. Commanders employ the TAC CP as an extension
of the main CP to help control the execution of an operation or
a specific task, such as a river crossing. Commanders employ
the TAC CP to direct the operations of units close to each other
when direct command is necessary. This can occur for a relief in
place. It can also be used for controlling a special task force or
complex tasks, such as reception and integration.
2.11.32 The TAC CP is fully mobile. As a rule, it includes only the
warfighters and equipment essential to the tasks assigned. The
TAC CP relies on the main CP for planning, detailed analysis,
and coordination. A deputy commander or the operations officer
leads the TAC CP.
2.11.3.3 When employed, TAC CP functions include the following:
Monitor and control current operations
Provide information to the common operational picture
Assess the progress of operations
Monitor/assess the progress of higher and adjacent units
Perform short-range planning
Provide input to targeting and future operations planning
Provide a facility for the commander to control operations,
issue orders, and conduct rehearsals

2.11.3.4 When the TAC CP is not used, the staff assigned to it reinforces
the main CP. Unit SOPs should address the specifics for this,
including procedures to quickly detach the TAC CP from the
main CP.
2.11.4

Command Group

2.11.4.1 A command group consists of the commander and selected


staff members who accompany commanders and enable
them to exercise command and control away from a CP.
The command group is organized and equipped to suit the
commander's decision-making and leadership requirements. It
does this while enabling the commander to accomplish critical
C2 functions anywhere in the AO. The command group consists
of critical staff officers necessary to assist the commander in
directly influencing the ongoing operation. Normally the group
provides the commander with local security and other personal
assistance.
2.11.4.2 Command group personnel normally include staff representation
that can immediately affect current operations, such as fires
(including the air liaison officer). The mission and available staff,
however, dictate the command group's makeup. For example,
during a deliberate breach, commanders may include an
engineer and an air defense officer. When visiting a dislocated
civilian collection point, the commander may take a translator,
civil affairs officer, a medical officer, and a chaplain.
2.11.4.3 Divisions and corps headquarters are equipped with a mobile
command group (MCG). The MCG serves as the commander's
mobile CP. It consists of a ground and an air component. The
ground component contains vehicles configured with Army
Battle Command System (ABCS) multifunctional displays and
communications equipment. The air component includes
UH-60A/L equipped with the Army Airborne Command and
Control System. The MCG's mobility allows commanders to
move to critical locations to personally assess situations, make
decisions, and influence operations. The MCG's information
systems and small staff allow commanders to do this while
retaining communication with the entire force.
2.11.5

Early Entry Command Post (EECP)

2.11.5.1 While not part of the unit's table of organization and equipment,
commanders can establish an EECP to assist them in controlling
operations during the deployment phase of an operation. An
EECP is a lead C2 element of a headquarters designed to
control operations until the remaining portions of

the headquarters are deployed and operational. The EECP


is normally based around the tactical CP with additional
intelligence analysis, planners, and other staff officers from the
main CP based on the situation.
2.11.52 This EECP performs the functions of the main and tactical CPs
until those CPs are deployed and fully operational. A deputy
commander, COS, or operations officer normally leads the
EECP.
2.11.6

Centers

2.11.6.1 A center is a C2 facility with a supporting staff established for


a specific purpose. Centers are similar to CPs in that they
are facilities with staff members, equipment, and a leadership
component. However, centers have a narrower focus (e.g.,
movement control) and are normally formed around a
subordinate unit headquarters.
2.11.62 Centers are more common at operational echelons (e.g., joint
interrogation and debriefing center of a joint task force). Centers
are also formed by Army tactical commanders. For example, a
civil affairs battalion under the operational control of a division
normally establishes a civil-military operations center. The civilmilitary operations center may not locate with a division CP.
2.12
2.12.1

CP Cells and Staff Sections


Wthin each CP, commanders further organize their staff into
a combination of CP cells and staff sections. A CP cell is a
grouping of personnel and equipment by warfighting function
or purpose to facilitate command and control. CP cells are
formed from staff elementspersonnel and equipment from
staff sections. For example, the current operations cell contains
elements from nearly all staff sections. The intelligence cell is
formed around the intelligence staff section.

2.12.2

While each echelon and type of unit organizes CPs differently


two types of CP cells exist: functional and integrating. Functional
cells group personnel and equipment by warfighting function.
Integrating cells group personnel and equipment to integrate the
warfighting functions by planning horizon.

2.12.3

While division and corps headquarters have resources to


establish all of the CP cells, brigade combat teams, brigades,
and battalions are not. Refer to echelon manuals for specific CP
organizations.

2.12.4

Functional cells coordinate and synchronize forces and activities


by warfighting function. The following are the six functional cells
within a CP. Not all echelons and types of units have resources
to establish all six functional cells. Figure 2-2 shows the cells in a
main CP.

Functional Cells

A.
Movement
And
Maneuver

Intelligence \

Fires

Staff Elements

Figure 2-2 Functional and Integrating Cells in a Division or Corps


Main CP

Note. The title of the network operations cell is not in direct alignment
with the C2 warfighting function. The C2 warfighting function includes
the commander and the entire C2 system. The network operations
cell is focused on network operations, information management, and
information protection (an information task).
2.12.4.1 Movement and Maneuver Cell coordinates activities and
systems that move forces to positional advantage over enemies.
This includes tasks associated with employing forces combined
with direct fire or fire potential (maneuver), force projection
(movement) related to gaining positional advantage over an
enemy, and mobility/counter-mobility. Elements of the operations,
aviation, and engineer staff sections form this cell. The unit's
operations officer leads this cell. Staff elements in the movement
and maneuver cell also form the core of current operations cell.

2.12.4.2 Intelligence Cell coordinates activities and systems that


facilitate understanding of the enemy, terrain and weather, and
civil considerations. The intelligence cell requests, receives,
and analyzes information from all sources to produce and
distribute intelligence products. This includes tasks associated
with intelligence preparation of the battlefield and Intelligence,
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR). Most of the intelligence
staff section resides in this cell. The unit's intelligence officer
leads this cell.
2.12.4.3 Fires Cell coordinates activities and systems that provide
collective and coordinated use of Army indirect fires, joint fires,
and C2 warfare through the targeting process. Elements of the
fire support, Air Force (or air component), electronic warfare, and
intelligence staff sections make up this cell. The unit's chief of
fires leads this cell.
2.12.4.4 Sustainment Cell coordinates activities and systems that
provide support and services to ensure freedom of action, extend
operational reach, and prolong endurance. It includes those
tasks associated with logistics, personnel services, and health
service support. Elements of the following staff sections work in
the sustainment cell: personnel, logistics, financial management,
and surgeon. The unit's chief of sustainment leads this cell.
2.12.4.5 Network Operations Cell coordinates activities and systems
that support communications and information management.
Network operations include network management, information
dissemination management, and information assurance. The
majority of the signal staff section resides in this cell. The unit's
signal officer leads this cell.
2.12.4.6 Protection Cell coordinates the activities and systems that
preserve the force through the composite risk management
process. This includes tasks associated with protecting
personnel, physical assets, and information. Elements of the
following staff sections form this cell: air and missile defense;
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear; engineer;
operations security; personnel recovery; provost marshal;
and safety. The protection cell coordinates with the network
operations cell to further facilitate the information protection
task. The protection coordinator leads this cell and chairs the
protection working group. Security operations that screen, guard,
or cover the force are parts of movement and maneuver cell
rather than the protection cell.

2.13
2.13.1

Integrating Cells
Integrating cells include plans, future operations, and current
operations cells. Integrating cells coordinate and synchronize
forces and warfighting functions within a specified planning
horizon, a point in time commanders use to focus the
organization's planning efforts to shape future events. The
three planning horizons are long, medium, and short. They are
associated with the plans cell, future operations cell, and current
operations cells, respectively. Planning horizons are situationdependent, ranging from hours and days to weeks and months.
The higher the echelon, the more distant the planning horizon it
is concerned with.

2.13.2

Not all echelons and types of units have resources for all three
integrating cells (e.g., combined arms battalions combine
planning and operations responsibilities in one operations cell).
Division and corps have resources for all three integrating cells.
Figure 2-3 depicts the relationship among the integrating cells.
The commander and chief of staff
set priorities and provide direction and guidance.

Long-Range Planning

Mid-Range Planning
Future Operations

Develops initial
OPLAN/OPORD
Plans to follow-on
phases (sequels)
Develops branch
contingency plans
Assesses long-range
progress of operations

Refines and modifies


OPLANs and OPORDs
based on current situration
Develops branch
Assesses mid-range
progress of operations

short-Range Planning
and Execution
Current Operations
Issues OPORDs, FRAGOs;
and WARNOs
Monitors, evaluates, directs
and controls execution of
orders
Conducts limited shortterm planning
Conducts operation update
and assessment brief

OPORD/
=RAGO

-Months-Weeks*
CONPLAN
FRAGO
OPLAN
OPORD
WARNO

concept plan
fragmentary order
operation plan
operation order
warning order

Weeks-Days *

Days-Hours *

* Planning horizons vary based on the situation


** Planning to operations handover may go
directly from the plans cell to the current
operations cell, bypassing future operations

Figure 2-3 Corps and Division Plans and Operations


Synchronization

2.13.3

The Plans Cell is responsible for planning operations for mid- to


long-range planning horizons. It prepares for operations beyond
the scope of the current order; develops plans, orders, branches,
and sequels using the military decision-making process. The
plans cell oversees military deception planning.

2.13.3.1 The plans cell consists of a core group of planners and analysts
led by the plans officer (or the operations officer at brigade and
battalion levels). All staff sections assist as required. While the
brigade combat team has a small, dedicated plans element, the
majority of its staff sections balance their efforts between the
current operations and plans cells. Combined arms battalions do
not have resources for a plans cell. Planning in combined arms
battalions occurs in the operations cell.
2.13.3.2 Upon completion of the initial operation order, the plans cell
develops plans for the next operation or the next phase of
the current operation. The plans cell also develops solutions
to complex problems resulting in orders, policies, and other
coordinating or directive products, such as memos of agreement.
In this case, planning teams are established to solve specific
problems. When complete, these planning teams dissolve.
2.13.4

The Future Operations Cell is responsible for planning


operations in the mid-range planning horizon. It focuses on
adjustments to the current operationincluding the positioning
or maneuvering of forces in depththat facilitates continuation
of the current operation. The cell consists of a core group of
planners led by an assistant operations officer (the chief of
future operations). All staff sections assist as required. The cell
uses the military decision-making process in a time-constrained
environment to develop plans and orders. Divisions and corps
headquarters have a future operations cell. Battalion and
brigade headquarters do not.

2.13.4.1 In many respects, the future operations cell serves as a fusion


cell between the current operations and plans cells. The future
operations cell monitors current operations and determines
implications for operations within the mid-range planning
horizon. In coordination with the current operations cell, the
future operations cell assesses whether the ongoing operation
must be modified to achieve the current phase's objectives.
Normally the commander directs adjustments to the operation,
but the cell may also recommend options to the commander.
Once the commander decides to adjust the operation, the cell
develops the fragmentary orders necessary to implement the
change. The future operations cell also participates in the

targeting working group, since the same planning horizons


concern them both. The future operations cell updates and adds
details to the branch or contingency plans foreseen in the current
operation and prepares any orders necessary to implement a
sequel to the operation.
2.13.5

The Current Operations Cell is the focal point for all operational
matters. It oversees execution of the current operation. This
involves assessing the current situation while regulating forces
and warfighting functions in accordance with the commander's
intent and concept of operations

2.13.5.1 The current operations cell displays the common operational


picture and conducts shift change, assessment, and other
briefings as required. It provides information on the current
status of operations to all staff members and to higher, lower,
and adjacent units. All staff sections are represented in the
current operations cell, either permanently or on call. From here,
the COS or XO guides the staff and supervises the activities of
all cells and staff sections in the main CP.
2.13.5.2 The operations officer leads the current operations cell aided
by an assistant operations officer (the chief of operations). The
movement and maneuver cell forms the core of the current
operations cell. Elements or watch officers from each staff
section and liaison officers from subordinate and adjacent units
form the rest of the cell.
2.14
2.14.0

Staff Sections
Not all staff sections reside in one of the functional or integrating
cells. Personal staff officers and their associated staff sections,
such as the inspector general and public affairs staff sections,
are examples. These staff sections maintain their distinct
organization. They operate in different CP cells as required
and coordinate their activities in the various meetings, working
groups, and boards established in the unit's battle rhythm. In
other cases, elements of a staff section join a CP cell, with the
remaining personnel of that staff section working together in their
assigned staff section. The information engagement and civil
affairs staff sections are examples.

2.14.1

Headquarters Staff Section of the main CP provides


administrative support for the commander. It serves as the
focal point for liaison and helps synchronize the staff. The
headquarters staff section consists of the COS orXO, organic
liaison officers, and supporting personnel. At division and above,
this section contains the secretary of the general staff.

The secretary of the general staff assists the COS by planning


and supervising conferences and meetings, directing
preparation, and monitoring execution of itineraries for
distinguished visitors to the headquarters. The secretary of the
general staff also acts as the informal contact person for liaisons.
2.14.2

Personal staff officers include the following: aide-de-camp,


chaplain, inspector general, public affairs, staff judge advocate,
and the surgeon. They workout of the main CP under the
commander's immediate control. Personal staff officers are not
assigned to a CP cell. They routinely coordinate their activities
with the staff through the chief of staff in CP cells, meetings,
working groups, and boards. Members of personal staff sections
may work in a CP cell as required as special staff officers. For
example, a staff judge advocate normally maintains a work area
in the current operations cell.

2.14.3

Special staff officers and their staff sections normally work in


one or more CP cells in the main or tactical CPs. Division and
corps headquarters, however, are assigned operations research/
systems analysis, knowledge management, and red team staff
sections. These staff sections are normally not assigned to a CP
cell and are coordinated by the chief of staff. They do, however,
integrate their activities with others on the staff via CP cells,
meetings, working groups, and boards.

2.14.3.1 Operations Research/Systems Analysis Staff Section applies


advanced analytic methods to improve the effectiveness of
operations and help commanders improve their decision
making. The senior officer in this section may serve as the chief
assessment officer and chair the assessment working group.
2.14.3.2 Red Team Staff Section conducts independent, critical
reviews and analyses from alternative perspectives, including
adversaries, enemies, and multinational agencies. This
capability provides commanders with independent, enhanced
capability to explore alternative plans, organizations, concepts,
and capabilities. Red team members work in the future
operations and plans cells, unless the commander integrates
them into the intelligence cell. Red team analyses may involve
the following:
Challenging planning assumptions
Helping define problems and describe end states
Identifying friendly and enemy strengths and vulnerabilities
Determining likely civilian reactions combatants
Identifying assessment measures

2-17

2.14.3.3 Knowledge Management Staff Section supports the


commander and staff to achieve situational understanding and
make informed and timely decisions. This is done by managing
people, technology, and processes that furnish commanders and
staffs with better knowledge and the relevant information needed
to make informed and timely decisions. See FM 6-01.1.
2.14.3.4 Coordinating Staff officers and their sections work in a CP cell.
The information engagement and the civil affairs staff sections
are not assigned to a CP cell, they integrate their activities with
the staff in CP cells. For example, information engagement and
civil affairs staff maintain watch officers in the current operations
cell. They provide planners to the future operations and plans
cell as required. Often the information engagement officer chairs
the information engagement working group. The civil affairs
officer chairs the civil affairs operations working group.
2.15
2.15.1

Meetings, Working Groups, and Boards


In addition to organizing staff into CP cells and staff sections,
commanders establish meetings, working groups, and boards to
integrate staff and enhance planning and decision making within
headquarters. Commanders identify staff members to participate
in working groups and boards. See JP 3-33 for information on
working groups and boards used by joint force commanders.

2.15.2

The commander establishes and maintains only the working


groups and boards required by the situation. Commanders,
assisted by the COS orXO, establish, modify, and dissolve
working groups and boards as situations evolve. The COS
orXO oversee battle rhythm and working group schedules.
Meetings, working groups, or boards should be sequenced so
one group's outputs are available as another's inputs when
needed. COSs orXOs balance the time needed to plan, prepare,
and hold meetings, working groups, and boards with other staff
duties. They also critically examine attendance requirements.
Some staff sections and CP cells lack the personnel to attend
all events. COSs and XOs look for ways to combine meetings,
working groups, and boards, and eliminate unproductive ones.

2.16
2.16.1

Meetings
Meetings are gatherings to present and exchange information.
They may involve the staff; the commander and staff; or the
commander, other commanders, and staff. Cell chiefs and staff
section representatives routinely meet to synchronize their
activities. Usually meetings that involve the commander end with

commander's guidance. Commanders must take that


guidance or directives and record them, share them within the
headquarters, and reflect them in orders to subordinate units.
2.16.2

The number of meetings and subjects addressed depends on


the situation and echelon. While numerous informal meetings
occur daily within a headquarters, the following meetings
are commonly included in a unit's battle rhythm and the cells
responsible for them:
Operations synchronization meeting (current operations cell)
Operations update and assessment briefing (current
operations cell)
ISR synchronization meeting (intelligence cell)
Movement synchronization meeting (sustainment cell)
Shift change briefing (current operations cell)

2.17
Working Groups, and Boards
2.17.1 A working group is a group of predetermined staff
representatives meeting to provide analysis and coordinate
and provide recommendations for a particular purpose or
function. Working groups are cross-functional to synchronize
the contributions of multiple CP cells and staff sections. For
example, the targeting working group gathers representatives
of all staff elements concerned with targeting. It synchronizes
the contributions of all staff elements in the fires cell. It also
synchronizes fires with current and future operations.
2.17.2

Typical working groups and the lead cell or staff section at


division and corps headquarters include the following:
Plans or future operations (plans cell)
Assessment (plans or future operations cell)
ISR (current operations/future operations cell)
Targeting (fires cell)
Information engagement (information engagement section)
Civil affairs operations (civil affairs staff section)

2.17.3

The number of subjects working groups address depends on


the situation and echelon. Battalion and brigade headquarters
normally have fewer working groups than higher echelons.
These working groups are often less formal. Working groups
convene daily, weekly, or monthly depending on the subject,
situation, and echelon. Table 2-1 shows a sample Standing
Operating Procedure (SOP) for a working group.

Figure 2-4 Sample SOP for a Civil Affairs Operations Working Group
2.17.4 A board is a temporary group of staff representatives with
decision authority for a particular purpose or function. Boards are
similar to working groups; however, boards are appointed by the
commander and meet with the purpose of arriving at a decision.
When the process or activity being synchronized requires
command approval, a board is the appropriate forum. Typical
boards address targeting, movements, and assessments.

Chapter 3: Characteristics of the CP


3.0.1

This chapter breaks down the physical components of the


Command Post (CP) and how they are assembled and/or
connected. Diagrams in this chapter depict CPs at brigade and
battalion level per their authorized equipment and personnel by
Modification Table of Organization and Equipment (MTOE). The
diagrams show the physical layout for each cell and for each
aggregate CP. Note the layouts presented show the CP only and
do not include support elements that would be co-located.

3.0.2

CP components fall into five main categories:


Physical Structure - Tentage or Building
Infrastructure - Power Generation and Distribution, Voice/
Data Wring
Information Systems -Army Battle Command Systems
(ABCS), Network Services
Large Screen Display (LSD) Solution
Combat Net Radios (CNR) and Intercom System

Figure 3-1 BCT Main Command Post (Isometric View)


3.1

CP Components

3.1.1

Physical Structure. The physical structure of the CP provides


work space and the framework for the infrastructure.

3.1.1.1 Physical layout of the CP Command and Control (C2) system is


composed of the army-fielded Trailer-Mounted Support Systems
(TMSS), associated CP vehicles, personnel, their assigned
information systems, and other related components. A physical
structure can also be an existing building or permanent shelter
depending on the unit mission.

3-1

3.1.1.2 The TMSS encompasses a tent shelter, self-powered


Environmental Control Unit (ECU), tables, and internal shelter
lights. TMSS shelters are fielded in both medium (High-Mobility
Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle [HMMWV] towable) and large
Light Medium Tactical Vehicle (LMTV/5-ton towable) shelters.
Both sizes are fully compatible with each other and can be
rapidly deployed in various configurations to provide well-lit,
environmentally-controlled, weather-resistant shelters. The
shelters are fielded for a mobile force to deploy anywhere in the
world and operate in unimproved environments.
3.1.1.3 The CP vehicles provide information management of the
integrated network of communication. They are located within
the headquarters sections at each echelon down to the battalion
level. Wth the integrated C2 suite of equipment, they provide
commanders with C2 capabilities.
3.1.1.4 Staff personnel are assigned to warfighting functions according
to individual Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) and
authorized MTOE position, and are assigned a designated
information system according to position. Tent layouts in this
handbook designate recommended staff positions within various
sections. A specific unit's MTOE may depend on MOS or
assigned information system
3.1.2

Infrastructure. The infrastructure of the CP is depicted with


diagrams of power generation and distribution, electrical
grounding, fiber distribution, Secure Internet Protocol Routing
(SIPR) data cable distribution, Non-Secure Internet Protocol
Router (NIPR) data cable distribution, and CP Communication
System (CPCS) cable distribution. Each may be tailored to the
unit's needs. Although shown in this handbook with the TMSS,
the infrastructure can be adapted to any physical structure.

3.1.3

Information Systems. Information systems of the CP consist of


various components that range from individual laptop computers
(Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System [AFATDS],
Maneuver Control System [MCS], Command Post of the Future
[CPOF]) to integrated vehicle platforms (Command Post Platform
[CPP], Warfighter Information Network-Tactical [WIN-T], Air
Defense Airspace Management [ADAM]). CP vehicle platforms
integrate capabilities into mobile and survivable shelters, or
trailers that facilitate setup and teardown and improve mobility.
Many of the shelters are designed to connect to the CP for easy
access, but can also be remoted into buildings. For a description
of each of these systems, see section 3.7, Information Systems.

3.1.4

Large Screen Display. The information systems ensure that


everyone is working from the same Battle Command information,
but it is also necessary for the staff to be able to plan and
execute missions from the same visual picture. A Large Screen
Display (LSD) in the Current Operations section is important to
display a common map, Significant Activities (SIGACTS), video,
and other system views that are relevant to the mission. For
more information on the Common Operational Picture (COP) and
displaying information in the CP, refer to section 4.12.

3.1.5

Combat Net Radios (CNR) and Intercom System. A key


component to C2 is voice communications. CNR, or tactical
radios, provide voice communications to all echelons on the
battlefield. Wthin the CP, the CPCS provides any staff section
with access to these radios and allows for internal intercom
system. For more information on CNR and the CPCS see
section 3.4

3.2

Initial CP Setup and Configuration

3.2.1

During the fielding and reset phases, a unit receives individual


system training and puts each system into operation independent
of the other CP components. To set the CP up as a System
of Systems (SoS) for the first time, certain tasks need to be
completed to link all of the systems together and various
supplies are needed that are not furnished by any of the
individual fieldings.

3.2.2

During the initial setup of the CP, a unit should plan to conduct
the tasks in Table 3-1.

Table 3-1 CP Initial Setup Tasks

3.2.3

During the setup validation of these CPs, various supplies are


required. These supplies are not fielded by any program. Some
supplies are required and others significantly facilitate the initial
setup of a CP. Below is a full list with recommended quantities.
The list is also available at the CP Handbook AKO site.

Table 3-2 Required Supplies for CP Setup

Figure 3-2 Brigade Combat Team (BCT) Main CP (Top-Down View)

Power Cables

Figure 3-3 Main CP Power Distribution

M *- (ft
0 0
=

Grounding Rod Points

Data Case

fj

SWGS Jumper Cable ^ ^


SWGS Cable

Figure 3-4 Main CP Grounding

NIPR Cables
SIPR Cables
SIPR Case
NIPR Case

Figure 3-5 Main CP Fiber Distribution

Figure 3-6 Main CP Communication System (CPCS) Distribution

H ft? ft?Q ft P^

Figure 3-7 Current Operations Cell Modified Table of Organization


and Equipment (MTOE) Positions

3-10

Grounding Rod Points

Power Cables

Receptacle Box

Extension Cables

jjj|

Grounding Cable '

Figure 3-8 Current Operations Cell Power Distribution

SIPR CAT5 Cable

Figure 3-9 Current Operations Cell SIPR Network Distribution

nn nn
ii

\ \

ni

N PR CAT5 Cab e

Figure 3-10 Current Operations NIPR Network Distribution

Q.W

<<

f=l

(===1

1=1

F=l

f=l

f=i

CAU (Controlled Access Unit) Q


CPCS Coax CPP2A
CPCS Coax CPP2B

Figure 3-11 Current Operations Cell CPCS Cable Distribution

z a: a:
5131
3 E CO

Figure 3-12 Network Operations Cell MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box

Power Cables

Power Strip

Extension Cables

Figure 3-13 Network Operations Cell Power Distribution

Lr rt
< CD a.
-J E co

^ rr rr
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S E co

< C3 Q3 E z

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-14 Network Operations Cell SIPR Network Distribution

8
S m
a

co

CO >

co

NIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-15 Network Operations NIPR Network Distribution

o
D
Q
D
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LU

r LC
< a a-

^ rr rr
S C3 9S E co

CAU (Controlled Access Unit)


CPCS Coax

Figure 3-16 Network Operations CPCS Cable Distribution

o
' Z)
Q
D

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LU

Figure 3-17 Fires Cell MTOE Positions

01 CO cu

Grounding Rod Points

Power Cables

Receptacle Box

Extension Cables

||

Grounding Cable

Figure 3-18 Fires Cell Power Distribution

S PR CAT 5 Cab e

Figure 3-19 Fires Cell SIPR Network Distribution

NIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-20 Fires Cell NIPR Network Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit) Q


CPCS Coax

Figure 3-21 Fires Depicting CPCS Cable Distribution

Figure 3-22 ADAM CPP Tent Layout of MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box
Power Strip
Power Cables
Extension Cables

Figure 3-23 ADAM CPP Power Distribution

! TO ra
CO Q O

Figure 3-24 Intelligence Cell MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box

Power Cables
Extension Cables

Power Strip

Figure 3-25 Intelligence Cell Power Distribution

~ TO TO

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-26 Intelligence Cell SIPR Layout

~ TO TO

O
3
. Q
3

O
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11

CO K

<\*
L'

"

CT

CO S
'

Q-'

'

CAU (Controlled Access Unit) Q

Figure 3-27 Intelligence Cell CPCS Cable Distribution

CO
[O

CO
CO

<<

Figure 3-28 Movement and Maneuver MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box

Power Cables

Power Strip

Extension Cables

Grounding Rod Points

Grounding Cable

Figure 3-29 Movement and Maneuver Power Distribution

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-30 Movement and Maneuver SIPR Distribution

N PR CAT 5 Cab e

Figure 3-31 Movement and Maneuver NIPR Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit)


CPCS Coax

Figure 3-32 Movement and Maneuver CPCS Cable Distribution

Figure 3-33 Sustainment Cell MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box
Power Strip

^^^

Grounding Rod Points - A ~

Power Cables
Extension Cables
Grounding Cable

Figure 3-34 Sustainment Cell Power Distribution

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-35 Sustainment Cell SIPR Distribution

NIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-36 Sustainment Cell NIPR Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit) Q


CPCS Coax

Figure 3-37 Sustainment Cell CPCS Distribution

Figure 3-38 Plans Cell MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box

Power Cables
Extension Cables

Power Strip

Figure 3-39 Plans Cell Power Distribution

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-40 Plans Cell SIPR Distribution

N PR CAT 5 Cab e

Figure 3-41 Plans Cell NIPR Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit) L J

Figure 3-42 Plans Cell CPCS Distribution

Figure 3-43 Stryker Brigade Combat Team Tactical (SBCT TAC)

Grounding Rod Points

-v-

SWGS Jumper Cable

SIPR Data Case

SWGS Cable

CCS Case

Power Cable

Figure 3-44 SBCT TAC Power and Grounding

Figure 3-45 SBCT TAC Fiber Distribution

Figure 3-46 SBCT TAC CPCS Distribution

Figure 3-47 SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box

Power Cables

Power Strip

Extension Cables

Grounding Rod Points

Grounding Cable

Figure 3-48 SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell Power Distribution

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-49 SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell SIPR Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit)


CPCS Coax

Figure 3-50 SBCT TAC OPS 1 Cell CPCS Distribution

Figure 3-51 SBCT TAC OPS 2 Cell MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box

Power Cables

Power Strip

Extension Cables

Grounding Rod Points m

Grounding Cable

Figure 3-52 SBCT TAC OPS 2 Cell Power Distribution

S PR CAT 5 Cab e

Figure 3-53 SBCT TAC OPS 2 Cell SIPR Distribution

ra
CO Q O

NIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-54 SBCT TAC OPS 2 Cell NIPR Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit) H

Figure 3-55 SBCT TAC OPS 2 Cell CPCS Distribution

Figure 3-56 SBCT Battalion (BN) CP Fire Exits

Grounding Rod Points

SWGS Jumper Cable

SIPR Data Case

SWGS Cable

CCS Case

Power Cable

Figure 3-57 SBCT BN CP Power and Grounding Distribution

Fiber Cables

Figure 3-58 SBCT BN CP SIPR and NIPR Distribution

Figure 3-59 SBCT BN CPCS Distribution

zz
JU CQ CD

Figure 3-60 SBCT BN Current Ops Cell MTOE Positions

Receptacle Box

Power Cables

Power Strip

Extension Cables

Grounding Rod Points - A ~

Grounding Cable

Figure 3-61 SBCT BN Current Ops Cell Power Distribution

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-62 SBCT BN Current Ops SIPR Distribution

< a. Q-co
"o

D_ 7^ <

NIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-63 SBCT BN Current OPs Cell NIPR Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit) L J


CPCS Coax ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ~

Figure 3-64 SBCT BN Current Ops Cell CPCS Distribution

Figure 3-65 SBCT BN Sustainment Cell MTOE Positions

-tjJJ

I H J

I H J

I H J

Receptacle Box

Power Cables

Power Strip

Extension Cables

Grounding Rod Points -^L~


Grounding Cable .
Fire Exit

Figure 3-66 SBCT BN Sustainment Cell Power Distribution

SIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-67 SBCT BN Sustainment Cell SIPR Distribution

NIPR CAT 5 Cable

Figure 3-68 SBCT BN Sustainment Cell NIPR Distribution

CAU (Controlled Access Unit)


CPCS Coax ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ~

Figure 3-69 SBCT BN Sustainment Cell CPCS Distribution

Figure 3-70 Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT CP

Grounding Rod Points

SWGS Jumper Cable

Figure 3-71 Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT CP Grounding

Data Case
Power Cables
Fiber Cable

Figure 3-72 Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT CP Power and Fiber

3= O
co >

W B
0 3

Figure 3-73 Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT Current Operations Tent

rr rr
< CD Q.

rr rr
< CD o.

Figure 3-74 Maneuver BN HBCT-IBCT Sustainment Tent

Figure 3-75 Brigade Support Battalion (BSB) CP

Figure 3-76 BSB Current Operations Tent

-= <
E S O

Figure 3-77 BSB Support Operations Tent

Figure 3-78 BSB Sustainment Tent

Figure 3-79 Brigade Special Troops Battalion (BSTB) CP

Figure 3-80 BSTB Current Operations Tent

LC rr
< CD 9z

Figure 3-81 BSTB Sustainment Tent

3.3

Power Distribution

3.3.1

The new Army-fielded standardized CPs with the ABCS suite are
powered in a different way from previous versions. Rather than
each particular system or item running off of its own generator,
all are collectively powered from a single source. This concept is
called Central Power. Power is provided by a Power Plant (PP)
and supplied to the equipment through a network of cables and
distribution equipment referred to in this guide as a "grid." This
guide provides an overview of the equipment and instructions on
how to set up the Central Power grid.

3.3.1.1 TQG. The Tactical Quiet Generators (TQGs), used to power


the CPs, are all configured as PPs. Each PP consists of two
generators, each on its own trailer and linked through a switch
box and power cable. The PPs used are the 15-kWAN/MJQ48; the 30-kWAN/MJQ-40; and the 60-kWAN/MJQ-41. When
available, backup power for each shelter in the CP is provided
by either a 10-kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) or a 10-kW power
unit, designated PU-798. Other TQGs can be found throughout
the brigade and battalion, but for the purposes of TOC power,
this guide will only address the PPs listed above.
3.3.1.2 PDISE. The Power Distribution Illumination System Electrical
(PDISE) system is a family of power distribution and illumination
equipment which transmits electrical power between powergeneration and power-using equipment. By adding components
to meet specific organizational missions and requirements, it
forms a consolidated power network. The PDISE system and
the user's electrical equipment are protected by circuit breakers
within the PDISE equipment, rated at the maximum permissible
load. The PDISE also:

Permits using units more flexibility by consolidating power


sources
Provides flexibility to unit operations and can be quickly
assembled/disassembled for rapid relocation
Is designed for basic climatic (120 to -25F [49 to -32C])
and field conditions
Is designed to be used with generator sets (120/208 VAC,
50/60 Hz, 5-200 kW), but is compatible with any similar
power source (e.g., utility or "pole" power)
Uses standard military connectors

3.3.1.3 The line distance from the TQG to the load is limited to a total
of 300 feet (91.4 m) at maximum load; anything longer would
cause an unacceptable voltage loss. Various types of PDISE
and ancillary equipment are listed below.
3.3.1.4 The M100 is the central distribution point for the CP power, and
connects the TQGs to the shelters and to the smaller boxes
(M48). It also serves as a circuit breaker box for the CP, identical
in operation to residential circuit breaker boxes. The M100s are
sometimes referred to as "turtles" or "big hibachis." Two M100s
are used with each MJQ-41 power cable and one is used with
each of the MJQ-40 and MJQ-48 power cables. Each M100 is
equipped with phase indicator lights that indicate the presence of
input power.
3.3.1.5 The M40 acts as a "branch circuit" for the CP. It is a smaller
distribution box that provides rows of electrical outlets which,
when used with the M46, allows TOC operators the flexibility
to power electrical and electronic equipment (servers, UPSs,
laptops, cellphone chargers, etc.) directly from the TQGs. At the
Brigade (BDE) and BSB TOCs, the M40 connects to the M100.
At the BNs, the M40 wires directly into the terminal lugs on the
switch box of the MJQ-48. The M40 also functions in the same
cap as a residential circuit breaker box.
3.3.1.6 The M46 Electrical Distribution Kit contains the electrical
outlets and cables that allow users to plug their equipment into
the TQGs. Each M46 kit consists of drop boxes with standard
electrical duplex receptacles, branch cables for connecting and
stringing up the drop boxes, and extension cables that run from
the PDISE box to the branch cables. In general, two M46s are
issued with each M40. They can also be connected to the small
20 A connectors on the M100.
3.3.2

General Guidelines for Setup

3.3.2.1 Power Plant Setup


Setup and grounding of each TQG is covered in the TM for
that TQG. THE TQGS MUST BE GROUNDED PRIOR TO
STARTUP!
Each PP consists of an A and a B unit. The A unit has the
switch box. The B unit has the power cable. Each PP has
two paralleling cables, one for each generator. On the MJQ40 , MJQ-41, and MJQ-48, they are stored inside the rear
doors, along with the auxiliary fuel hose. Remove the cables
from storage and install using the following steps:

1.

Connect one end of the paralleling cable to connector J3 on


the switch box located on unit A. Route the other end of this
cable through the power cable sock and connect to connector
J16 on unit B. The J16 receptacle is found inside the load
terminal area in the far upper left corner. This provides power
to the switch box. This connection can be difficult to secure;
the cable has to seat properly for the switch box to work.

2. Connect the second paralleling cable between the two


paralleling receptacles on the generator set control panels.
This allows the TQGs to "talk" to each other.
3. Once these two cables are connected, ensure they do not
form an X. If they do, the cables are connected incorrectly.
4.

Unwrap the power cable from around unit B, but do not


disconnect it from the unit B. Connect the plug end of the
power cable to port J2 of the switch box on unit A. Route the
other end of the cable through the power cable sock and
connect leads to appropriate load terminals on unit B. Leads
will be labeled with load terminal designations.

5. For detailed instructions and diagrams, refer to TM 9-6115663-13&P, paragraph 2-3.4.2, for the AN/MJQ-41; TM 9-6115662-13&P, paragraph 2-3.4.2, for the AN/MJQ-40; and TM
9-6115-661-13&P, paragraph 2-3.4.2, for the MJQ-48s. These
TMs are provided with the generators, and can be accessed
online through the LOGSA Website (https://www.loqsa.armv.
mil/etms/online.htm) or the PM-MEP Website (http://www.pmmep.armv.mil/loqistics/pubs.htm).
3.3.2.2 Connecting M100s to PPs
Each M100 is supplied with two 25-ft feeder cables and one
4-ft pigtail used to connect the M100 to the power plant.
Each power plant has a switch box that combines the power
produced by the TQGs, and provides a safe, common
connection point. The power is taken off the switch box
through the terminal lugs found on the side of the switch box.
The pigtail from the M100 connects to the switch box
terminal lugs. The marking on the switch box (G, N, L1, L2,
L3) matches the marking on the pigtail. The wires are also
color coded:
1) Green = ground = G
2) White = neutral = N or LO
3) Black = Phase A = L1

4) Red = Phase B = L2
5) Orange or Blue = Phase C = L3

3reen\

White

Back/

Red

M100 Pigtail Cable

Figure 3-82 M100 Pigtail Connection to TQG


The two long cables connect between the pigtail and the
M100. These enable the user to move the PP away from the
TOC, and reposition the M100 as needed.
3.3.2.3 Connecting Shelters to M100s
Each shelter mounted on a HMMWV has one 50-ft cable
and one 10-ft pigtail, both rated for 60 A. Prior to connecting
anything to the M100, ensure the connector to be used is not
ON. This is done by switching the appropriate circuit breaker
into the OFF position.
For the CPP and ADAM shelters, use the 50-foot vehicle
cable to connect from the J1 port on the power entry panel
to a 60-A rated port on the M100 (J3 or J6). Other shelters
(such as DTSS) can use J4 or J5 on the M100. After the
cable is connected, close the appropriate circuit breaker.
Ensure shelter power requirement of 40 or 60 A prior to
connecting power. See Figure 3-83.
3.3.2.4 PDISE: M40, M46
The M40 PDISE boxes are used in conjunction with the
M46 electrical distribution kit to provide a place to plug in
electrical and electronic equipment. Use the large feeder
cables that come with the M40. Connect the cables to the J1
port on the M40 and a port rated for 40 A on the M100 (J4 or
J5; Figure 3-84).

Figure 3-83 M100 Connections

Figure 3-84 M40 Connections


The M40 receives 3-phase power and splits each phase
to separate connectors. On each side of the M40 are two
connectors for each phase. These connectors alternate ABCABC. A corresponds to L1 on the TQG, B corresponds
to L2, and C corresponds to L3.
When connecting the M46 cables to the M40, use groups of
three connectors. This keeps the total load balanced on the
generator, and prevents overloading any one phase. Use the
C connector first, then B, then A, and then repeat as needed.

The M46 branch is one line with three outlet boxes. Each
box has four outlets. The entire line is connected to one 20-A
circuit breaker. When connecting, go in numerical order,
i.e., J3, then J4, then J5. This ensures each phase gets
loaded, and that C is guaranteed a load. The items that are
connected to each branch are METT-TC dependent.
3.3.3

General Operation

3.3.3.1 Start and Parallel PPs

Start one generator and apply load as per the TQG operation
instructions. To parallel the TQGs or transfer load from one
to the other, follow the instructions below. These instructions
are also on the inside of the switch box control panel door.
For detailed instructions and diagrams, refer to the PP TM.
To start the MJQ-48: the DEAD CRANK switch must be in
the NORMAL position, the DC Control Power circuit breaker
must be pushed in, and the Emergency Stop Switch must
be in the OUT position. Move the MASTER SWITCH to the
START position and HOLD until the frequency gauge reads
60 Hz, the voltage gauge reads 120 volts, and oil pressure
is at 60 psi. Once the generator set is running, move the AC
CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER switch to the CLOSED position to
supply power to the load. If the generator set's STATUS light
is on, move the ON/OFF switch at the switch box to the ON
position to supply power to the load.
Use to following steps to parallel the MJQ-48. Gen 1 is the
generator that is on; Gen 2 is the generator that is off.
1. Start the vehicle engine to supply power to
the shelter equipment (except the ECU), while
transferring power to the TQGs.
2. On Gen 1, set UNIT-PARALLEL switch to
PARALLEL.
3. Start Gen 2. Adjust VOLTAGE and FREQUENCY to
match Gen 1.
4. On Gen 2 switch box, set ON-OFF switch to ON. ON
LINE and STATUS lights should illuminate.
5. At Gen 2, set UNIT-PARALLEL switch to PARALLEL.
Both SYNCHRONIZING lights should be flashing at
the same time.
6. Increase frequency until SYNCHRONIZING lights
flash in sync one or more times per second.
7. Decrease FREQUENCY until lights flash in sync
once every 3 to 4 seconds.

8. When lights are off, set Gen 2 CIRCUIT INTRPT


SWITCH to CLOSE. Gen contactor light should
illuminate and SYNCHRONIZING lights should go
out.
9. At Gen 1, set CIRCUIT INTRPT SWITCH to OPEN,
set UNIT-PARALLEL switch to UNIT. Turn MASTER
switch to STOP. At switch box, ON LINE and
STATUS lights should be off.
10. At Gen 2, set UNIT-PARALLEL switch to UNIT.
Use the following steps to start the MJQ-40 and MJQ-41:
1. Move the MASTER CONTROL switch to the ON
position and allow the Computer Interface Module
(CIM) to load.
2. Once the CIM software has loaded, clear any faults
previously registered on the CIM display screen by
holding the FAULT RESET switch in the ON position
for 5 seconds.
3. Hold the ENGINE CONTROL switch in the start
position until frequency gauge reads 60 Hz, and the
voltage gauge reads 208 volts.
4. Once the generator set is running, supply power to
the load by moving the AC CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER
switch to the CLOSED position. The green light
should come on.
5. On the generator set with a STATUS light on, move
the switch box ON/OFF switch to the ON position to
supply power to the load.
Use the following steps to parallel the MJQ-40 and MJQ-41.
Gen 1 is the generator that is on; Gen 2 is the generator that
is off.
1. Start the vehicle engine to supply power to shelter
equipment (except the ECU), while transferring power
to the TQGs.
2. Start Gen 2. Adjust VOLTAGE and FREQUENCY to
match Gen 1.
3. At the Gen 2 switch box, set ON-OFF switch to ON.
ON LINE and STATUS lights should illuminate.
4. Set Gen 2 CKT INTRPT SWITCH to CLOSE.
Contactor position on CIM display screen reads
CLOSED.
5. At Gen 1, set CKT INTRPT switch to OPEN. Turn
ENGINE CONTROL switch to STOP. At switch box,
ON LINE and STATUS lights should go off.
3-91

3.3.3.2 Use the following steps to switch from on-board power to import
power:
1.

If an APU is installed in the shelter, turn off APU and remove


the feeder cable at the J1 import connector of the shelter's
Power Entry Panel (PEP). BEFORE CONNECTING
THE CABLE AT THE M100, MAKE SURE THE CIRCUIT
BREAKER ASSOCIATED WITH THE CONNECTOR IS
TURNED OFF!
2. Connect the 50-ft, 60-A feeder cable supplied with the CPP
from a 60-A rated port on the M100 (J3 or J6) to the J1
Import connector on the CPP's PEP.
3. Wth the connections made, first turn the circuit breaker at
the M100 to the ON position, and then turn the IMPORT
POWER circuit breaker and the DC POWER SUPPLY circuit
breaker at the shelter's PEP to the ON position.
4. To verify power at the PEP, press the PUSH TO TEST button
and the three PWR SUPPLY AC INPUT and PWR SUPPLY
DC OUTPUT LEDs should illuminate.
3.3.4

PDISE Placement - General Guidance

3.3.4.1 BDE Main, BSB


The BDE HHC Main TOC uses one MJQ-41 as the primary
power source. The BSB TOC uses one MJQ-40 as the
primary power source. Figure 3-83 shows a suggested
layout for the BDE Main based on the TRADOC-designed
TOC configuration. After the TOC tents are set up, place the
M40s so there is one M40 for about every two TMSS tents
(the exception is the CIC, which may need its own M40).
Then place each M100 within 50 ft of two shelters and one
of the M40s. Keep the number of items connected to the
M100s balanced. This helps prevent overloading and tripping
circuit breakers. At the BDE Headquarters and Headquarters
Company (HHC), park the PP halfway between M100s. At
the BSB, park the PP no more than 50 ft away from M100.
Use the branch cables and two or three outlet boxes in the
M46 to run a line of outlets for items like the CP of the Future
(CPOF), laptops, cell phone chargers, etc.
Use extension cables to provide a single power drop for
items such as Battle Command and Control System (BCCS)
server and Joint Network Node (JNN) SIPR/NIPR stack.
Provide a single power drop for the coffee pot to share with
items that draw a lot of power, but are used infrequently,
such as printers, plotters, or shredders.

Again, when connecting the M46 cables to the M40, use


groups of three connectors. This helps keep the total load
balanced on the generator, and prevents overloading any
one phase. When in doubt, put the larger load on L3.
3.3.4.2 Maneuver BNs, BDE TAC
The BDE TAC and Maneuver BN Tactical Operations
Centers (TOCs) each use one 15-kW PP, MJQ-48, as the
primary power source. Place the M40 near where the tents
come together. Place the M100 as close to the M40 and
CPPs as possible, but no more than 50 ft from the CPPs.
Park the PP no more than 50 ft from the M100.
Use the branch cables and two or three outlet boxes in the
M46 to run a line of outlets for items like the CPOF, laptops,
cell phone chargers, etc. Use the extension cables to provide
a single power drop for items such as the BCCS server.
Provide a single power drop for the coffee pot to share with
items that draw a lot of power, but are used infrequently,
such as printers, plotters, or shredders. When connecting
the M46 cables to the M40, use groups of three connectors.
This keeps the load balanced on the generator and prevents
overloading any one phase. Put the larger load on L3.
3.3.5

Address questions/comments about this guide or TOC power to:


PM-Mobile Electric Power
ATTN: SFAE-CSS-ME (R. Nutter)
10205 Burbeck Rd, Suite 105
Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060-5863
Phone: DSN 654-3802, Comm 703-704-3802
E-mail: Robert.C.Nutter@us.armv.mil
Jose.Santos@us.armv.mil

3.4

Combat Net Radios (CNR) and CP Communication System


(CPCS)

3.4.1

The system includes the FM very high frequency (VHF)


SINCGARS, high frequency (HF) AM radios, and TACSAT radio
systems. Figure 3-85 is an example of CNR deployment.

3.4.2

Single Channel Ground Air Radio System (SINCGARS)

3.4.2.1 SINCGARS is the most widespread communications system,


found in all units. These radios are portable, mobile, and can
be used on the move easier than other CNR systems. Although
limited in range, their reach can be extended with directional
antennas, retransmission stations, or relays.

3.4.2.2 SINCGARS transmits both voice and limited data traffic


and resists jamming and other electronic attack techniques
by frequency hopping. Imbedded communications security
(COMSEC) further contributes to survivability.
3.4.3

High Frequency (HF) Radios

3.4.3.1 HF AM radios extend ranges beyond that possible with VHF


radios such as SINCGARS. They are reliable, with good
frequency management and antenna selection and can be used
in a retransmission mode to extend the ranges of VHF nets.
Current available versions are the vehicular-mounted, shortrange AN/GRC-213 and the long-range AN/GRC-193 HF radios.
Both support secure voice and data transmission.
3.4.4

Tactical Satellite (TACSAT) Radios

3.4.4.1 TACSAT radios carry both voice and data traffic globally,
eliminating distance constraints inherent in other CNR systems.
Range is the main advantage of TACSAT radios for beyond-lineof-sight capability. For contingency operations, CORPS and DIV
need to include TACSATs in C2 architecture planning.
3.4.4.2 CORPS Commanders can direct that single-channel Earth
stations be provided to subordinate BDE-sized elements if
distances or terrain exceed other CNR system capabilities.
3.4.5

Command Post Communication System (CPCS)

3.4.5.1 Tactical Operations Center Intercommunication System


(TOCNET) provides an expandable approach to voice and
data communications for field tactical C2 personnel. The
system consists of three different Line Replaceable Units:
Enhanced Micro Central Switching Unit (eMCSU), Desktop
Crew Access Unit (CAU), and Soft CAU. Each eMCSU with
attached communication assets comprises a node. Different
sized systems can be constructed by adding or deleting nodes.
Multiple nodes (up to 64) can be networked to form one larger
system with up to 1024 assets (radios, phones, CAUs, etc.).
3.4.5.2 TOCNET enables users to interface and remotely manage
tactical radio assets and other communication applications
consistently, regardless of platform, while reducing training and
logistical impact. Workstations and radios can be configured
easily and replicated in all common stations with access to CAUs
not physically on the platform.

3.4.5.3 Extended Voice Communication (EVC) provides the capability to


interconnect many TOCNET systems. The radio cross-banding
function can be easily accomplished, resulting in optimal use of
each platform's resources, and transparent to off-platform users.
3.4.5.4 The eMCSU's configuration file allows control of the following
radio equipment:
SINCGARS RT-1523E via a PPP serial or Ethernet
connection to the INC
SINCGARS RT-1523E through a direct RS-232 connection
ARC-231 through a direct RS-232 connection
PSC-5D through a direct RS-232 connection
ARC-220 through a direct RS-232 connection
PRC-117F through a direct RS-232 connection
PRC-150 through a direct RS-232 connection
STE-R through a direct RS-232 connection

Afghanistan

Iraq

eMCSU IP Address: 192.169.1.15/24


EVC Channel 1
EVC # 5001
Codec Type: G729a

eMCSU IP Address: 192.168.1.16/24


EVC Channel 1
EVC # 5002
Codec Type: G729a

Figure 3-85 CNR Deployment Example

3.5

Network Cabling

3.5.1

The methods outlined in this handbook provide best practices


and procedures for the installation and utilization of physical
network assets. Installation of a CP Local Area Network (LAN)
from a distribution point (e.g., CPP or data access case) to
end user can be performed more efficiently once the end user
systems are positioned within the CP.

3.5.2

Equipment should be emplaced but not connected until a final


layout is obtained. The use of a diagram or notional architecture
allows for concurrent execution in various cells within a CP.
When running cable from the distribution point to the end user,
the installer should route the cable according to the plan outlined
in this handbook or unit Standing Operating Procedure (SOP).
Once sections of a specific cell have been wired, class-specific
wires can be bundled into harnesses utilizing hook-and-loop ties.
Single-use nylon zip ties should not be used for cable bundling
since overtightening may damage cabling.

3.5.3

Class-specific wiring harnesses increase efficiency in


establishment and subsequent displacement of the CP. In
accordance with NSA73-2A TEMPEST, SIPR and NIPR cables
running in parallel for distances greater than 30 m must be
15 cm from each other. For more security requirements, refer to
NSA73-2Aand other TEMPEST-related regulations.

National Security Telecommunications and Information Systems


Security Advisory Memorandum (NSTISSAM) TEMPEST/2-95, RED/
BLACK Installation Guidance specifies RED/BLACK equipment/system
installation guidance, provides an explanation of the TEMPEST policy
concept, and addresses RED/BLACK considerations for facilities wherein
national security information is processed. This publication supersedes
National COMSEC Information Memorandum (NACSIM) 5203, dated 30
June 1982. However, Appendix K of NACSIM 5203 will remain in effect
until NACSI 4009, Protected Distribution Systems, dated 30 December
1981, is superseded.

3.6

Network Operations and System Architecture

3.6.1

The purpose of this chapter is to outline key components of


Network Operations (NetOps):
Capabilities and responsibilities for supporting military
operations
Commander's role and responsibility concerning the
establishment of network priorities
Guidance for facilitating both internal connectivity as well as
external connectivity to the Global Information Grid (GIG)

3.6.2

In addition, this chapter will highlight the fact that the network
reaches far beyond the tactical boundaries of the battlefield,
crossing operational and strategic echelons up to the
Department of Defense in support of the Land War Net (LWN).
This chapter will also discuss:
Specific network management activities, functions, and tasks
performed by network managers
An overview of Information Assurance (IA) (including
responsibilities, tools, and incident reporting)
An overview of Information Dissemination Management
(IDM) as an enabler of information management

3.6.3

Role of NetOps

3.6.3.1 As technology continues to advance the development of more


sophisticated weapons systems, so does reliance on the
network to integrate these systems in order to achieve their
desired effects. In this light the network can and should be
considered a weapons system, equal to any of the traditional
combat platforms, which provides commanders shared
situational awareness, enhanced speed of command, and task
force synchronization. This is an important distinction to make,
especially when discussing what comprises a weapons system.
The DoD definition of a weapons system is "...a combination
of one or more weapons with all related equipment, materials,
services, personnel, and means of delivery and deployment (if
applicable) required for self-sufficiency" (JP 1-02, DoD Dictionary
of Military and Associated Terms, 12 Apr 2001).

What is NetOps?
Network Operations (NetOps): the allocation of network,
information system, information security, and information
dissemination resources directly in support of the Warfighter.
Network
Management
+
Info Assurance/
CyberDefense
+
Dissemination
Management

NM: Engineer, manage, restore


networks/systems
IA/CND: Protect/defend networks,
"systems, and information services
IDM/CS: Emplace, manage, and
"restore information and services

T h e Network is UP!
(G)The network can be
reconfigured ISO operations
\/Information is protected and
the network is protected
^2/The right information is in the
right place at the right time

Figure 3-86 NetOps


3.6.3.2 When comparing a traditional weapon system with the network,
they both utilize the exact same components to put them into
operation. These components are listed below:
Training
Preventative Maintenance
Function Checks
Operation
Capabilities
Limitations
Corrective Actions
Management
TTPs
Crew Roles and Responsibilities
3.6.3.3 As this list shows, whether a combat or network platform,
mission success depends on a detailed operational (and
functional) understanding if the system capabilities and
limitations in order to properly apply the system to the fight.
3.6.3.4 NetOps provides the over-arching management of these
capabilities and can be prioritized based on the commander's
intent and guidance.

3.6.3.5 NetOps is defined as the operational construct consisting of the


essential tasks, Situational Awareness (SA), and C2 that the
commander uses to operate and defend the tactical network
and its connectivity to the GIG. In this construct, NetOps
allocates network, information system, information security,
and information resources directly in support of the warfighter.
Although immediate operational commanders "own" the network,
they grant control, operation, and oversight to the senior signal
officer and staff. NetOps control is granted by the operational
commander in order to ensure the day-to-day compliance
of the network with the associated Tactical Information Grid
(TIG) and GIG requirements. Due to the fast moving nature of
NetOps and its 24/7 operation, NetOps requires quick decisions
and adjustments in order to fully support the dynamics of an
ever-changing battlefield. NetOps enables the commander by
providing assured network availability, information protection,
and information delivery.
3.6.4
Key Components
3.6.4.1 NetOps is the critical fusion point in the CP that combines
infrastructure and services that provide processing, storing,
and transporting information across the network. The functional
areas that comprise this infrastructure and services consist of
the wireless area network (WAN) and LAN management, Battle
Command systems, IA, Communications Security (COMSEC),
and Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations (EMSO). Each of
these areas is interrelated. As such, they cannot be viewed
and operated as single stove-piped systems, but instead must
be viewed from a holistic approach. It is also important to
understand that these areas are executed at both the Division
and BCT level and, therefore, must be synchronized both
horizontally and vertically between the two echelons so the
shared bandwidth, spectrum, and GIG (network) access is
properly managed. NetOps provides this management by:
Identifying the user's information requirement (who, what,
when, where)
Identifying which network, information systems, and
security architecture (hardware and software configuration
management) is required
Ensuring availability and access to networks
Applying the right technology and equipment
Protecting network resources and user information with IA
security measures

Ensuring the right information is disseminated to users in a


usable format at the right time and place
3.6.4.2 The synchronization between the BCT and Division cannot be
overlooked and marginalized. Although the Division G6 does not
own the signal assets in the BCT (this includes signal personnel
as well) all network configuration changes and WAN transport
equipment (JNNs and specifically satellite terminal) locations
must be coordinated with the next NetOps echelon. Failure to
do so will significantly impact not only the affected BCT, but
the entire tactical network as well. There must be an informal
command relationship between the Division G6 and S6 in regard
to network operations and management. Although the BCT
commander has the right to move assets based on operational
necessity, the BCT S6 still has the requirement to coordinate any
configuration changes, report network incidents, and highlight
future operations and any additional network requirements
needed for support of those operations.
3.6.5

Organizational Structure and Force Multipliers

3.6.5.1 As mentioned earlier, the operational commander grants


network control to the senior signal officer in the organization.
In the Division this would be the G6. Although the G6s are
considered primary staff officers, they have the authority to
make "command" decisions and changes to the tactical network
in order to ensure that it operates at maximum efficiency. The
mission statement for the G6 is listed below:
The G6 (CIO) integrates, manages, and provides operational oversight
for the C4I architecture ensuring the availability, reliability, and security
of voice, video, and data networks that support robust, adaptable, and
survivable C2 capability for the Commanding General and subordinate
US and coalition commanders throughout the Area of Operations (AO).
3.6.5.2 Division G6 Responsibilities. The G6 is the principal staff officer
and senior advisor to the Division Commander for all matters
concerning communications and networks. The G-6 has the
technical authority over the division information networks
including Training Readiness Oversight (TRO) of the DNOSC,
subordinate signal units and signal personnel. The G6 is
responsible for planning, designing, and directing the Division
NetOps and Security Center (DNOSC) to execute the C4 plan
in support of the division commander's intent. By executing the
commander's intent, the G6 directs all technical changes to the
network. To make physical moves to signal equipment, the G6
produces a Technical Support Order (TSO) and recommends

3-100

Fragmentary Orders (FRAGOs) to direct such movement


with the G3. The G6 is responsible for advising the division
commander, staff, and subordinate commanders on C4
operational matters (staff responsibilities, technical authority, and
training readiness oversight). G6 staff responsibilities includePrepare, maintain, and update C4 operations estimates,
plans, and orders. These orders will often cause
configuration management changes across multiple brigades
Monitor and make recommendations on all technical C4
operations
Act as the Army Forces' (ARFOR) G-6 when needed
(equipment and personnel augmentation will be required
to support this mission). Refer to FM 6-02.71, Network
Operations for more information
Advise the commander, staff, and subordinate commanders
on C4 operations and network priorities for battle command
(e.g., changing bandwidth allocation to support the division
main efforta brigade reinforced with additional ISR assets)
Direct technical changes to all portions of the division
network via the TSO process
Act as the JTF J-6, if required. Equipment and personnel
augmentation will be required to support this mission and will
be provided by the corps and/or theater as necessary. Refer
to FM 6-02.71, Network Operations for more information
Oversee development, production, changes, updates, and
distribution of the Signal Operating Instructions (SOIs)
Direct preparation and or publication of C4 operations SOPs
for division command posts
Coordinate, plan, and manage division spectrum
management within its Area of Responsibility (AOR)
Plan and coordinate with higher and lower headquarters
regarding information systems upgrade, replacement,
elimination, and integration
Coordinate with G2, G3, G7, and the operational CoC to plan
and direct all IA activities and C4 operations vulnerability and
risk assessments
Coordinate with staff of a variety of external agencies to
develop the information and communications plans, manage
the information network, obtain required services, and
support mission requirements

Confirm and validate user information requirements in direct


response to the tactical mission
Establish C4 policies and procedures for the use and
management of information tools and resources
3.6.5.3 Technical Authority Responsibilities. The following are the
technical authorities responsibilities:
Provide signal unit operations sections with direction and
guidance during preparation of network plans and produces
diagrams establishing the information network (WAN)
Plan and integrate information systems and battle command
equipment due to unit task organization/reorganization
Coordinate with the corps and JTF to plan and direct all
NetOps activities within the division AOR
3.6.5.4 Training Readiness Oversight Responsibilities. The following are
the TRO responsibilities:
Ensure the development of required skills to all signal
personnel within the division AOR
Develop and mentor all signal officers, including career
management
Coordinate with G1 to identify requirements and manage the
distribution of signal personnel within the division
Ensure the division NSC is trained to support division
missions and tasks
3.6.6

Division NetOps and Security Center (DNOSC)

3.6.6.1 The Division G-6 employs a fully integrated NetOps and Security
Center (NOSC), providing all NetOps functions for the division.
It has combined key assets within the G6 sections (primarily
NetOps, Ops, LAN, WAN). All division signal elements must
coordinate with the NOSC during the engineering, installation,
operation, maintenance, and defense of the division information
network. It has overall responsibility for establishing the division
information network and provides the operational and technical
support to all of the division signal elements in its AOR.
3.6.6.2 The division NOSC performs the NetOps activities, functions,
and tasks required to create a dynamic and responsive network.
This network also quickly shifts priorities in order to support the
ground tactical plan. This management function extends the
strategic GIG capabilities into the responsive, dynamic, and
tactical formations.

3.6.6.3 In order to increase responsiveness of a complex network


and to facilitate the bandwidth required to support the division
headquarters and brigade networks, the division employs
a NetOps cell with the Tactical Hub Node (THN). The THN
reallocates the TDMA satellite network structure and increases
the bandwidth capability from approximately 6 Mbps to 40 Mbps.
The embedded NetOps cell provides the management to enable
the division network. In addition, by expanding bandwidth,
the division has the capability to dynamically re-assign the
bandwidth so that the communications support plan can match
the division commander's ground tactical plan. The division G-6
matches the communications support plan enabling the added,
non-organic, capability by allocating a larger segment of the
division enabled bandwidth.
3.6.6.4 DNOSC Responsibilities. The following are the DNOSC
responsibilities:
Coordinate with the operational CoC and subordinate
organizations to monitor, manage, and ensure
implementation of Network Management, Information
Dissemination Management, and IA activities
Provide near-real-time awareness of division networks and
systems to the division G-6
Coordinate actions to resolve attacks/incidents on the
division network with subordinate organizations
Coordinate operational procedures and requirements for IA
and Information Systems Security (ISS) with the operational
CoC and supporting corps Regional Computer Emergency
Response Team (RCERT)
Coordinates wit subordinate NSCs to monitor, manage, and
control intra-division information network components.
Monitor the operation of the networks in the division's
subordinate units
Provide support and assistance to the subordinate NOSCs
Administer the organizational message system (Defense
Message System [DMS]) in the division, including managing
network addresses and sub-domains
Coordinate operation and maintenance support of C4
systems. These systems are attached to support deployed
division forces with the split-base and reach operations
capability to the home base.
Share Network Management information with other
management or monitoring centers

3-103

Provide the supporting ARFOR NOSC with near-real-time


information on the status and performance of inter-division
networks
Order and account for all forms of COMSEC material,
including storing keys in encrypted form and performing key
generation and automatic key distribution
Perform COMSEC material accounting functions and
communicates with other COMSEC elements
Perform Information Dissemination Management/Combat
Service (IDM/CS) functions to support all aspects of relevant
information dissemination
Provide near-real-time awareness of division networks and
systems that support the joint backbone to the Joint Task
Force Joint Communications Control Center (JTF JCCC)
when the division is serving as the ARFOR
Inform the G-6 of network outages and shortcomings that
require the electronic maintenance shop
3.6.7

NetOps at the BCT

3.6.7.1 As part of the overall LWN construct, the BCT is now considered
the centerpiece of the Army fighting force. As such, the
BCT could be called upon to deploy and conduct operations
independent of their organic command structure. To do this,
the BCT must be able to establish, operate, and maintain its
own network for the duration of the operation. This includes
the establishment of a central integrated section dedicated to
execute NetOps functions and is manned by the S6 section,
Signal Company personnel and assigned government and
civilian contractors. Figure 3-86 shows the BCT hierarchy.
3.6.7.2 The Brigade Signal Officer (S6) organization is augmented by
their STB Signal Company to provide a robust Brigade Network
Operations and Security Center (BNOSC). The Brigade S6
could not operate without direct support/attachment of those key
personnel. The Brigade organization provides both the tactical
support for the BCT and also the interface with the Division
for all C4I issues. The brigade S6 section is task organized to
best support the commanders' intent, normally located within
the brigade command posts to support the commander's
communications requirements across the AO.
3.6.7.3 The S6 is the principal officer for all matters concerning
communications and networks for a fully digitized

BCT with one Cavalry BN, two Combined Arms BN, one Field
Artillery BN, one Special Troops BN, one Support BN, and a
separate Headquarters company. Responsible for advising
the commander and staff on all aspects of Command, Control,
Communications, and Computer Operations (C40PS),
COMSEC, automation, and ensuring all aspects of C40PS
are ready to conduct combat operations. Due to the dynamics
of having signal assets assigned to multiple separate
organizations, the S6 must first have the support of the BCT
commander and develop a close working relationship with
the BSTB and maneuver battalion commanders, each of
the battalion S6s, and the Division G6. The BCT S6 is also
responsible for the maintenance and employment of FBCB2,
MSE, lower and upper tactical internet, automation, strategic,
TACSAT, FM, HF, MSE, and UHF tactical communications
systems, and the digital connectivity between ATCCS as part
of the Digital Division. The BCT S6 works closely with the
division G6 and the Nodal Signal Company (NSC) commander.
The brigade NSC commander works closely with the brigade
S6 when deployed. In addition, the Brigade S6 has technical
authority over all brigade NSC equipment. When the BCT
operates independently, the brigade S6 performs all of the same
duties and responsibilities as the G6.
3.6.7.4 Brigade S6 Responsibilities. These are Brigade S6
responsibilities:
Prepare, maintain, and update C4 operations estimates,
plans, and orders. Orders will often cause configuration
management changes across multiple battalions
Monitor/make recommendations on technical C4 operations
Designated as the ARFOR G6 when needed. Equipment and
personnel augmentation required to support this mission
Advise the commander, staff, and subordinate commanders
on C4 operations and network priorities for battle command
Develop, produce, change/update, and distribute SOI
Prepare/Publish C4 operations SOPs for BCT CPs
Coordinate, plan, and manage BCT spectrum within its AOR
Plan and coordinate with higher and lower headquarters
regarding information systems upgrade, replacement,
elimination, and integration
Coordinate with S2 and S3 to plan and direct all IA activities
and C4 operations, vulnerability, and risk assessments

Coordinate with staff from a variety of external agencies to


develop the information and communications plans, manage
the information network, obtain required services, and
support mission requirements
Confirm and validate user information requirements in direct
response to the tactical mission
Establish C4 policies and procedures for the use and
management of information tools and resources

The "Team" in the BCT

IN BN
Commander

BattaliornS6 -+

Figure 3-87 BCT Hierarchy

3.6.8

Tool Sets

3.6.8.1 NetOps tools enable network managers (G6/S6) to get nearreal-time information on the status and health of the integrated
network (LAN, WAN, Battle Command, and CNR) to enable
commanders to make sound decisions and execute operations.
The information collected can be used to conduct detailed
analysis of the network to identify trends that can be used to
optimize the efficiency and better protect it and its users. These
tools are normally consolidated and reside in the Division and
BCT NOSC under the control of the G6/S6. These tool sets
are fielded as part of the Unit Set Fielding (USF) process and
incorporated into the system architecture and data product
development. Discussion on data product develop will follow in a
later section. Figure 3-87 shows the current NetOps capability.

Current NetOps Capability


WAN Manager x 2
Building the G6
Enterprise Network
COP based on industry
Standards and Protocols

W A N / T R A N S

Planner

p0RT
Solar Winds
SNMPc

Scrutinizer
(netflow
analyzer)

LAN
IV4

BIT

LAN
Manager

BCCS
Server

Portal
Server
(Sharepoint)
Configuration IA Remote
Manager
Manager

Retnia
Hercules

&

<&

CPOF
Server

R ea | Secure
Netscreen Manager

Solar Winds
SNMPc

&
j

ENM

GCCS-A
Server

SPECTRUM
XXI

j
MCS
Server

TROUBLE TICKET MANAGEMENT

<&

TRACK-IT
LKMS

^
TACLANE
Manager

SWLAN
Manager

F?

BATTLE COMMAND'

INFORMATION
ASSURANCE

Node Manager

<!

HEAT

REMEDY

ANCD

RBECS

ACES

Figure 3-88 Current NetOps Capability


3.6.9

Battle Rhythm

3.6.9.1 Due to the number of briefings and mandatory events occurring


in a CP, both in garrison and combat, it is critical that these
events be synchronized. From a NetOps perspective, this
ensures that the network is available and accessible to support
operations. All mission essential network-related events MUST
be nested in with the Division/BCT battle rhythm. Critical events
that the G6 and S6 must pay close attention to include, Battle
Update Briefs (BUBs), network operational updates, server
maintenance, generator services, other scheduled system
downtime requests, and mission planning for future operations.
3.6.10 Establishing the CP
3.6.10.1 The setup and teardown of the CP is the most critical time for the
unit to conduct Ops. It is during these periods that the NetOps
section has minimal tools with which to monitor the stability of
the network and to take corrective action if any degradation
occurs. The unit must ensure that these processes are part
of the unit SOP, and trained and executed in accordance with
established unit battle drills. During the movement of the CP
(specifically the main CP) NetOps functions will remain with
the CP that has operational control of operations within the AO.
Once the displaced CP has established full network connectivity,

a battle handover of tasks, functions, and responsibility will be


transferred to it. This battle handover is a deliberate process with
control measures (decision points) in place to ensure the proper
handover criteria is met.
3.6.11

Reporting

3.6.11.1 As mentioned previously, the G6 does not control or own the


signal assets or personnel in the BCT. However, when the
BCT is connected to the Division network, then the Division
G6, empowered by the Division commander, has technical
control of the network and the BCTs are obligated to report
their network status to the higher HQ. Reporting procedures
are normally included as part of Annex H to the division or task
force operations order and specific timelines and report formats
are part of the NetOps battle rhythm. Data gathered from these
reports serve as a method for the G6 and staff to conduct
additional analysis on the overall health of the network, looking
for trends that may signal an issue before it happens, track the
maintenance status of all network related equipment, systems
and platforms, and to prepare updates to be presented as part of
the commander's battle update brief. Report formats and content
are defined as part of the unit SOP.
3.6.12 Commander Network Roles
3.6.12.1 The potential missions a BCT can be assigned are more
diverse than ever. Since the BCT is capable of unit-specific,
self-sustained operations for a period of time, it must be
able to establish and maintain access to the GIG to conduct
operations. It is imperative that BCT commanders have a
better understanding of the network and its capabilities, the
BCT architecture and systems that utilize the network, and
the responsibility for utilizing and protecting the network. The
commander is not the resident expert, but must possess an
operational understanding of the network, its applications, and
systems to employ and utilize it as a weapons system; and be
able to provide the appropriate guidance and support to the
S6 running and maintaining the BCT enterprise network. It is
important for commanders to understand that the decisions
made about the network and how they operate have an impact
on the larger enterprise information grid. This affects not only the
ability to execute operations, but affects the larger task force as
well. Depending on the situation, adverse network effects can
be felt all the way back to the sustaining base. The following are
some specific areas for the commander to focus:

Spectrum - There has been a significant increase in the


number of emitters and spectrum dependent systems
fielded down to the Brigade level. In some cases, these
new emitters are competing for the same limited spectrum
that the existing battle command and transport systems are
utilizing. Commanders must understand and incorporate
spectrum as part of their overall mission planning process.
Of specific concern is the impact that the operational
environment (terrain, urban density, proximity to U.S. and
coalition partners, host nation spectrum utilization, etc.) has
on the availability of spectrum to support operations. The
closer in proximity that similarly configured and equipped
units are operating, the more likely that spectrum conflicts
become. Unmanned aerial platforms are an example. Due
to the frequency band used to operate each platform and
the bandwidth required, numerous units operating a defined
area must be prepared to share the spectrum, limiting the
number of platforms that can be airborne at any given time.
Commanders cannot use all of the emitters that fielded and
must prioritize installation, operation, and restoration of these
systems. The S6 and Bde/Division Spectrum Manager are
critical to the development of the spectrum utilization plan in
support of operations and commanders intent.
CP Operations - Commanders must integrate the increased
personnel and systems, including increases in Battle
Command Systems (BCSs) and applications, to enable
effective C2. Each staff section residing in the TOC has
extensive data requirements to develop products for the
commander. This information is critical to CP operations; but
excessive data can rapidly exceed the allocated bandwidth
for a unit. It is critical that commanders establish and enforce
"digital rules of engagement" inside the CP to ensure all
systems are utilized to their fullest potential. These rules
help to protect bandwidth supporting critical TOC events.
Applications and products requiring extensive time and/
or bandwidth to produce should be allocated a time slot in
conjunction with daily operations. These products should be
synchronized with/included as key events on the unit's battle
rhythm. For example, the S2 cannot pull multi-megabit sized
map products through the network when the commander is
executing a battle update brief with the higher headquarters.
Trying to access the map/intel products can impact the
quality of the update brief. Disciplined adherence to the
digital rules will ensure network stability and unhindered
support to operations.
3-109

A Point of Time in the TOC


Available
3.75 Mbps
NIPR Usage
(sending pictures home)
2 Mbps

BREEZE (CUB]
2 Mbps
Downloading a File
from IDMT
900 kbps
Predator FMV
200 kbps

Using
4.39 Mbps

mIRCChat
100 kbps
Fusion Net Query
100 kbps

VOIP Phone Call


90 kbps

The CDR want you to come up on BREEZE and you


can't receive the slides... Why?... Bandwidth!

Figure 3-89 Controlling Bandwidth


Information Assurance (IA) - With this influx of data coming into
the CP comes the operational necessity to safeguard it. The
tactical network is no longer "closed" to the global community,
and as a result makes network more vulnerable intrusion aimed
at data collection (intel) or to undermine operations. To this end,
the IA posture is aimed at protecting systems from such attacks.
There is no differentiation or separation between the network in
garrison or in a forward theater of operations. This concept also
applies to the fact that there is no difference between the tactical
and strategic network. There are stringent rules on what is and is
not allowed on the network and the commander is an essential
part of enforcement of these rules. If the commander does not
ensure compliance, anomalies can be injected into the network
that can cripple an entire theater in just a matter of hours,
having ramifications that reach all the way back to the sustaining
base. Units must gain approval to add components, especially
Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) components outside their
MTOE. This is important for several reasons. In a network where
each and every component has an assigned IP address, the
addition of outside components can interfere with the proper
functions of other systems. These additional systems utilize
precious bandwidth that was not planned for, potentially reducing
available bandwidth required for operational support. In addition,
"non-standard COTS systems" are not included as part of the

approved unit system architecture driving the production of data


products that establish specific unit configuration baselines for
digital connectivity. These additions force network managers to
manually add their IP addresses to the baseline files, increasing
the likelihood of configuration mismatches. There are stringent
guidelines and policies in place to safeguard the network and
critical information. The Division G6 has overall responsibility
in the Division and has a staff section dedicated to monitoring
IA across the divisional footprint. The Brigade and Battalion S6
work directly with the G6 on all compliance matters.
3.6.13 Dataproducts
3.6.13.1 Data Products are a collection of mission data required to
initialize Battle Command and other Army C4ISR systems. This
data includes the information required to enable end-to-end
network-centric connectivity and interoperability across the
Tactical Internet (Tl). In simpler terms, Data Products are a set of
software databases which provide the following:
Blueprint for building a unit
Initialization data required to configure the network
Upper and lower tactical internet address book
3.6.13.2 These software files ensure the configuration and connectivity
requirements of the individual BFAs within ABCS are met.
They include the data that provides accurate addressing and
networking information for routing communications and C2
messaging between these systems. Two specific products that
are produced to facilitate network management by the S6/G6 are
the System Architecture and Lightweight Data Integration Format
(LDIF) which contains the role name and IP address for every
C4I system in the unit.
3.6.14 System Architecture
3.6.14.1 As alluded to previously, the system architecture is the
foundation for which unit digital connectivity is developed and
serves as an essential guide to support CP establishment and
operations. By definition, the system architecture "is a graphical
display of radios and computer systems (based off of the MTOE
from USAFMSA, the ARDP from TCM BC, and the KLO from
TCM PBC/CID) inside their platform (e.g., vehicles, tents, transit
cases, or aircrafts) networked together in order to provide a
computer networking blueprint." The diagram in Figure 3-89
shows an example of a NetViz diagram which displays the
interconnectivity between the CP, network platforms, and C2

3-111

systems. Without this interrelationship, network connectivity, and


situational awareness across the unit could not be shared.

stem Architecture - NetViz

WCS-NCU AN/PYQ-6B CF7


V1CS-NCU A
OPS FIRE NETiV

MCS-NCU AN/PYQ-6B CF7-73


53 OPS S CPS TENT

F3 INTEL NETiV

EX INTEL NETiV

S3 MVR SPT NC

BCT3CMDNET(V)

Figure 3-90 NetViz Diagram


3.6.15 Data Product Development
3.6.15.1 Data products are extremely detailed and their development
can take anywhere between 60-120 days. It is critical that the
unit commander understands this complexity and ensures the
development timeline is synchronized with the unit's operational
timeline. Failure to do so can adversely affect unit training
events across multiple echelons. Throughout the development
process, it is imperative that the right people are involved. At
the Brigade level, the S6, network techs (warrant officers),
and senior automation officers/NCOs play a pivotal roll. These
people must be familiar with the type and location of all the C4I
systems, including the combat platforms and command vehicles.
Additionally, they must have a clear understanding of the unit's
system architecture and be able to make recommendations
to the commander regarding redistributing assets or making
additions platforms. There are several planning conferences
taking place at different phases in the process. It is essential that
these personnel are involved with each of them.

3.6.15.2 The development process begins with a review of all approved


authorization documents for a particular unit (MTOE, ARDs,
Fielding Schedules, Fragos, ARFORGEN timelines, etc). With
these documents, the developers create a baseline systems
architecture which will serve as a baseline that any scheduled
new equipment fielding or system changes can be annotated.
Once completed, the systems architecture is provided to the unit
at the initial synchronization conference. During this conference,
the unit is provided fielding timelines linked to the operational
and training calendars.
3.6.15.3 Once this initial conference is complete, there are a number of
technical exchange conferences that occur between the data
product developers and the BFA leads to verify network and
configuration parameters. At the same time, they continually
refer to the source documentation and ensure that the system
architecture accurately reflects these protocols. This is the
most important phase, as any unit-specified equipment/system
changes are reflected in the configuration matrices. The final
step in this phase is the addition of Unit Reference Numbers
(URNs) to the system architecture documentation and database
files.
3.6.15.4 The final phase involves a multi-tiered review of the system
architecture data product and all system configurations. This
phase involves a special data review board, the unit, and the Pd
NetOps data products working groups. Once approved, these
configurations are installed in CP router, switches, servers, and
applicable BCSs to serve as baseline configurations the unit
uses to execute their mission essential training events. Once
training is complete, the unit receives a final set of data products
to support their deployment. These data products are classified
and must be treated as any other classified document.
3.7

Information Systems

3.7.1

Table 3-3 describes the information systems. Additional


information can be found at the Single Interface to the Field (SIF)
site (noted at asterisks) at https://sif.kcus.armv.mil/

Table 3-3 Information Systems

Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)

Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)

Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)

Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)

Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)

Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)

Global Broadcast Service - GBS is an Internet Protocol (IP)based integrated communications system consisting of uplink
injection sites, broadcast satellites, receive terminals, and
management processing. GBS augments MILSATCOM Systems
and provides high-speed, one-way information flow of high volume
data and multimedia information such as UAV video, imagery, map
data, weather, and software upgrades to deployed CP LANs and
garrisoned forces worldwide. GBS is a Joint ACAT ID program
with USAF as EA. Product Manager (PdM) Multi-Channel Satellite
Terminals (MST) is the procuring agent for the Army, ACAT III
systems (Transportable Ground Receive Suites [TGRS] and
Theater Injection Point [TIP]).
*See GBS on SIF.
Secure Mobile Anti-Jam Reliable Tactical - Terminal - The
SMART-T is a tactical Milstar terminal. Specifically, it provides a
satellite interface to permit uninterrupted voice/data communication
as advancing forces move beyond the line-of-sight capability
of terrestrial communications systems. This program supports
Echelons Corps and Below (ECB) and special contingency
operations. SMART-T equipment communicates at both low (752400 bps) and medium (4.8 to 1.544 Kbps) data rates. It provides
the security, mobility, and anti-jam capability required to defeat the
threat and satisfy the critical need stated above. The SMART-T
has inherent Low Probability of Interception and Low Probability
of Detection (LPI/LPD) capability to avoid being targeted for
destruction, jamming, or eavesdropping. The prime mover is a
High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), which
carries all electronics, power generation, and a self-erectable
antenna. The SMART-T can also be used in a fixed configuration.
These terminals increase the tactical utility of the Milstar System.
The SMART-T terminals will be modified to compatible with the
Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellites with rates
up to 8.192 Kbps.
*See SMART-T on SIF.
Table 3-3 Information Systems (Continued)
3.7.2

Additional Information Systems

3.7.2.1 WAN Manager V2 and V3


These provide WAN fault, performance, and configuration
management functions for routers within division, brigade, and
ESB responsibility. The difference between these versions is
the license for the Cirrus application. The Division Tactical CP
(DTAC) WAN Manager hosts the following software components:
SNMPc Enterprise and SNMPc Online
SolarWnds Engineer Edition
Cirrus Configuration Management

3.7.2.2 LAN Manager V3 provides LAN management functions for S6


cell supporting the BN CP. It serves as a syslog server due to
lack of other NetOps platforms at that echelon, used to configure
or reconfigure the local routers managed by a higher echelon.
SNMPc Workgroup is the primary software component hosted.
3.7.2.3 Help Desk (HEAT) Management Software provides
administrators the ability to log trouble tickets, manage
personnel and assets, and provide stored solutions for network
problems. The system utilizes a HEAT software suite developed
by FrontRange Solutions: HEAT Support and Services, iHEAT,
and HEAT Self Service.
3.7.2.4 Detailed Planning and Engineering Module (DPEM) is the
planning and engineering tool used within NetOps cells and
G6/S6 staff sections. DPEM software operates on a GETAC
M220 laptop. The system provides software modeling and
display capability that planners use to build graphically-planned
networks. Planners lay down and link communications nodes
on a map background. The network can be viewed in a logical
diagram indicating how assets are connected, but not their
location. Planners place assets on a battlefield map and
graphically assess connectivity in a logical view, or on a map
background. Patching diagrams, cutsheets, and reports for
switch configurations are generated from the DPEM.
3.7.2.5 ISYSCON (V)4 is a digital, battle command InfoSys for S6/
G6 sections providing on-the-move, real-time C2 information.
It provides a semi-autonomous management capability to
aid in the planning, configuration, initialization, monitoring,
troubleshooting, and reconfiguration of TOC and LTI
communications networks. ISYSCON(V)4 also supports SA
down to the warfighter/platform level.
3.7.2.6 Army Key Management System (AKMS)
AKMS is the Army's implementation of the Electronic Key
Management System (EKMS). EKMS involves the following
tiered hierarchy:
Tier 0 - NSA Central Facility (CF)
Tier 1 - Service-level EKMS account support
Tier 2 - LCMS software and KP support
Tier 3 - End User (Field-level) key and non-key data loading
to mission support equipment
AKMS is comprised of three subcomponents: LCMS, ACES, and
SKL. The following paragraphs describe each component.

The Army Local COMSEC Management Software (LCMS)


Workstation Phase 5 Upgrade is an InfoSys functioning at
the user level (Tier 2) of the EKMS, to integrate all functions
of COMSEC. The LCMS Workstation automates and
integrates processes required to generate, distribute, and
manage data needed by various secure communications
systems. The Workstation provides tools to support changing
requirements in strategic and tactical environments, and
is fully compatible with EKMS and Joint Key Management
System (JKMS). The LCMS Workstation Phase 5 Upgrade
includes the LCMS Workstation (AN/GYK-49(V)3). The
Laptop (Tactical) LCMS Workstation (AN/GYK-49(V)2) has
been replaced by the LCMS Workstation (AN/GYK-49(V)3).
Automated Communications Engineering Software (ACES)
was designed to replace the legacy Revised Battlefield
Electronic CEOI System (RBECS) for automated cryptonet
planning and EP data. It generates and distributes SOI
and EP fill data for CNR operations. It also enhances the
operator's ability to provide cryptonet planning for other
devices. The data stream used to randomly generate SOI
and EP data will be implemented via software, replacing the
legacy Random Data Generator (RDG) hardware.
Simple Key Loader (SKL) component was developed by
PD NetOps and is used as the Tier 3 data-loading device.
The SKL's primary task is managing key material. The
SKL is a ruggedized, hand-held PDA consisting of a host
computer and NSA-developed cryptographic and ECU
protocol engine on a Personal Computer Memory Card
International Association (PCMCIA) Type II card (KOV-21).
It uses service-specific applications software called UAS
to automate the loading process for field/mobile COMSEC
components. SKL will replace DTDs and provide simple
loading capabilities. It will be backward compatible with
existing DTDs (i.e., CT3 UAS) until all DTDs have been
replaced.

3.8

Configuration Customization

3.8.1

Customizating a CP must be planned to incorporate all essential


CP elements. A CP may need to be customized for numerous
reasons. The following things need to be planned out: power
distribution and grounding, distances for network, flow of traffic,
security measures, and operational tempo.

3.8.2

Terrain is the largest factor in planning for CP customization.


Security and fueling operations must be considered. Terrain
dictates where to place security. Adequate areas around the CP
must exist to put security measures in place. Fuel trucks need
room to travel around the CP to refuel power and environmental
equipment, or alternative plans must be made for refueling.

3.8.3

Power distribution is a major priority when planning CP


customization. Planners must consider distances from the power
plant to ensure the proper length of power cable is available.
Planners must also ensure cable distances do not interfere
with the electrical grounding system in the power plant. Safety
is a concern if power cables are run where they may cross a
walkway or roadway. Plan to ensure that the correct equipment,
PDISE M40 or M100, is on hand and can cover the power needs
of the change. The maximum distance from the power plant to
the CP should be 100 feet. Longer distances require additional
cables. Use of additional cables cause the voltage to drop to a
level that prevents proper operation of CP C4ISR equipment.

3.8.4

Some information system networks are limited by the distance


the signal can travel and the surrounding terrain features.
When customizing the CP, plans have to be made to ensure
that network assets can communicate to other information
systems. Network cable runs must be planned according to Army
regulations for security and safety, personnel, and cable.

3.8.5

CP customization requires a consideration of flow-of-traffic


considerations. Fire exits and other safety features need to be
clearly identified in the plan. The CP planner needs to ensure
that the CP does not turn into a "maze" of corridors. A minimum
amount of cells that have walk-through traffic is desired.

3.8.6

Although deviation from the CP standard is not encouraged,


customization is sometimes necessary. Prior planning and
considerations for all elements of the C2 System within the CP
will ensure it is safe and functional.

3.9

Network Services Architecture


For information on Network Services Architecture, see the CP
Warfighter Handbook website at https://wwwus.army.mil/suite/
page/547567.

Chapter 4: Establishing the Command Post


4.0.1

This chapter outlines the setup procedures of the Brigade


Combat Team (BCT) Main, Tactical Command Post (TAC CP),
and Battalion Command Posts (CPs). When establishing a
CP at any echelon, it is important to follow priorities of work in
order to maintain Command and Control (C2) while expanding
warfighting function capabilities. Through the warfighting C2
function, commanders integrate all warfighting functions to
accomplish the mission.

4.0.2

As explained in Chapter 7 of FM 7-15, The Army Universal Task


List states:
"The command and control (warfighting function) includes
collective tasks associated with supporting the exercise of
authority and direction by a properly designated commander
over assigned and available forces in the accomplishment
of the mission. Command and control has two components:
the commander and the C2 system. The C2 system is the
arrangement of personnel, information management, procedures,
and equipment and facilities essential to the commander to
conduct (plan, prepare for, execute, and continuously assess)
operations. The C2 system supports the commander's ability to
make informed decisions, delegate authority, and synchronize
the [warfighting functions] toward achieving a common goal.
It includes acquiring and managing information, maintaining
situational understanding, supporting commander's visualization
and maintaining staff estimates, applying risk management, and
directing and leading subordinates. Moreover, the C2 system
supports the ability of commanders to adjust plans for future
operations, even while focusing on the current operation. Staffs
work within the commander's intent to direct units and control
resource allocations. They also are alert to spotting enemy or
friendly situations that require command decisions and advise
commanders concerning them."

4.1

Order of Setup

4.1.1

This section will outline CP order of setup following applicable


portions of the Army Tactical Task (ART) 7.1, Establish
Command Post Operations.

ART 7.1
Establish Command Post Operations

ART 7.1.1
Establish and Conduct CP Operations
to Support Tactical Operations
ART 7.1.1.1 Organize People,
Information Management
Procedures, and
Equipment and Facilities
ART 7.1.1.2 Organize a Command
Post to Support Command
and Control Functions
-ART 7.1.1.3 Produce the
Information Management
Plan
-ART 7.1.1.4 Establish or Revise
Standing Operating
Procedures

ART 7.1.2
Displace the Command Post
ART 7.1.2.1 Prepare the
Command Post for
Displacement
ART 7.1.2.2 Select and
Reconnoiter, and
Evaluate the New
Command Post Location
ART 7.1.2.3 Occupy the New
Command Post Location
ART 7.1.2.4 Transfer Command
and Control Functions
During Displacement

Figure 4-1 Establish Command Post Operations

ART 7.1: ESTABLISH COMMAND POST OPERATIONS


Organize, create/erect, operate, and move the principal facility used
by the commander to exercise command and control of tactical
operations. The command post performs the C2 functions discussed
in succeeding subtasks. (FM 6-0) (USACAC)

ART 7.1.1 ESTABLISH AND CONDUCT COMMAND POST


OPERATIONS TO SUPPORT TACTICAL OPERATIONS
Organize, create/erect, and operate the command post in a manner
that allows it to perform C2 functions most effectively for a particular
operation. (FM 6-0) (USACAC)

Establish the BCT Tactical CP


The BCT TAC CP is staffed and equipped to perform the
warfighting functions of movement and maneuver, intelligence,
and fires. The priorities of work for establishing this CP should
follow this purpose. The TAC CP is made up of two integration
cells: Current Operations 1 and Current Operations 2. After
completing site occupation and establishing tactical voice
communications to higher and lower echelons, the Current
Operations 2 tent can be established while the Warfighter
Information Networks-Tactical (WIN-Ts) and Command Post
Platforms (CPP) are being set up. Once this equipment is
erected and operational, the Maneuver Control System (MCS),
All Source Analysis System (ASAS), and Advanced Field Artillery
Tactical Data System (AFATDS) information systems can be
powered and connected by the CPP Tent Interface Panels (TIPs)
for operation by their respective staff operators. The Command
Post Communications System (CPCS) and digital voice
capabilities should also be established by setting up a Crew
Access Unit (CAU). When completed, personnel can emplace
the power plant, as well as the Access Control Point (ACP) and
Current Operations 1 tents, without hindering battle tracking in
the adjacent tent.

Temporary
battle tracking
stations

Figure 4-2 Steps 1 Through 5 of TAC CP (BN CP) Setup

4.2.2

The Current Operations 1 tent should be fully established so the


MCS, ASAS, and AFATDS operators can seamlessly relocate
to their assigned positions. Once the Current Operations 2 tent
is cleared, assigned personnel can begin setting up equipment
per the diagrams in this handbook or unit Standing Operating
Procedure (SOP).

Relocate
systems to
Current Ops 1

Figure 4-3 Steps 6 Through 7 of TAC CP (BN CP) Setup

Table 4-1 Setup Procedure of BCT TAC CP (Modified BN CP)

4.3

Establish the Battalion CP (BN CP)

4.3.1

The BN CP is very similar to the BCT TAC CP in regard to


equipment and footprint. The setup procedures are the same;
however, instead of a Current Operations 2 cell, the BN employs
a Sustainment cell which handles the additional warfighting
functions of Sustainment, Logistics, Personnel Services, and
Protection. This cell also serves the Integrating cell function of
Plans. The BNs do not have the WIN-T INC 1 (JNN) shelter. Only
the trailer-mounted secure Satellite Transportable Terminal (STT)
is fielded at the BN level. CPP shelters are only fielded to Stryker
Battalions, therefore all other BNs will need to deploy their transit
case-mounted CPCS and setup tactical radios.

4.4

Establish the BCT Main CP

4.4.1

The BCT Main CP is tasked with executing full spectrum C2 of


operations. It includes representatives of all staff cells and a
full suite of information systems to plan, prepare, execute, and
assess operations. The Main CP is functionally organized into a
mix of staff cells and CP functional and integrating cells.

4.4.2

During the establishment of the Main CP, C2 of current


operations are conducted from an alternate CP, such as the
TAC CP. There is still a requirement during setup to maintain
situational awareness and track operations. Again, the sequence
of CP establishment is done by priorities of work. See Table 4-2
for the BCT Main CP setup procedures.

Table 4-2 Setup Procedure of BCT Main CP

Table 4-2 Setup Procedure of BCT Main CP (Continued)


4.5

Standing Operating Procedures (SOPs)

ART 7.1.1.4 ESTABLISH OR REVISE STANDING OPERATING


PROCEDURES
Create or modify a set of instructions covering those tasks and
functions that lend themselves to a definite or standardized procedure
without a loss effectiveness; the SOP is effective unless ordered
otherwise to meet altered conditions. (FM 6-0) (USACAC)
4.5.1

As outlined in FM 3-90.5, TAC SOPs for each CP should be


established, known to all, and rehearsed. TAC SOPs include:
The organization and setup of each CP
Plans forteardown and displacement of the CP
Eating and sleeping plans during CP operations
CP shift manning and operation guidelines
Physical security plans for the CP
Priorities of work during CP operations
Loading plans and checklists
Orders production
Clearance of fires drills
Techniques for monitoring enemy and friendly situations
Displays of electronic map boards and status charts
Maintenance of CP journals and logs

4.5.2

Units are encouraged to utilize any portion of these procedures


to establish unit SOPs. For additional documents that provide
more detail of this section, go to https://www.us.armv.mil/suite/
page/547567

4.6

Displace the CP
ART 7.1.2 DISPLACE THE COMMAND POST
Move or transfer the principal facility used by the commander to
exercise command and control of tactical operations in order to
support C2 of a specific operation. (FM 6-0) (USACAC)

ART 7.1.2.1 PREPARE THE COMMAND POST FOR


DISPLACEMENT
Execute activities before movement to make the command post
more ready to move. These activities include, but are not limited
to, dismantling information systems and associated networks,
dismantling the facilities and equipment, and packing elements of the
command post according to load plans. (FM 6-0) (USACAC)

ART 7.1.2.2 SELECT, RECONNOITER, AND EVALUATE THE NEW


COMMAND POST LOCATION
Decide and confirm the suitability of the location to which the
command post should displace, including the time of/for movement.
(FM 6-0) (USACAC)
4.7

Select CP Location

4.7.1

As outlined in FM 3-90.6, Chap 3, The Main CP is positioned to


maintain communications with subordinate units and control of
the operation. Considerations for positioning the Main CP:
Where the enemy can affect the main CP operations least
Where the Main CP can achieve the best communications
Where the Main CP can control operations best

4.7.2

In contiguous AOs, the BCT main CP usually locates


behind battalion TOC and out of medium artillery range. In
noncontiguous Areas of Operations (AOs), the BCT Main CP
usually locates within a subordinate battalion's AO.

4.7.3

Battalion level CPs are considerably smaller and able to be


positioned with more flexibility. FM 3-90.5, Section 3-58,
Command Post Survivability, outlines considerations of location,
access, size, shelter, and operational security that may be apply
to both echelons.

4.8

Occupy CP Location

ART 7.1.2.3 OCCUPY THE NEW COMMAND POST LOCATION


Execute activities following a tactical or administrative movement to
establish and conduct command post operations. (FM 6-0) (USACAC)
4.9

Transfer C2 Between CPs

ART 7.1.2.4 TRANSFER COMMAND AND CONTROL FUNCTIONS


DURING DISPLACEMENT
Reassign C2 functions from the old location to the new location.
Maintain C2 functions during the move without disrupting performance
of C2 functions for the force. (FM 6-0) (USACAC)
4.9.1

Before transferring C2 functions from one CP to another, there


are numerous considerations to ensure that all information is
properly transferred. In the deliberate establishment of a CP,
there are two types of C2 transfer functions. Either the TAC CP
is established to provide C2 to allow the Main CP to displace,
or the TAC CP is established in an area of operation to provide
improved C2 to subordinate echelons in that geographic area.
This may be done to allow the use of additional Line-of-Sight
(LOS) communications systems and provide improved local
situational awareness.

4.9.2

At the BCT level and above, headquarters has TAC and Main
CPs with redundant information systems. Although these
systems are redundant by capability, information may only reside
in one location. It is important to consider what information
should be duplicated or transferred to ensure it is available to the
commander and staff at the proper location and at the right time.

4.9.3

Once a CP is established, all pertinent information such as


planning documents, operations orders, fragmentary orders,
intelligence files, map data/imagery, and other pertinent files
should be duplicated. Even if both CPs will be operational, this
will ensure that all information is available locally in the event
that digital communications are lost. Information system servers
should be synchronized with the appropriate node to ensure
that all data is up to date. Staff relocating to another CP will also
need to have their respective email accounts transferred.

4.9.4

If a CP will be displacing, there are additional steps to take to


ensure that information systems will continue to properly publish
and subscribe data between CPs at various echelons (refer to
Table 4-3). The staff proponent for each ABCS system will need
to report a GO/NO GO status before digital communications can
be disconnected and displaced. Subordinate units' information
systems may also need to have configuration changes made
to ensure continued digital communications while a CP is
displaced.
Data Transfer between MAIN CP and TAC CP

Army Battle Command System (ABCS) Information


1. Verify current operational picture in TAC CP on MCS, AFATDS, and ASAS.
2. Initiate PASS-to-PASS connection from TAC CP BCS to Main CP BCS.
3. Retrieve pertinent information from Main CP BCS.
4. Conduct MCS DB replication on MCS SQL database (MCS Specific)
5. Conduct C2R replication (this is done only if modifications to units data
products have been made).
6. Verify information transfer is complete through MCS. Data should be the
same as on the Main CP BCS.
7. Verify that subordinate unit servers are communicating with the TAC server
(applies to various ABCS systems).
Enterprise Service Information
1. When TAC CP servers are initialized, verify replication of Active Directory
for all login accounts, computers, and additional resources. Ensure that any
new required accounts or computers are added BEFORE communication to
Main CP is broken.
2. Transfer all users' email accounts at the TAC and any additional accounts
that may be needed (Admin accounts) to the TAC CP exchange server.
Consider subordinate unit e-mail accounts as well.
3. Verify email functionality within TAC CP.
4. Verify email is flowing outside TAC to other units and higher headquarters.
Command Post of the Future (CPOF)
1. Verify CPOF mid-tier server connection to Master Repository.
2. Verify CPOF clients can connect to CPOF Master Repository.
Table 4-3 Data Transfer Between Main CP and TAC CP

4.10

Deploy CP at the Quick Halt (ATQH)

Table 4-4 Deploy CPATQH

Table 4-4 Deploy CP ATQH (Continued)

Table 4-4 Deploy CP ATQH (Continued)


4.11

System Validation

4.11.1

Due to density and complexity of the CP System of Systems


(SoS) it is necessary to plan for and conduct validation checks.
These checks ensure that all systems are properly configured
and have full functionality prior to deployment for training or realworld operations.

There are various tools that can be utilized and incorporated into
units' SOPs, including the following:
Setup procedure checklists
Individual system validation sheets
System status charts
4.11.2 Units should utilize these procedures and validation tools for the
following events:
Initial CP setup (garrison training)
Unit CP Exercise (CPX) Training
Mobilization Readiness Exercise (MRE)
Deployment Reception, Staging, Onward, & Integration
(RSO&I)
Tactical Assembly Area (TAA) occupation and setup
4.11.3 When conducting a CP checkout, it is recommended that the
current operations Battle Captain/Non-Commissioned Officer
(NCO) lead the coordinated effort to track system status.
Each system's functionality correlates to a C2 capability and
information source. By coordinating system status at the
current operations cell, the commander/Battle Captain will have
situational awareness (SA) of the information available for
tactical decision making. For example, if indirect fire is received
and the air picture is not available, the current operations
staff needs to know that a clearance of fires for a counter-fire
cannot be conducted per the standard unit battle drill. Alternate
resources would need to be employed to react to the threat.
4.11.4 Various examples of these tools can be downloaded from the CP
Handbook site. These examples are designed to be customized
and adapted by the unit. See examples at the AKO site https://
www.us.armv.mil/suite/paqe/547567.
4.12

Common Operational Picture (COP)

4.12.1 The COP (Figure 4-4) is a display of relevant information


within a commander's area of interest, tailored to the user's
requirements and based on common data and information
shared by more than one command (FM 6-0). The COP features
a scale and level of detail that meets the information needs of
the commander and staff and varies among staff sections and
echelons. The COP facilitates mission command and allows
subordinates to see the overall operation and their contributions
to it. Separate echelons can create a shared COP.

Figure 4-4 COP


4.12.2 The COP is based on information from individual platforms
(FBCB2/BFT) and subordinate, higher, and adjacent units.
Each Information System (INFOSYS) in the CP creates and
manages specific staff-related COP components. INFOSYSs
can share their data and display data from other INFOSYS
accessible over the unit network. The Publish and Subscribe
Services (PASS) running on the CP Battle Command Server
(BCS) or Maneuver Control System (MCS) Gateway is the
conduit for data sharing across the INFOSYS spectrum. Sharing
and displaying INFOSYS data allow the commander and staff
to "see themselves, see the enemy, and see the environment."
The COP, observations of commanders, and running estimates
are primary tools for assessing the operation against operations,
mission, and commander's intent. Running estimates provide
information, conclusions, and recommendations from each
staff section to refine and supplement information not readily
displayed (FM 3-0).
4.12.3 Commanders begin with SA, immediate knowledge of the
conditions of the operation, constrained geographically
and in time (FM 3-0). SA is an awareness of the immediate
surroundings. It is not a display or the COP, but the interpretation
of displays or actual observation.
4.12.4 Commanders use the SA available to shape their Situational
Understanding (SU), enhancing decision making by identifying

opportunities, threats to the force or mission accomplishment,


and information gaps. SU based on a continuously updated COP
fosters individual initiative by reducing uncertainty.
4.12.5 INFOSYSs provide unique data contributions and a view of
the battle space, which comprise the COP. The COP reflects
changes and enables commanders and staffs to see the
battle space more accurately and in near-real time. INFOSYS
contributions to the COP include the following (see Table 4-5):
AFATDS: Fire unit and radar range fans; Fire Support
Coordination Measures (FSCM); preplanned fires; final
protective fires; active fire support missions
AMDWS: Air defense weapon and sensor coverage;
location, speed, and flight direction of aircraft; tactical
ballistic missile launch and impact point, current track, and
launch/impact point pairing line
BCS3: Unit combat power; supply status by class of supply
for units, facilities, and transportation features; supply and
maintenance points and supply routes; location of logistics
assets and convoys
CPOF: Unified picture of operational environment; friendly
and enemy unit locations; graphic control measures;
executive level decision support and collaboration; troop to
task creation, analysis, and sharing
DCGS-A/ASAS: Enemy unit locations; enemy equipment,
facilities, and individuals; gathering, analysis, and display of
enemy event and activity data
DTSS: Digital maps for INFOSYS, mobility and trafficability,
LOS tactical decision aids, and background images
FBCB2/BFT Individual vehicle icons of equipped platforms,
graphic control measures, geo-referenced graphical
observation reports
GCCS-A: Political boundaries with countries differentiated
by color; friendly and enemy ground units, naval vessels,
obstacles, and military installations
IMETS: Standard weather symbology depicting current
weather conditions, forecasts, and severe weather warnings;
weather contour overlays to show 30+ different weather
conditions
MCS: Friendly unit locations, graphic control measures,
orders, task organization.
TAIS: Multi-dimensional display of ACOs and ACMs

Table 4-5 Parts of the COP

4.12.6 The unit determines which INFOSYS to use as the central


COP display based on INFOSYS availability and unit mission.
Different types of units may use different INFOSYS, yet still
retain a common picture of the battle space. Generally, however,
either MCS or CPOF is used as the displayed COP. As events
or other reports warrant, INFOSYS operators can zoom in to the
appropriate level of detail as required. Many INFOSYS allow
operators to create specific map type, scale, and zoom views
as needed, and then choose them to automatically change the
map background. As the map focuses on a smaller area, more
detailed information is displayed. Additionally, INFOSYS allow
operators to filter live feeds to the required echelon and types.
The basic formula is in Table 4-6.

Table 4-6 AO Information


4.12.7 COP Manager. The COP Manager is a person selected and
designated to serve in this position due to their high degree of
attention to detail, INFOSYS and computer skills, knowledge
of FM 5-0 and FM 6-0, intelligence, and experience working in
a CP. The COP Manager works for the Battle NCO. The COP
Manager's duties include:
Responsible for all information displayed as the COP
Updates unit locations and events through the digital
component of the COP
Updates unit locations and events on the analog COP (if
used)
Coordinates with other staff sections for COP manipulation
during briefings
Receives guidance from the G-3/S-3 and Commander on
specific views or manipulations of the COP for SA purposes

4.12.8 INFOSYS Contributions to the COP. Digital INFOSYS allow


the commander and staff to tailor the wealth of information
into specified functional area views. Although the information
is functionally managed and updated by various systems
throughout the network, the data distribution architecture
ensures the availability of critical, time-sensitive information to
the commander and staff. The table below details the types of
graphical information that comprise and contribute to the COP.
The table details information types and INFOSYS capability to
send/receive them. While only a guideline, the listed information
is likely to be highly relevant to the commander and staff. Inputs
to the COP are of two types: overlays and data displayed within
the COP, and reports that contribute to the display of information
in the COP.

Table 4-7 Information Comprising and Contributing to COP

Table 4-7 Information Comprising and Contributing to COP


(Continued)

Table 4-7 Information Comprising and Contributing to COP


(Continued)

4.12.9 COP and the Operations Process. By providing a clear, accurate,


and common view of the battle space in near real time, the COP
is key to each step of the operations processplan, prepare,
execute, and assessas summarized below.
4.12.9.1 Plan
Intent and Planning Guidance. The commander can readily
impart intent and issue planning guidance. The COP
also helps ensure a subordinate commander is planning
within the intent and concept of operations of the superior
commander.
Relevant Information (Rl). A commander can use the
COP to depict the operational picture. This helps staff and
subordinate leaders focus on relevant information for the
operation. This facilitates the planning process, resulting
in more rapid planning and precise understanding of and
adherence to the commander's intent. SU of friendly forces
(air and ground) is automatically fed into the COP. However,
graphical data must be manually input into INFOSYS before
being displayed in the COP.
Collaboration. Because leaders at different locations can
simultaneously view the battle space in an identical manner,
collaboration is significantly enhanced, thereby facilitating
planning, directing, and brief-backs. Staffs can use the same
graphics and overlays (both active and notional) concurrently
from different INFOSYS.
Parallel Planning. The COP helps subordinate units conduct
their own planning concurrent with the development of
parent headquarters' plans.
Branches and Sequels. Different configurations of the
COP can be developed to match anticipated branches and
sequels of an operation. As the tactical situation evolves,
revisions to the original plan, such as changed operational
graphics, can be rapidly disseminated.
Reduced Control Measures. Increased SU attained through
the COP may reduce the need for extensive control
measures to coordinate maneuver and to avoid friendly-onfriendly engagements. This allows units to function more
effectively should the battle become fluid and/or non-linear.
However, this must be weighed with the fact that SU is
imperfect.

4.12.9.2 Prepare
Brief-Backs. Using the common framework provided by
the COP, subordinate leaders are better able to confirm
the commander's intent and concept of operations. This
common framework also assists subordinates in conveying
their own plans during the brief-back.
Plan Updates. Units can monitor the current tactical situation
even as they ready themselves for an operation. Tactical
plans and staff estimates can be revised as necessary to
meet changes in the battle space as seen through the COP.
This is especially critical in a highly fluid tactical situation.
Rules of Engagement (ROE). The COP can be used to
depict certain parts of the ROE. This will help to ensure
the ROE are disseminated uniformly down to the lowest
echelons.
4.12.9.3 Execute
Adaptability. Units can respond rapidly to the dictates of the
evolving tactical situation during an operation. The shared
SU increases the ability of commanders at all levels to
quickly make the right decisions, synchronize their forces
and fires, and increase the operational tempo.
Initiative. Armed with the commander's intent and superior
SU, subordinate leaders are better able to seize and retain
the initiative within their respective tactical spheres. Units,
therefore, will be better able to dictate the terms of combat in
order to build momentum quickly and to win decisively.
Risk Management. Commanders are better able to assess
risk using the SU gained via the COP. This enables them to
act more aggressively while simultaneously enhancing the
protection of their forces.
Friendly-on-Friendly Engagements. The enhanced
SU gained through the COP, combined with C4ISR
enhancements and improved optics, offer the opportunity to
reduce the chance that friendly forces will become engaged
with one another. This contributes to force protection, rapid
engagement, and aggressive maneuver. This is, of course,
contingent on the premise that all friendly forces involved
have a full suite of fully operational INFOSYS.
Changes to Operations. Using the COP, the commander can
rapidly communicate changes to an ongoing operation. This
might entail following a branch or sequel, changes to control
measures, or even a new line of operations.

4.12.9.4 Assess
Monitoring Operations (Battle Tracking). The COP helps
leaders to measure, analyze, and report unit performance
during an operation. This enables them to compute or
otherwise identify variance from the plan or its assumptions
and to forecast change. Using the COP, staff sections can
employ their respective INFOSYS to monitor operations
according to a common baseline to assess unit performance.
A commander can help satisfy CCIRs by ensuring
requirements are depicted within the COP, as applicable.
This ensures staff and subordinates focus on this information
during an operation.
COP Maintenance. The COP is not static but requires
continuous monitoring and revision, where appropriate.
Factors that might indicate such changes include: success
on the battlefield, changes in task organization, significant
alteration to the enemy picture, change in mission, significant
friendly losses, change in concept of operation, movement
to a new phase of the joint campaign, and/or environmental
changes or shifts (e.g., weather, civil disturbances). Such
changes may be anticipated and, therefore, preplanned.
4.12.10 Relevant Information. Rl is all information of importance to
commanders and staffs in the exercise of C2 (FM 3-0). To
be relevant, information must be accurate, timely, usable,
complete, precise, reliable, and secure. Rl provides the answers
commanders and staffs need to conduct operations successfully.
The COP consists primarily of knowledge, which the staff
provides through analysis and evaluation. Information
becomes Rl if it supports exercising C2 for a mission. It is
the combination of Rl and data from digital INFOSYS that
forms the Information Management component of the C2
system: personnel, information management, procedures,
and equipment and facilities (FM 6-0). Staffs use C2
processes to support their commanders' decisions and use
information management to collect, process, display, store,
and disseminate Rl.
Not all information required in the CP is displayed on the
COP. Information on unit strength, CCIR, mission and intent
statements, briefings, and orders tracking are examples of
this type information. The data needs to be available and
displayed, but is not part of the graphical COP.

The fielded Command Center System (CCS) provides for


unit-configured INFOSYS displays on multiple screens as
well as multiple displays on a single screen. This capability
enables units to display the COP plus Rl and other data
as deemed necessary by the command, the staff, and the
situation. For example, a unit can use one screen to display
the COP, and use another screen to display in a quad format
of the combat power from BCS3, a rolling BUB, UAS feed,
and MCS. Units should take into consideration display
requirements when cabling video output connections to the
CCS.
For CPs or CP cells with only a single screen, the CCS can
be used for creating multiple displays. The unit can have
a single display for their COP and also configure multiple
INFOSYS displays to use as required. Utilizing hot key
shortcuts, the unit can move back and forth quickly from one
view setting to another.
4.13

Battle Drills

4.13.1 These Battle Drills can be used when battle staff is conducting
training on staff operations in a classroom/field environment.
These Battle Drills show what staff actions need to be taken, in
relation to the Battle Drill, when a message is received in the CP.
The event is designed to trigger the staff and start the Battle Drill
process. The flowchart in Figure 4-5 is a guide that shows how
a message enters the CP, what kind of message may be sent to
the CP, and the digital flow of messages from one staff section/
ABCS machine to another.
Friendly KIA/WIA
Friendly Death (Non-Hostile Action)
Iraqi NIA/ICDC/Police Death (Enemy Action)
Friendly Fratricide
Non-Lethal Fire Fratricide
Homicide/Suicide Bomber Attack (DismountedA/ehicular)
Missing Soldier/Civilian/Contractor (POW/Missing/AWOL)
Detainee
Downed Aircraft
Demonstration/Riot
Power Outage in Town
Oil Line Sabotage

Oil Line Stops Flowing


Mass Grave Found
WMD Site Located
Deck of Cards Information/Intelligence
Division Contacts BCT for Raid
Refugee Crisis
Short Fuse Tasking
Bridge Collapse/Destruction
MSR Blocked by Enemy Activity
MSR Blocked by Civilian Activity
Local National Murders Another Local National
NGO Is Attacked/Killed
VIP Visit
DIV or Higher Convoy Escort
Wrongful Killing of Detainee
Wrongful Killing of Civilians
Potential War Crime by U.S. Soldier
U.S. Soldier Felony Crime
ROE Violation Reported
FOB Security Breach
FOB Mortar Attack
Mass Casualties (Five or More in a Single Incident)
Critical Friendly Communication Failure
Counter Radar Breakdown
WMD Employed (Intentional/Accidental)
PAO Emergency
Minefield Located
Political Asylum Seeker
Stolen/Missing Sensitive Item
Change in Task Organization BN or Higher
Change in Unit Area of Operation BN or Higher
Clearance of Fires
Close Air Support
Counterfire
VBIED/IED Attack

; 5 ^ 0) O <

Figure 4-5 Battle Drill Flowchart

4.13.2 Example Battle Drill


Proponent: S3
Action: S1, S2, FSE, S3 Air, ALO, ENG
BATTLE DRILL: Counterfire
CONDITIONS: The BCT Battle Staff receives a Counterfire Mission.
STANDARDS: The BCT Battle Staff:
1. S3 Battle CPT immediately disseminated report to selected staff
according to SOP.
2. Assessed the impact on BCT operations.
3. Determined appropriate response, notified appropriate units and individuals.

SUPPORTING COLLECTIVE TASKS:


ART 7.2 Manage Tactical Information
Task: 20-6-7261.6400 Maintain the Common Operational Picture (COP)
Tailored to the User's Needs (Battle Staff)
Task: 20-6-7262.6400 Manage Relevant Information (Battle Staff)
ART 7.3 Assess Current Operations
Task: 20-6-7362.6400 Evaluate Situation or Progress of Operations (Battle
Staff)
Task: 20-6-7363.6400 Develop Staff Estimates (Battle Staff)
ART 7.6.4 Synchronize Current Operations
Task: 20-6-7661.6400 Synchronize Tactical Operations (Battle Staff)
Task: 20-6-7662.6400 Coordinate Sustainment Operations (Battle Staff)
ART 7.8.3 Maintain Continuity of C2
Task: 20-6-7863.6400 Brief the Brigade Combat Team Command Post Using the Battle Update Briefing (BUB)
Task: 20-6-7864.6400 Brief the Brigade Combat Team Command Post
During a Shift Change)
ART 3.1 Decide Surface Targets to Attack
Task: 20-6-3161.6400 Process Targets Using the Decide Function for the
Brigade Combat Team)
Task: 20-6-3261.6400 Detect Targets to Attack for the Brigade Combat
Team)
Task: 20-6-3262.6400 Deliver Lethal and Non-Lethal Fires on Targets Using Attack Guidance Developed in the Decide Function)
Task: 20-6-3263.6400 Process Targets Using the Assess Function for the
Brigade Combat Team)

OPFOR TASKS AND STANDARDS: None


REFERENCES:
FM 3-0, Operations, 14 June, 2001
FM 3-09 Fire Support in the Airland Battle, 17 May, 1988
BATTLE DRILL: Counterfire
EVENT: BN reports a platoon-sized combat patrol convoy, composed of two
M3A3s and three up-armored M1114, has been ambushed along Hwy 1, vie:
38SMC324002. Patrol was engaged by mortars, small arms, and RPG fire. Patrol
estimated there are approx 50-60 enemy fighters. Patrol called for immediate attack helicopter support and counter fire artillery. Three warfighters were wounded
and two M1114s were destroyed. Warfighters were taken by vehicle to BAS.
M1114s need to be recovered.
See TPIO-BC Thread Assumptions at end of chart.
See Enemy Reporting [Incoming to ASAS-ACE SA] chart for steps that ASAS
Operator/S2 take to process incoming messages and incorporate into All Source
Correlated Database.
Note. For additional battle drills, go to the CP Warfighter Handbook website at
https://www.us.army.mil/suite/page/547567

Chapter 5: Transportability
5.0.1

Effective movement of the Command Post (CP) weapon system


results in expediting operational capability, reducing damage to
equipment, and maximizing storage space. This document does
not cover moving equipment over land, water, and air; but the
following section details a suggested method for preparing the
CP for transport. Weights and dimensions are provided to assist
the warfighter in creation of vehicle and air load plans.

5.1

Dimensions and Weights

5.1.1

Table 5-1 provides a list of CP equipment to assist the warfighter


in developing load plans. Each vehicle or container is limited to a
specified amount of weight and volume for equipment cube size.
Preplanning is essential for expediting operational capability,
reducing damage to equipment, and maximizing storage space.

Table 5-1 Battalion CP Equipment List

One person carry

Three or
more person
carry

Table 5-1 Battalion CP Equipment List (Continued)


5.2

Load Plans

5.2.1

Vehicle Load Plans are essential to maximize vehicle and


container volume or equipment placement. Reference individual
vehicle and container publications for maximum capacity.

5.2.1.1 The following figures provide conceptual views of load plan/


layouts for the equipment contained in a 20-foot International
Organization for Standardization (ISO) container for the Battalion
(BN) CP Current Ops tent (refer to Figure 5-1). Figure 5-4
provides a side view of the contents of a BN Current Ops tent.
5.2.1.2 Due to the container's end entry, equipment must be packaged
for equipment loading/unloading to facilitate order/rhythm of CP
setup and teardown. Equipment is loaded/unloaded from the left.
This concept packages the multiple laptops into a transit case to
reduce the number of smaller cases and bags. Figures 5-2 and
5-3 show views of containers with equipment placement.

Figure 5-1 20-Foot ISO Container

Figure 5-2 Load Plan - Side View

Figure 5-3 Load Plan - Isometric View

Figure 5-4 BN Container - Top Down View

5.2.1.3 Figure 5-5 portrays an end view of the packing order in a 20-ft
ISO Container with doors open.

Figure 5-5 Load Plan - End View


5.2.1.4 The equipment is arranged in the order of removal for placement
in a CP tent:
Power distribution equipment (Power Distribution Illumination
System Electrical [PDISE] and power cables)
Wood pallet
Joint Network Node (JNN) switch cases
Command Center System (CCS) equipment
Stanley tough boxes for cable storage
Tables
Battlefield Command and Control System (BCCS) server
Printers
Command Post of the Future (CPOF) workstation cases
Chairs
Client workstation cases
Laptops and IP phone cases
5.2.1.5 The Center of Gravity (CG) of a loaded ISO container must fall
within following restrictions (per ISO 1496/1):
X-axis: 24 in from center (20-ft container)

Y-axis: center of container


Z-axis: below geometric center of container (48 in)
5.2.1.6 In this example, the container is within ISO CG restrictions:

BN equipment weight: 5,161 lb


Container Weight (empty): 5,000 lb
Total Weight: 10,161 lb
Container Dimensions:
X-axis: 238 in Y-axis: 96 in
Z-axis: 96 in
Center of Gravity:
X-axis: 120 in Y-axis: 48 in
Z-axis: 35 in
Variance from Center:
X-axis: 1 in
Y-axis: 0 in
Z-axis: 13 in

Figure 5-6 ISO Container Center of Gravity


5.2.1.7 The following publications contain additional information for
identifying container and load planning requirements.

Naval Air Systems Command Mobile Facility Program,


Program Overview, Joint Committee on Tactical Shelters
(JOCOTAS), May 2005, http://www.mobile-facilities.com/.
JOCOTAS, DoD Standard Family of Tactical Shelters, U.S.
Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command, Natick,
MA, May 1999
FM 4-01.30 (FM 55-10), Movement Control, 1 Sep 2003

FM 4-01.41 (FM 55-20), Army Rail Operations, 12 Dec 2003


FM 7-15, The Army Universal Task List, 31 Aug 2003
FM 38-701, Packaging of Material, Packing, 1 Dec 1999
FM 55-15, Transportation Reference Data, HQDA, 27 Oct
1997
FM 55-17, Cargo Specialists' Handbook, 16 Feb 1999
FM 55-80, Army Container Operations, 13 Aug 1997
5.2.2

Air Load Plans are essential to maximize aircraft volume usage


or equipment placement. The aircraft load master is the safety
and packing inspector of the aircraft. These publications and
links for guidance for maximum load capacity and specifications.

Automated Air Load Planning System (AALPS) -A


knowledge-based expert system to assists users in the
task of planning and executing aircraft loads for all types
of deployments. It is selected as the aircraft load planning
system for the DoD. See the Transportation Information
Systems AALPS website: http://www.tis.armv.mil/AALPS/
Transportation Coordinators -Automated Information for
Movements System II (TC-AIMS II) -A critical deployment
and transportation system providing transportation agents
and deploying units a joint capability to automate the
processes of planning, organizing, coordinating, and
controlling deployment, redeployment, and sustainment
activities in peacetime and war. It provides a modernized,
integrated, and easily deployable Automated Information
System (AIS) that supports current and re-engineered
functional business processes in the DoD. TC-AIMS II links
all functionality for DoD component unit movement and
Installation Transportation Office/Traffic Management Office
(ITO/TMO) into a consolidated system that moves personnel,
equipment and supplies. See the TC-AIMS II website:
http://www.tis.armv.mil/tc aims2.html
FM 55-1, Transportation Operations, HQDA, 3 Oct 1995
FM 55-9, Unit Air Movement Planning, 5 Apr 1993
AF110-403, Deployment Planning and Execution, 13 Jan
2008

5.2.2.1 Aircraft requirements for transporting the following equipment is


shown in Figure 5-7 and Table 5-2.

One 20-ft ISO container


Two 463L pallets
Two CPP RWS
5-7

Two TMSS-mediums
Two 15-kW generators

Figure 5-7 Example of Equipment to be Transferred

Table 5-2 Aircraft Transport Requirements

5.2.2.2 The following figures depict airtransport requirements for C-130,


C-5, C-17, and C-19, as well as other transport options. The load
plans for the aircraft shown are notional-based estimated weight
distributions. The Air Force Loadmaster of each aircraft type is
the final authority for loading and weight distribution.

The number of aircraft is driven by weight capacity of the C-130

Aircraft 1 - Tent Equipment


20-ft ISO Container

Aircraft 2 - CPP RWS

Aircraft 3 - C P P RWS,
B-Bag Pallet

Aircraft 4 - 2X TMSS-Medium

Aircraft 5 - 2X 15-kW Generator,


Tent Flooring Pallet
Figure 5-8 Air Transport C-130

Figure 5-9 Air Transport C-5 Side Views

Figure 5-10 Air Transport C-5 Top Down View

Figure 5-11 Air Transport C-17 Loading Sequence

Figure 5-12 Air Transport C-17 Top Down View Loading Sequence

5-10

The number of aircraft is driven by cargo area length.


2X CPP RWS, 2X TMSS-Medium

20-ft ISO Container, B-Bag Pallet, Tent Flooring Pallet, 2X 15 kW-Generator

Figure 5-13 Air Transport C-19 Loading Sequence

Figure 5-14 Additional Transport Options

Movement Plans
5.3.1

Supplemental material under development provides a guide


to assist the commander and staff for moving the unit. This
information is referenced in Command Post Warfighter's
Handbook (SM 55- Series) Movement Planning Reference Data,
as they are validated and become available.
INFANTRY Brigade Combat Teams (IBCT)
HEAVY Brigade Combat Teams (HBCT)
STRYKER Brigade Combat Teams (SBCT)
AIRBORNE Brigade Combat Teams (ABCT)
COMBAT AVIATION Brigade (CAB) - Heavy
COMBAT AVIATION Brigade (CAB) - Light
BATTLEFIELD SURVEILLANCE Brigade (BFSB)
FIRES Brigade (FIRES)
COMBAT SUPPORT Brigade (ME)
SUSTAINMENT Brigade (SB)
AIR DEFENSE Brigade (ADB)
CHEMICAL Brigade (CB)
ENGINEER Brigade (EB)
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE Brigade (MIB)
MILITARY POLICE Brigade (MPB)
SIGNAL Brigade (SIGB)
DIVISIONS & CORPS
THEATER, GROUPS, & COMMANDS

Chapter 6: Sustaining Operations


6.0.1

Command Post (CP) sustainment is the process of managing


personnel safety, fuel consumption, power management,
environmental impacts, and maintainability of equipment. In
order to compensate for the trade-offs encountered between
effectiveness and survivability, proper sustainment techniques
should be developed and implemented to ensure maximum life
cycle longevity. The content within this section can be used to
augment a unit's existing sustainment plan.

6.1

Daily Operations

6.1.1

Outline of duties and tasks to be considered in planning


and sustaining CP operations. These should include fuel
consumption factors, maintenance intervals, extreme
environment issues, and best practices for conducting duties
and tasks with regular 24-hour events, such as shift change.
Table 6-1 gives examples of daily duties.

Table 6-1 Daily Duties


6.2

Safety

6.2.1

This section outlines safety concepts and considerations that


unit and section leaders should be aware of to plan, configure,
set up, operate, and train for CP operations.
Use ground guides when positioning vehicles, Tactical Quiet
Generators (TQGs), Trailer-Mounted Support System (TMSS)
trailers, and Light Tactical Vehicle (LTV) trailers.
Set parking brakes.
Place chock blocks around wheels.

6.2.2

6.2.3
6.2.4

6.2.5

6.2.6

Place drip pans under engine drip points.


Install Surface Wire Grounding System (SWGS) and attach
to Rigid Wall Shelter (RWS) Power Entry Panel (PEP)
ground lug and LTV bumper ground.
Drive ground rod using gloves and goggles.
Comply with applicable Tactical Operations Center (TOC)
subsystem Technical Manual (TM) setup procedures.
Cabling
Visually confirm that cables are routed with appropriate bend
radius and support, inspect for visible exterior damage and
sharp edges that can cause insulation damage.
Minimize trip hazards using proper cable routing, cable
guards, etc. Mark remaining hazards.
Visually inspect that connector pins are not bent. Document
cable pin-to-pin continuity is correct.
Visually confirm color-coded or keyed connectors are
properly mated.
Visually confirm that connectors or cables do not protrude
into aisle ways, significantly impeding egress.
Visually confirm that cables have permanent and legible
identification within 2 inches of both cable ends.
Visually confirm that exposed wiring and cable condition is
not cut or crushed.
Visually confirm all AC-powered remote equipment is
supplied from Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI)
protected outlets or surge protection devices.
Grounding
Visually confirm that path from tie point to ground is
continuous and secure.
Visually confirm that ground lug connectors are present,
marked and tightened.
Verify equipment case grounding to external ground point
continuity and resistance less than 100 Ohms (25 Ohms
preferred). Verify ground cable amps are sufficient to carry
maximum fault current to ground.
Visually confirm shelter grounding terminal is identified and
marked with warning to establish ground before applying
power.
Antennas
Erect no antennas within two times the antenna height to the
base of the power lines.

When setting up antenna farm, consider adding additional


guy wires if bad weather is expected.
Insure vehicle-mounted antenna tips are present and
secured to protect against eye injury/puncture.
Verify that personnel positions are beyond the minimum safe
distance to operating antennas and visually confirm general
RF safety markings present near antenna access.
6.2.7
Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT)
Enforce no smoking or welding within 50 ft of refueling,
solvent use, or flammable storage points.
Comply with local installation HAZMAT procedures for
storing and disposing of Petroleum Oil and Lubricant (POL)
products, cleaning solutions, and contaminated waste.
Set up HAZMAT spill barriers around fuel truck points.
Set up HAZMAT spill kits inside soft shelter entrance points.
6.2.8 Place TMSS and TQG trailers at max distance from tents.
TMSS-Medium recommended distance is 10-12 ft.
TMSS-Large recommended distance is 20-22 ft.
TQG recommended distance is 50 ft.
Visually confirm that systems are positioned where exhaust
from one will not enter another's fresh air intake or blow into
occupied tents/shelters.
Place chock blocks around wheels.
Place drip pans under engine drip points.
Install ground rods (minimum of two sections) and do not
operate Generator set (GenSet) until the ground terminal
stud is properly connected to the ground point.
Drive rods using goggles and gloves (includes helpers).
Visually confirm all circuit breakers OFF before starting the
engine.
Do not attempt service or adjustments to electrical
connections until GenSet is OFF and completely
de-energized.
6.2.9
Lighting
Place tent lighting high enough to prevent head strikes.
Connect light sets with power OFF.
6.2.10 Shelter Life Safety
Maintain a clear egress path and mark exits for each tent.
Set up fire extinguisher points near each shelter exit and
power systems.

Set up medical aid point.


Provide minimum first aid kits and resuscitation equipment
per unit requirements.
Identify personnel trained as emergency life savers.
Ensure that all personnel know emergency contact
numbers.
Follow Technical Bulletins Medical (TB MED) guidance for
heat and cold stress.
Ensure that RWS ladders are in contact with ground before
using.
6.2.11 Transit Case Setup
Visually confirm presence of lift labels on items that exceed
37 lb. Use proper number of lifters per MIL-STD-1472F
guidance.
Connect all Operational Transit Cases (OTCs) to a ground,
with power OFF prior to use.
Connect fiber optics with power OFF to avoid Ultra Violet
(UV) eye hazard.
Connect laptops with power OFF.
6.2.12 Operations
Identify unobstructed emergency egress routes for vehicles
in the TOC complex should they need to be moved quickly.
Protect and/or mark head strike hazards.
Enforce personnel use of Personal Protective Equipment
(PPE) where required (around operating generators,
pounding metal stakes, etc.).
Confirm that noise levels are less than 85 dBA (82 dBA for
12-hr operations). Hearing protection, as recommended by
medical or safety officers, must be worn within identified
noise hazard areas.
Confirm that shelter floor, step surfaces of roof and ladder
climbing and access surfaces for elevated equipment (e.g.,
Environmental Control Unit [ECU]) are equipped with nonskid pads.
Maintain filler nozzle and fuel tank contact and attach
bonding wires where available to avoid static spark ignition
of fuel vapors.
Discharge static electricity from the body by touching a
metal chassis or cabinet before touching electrostatic
discharge (ESD)-sensitive electronic components,
otherwise, internal circuits can be destroyed.

6.2.13

6.2.14

Follow Lithium Battery guidance to avoid runaway


(especially lithium sulfate non-rechargeable batteries).
Recharging
Direct shorts and high draw loads
Use of Complete Discharge Devices (CDDs)
M axi m u m sto rag e te m pe ratu res
Disposal per Unit requirements
Remove conductive jewelry for electrical/battery
operations and maintenance
Remove power before making/breaking electrical
connections.
During storms, follow lightning guidance in Communications
Electronics Command (CECOM) TR-98-6, Earth Grounding
and Bonding Pamphlet, Oct 1998 (Appx. F).
Inspect and correct sharp edges that may have been
created in transportation, handling, or setup.
Maintenance
Cool down hot engines before performing Preventive
Maintenance Checks and Services (PMCS) or require PPE
use.
Visually confirm that fuel lines and connections are not
leaking or subject to moving part damage.
Require qualified persons for hazardous electrical tasks and
practice the buddy system.
Remove power when possible during electrical circuit work.
Shut down rotating equipment when possible for servicing.
Use appropriate PPE for tent repair adhesives.
Move Preparations
Comply with TM and unit load plan directives, including
Warnings/Cautions when packing vehicles and trailers.
Adhere to approved load plans.
Confirm that load plans are not causing a weight and center
of gravity problem for the carrying platform (cannot exceed
the Gross Vehicle Weight [GVW] for the vehicle and towing
limit, including its trailer system).
Properly tie down whip antennas.
Connect safety chains, lights, and brake connections to
trailers. Verify proper operation of trailer and vehicle lights.

6.3

Information Systems (INFOSYS)

6.3.1

Keeping laptop computers laying flat on table tops for extended


periods can lead to overheating, degraded performance, and
possible system damage. Utilize locally purchased cooling
devices or docking stations to keep systems cool. If these are
not available, use the power adapter or another item to lift the
back of the laptop off the table about 1 inch to allow airflow.
Ensure proper air flow around transit case-mounted systems to
prevent overheating.
At a minimum, clean air filters on proximas weekly.
Maintain a stock of spare bulbs for proximas to ensure
continuous operations.
Only use approved methods for cleaning computer and display
systems. The use of non-approved solutions and devices can
damage these systems.

6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.5

Chapter 7: Fielding and Training Support


7.0.1

Manning of information systems, specific mission operations


specialties, and the commander's use of the Command and
Control (C2) system are not within the scope of this handbook.
The intent of this section is to provide a comprehensive guide to
where a warfighter can obtain additional training and assistance
for the individual information systems of battle command.

7.1

Unit Set Fielding (USF)

7.1.1

The Army Forces Generation (ARFORGEN) cycle and the USF


process are holistic approaches to warfighting and equipping
Army units. Although the two processes are not directly aligned
by phase and cycle, they are synchronized to achieve the
desired end state of trained and ready combat forces.

7.1.1.1 USF consists of 5 phases (Figure 7-1) which are NOT directly
aligned with the ARFORGEN cycle. The 5 phases are:
Phase I: Planning for Fielding and Engineering
Phase II: Fielding Execution
(Note: Phase II is broken down into Phase MA and Phase MB)
Phase III: Supporting While Deploying
Phase IV: Supporting While Deployed
Phase V: Reset to DA Readiness Standards
7.1.1.2 The ARFORGEN cycle has 3 phases (Figure 7-2):
Reset - The Reset phase culminates in a brigade-level
collective training event. Units in the Reset pool are not
ready or available for major combat operations. However,
they should be ready to respond to homeland defense
requirements and provide defense support to civil authorities
at all times.
Train/Ready - Units in the Ready Force continue missionspecific collective training and are eligible forsourcing
necessary to meet joint requirements. Their collective
training is designed to focus on its direct MELT, such as
stability operations.
Available - Units in the Available force pool are in their
planned deployment windows and are fully trained, equipped
and resourced to meet operational requirements. In this way,
ARFORGEN enables units to be fully-trained to conduct fullspectrum operations.

Figure 7-1 Phase V Unit Set Fielding and Reset

-^

DA

^AflV/A/G

Figure 7-2 ARFORGEN Phases


7.1.1.3 During the ARFORGEN Reset Phase there are "select individual
training tasks" which occur. The balance of the individual
training and collective training, including Mobilization Readiness
Exercises (MREs)/Mission Readiness Exercises (MRXs) occur
in the Train/Ready Phase. There are some new fielding's which
occur during the Reset Phase with the balance of fielding's being
completed during the Train/Ready Phase.
7.1.1.4 Reset, as defined by the DA Execution Order, has 3 phases
which are NOT directly aligned with the ARFORGEN cycle. The
3 phases are as follows:

Phase I: R-180 to R (In Theater Phase)


Phase II: Rto R+180 (RESET Phase)
Phase III: Starts at R+181 and ends when a unit moves into
the Available phase of the ARFORGEN cycle (Train/Ready
Phase). Phase III starts at R+181 and goes through the
entire Train/Ready phase of the ARFORGEN cycle.

7.1.1.5 In general terms the ARFORGEN, USF and Reset are aligned as
follows:
Reset Phase of ARFORGEN encompasses Unit Set Fielding
Phases I, part of Phase MA and V and Reset Phase II.

Train/Ready Phase of ARFORGEN encompasses part of


USF Phase II A, and all of Phases MB and III and Reset
Phase III.
Available Phase of ARFORGEN encompasses USF Phase
IV and Reset Phase I.
7.1.1.6 As previously indicated, these Phases do NOT align directly. For
example, Reset Phase I is from R-180 to R. The Available Phase
starts well before R-180, so Reset Phase I takes place only for a
portion of the Available Phase.
7.1.2

USF is an orders-based, 5-phase process that manages the


planning and implementation of fielding and reset for all major
Army tactical Command, Control Communications, Computers,
Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)
capabilities. The U.S. Army and the organizations of the
Communications-Electronic Life Cycle Management Command
(CE-LCMC), simultaneously provide the warfighter with the C4I
equipment needed to perform a mission in combat.

7.1.2.1 PEO C3T's desired end state for the USF model is:
Quality systems architecture and data products provided in a
timely manner
All systems across the PEO C3T synchronized and focused
on fielding windows of opportunity
All required resources planned, programmed and executed
Development and delivery of an integrated, holistic battle
command capability to all Army units, as directed by
Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA)
7.1.3

USF Phases - The USF model is divided into five phases:

7.1.3.1 Phase I. Planning for Fielding and Engineering


This entails the preparation and execution of materiel fielding,
scheduling of New Equipment Training (NET), and work on the
initial Systems Architecture (SA). The main effort during this
phase is Program Manager, Command Post (PM CP); all other
organizations are in support. The phase includes the following:
Publishing the HQDA G-3 / G-8 USF execution schedule
Identification of the units to receive BC systems
Organization and execution of the initial site survey and the
conduct of new materiel information briefings (NMIBs)
Detailed scheduling of all NET classes
All initial system engineering work

The end state for Phase I is the following:


A USF timeline, supportable SA, and data product
development plans
NET operations planned for, coordinated, and confirmed with
the unit
A signed USF memorandum of agreement (MOA) between
the PEO C3T and the unit commander (division or brigade
combat team [BCT]/Stryker Brigade Combat Team [SBCT],
as appropriate)
Battle Handoff (BHO) to PM CP occurs approximately one week
prior to the beginning of the first NET class (of any system).
7.1.3.2 Phase II. Fielding Execution
This phase occurs in two sub-phases with main effort to PM CP
and all other organizations in support:
Phase MA-This sub-phase consists of implementing the
total package fielding effort as defined in Phase I planning
documents, fielding agreements, and coordination conferences
with the Army Command and / or unit. This sub-phase includes
the following:
System hardware, software, and documentation distribution
and issue to the gaining unit
Joint inventory and property book transfer
Conducting PM-scheduled and -controlled system-specific
NET activities
Completion of individual acceptance and handoff activities
and documentation
The conduct of Command Post and Staff Integration
(CP&SIT) and Tactical Operations Center (TOC) NET
The end state for Phase IIA is the:
Successful delivery, issue, and initial training of individual
systems' functionality
Successful conclusion of CP&SIT and TOC NET activities
Use of training data products during the conduct of TOC NET
Handoff of total package fielding requirements for each
system and the collective system of systems (SoS) as
defined in Phase I planning

Phase MB - In this sub-phase, the supporting unit undergoes


scheduled and controlled collective training events for the
reinforcement and honing of BC skills acquired during NET. This
sub-phase includes all CP training events following the conduct
of system-specific NET activities, and support for unit-scheduled
and -conducted training events, including the following:
CP Exercises (CPXs)
Field Training Exercises (FTXs)
Battle Command Training Program (BCTP) events
Digital Exercises (DIGEXs)
Support for deploying unit MREs is also part of this sub-phase.
This sub-phase includes monitoring "Get Well" plans and
correcting any fielding discrepancies noted in the Phase IIA
fielding implementation process and handoff.
The end state for Phase MB is the:
Successful use of training data products and CP capabilities
during the conduct of a major FTX/MRE/CTC rotation
Return unit to its home station
All "Get Well" plans for fielding discrepancies resolved
If a unit is not deploying but is returning to its home station for
normal peacetime training activities, USF operations will be
considered complete at the conclusion of Phase MB.
7.1.3.3 Phase III. Supporting While Deploying
In this phase, the unit receives support following its CTC rotation
or MRE and during preparations for deployment at home
station and in-theater Reception, Staging, Onward Movement,
and Integration (RSO&I) operations prior to moving to battle
positions. The phase includes the following:
Support for a unit's home station deployment operations
following its return from MRE/CTC rotation
RSO&I operations in the theater of operations
Delivery of Go-to-War (GTW) data products
Exercise of both the upper and lower Tactical Internets (TIs)
The end state for Phase III is the following:
Successful exercise of the upper and lower TIs
Depart from RSO&I area to battle positions, commence unit
sustainment by in-theater C-E LCMC support infrastructure

7.1.3.4 Phase IV. Supporting While Deployed


In this phase, the unit receives support after RSO&I is complete.
The unit is deployed to its designated battle position and is
actively conducting its in-theater mission. The main effort during
this phase is C-E LCMC; all other organizations support. This
phase includes all actions to support the unit:
After it moves from its designated in-theater RSO&I area to
its battle positions
After it moves from its designated in-theater RSO&I area to
its battle positions
During the unit's conduct of its in-theater mission
During the unit's return to its designated in-theater
redeployment staging area in preparation for its return to its
home station.
The end state for Phase IV is when the unit has been properly
supported during the conduct of its in-theater mission and begins
arriving at the in-theater redeployment staging area.
7.1.3.5 Phase V. Resetting to Headquarters - HQDA-Directed
Readiness Standards
Phase V begins when the first unit arrives at the in-theater redeployment staging area and includes all actions at the staging
area and at the unit's home station. If the unit is to undergo a
re-netting upgrade upon its return to its home station due to
a significant change in software or hardware, a USF-phased
execution plan will be implemented.
The end state for Phase V is when the unit has been reset to
HQDA-directed readiness standards and, if required, all actions
required under Phases IIA an MB are accomplished.

7.1.4

The approximate timeline for the above USF model is shown in


Table 7-1.

Table 7-1 Key DSE Interfaces

7.2

BCSoSIT Overview

7.2.1

Battle Command System of Systems Integration Training


(BCSoSIT) is comprised of three training events designed to
train units to use all Command Post (CP) equipment (Enablers,
Information Systems [INFOSYS], and Communications) as a
system of systems (SoS) in a battle command environment. All
training is executed in the unit's CP using the unit's equipment.
BCSoSIT is coordinated and scheduled at the Program
Executive Office-Command, Control, and Communications
Tactical (PEO-C3T) Unit Set Fielding (USF) conferences, and is
executed during Phase II of the USF process.

7.2.2

The training is facilitated and executed by Product Manager


CP Systems and Integration (PdM CPS&I), who coordinates
with other PMs/PdMs to facilitate BCSoSIT. The training uses
pre-developed orders, scenarios, and situational injects to train
the battle staff on staff functions, battle drills, and INFOSYS
integration. The training focuses on staff and system processes.

7.2.3

The primary focus for the training is the brigade staff; however,
units may establish and incorporate subordinate Battalion (BN)
CPs and staffs into the training. If BNs are included, all formal
training occurs within the Brigade CP, with BN staff personnel
returning to their individual CPs for the practical exercises.
Trained units should anticipate and plan around personnel and
INFOSYS density, as well as brigade CP size, when planning BN
staff inclusion into the training.

7.2.4

BCSoSIT Sequencing. The diagram below depicts a typical


sequencing of BCSoSIT in conjunction with USF Phase II events.

SYNC
PdM CPS&I N MIB
Conference
Site Survey
MAINTAIN
A
'
/\
UNIT CONTACT

,pR
#1

,pR
#2

Command Post
Mew Equipment
Training (NET)

= BCSoSIT
Events
l-ll

Figure 7-3 Typical Sequencing of BCSoSIT


7.2.5

Event I Training is a 4-day event designed to establish the unit's


CP in order to validate CP infrastructure and network. The unit
accomplishes specific tasks each day based on PdM CPS&Iprovided event schedules. Progress is tracked and After Action
Reviews (AARs) conducted at the end of each day. The end
state for Event I is the successful integration of all CP equipment,
and unit confidence in the ability to set up and integrate their
equipment and restore capability upon major failures.

7.2.5.1 Event I consists of Enabling Learning Objectives (ELOs) based


on the Terminal Learning Objective (TLO) Establish CP (Internal/
External). The following are the ELOs:
Event I Overview Establish SICPS Internal and External
Establish CP Power Grid
Establish Staff Section Cells
Establish CP Network and Configure INFOSYS
Conduct CP Validation
7.2.5.2 The key tasks for Event I are:
Set Up CP Infrastructure. The unit erects Trailer-Mounted
Support System (TMSS) tents; places tables and chairs;
establishes power, environmental control, and lighting; and
emplaces systems within the CP.
Establish the Network. The unit emplaces required network
cabling, powers up network and INFOSYS servers,
establishes unit domain, powers up INFOSYS and other
computers, establishes CP displays, validates network
connectivity, and validates both system intra-operability and
inter-operability among fielded INFOSYS.
Inject Failure and Restore Capability. The unit experiences
and recovers from failures to power generation, network,
systems, and domain.
CP Validation. The unit verifies voice and data
communications for all CP systems (fielded and organic)
using a series of Communication Exercises (COMMEXs).
7.2.6

Event II Training follows Event I. Event II is a 4-day event


designed to train the unit on how to integrate INFOSYS into an
SoS. The training audience is leaders, battle captains, Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs), and key system operators. The
training method used is a combination of lecture, demonstration,
and practical exercises (PEs). Lecture and demonstration
occur in the current operations cell of the Brigade CP, and the
warfighters return to their CP cells to use their INFOSYS for PEs.
If the brigade includes personnel from their subordinate BNs
in the training, those personnel do the PEs in their respective
BN CP. The end state for Event II is a staff with increased level
of confidence in abilities to execute CP operations using the
INFOSYS as a system of systems. Event II consists of these
ELOs based on the TLO Manage Tactical Information:
Event II Overview (includes INFOSYS Overview)
Process Higher Command's Order

Prepare Staff Products


Create and Manage the Common Operational Picture (COP)
Develop a Staff Briefing Using INFOSYS
Publish Unit Order
Process Significant Activities (SIGACTS)
7.2.7

Event III Training is the BCSoS Integration Exercise. Event III is


scheduled in support of a current training event (Staff Exercise
[STAFFEX], CP Exercise [CPX], and COMMEX) already on the
unit's training calendar. The team provides over-the-shoulder
training in support of the commander's training objectives for
the scheduled training event. The training objectives focus on
integrating INFOSYS. The Event III end state is staff confident
in their abilities to establish the CP, establish the network, and
conduct CP operations with all equipment as an SoS.

7.3.

Digital Systems Engineer (DSE) Roles and Responsibilities

7.3.1

DSEs provide the unit a world-wide, single interface for CELCMC-, and PEO C3T-managed ABCS and enables technical,
planning, and training support to Army formations from brigade
combat team/Stryker brigade combat team to corps level during
all cycles of the Army Force Generation Model.

7.3.2

Operational Concept
The DSE program is the CE-LCMC's primary arm throughout
all Army formations (BCT/SBCT through corps, as well as
things pertaining to digital Battle Command (BC) systems and
enablers during BC/Unit Set Fielding (USF) phases, supporting
combat commanders in continuous, full-spectrum expeditionary
operations. DSEs provide a single-point interface between units
and BC and Network Support Directorate (BC&NSD) to provide
the commander and staff a single point of contact to access all
resources available for BC systems and enablers. A DSE is to be
embedded at each echelon of a unit during a digital exercise or
reset event. The DSE does the following:
Provides leadership, organization, and synchronization of
ABCS and enabler FSR-/FSE-provided support training
Acts as the subject matter expert (SME) for ABCS SoS and
enablers, technically, logistically, and operationally
Acts as the master gunner of digital tactics, techniques, and
procedures (TTP) in support of BC as a weapon system

Is a trained professional applying advanced methods,


theories, research, and training techniques for advanced
networking, configuration, software, and hardware problems
Troubleshoots complex SoS and network malfunctions,
brings to bear PM/PdM support for identified issues and
tracks to resolution
Provides the commander an embedded, fully-deployable,
single-unit interface for PEO C3T- and SEC-supported
products throughout the entire ARFORGEN process
Advises the commander and trains leaders and warfighters
on the capabilities, integration, and employment of the BC
SoS and supporting enablers
Synchronizes provision of and logistics for external support
throughout all phases of BC/USF
Synchronizes designated CE-LCMC lead and leadership,
PMs, PdMs, and units through a consolidated ABCS SoS
situational awareness
7.3.3

Lead DSE
As in Figure 7-2, the lead DSE is the DSE at the highest
participating echelon in the BC/USF process for a particular
fielding. For example, in a BCT MRE in which the HICON is
the division headquarters, the DSE at that headquarters is
the lead DSE. DSEs are responsible for the coordination and
management of all CE-LCMC/PEO C3T support for unit.

Supported
Unit

Regional
Coordinators
Field Spt
Managers
Regional
Influences
Figure 7-4 Key DSE Interfaces

In this role, they coordinate, manage, and oversee the activities


of all subordinate DSEs and FSRs at their respective echelons.
The lead DSE falls in on the support plan and organization
established by the regional coordinator for the fielding, most
often during Phase II. At some point prior to Phase III, the lead
DSE accepts BHO as directed by the regional coordinator
and becomes responsible for all DSE support to the entire
organization as well as support provided personally to the
organization at the lead's own echelon.
7.3.4

DSE Professional Imperatives


The DSE must establish a rapport with the supported
organization (division/brigade/Combat Training Center [CTC]
Operations Group) to be regarded as a valued member of
that organization's staff. This relationship should establish the
DSE as the single individual to whom the organization turns to
address any questions or issues pertaining to BC/USF. Such a
relationship is based on the professionalism, technical expertise,
proactive support, responsiveness, attention to detail, and
thorough follow-up in all aspects of the DSE's duties supporting
the organization. This approach will inevitably make an
immediate and sustained positive impact on the organization's
leadership and give it confidence in the DSE's leadership and
experience.

7.3.5

DSE Tasks
The DSE is a BC SME who is knowledgeable in System
Administration (SA) and system operation (being both hardwareand software-capable). The DSE is able to address integration
and configuration issues and serve as the PEO C3T software
configuration control representative, troubleshooting system
failures, resolving the majority of digital TOC problems on site
for the unit. If DSEs cannot resolve the problem, they are able
to contact the responsible PM/PdM or other SME to get the job
done. Embedded with Army maneuver BCTs, SBCTs, divisions,
and corps, DSEs are deployable worldwide. They can provide
opportunity training to the unit they support and provide the
feedback mechanism between units and both PEO C3T PMs/
PdMs and BC&NSD.

7.3.6

Specific DSE Tasks by Phase


During all phases of the BC/USF process, DSEs are to serve as
the SoS lead for SEC/PEO C3T-supported products to include
the unit Common Operational Picture (COP). DSEs act as the

unit commander's SME for the SoS, attend unit G6/S6 meetings,
and identify, track, and resolve all technical and operational
issues pertaining to commander's Critical Information
Requirements (CCIR) and they report on BC/USF by phase
and perform AFSB reporting. Table 7-2 summarizes DSE tasks
specific to a certain phases.
All BC/USF Phases
Technical/operational issue
identification, tracking, & resolution
SoS lead for SEC-/PEO C3Tsupported products
Unit SME for SoS

Provide BC/USF phase reporting


Provide AFSB reporting
Attend S6 meetings
Provide input for USF COP

Conduit between unit & PEO C3T


for PEO C3T/C-E LCMC CCIR
Phase I - Planning (Lead: PEO C3T - PM CP)
Attend regional all-hands meetings
Attend SCR/trail boss/LAC
meetings
Represent/assist unit in data
products ERB

Attend/support force modernization


meetings (division/corps/
installation)
Initiate coordination meetings as
lead for SEC- / PEO C3T-supported
products as an SoS

Attend USF Synchronization


Conference

Attend PdM NMIB

Monitor NET schedule & execution

Communicate command areas of


concern to ALT community

Initiate relationship with


commander, XO, S3, & S6

Phase II - Fielding Execution (Lead: PEO C3T - PM BC)


Attend regional all-hands meeting
Attend SCR/trail boss/LAC meetings
Lead/conduct TOC checkouts
Track/facilitate data product delivery
Provide technical support &
leadership during unit collective
training
Support DSI-NET, as required
Conduct pre-deployment planning:
Support roster
Conduct pre-deployment IPR with
FSR/FSE team
Coordinate refinement of GTW
data products

Submit daily & weekly DSE report


via C4ISR Support Operations
Center
Coalesce all PEO C3T issues
Participate in BC&NSD D-90,
D-60, and D-30 meetings
Attend CTC D-90 conference
Attend LTP with unit
Facilitate technical & operations
support questions
Submit incident reports via C4ISR
Support Operations Center
Lead BUB at CTCs

Table 7-2 DSE Tasks by Phase

Table 7-2 DSE Tasks by Phase (Continued)

7.3.7

Detailed Exercise Responsibilities

7.3.7.1 During an exercise/deployment of whatever type, the lead DSE

Sends CCIR reports to BC&NST leadership


Assumes lead position of support team (e.g., signs for
facility, phones, printers, handheld units, plasma)
Gains Non-Secure Internet Protocol Router Net (NIPRNET)
access for support contractors
Links up with the U.S. Army Material Command (USAMC)
Brigade Logistic Support Team (BLST) and invites to
participate in the daily Battle Update Briefing (BUB)
Maintains BC&NST operations facility
Collects Field Support Representative (FSR) quads daily for
the BUB, assembles BUB, leads, and posts the BUB to the
C4ISR Support Operations Center Single Interface to the
Field (SIF) 15 minutes prior to the daily BUB
Sends trouble tickets to the C4ISR Support Operations
Center, follows issues until they are resolved, and posts
documents to the C4ISR Support Operations Center SIF
Interfaces with CTC Operations Group, supports as needed,
and resolves issues
Works directly with brigade DSEs and FSRs to meet unit
support requirements and resolve issues
Addresses support requirements, helps to establish FSR
priorities

7.3.7.2 The DSEs are central to Configuration Management (CM) in a


supported unit. They are responsible for obtaining software from
the CM organization, submitting reports, and performing other
associated activities. They are responsible for the following:
Timely, accurate feedback in the form of reports
CM's need to know what versions of software a unit uses
Prompt installation of software upgrades and Information
Assurance Vulnerability Alerts (lAVAs)
Complete understanding of the instructions included in
the readme file before installing any software or lAVAs (all
software and lAVAs have a read-me file)
The number of individual BC platforms possessed and in use
by the supported unit

CM's need for all the specification data for systems being
used by the unit
Notice of reception for any software shipments or IAVA
packages
Weekly reports of progress when installing quarterly lAVAs
Complete technical details when reporting issues pertaining
to CM
Use of the web-based platform when requesting DSE toolkits
Minimum number of working days for CM to assemble
software drops
The Brigade Logistic Support Team (BLST) Commander is
administratively responsible for the DSE; however, the DSE
works directly for the unit and S6.
7.4

Army Field Support Brigade (AFSB) & POCs


For information on current Army Field Support Brigade (AFSB)
and Points of Contact (POCs), see the Single Interface to the
Field (SIF) Module at https://sif.kc.us.armv.mil.

Figure 7-5 Regional Leads / RCS

7.5

Battle Command as a Weapons System

7.5.1

What is it?
Battle Command (BC) is the exercise of command in operations
against a hostile, thinking enemy. The Vice Chief of Staff of the
Army directed that units' BC capabilities be reported as weapons
systems and a standardized solution for BC be fielded across
the force. When fully implemented, BC as a Weapon System
(BCAWS) establishes commonalities among commanders to
create a seamless transition for rapid task organize to support
any mission. Reporting BCAWS will be executed using the
current Net Unit Status Report, allowing the Army to increase
efficiency by quickly identifying capability gaps across the force.
Reporting BCAWS will assist HQDA with resource quantification,
re-allocation to support ongoing operations, and improve force
readiness as standardized capabilities and training metrics are
employed across the force. For reporting purposes, BCAWS
is limited in scope to the Battle Staff (Personnel/Training and
Command Group), systems (C2, Transport, and Infrastructure),
and training associated with the CP and Command Group.

7.5.2

What has the Army done?


Reporting BCAWS is currently under development. The effort
began in September 2006 to establish doctrinal, manning
and training requirements for BCAWS and personnel. These
personnel, training, and equipment readiness metrics guide
the commander's assessment in reporting their Battle Staffs'
capability to conduct operations in accordance with their mission.

7.5.3

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the
future?
Army Regulation 220-1, Unit Status Reporting regulation is
being updated to specify the capabilities, manning, and training
requirements for Army Battle Staffs and the Joint Network NodeNetwork (JNN-N). In successive phases, BCAWS readiness
reporting will be incrementally applied to functional and multifunctional brigades, and division/corps headquarters.

7.5.4

Why is this important to the Army?


The Army has made tremendous breakthroughs in identifying
and providing a common set of advanced command and
control capabilities to deploying units. Reporting BCAWS
will focus and facilitate the commander's assessment of BC
readiness. Reporting BCAWS supports the synchronization and
modernization of BC elements as the network modernizes to
ensure the integration of task organized modular units (during
the reset and train cycles of Army Force Generation process),
minimizing the negative impacts on deployed units and their
mission sets.

Chapter 8: Equipment and Maintenance


8.0.1

Accountability of the commander's Command and Control (C2)


system is managed through Property Book and Unit Supply
Enhanced (PBUSE). See Chapter 3 for more information on
training and assistance with the PBUSE system.

8.0.2

During the CP setup, this handbook provides valuable and


relevant information regarding how to effectively establish the
commander's C2 system. The following section identifies the
primary resources for setup, operation, and maintenance of each
CP component.

8.0.3

Equipment maintenance, Repair Parts and Special Tools Lists


(RPSTLs), and other system information can be found in the
Technical Manuals (TMs) in Appendix A.

8.1

Troubleshooting Support

8.1.1

The primary goal of the Command, Control, Communications,


and Computers Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance
(C4ISR) Support Operations Center (SOC) is to provide a single
point of contact for end users in need of assistance. End users
are warfighters/operators and civilian Field Support/System
Engineers (FSEs) and Digital System Engineers (DSEs). The
C4ISR SOC Team provides general systems information, Tier
1 maintenance assistance, responds to requests on procedural
matters, and escalates Incident Reports to the appropriate
agency. The C4ISR SOC performs three major functions:
Assists warfighters and support personnel with all C2
systems issues
Records, tracks, and resolves software, hardware, network,
satellite, radio, and support issues
Activates Commander's Critical Information Requirements
(CCIRs) Priority Intelligence Requirement (PIRs) for Program
Executive Office - Command, Control, Communications
Tactical (PEO-C3T) and Program Executive Office Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors (PEO-IEW&S)
in accordance with their commanders.

8.1.2

The SOC can be used to report issues, report training, request


assistance, request information, and request support. The SOC
uses the automated Incident Reporting Module (IRM) tool as a
repository of information. Once the knowledge base is updated
and in use, most users will be able to access an enormous
amount of shared information. The SOC, DSEs, Field Service

8-1

Representatives (FSRs) and warfighters will be able to use the


Knowledge Base for quickly resolving issues. The SOC is the
central point used to record, assist, direct, and resolve issues.
8.1.3

SOC contact is available through telephone, the IRM website,


and Non-Secure Internet Protocol Router (NIPR) or Secure
Internet Protocol Routing (SIPR) email.
NIPR c4isr.support@us.armv.mil
SIPRsoc.support@us.armv.smil.mil
Direct Dial 254-287-1608; DSN 737-1608
Toll Free 1-877-839-0813
FAX 254-618-7089; DSN 259-7089
STE 254-618-7525; DSN 259-7525

8.1.4

Support follows a tiered approach. The SOC operates in Tier 1


through problem resolution. If the SOC cannot address the issue
at Tier 1, the issue is escalated. The SOC gathers data to build
the knowledge base for future self-service. The four tiers are:

Field Tier is where most issues are discovered. The Field


Tier support structure consists of DSE, FSEs, FSRs, and
Logistics Assistance Representatives (LARs), in their Area
of Responsibility (AOR). Warfighters normally notify a DSE
or FSR, LAR, or S6 when they have a support need or
experience a C4ISR issue. The Field Tier Support Structure
helps the warfighter assess the issue and determine the
urgency of the issue. The warfighters also have the ability
to reach back to a centralized support center through a web
portal for Tier 1 type support.
Support Tier 1 is the initial line of defense in Support Tier
1 is the SOC, which is responsible for logging, tracking,
and conducting initial fault analysis attempting to resolve
the issue in the timeliest manner. When the SOC receives
an Incident Report (IR), it is logged and assigned to the
SOC Operator. The SOC Operator is responsible for
the assignment from the cradle to the grave. It is the
responsibility of the SOC staff to ensure the ticket is followed
and updated from the time it enters the IRM until the time
the ticket is resolved. SOC Operators are trained DSEs that
have been deployed everywhere in the world that the U.S.
Army has a presence. Every DSE working in the SOC is
ex-military and both understands and has experienced the
issues of the warfighter. When an issue comes into the IRM,
the SOC Operator on duty decides whether they can quickly
resolve the issue. If the Operator cannot resolve the issue, a

person on the Tier 2 FSR list is notified. SOC personnel also


provide additional reach-back capability into Support Tier 2
and the Effects Cell to resolve incidents.
Support Tier 2 is comprised of members of the Effects Cell,
FSRs, and System Engineers that have access to additional
expertise on the specific Battlefield Functional Area (BFA)
or systems. Each BFA will determine the appropriate Tier 2
level for their system, consistent with the overall concept of
operations. The SOC keeps phone and email contact lists
in order to place the right people into the fight to resolve the
warfighter's issues.
Support Tier 3 has the most detailed expertise on the
specific BFA or system. Tier 3 generally consists of actual
hardware and software developers and others with in-depth
knowledge of the system.

8.1.5

Cradle to Grave - Once a warfighter places a ticket into the


IRM, they are notified through Army Knowledge Online (AKO)
email each time there is a change to the ticket. If the SOC has a
suggestion for a possible solution, the SOC provides the solution
to the warfighter through email. If the issue is critical, the SOC
calls the person that placed the ticket into the IRM to assist
and refine the information needed to resolve the issue. SOC
personnel, DSEs, FSRs, and System Engineers are required to
log working information into the "Incident Work Info Field" located
in the IRM ticket to keep everyone that is participating in the
resolution process informed of the progress. Anyone involved in
ticket resolution can view the progress of the ticket at any time.

8.1.6

The Analysis section of the SOC views and records all trouble
reports and provides reports to commanders and senior
persons in the community. The Analysis Section is comprised
of two personnel trained to analyze the reports and information
coming from the IRM. These personnel assess possible trends
and perform analysis to give commanders useful information
in assessing the process and progress of their units as they
move through the different stages of the Unit Set Fielding (USF)
process.

8.1.7

A ticket can be placed into the IRM using the IRM website
https://hd.kc.us.armv.mil/ or through the Single Interface to the
Field (SIF) Module at https://sif.kc.us.armv.mil. The IRM is the
online tool to input incident reports online.

SINGLE INTERFACE TD T H E FIELD (SIF)

U.S. ARMY TEAM C4ISR

eapon Systems Portf

Figure 8-1 SIF Login Page


Users can also contact the SOC to enter an incident report.
Phone: 254-287-1608/DSN 737-1608
Toll free: 877-839-0813
Fax: 254-618-7089/DSN 259-7089
STE: 254-618-7525/DSN 259-7525
Email:
NIPR: c4isr.support@us.armv.mil
SIPR: soc.support@us.army.smil.mil
8.2

TQGs and PDISE Support

8.2.1

Tactical Quiet Generators (TQGs) and Power Distribution


Illumination Systems Electrical (PDISE) are organically
supported, maintained and repaired by trained warfighters.
The first tier for maintenance and support of TQGs is the unit's
maintenance support company, located in the Brigade Support
Battalion (BSB) for Infantry, Heavy, and Stryker BCTs. Each BSB
has generator mechanics (MOS 52D or 52X) to support TQGs
and PDISE in their brigade.
When a problem occurs with CP TQGs or PDISE, first contact
the unit maintenance company before contacting the Power and
Environmental (P&E) LAR. Notify P&E LAR so they are aware of
the issue, but they are not meant to be the "first responder."

8.2.2

Appendix A: References
For current DA approved publications, see USAPA website at
https://akocomm.us.armv.mil/usapa/
Air Force Instruction (AFI)
AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning and Execution.
Field Manuals (FMs)
FM 3-0, Operations.
FM 3-07, Stability Operations.
FM 3-90.5, The Combined Arms Battalion.
FM 3-90.6, The Brigrade Combat Team.
FM 3-93, The Army in Theater Operations.
FM 4-0, Sustainment (Draft).
FM 4-01.30 (FM 55-10), Movement Control.
FM 4-01.41 (FM 55-20), Army Rail Operations.
FM 5-0, The Operations Process.
To be published for Army use,
FM 6-0, Mission Command: Command and Control of Army Forces.
FM 6-01.1, Knowledge Management Section.
FM 7-0, Training for Full Spectrum Operations.
FM 7-15, The Army Universal Task List (Incl C-2).
FM 38-701, Packaging of Material: Packing.
FM 55-1, Transportation Operations, HQDA.
FM 55-9, Unit Air Movement Planning.
FM 55-15, Transportation Reference Data, HQDA.
FM 55-17, Cargo Specialists' Handbook.
FM 55-80, Army Container Operations.
Joint Publications (JPs)
JP 1-02, Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated
Terms.
JP 3-16, Multinational Operations.
JP 3-33, Joint Task Force Headquarters.
Military Standards (MIL-STDs)
MIL-STD-1472F, Department of Defense Design Criteria Standard:
Human Engineering.

Points of Contact (POCs)


Automated Communications Engineering Software (ACES)
Project Lead
Jorge Tersy
732-532-2641
Jorqe.tersv@us.armv.mil
Army Key Management Systems (AKMS) Chief
Rose Mary Matura
732-532-4045
Rosemarv.matura@us.armv.mil
ISYSCON(V)4
Team C4ISR KC Website
https://www.kc.us.armv.mil/c4isrsvstems2.nsf/vLookupid/37879E017BF1
DC4F85256FB80054EC35?OpenDocument
Product Leader
Kevin Walsh
732-427-5262
Kevin.j.walsh@us.armv.mil
Fielding Manager
Larry Wyche
732-532-2866
larrv.wvchel @us.armv.mil
Systems Engineer
Aaron Clayton
732-427-0639
aaron.clavton@us.armv.mil
ILS Manager
Alan House
732-532-5365
Alan.House@us.armv.mil
Lead Engineer
Larry Davis
254-532-8321, ext 2767
larrv.j.davisl @us.armv.mil

NET Manager
Dean Snider
732-532-1454
dean.snider@us.armv.mil
Local COMSEC Management Software (LCMS)
Project Lead
Ken Maloon
410-436-9953
Kenneth.maloonjr@us.armv.mil
SIF
Register and log in with AKO. Under the third Browse To drop-down
menu on the main page, select JNN NETOPS.
https://sif.kc.us.armv.mil/
Simple Key Loader (SKL)
Project Lead
Chris Caputo
732-532-3236
Chris.caputo@us.armv.mil
SKL Help Desk- 866-651-1199
SKL Website - https://rdit.armv.mil/commsc/menu.cfm
WIN-T
See the WIN-T AKO website for POC telephone numbers:
https://www.us.armv.mil/suite/paqe/296151
Quick Reference Guides (QRGs)
LCMS
AN/GYK-49(V)3, Phase 4.0.3.2 Workstation Setup Procedures, Quick
Setup Guide
LCMS Helpdesk- COML: 520-538-9900, DSN 879-9900
Technical Manuals (TMs) & Technical Bulletins (TBs)
ACES
TB 11-7010-293-10-2

CCS
TM 11 -5895-1813-13&P (CCS)
Operator and Field Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for Command
System, Tactical AN/TSQ-243 (NSN 5895-01-541-4812) (EIC N/A).
CPCS
TM 11-5895-1874-13&P (CPCS-OTC)
Operator and Field Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for Communication Subsystem AN/TSQ-259 (NSN xxxx-01-xxx-xxxx) (EIC N/A).
CPP
TM 11-5895-1812-10 (CPP V-2/V-4)
Operator's Manual for Command System, Tactical, AN/TSQ-232(V)2
(NSN 5895-01-535-9546) (EIC N/A), AN/TSQ-232(V)4 (NSN 5895-01536-0109) (EIC N/A).
TM 11-5895-1812-23 (CPP V-2/V-4)
Field Maintenance Manual for Command System, Tactical, AN/TSQ232(V)2 (NSN 5895-01-535-9546) (EIC N/A), AN/TSQ-232(V)4 (NSN
5895-01-536-0109) (EIC N/A).
TM 11-5895-1812-23&P (CPP V-2/V-4)
Field RPSTL for Command System, Tactical, AN/TSQ-232(V)2 (NSN
5895-01-535-9546) (EIC N/A), AN/TSQ-232(V)4 (NSN 5895-01-5360109) (EIC N/A).
EPLRS
TM 11-5825-299-10
Operator's Manual for Radio Sets AN/ASQ-177D(V)4; AN/PSQ-6D; AN/
VSQ-2D(V)1; AN/VSQ-2D(V)2; & ANA/SQ-2DD(V)4; Grid Reference
Radio SetAN/GRC-229D, part of Enhanced Position Location Reporting
System.
TB 11-5825-299-10-1
Operator's Manual for Radio Sets AN/ASQ-177D(V)4; AN/PSQ-6D; AN/
VSQ-2D(V)1; AN/VSQ-2D(V)2; & ANA/SQ-2DD(V)4; Grid Reference
Radio SetAN/GRC-229D, part of Enhanced Position Location Reporting
System.
GBS
TM 11-5895-1612-12
Operator's and Maintenance Operator and Unit Level Global Broadcast
Service Receive Suite AN/TSR-8 (NSN 5820-01-530-6497).

ISYSCON v.4
TM11-7010-362-12&P
ISYSCON(V)4
TB 11-7010-362-10
ISYSCON(V)4
JNN
TM 11 -5805-861 -13&P-1
Operator, Unit and Direct Support Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for
Central Office, Telephone Automatic AN/TTC-59(V)1 (NSN 5805-01-5254019) (EIC N/A); Central Office, Telephone Automatic AN/TTC-59(V)2
(NSN 5805-01-529-9573) (EIC N/A); Central Office, Telephone Automatic
AN/TTC-59(V)3 (NSN 5805-01-NNN-NNNN) (EIC N/A).
TM 11 -5805-861 -13&P-2
Operator, Unit and Direct Support Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for
Central Office, Telephone Automatic AN/TTC-59(V)1 (NSN 5805-01-5254019) (EIC N/A); Central Office, Telephone Automatic AN/TTC-59(V)2
(NSN 5805-01-529-9573) (EIC N/A); Central Office, Telephone Automatic
AN/TTC-59(V)3 (NSN 5805-01-NNN-NNNN) (EIC N/A).
NTDR
TM11-5820-1171 -12&P
Operator's and Unit Maintenance (Incl. RPSTL) for Radio Set AN/VRC108 (NTDR) (NSN 5820-01-519-2729).
Power Unit
TM 9-6115-661-13&P
Operator, Unit, and Direct Support Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL)
for Power Unit, Diesel Engine Driven, 2 1/2 Ton Trailer Mounted, 15
kW, 400 HZ, PU-800; Power Unit, Diesel Engine Driven, 1 Ton Trailer
Mounted, 15 kW, 50/60 Hz, PU-801; Power Unit, Diesel Engine Driven, 2
1/2 Ton Trailer Mounted, 15 kW, 50/60 Hz, PU-802; Power Plant, Diesel
Engine Driven, 2 1/2 Ton Trailer Mounted, 15 kW, 400 Hz, AN/MJQ-39.
TM 9-6115-662-13&P
Operator, Unit, and Direct Support Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL)
for Power Unit, Diesel Engine Driven, 2 1/2 Ton Trailer Mounted, 30 kW,
50/60 Hz, PU-803; Power Unit, Diesel Engine Driven, 2 1/2 Ton Trailer
Mounted, 30 kW, 400 Hz, PU-804; Power Plant, Diesel Engine Driven, 2
1/2 Ton Trailer Mounted, 30 kW, 50/60 Hz, AN/MJQ-40.

TM 9-6115-663-13&P
Operator, Unit, and Direct Support Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL)
for Power Unit, Diesel Engine Driven, 1/2 Ton 2 Trailer Mounted, 60 KW,
50/60 Hz, PU-805; Power Unit, Diesel Engine Driven, 2 1/2 Ton Trailer
Mounted, 60 kW, 400 Hz, PU-806; Power Plant, Diesel Engine Driven, 2
1/2 Ton Trailer Mounted, 60 kW, 50/60 Hz, AN/MJQ-41.
SICPS
TM 11 -7010-321 -12&P (S-832/G SICPS RWS V-4)
Operator's and Unit Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for Tactical Command Systems Used in S-832/G Rigid Wall Shelter (RWS) Standardized
Integrated Command Post System (SICPS).
SKL
TM11-7010-354-12&P
Technical Manual Operator's and Unit Maintenance Manual Including Repair Parts and Special Tools List For the Computer System, Digital AN/
PYQ-10 (C) (Simple Key Loader) (NSN 7010-01-517-3587) (EIC: N/A).
SMART-T
TM 11-5895-1612-12
Operator's and Unit Maintenance Manual for Terminal, Satellite Communication AN/TSC-154 (NSN 5895-01-435-0571) (EIC GJH PN G6894006,-1,-5 CAGEC 49956.
SWLAN
TM11-5820-1170-12&P
Operator's and Unit Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for Radio Set
AN/VRC-106(V)1(C) (NSN 5820-01-505-9931) Radio SetAN/VRC106(V)2(C) (NSN 5820-01-506-3226) (EIC N/A).
TMSS-Medium & TMSS-Large
TM 11-6115-742-13&P (TMSS-Medium)
Operator and Field Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for Power Plant,
Utility PU-821/T (NSN 6115-01-547-6713) (EIC N/A)
PU-822A/T (NSN 6115-01-547-6738) (EIC N/A).
TM 11-6115-743-13&P (TMSS-Large)
Operator and Field Maintenance Manual (Incl. RPSTL) for Power Plant,
Utility PU-823/T (NSN 6115-01-547-8513) (EIC N/A)
PU-824A/T (NSN 6115-01-547-8552) (EIC N/A).
TRADOC Regulations (TRs)
TR-98-6, Earth Grounding and Bonding Pamphlet.

WIN-T
Refer to WIN-T Operators Field Level Maintenance Manual Including
Repair Parts & Special Tools List: JNN/SSS/TACHUB NetOps for number
associations. The number is the chapter number or chapter number and
page number combined.
General Information, Equipment Descriptino, and Theory of Operation
Hardware Description and Data
General Information - Page 0004-1 (First Section Only)
Details - Chapter 0004
WAN Manager V2, V3
General Information - Page 0005-5 through Page 0005-7
Details (Including the setting up of the applications) -Chapter 0019
through Chapter 0024
LAN Manager V3
General Information - Page 0005-7 and Page 0005-8
Details (Including the setting up of the applications) - Chapter 0025
and Chapter 0026
Help Desk
General Information - Page 0005-13 and Page 0005-14
Details (Including the setting up of the applications) - Chapter 0037
and Chapter 0038
DPEM
General Information - Page 0005-8 through 0005-10
Details (Including the setting up of the applications) - Refer to the
"Software Operator's Manual, Detailed Planning and Engineering
Module (DPEM) and Battlefield Spectrum Management (BSM) for
Computer Group, Tactical OL-726(V)/T Joint Network Node (JNN),
(TB 11-7010-402-10)".
Websites
Incident Reporting Module (IRM)
https://hd.kc.us.armv.mil/arsvs/shared/loqin.jsp7/arsvs/home
Log in using your AKO username and password.
Joint Automated Deep Operations Coordination System (JADOCS)
https://www.iec.belvoir.armv.mil/jadocs/index.htm
Need special login, password, to access.
Battle Command Sustainment Support System (BCS3)
https://vports.atsc.armv.mil
A-7

Property Book Unit Supply Enhanced (PBUSE)


https://www.pmlis.lee.armv.mil/tls/pbuse/pbuse.htm
Medical Communications for Combat Casualty Care (MC4)
https://207.87.24.38/jpta
Naval Air Systems Command Mobile Facility Program (MFP)
http://www.mobile-facilities.com/
Transportation Information Systems (TIS)
http://www.tis.armv.mil/AALPS/
http://www.tis.armv.mil/tc aims2.html
LOGSA
https://www.loqsa.armv.mil/etms/online.cfm
Program Manager Mobile Electric Power (PM-MEP)
http://www.pm-mep.armv.mil/loqistics/pubs.htm
Single Interface to the Field (SIF)
https://sif.kc.us.armv.mil/
Army Knowledge Online (AKO) CP Warfighter Handbook Website
https://www.us.armv.mil/suite/paqe/547567
Miscellaneous
Army Regulation 220-1, Unit Status Reporting.
JOCOTAS, DoD Standard Family of Tactical Shelters, U.S. Army Soldier
and Biological Chemical Command, Natick, MA.
National Security Telecommunications and Information Systems Security Advisory Memorandum (NSTISSAM) TEMPEST/2-95, RED/BLACK
Installation Guidance (FOUO).
National Communications Security Emanation Memorandum (NACSEM)
5204, "Shielded Enclosures," promulgated May 1978, together with Appendix C, Specification NSA No. 73-2A, "National Security Agency Specification for Foil RF Shielded Enclosure." NACSEM 5204 was replaced by
NSTISSAM TEMPEST/1-95, Shielded Enclosures (FOUO).
Naval Air Systems Command Mobile Facility Program, Program Overview, Joint Committee on Tactical Shelters (JOCOTAS).

TR-98-6, Earth Grounding and Bonding Pamphlet.


C4ISR
Support Operations Center (SOC) Standing Operating Procedure (SOP).
Supplemental Material
Supplemental material being developed to provides a detailed overview
of the CP as a guide to assist the commander and staff in preparing for
movement of the unit. This information is referenced in the special manuals Command Post Warfighter's Handbook (SM 55- Series) Movement
Planning Reference Data as it becomes available and validated.
INFANTRY Brigade Combat Teams (IBCT)
HEAVY Brigade Combat Teams (HBCT)
STRYKER Brigade Combat Teams (SBCT)
AIRBORNE Brigade Combat Teams (ABCT)
COMBAT AVIATION Brigade (CAB) - Heavy
COMBAT AVIATION Brigade (CAB) - Light
BATTLEFIELD SURVEILLANCE Brigade (BFSB)
FIRES Brigade (FIRES)
COMBAT SUPPORT Brigade (ME)
SUSTAINMENT Brigade (SB)
AIR DEFENSE Brigade (ADB)
CHEMICAL Brigade (CB)
ENGINEER Brigade (EB)
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE Brigade (MIB)
MILITARY POLICE Brigade (MPB)
SIGNAL Brigade (SIGB)
DIVISIONS & CORPS
THEATER, GROUPS, & COMMANDS

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Appendix B: Acronyms

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Appendix C:
Composite Equipment Listing: Dimensions and Weights
List is also available at https://www.us.armv.mil/suite/page/547567

Includes pallet weight of 36 lb

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For additional tools and resources visit the Warfighters Command Post Handbook
Knowledge Center
https://www.us.armv.mil/suite/paqe/547567
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Looking for more information on your Command Post Systems?


Visit the SIF at https://sif.kc.us.army.mil and enter the
Weapon Systems Portfolio
To report a problem or submit a trouble ticket regarding your Command Post
Weapons System, please contact the
C4ISR Support Operations Center (SOC)
Telephone Support Information
Toll Free: (877) 893-0813 Commercial: (254) 287-1608 DSN: 737-1608
Fax: (254) 618-7089 Fax DSN: 259-7089
STE: (254) 618-7525 STE DSN: 259-7525
NIPR: C4isr.support@us.armv.mil SIPR: soc.support@us.armv.smil.mil
or visit the SOC on the Web at the SIF Website and click on the IRM
DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT D. Distribution authorized to the Department of Defense and U.S. DoD contractors only
(Administrative or Operational Use) (31 JAN 09). Other requests shall be referred to (Product Manager Command Posts).
DESTRUCTION NOTICE. Destroy by any method that will prevent disclosure of contents or reconstruction of the document.